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Jakobsweg Nijmegen - Koln - a short report

Marc S.

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Since 2012: CF, CdN, CP, Salvador, Aragones, Via Regia, Elisabethpfad, Jakobsweg NRW, Jakibspaad.
I have just walked The Nordrheinische Jakobsweg from Nijmegen to Koln and liked to share this little report with the forum.

I actually attempted to walk this Jakobsweg two years ago, but ended up doing nice walks near the river Rhine, watching the boats float by.. Now I tried again, as I had an urgent desire to follow shells.

Nijmegen is an interesting town but - as I have visited it many times before - I decided to start in Emmerich/Elten and join the Jakosbweg in Kleve (this stretchis actually also waymarked).

I walked app 120 km in the following stages: Emmerich/Elten – Kleve – Appeldorn (just behind Kalkar) – Vinjen (just before Xanten) - Rheinberg/Ossenberg – Orsoy – Moers – Krefeld, From there it is another 70 km to Koln (via Neuss and Dormagen), but I did not have enough time for this. Koln, of course though, is very much worth visiting.

The Jakobsweg more or less follows the course of the old Roman road (no traces of it are visible though). The city of Xanten may be particularly of interest for those interested in Roman history, as it hosts the Archaeological Park, one of the largest archaelogical open air museums in the world, built at the site of the Roman settlements Colonia Ulpia Traiana.

It was a pleasant walk. The landscape may not be spectacular, but I was mainly walking through forests and open lands, without any serious elevatons, and some little old towns with a nice laidback feel such Kalkar, Xanten, Rheinberg and Orsoy. The industrial Ruhr area is nearby, particularly once you have passed Rheinberg. For me it gave an interesting contrast of walking on quiet paths – but sometimes seeing chimneys and factories on the other ( east) side of the river Rhine.

As expected, there were no other pilgrims, at least I did not see them. I was invited in for a coffee by someone who was actually really pleased to see someone walking this Jakobsweg. He said there were more people walking in the past – I do not know if and why this is the case. However, this area of Germany is mostly very popular for cycling.

Waymarking

Waymarking is excellent. There is no shortage of stickers with a yellow shell on a blue blackground.

In addition, I used the German guide book – which is excellent on providing background information, but rather outdated on the practicalities (it is from 2009). https://www.amazon.nl/Jakobswege-Wege-Jakobspilger-Rheinland-Band/dp/3761621914

Another Invaluable source of information (also providing GPS tracks) is of course: http://www.jakobswege-europa.de/wege/nordrhein.htm

Accomodation

Pilgrim infrastructure is virtually non-existing. Although there actually is a pilgrim Herberg (three beds) in Emmerich. http://jakobus-camino-emmerich.de/ (for some reason, it is not mentioned in any listings)

For the first time ever I completely pre-booked my accomocation. I stayed in hotels and Gasthofe in the 50-60 euro range (including breakfast). I noticed no significant increase in prices as compared to pre-covid times two years ago. It is possible to find cheaper accomodation, when staying in hostels, Pensionen and private rooms.

My general advice when walking in Germany (and aiming to keep costs down) is not to rely solely on booking.com, but also check local tourist information offices: they often have more (and cheaper) options – listings are usually available on their websites. When visiting them, I have found the local tourist information offices to be very friendly and helpfull.
 
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amancio

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, Norte, Primit, Salvador, Portug, Arag, Ingles, VdlP, Leban-Vadin, Fisterra, Invierno, LePuy
Wow! Entering Köln as a pilgrim must be some experience, thanks for the beautiful story you told us! My ultimate dream is to walk Regensburg-Ratisbona to Santiago, who knows, maybe one day... in the meantime reading your story was beautiful
 

Marc S.

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Since 2012: CF, CdN, CP, Salvador, Aragones, Via Regia, Elisabethpfad, Jakobsweg NRW, Jakibspaad.
I am curious if you carried a pilgrims pass and got stamps along Jakobsweg?

This time, no. On my previous walks in Germany I did, and got the pass from the regional association responsible - there were many opportunities to get stamps. This time I did not really look for them.
 

Bohinjboy

New Member
Past OR future Camino
SJPP - Santiago 2010
Cahors - SJPP 2013
I have just walked The Nordrheinische Jakobsweg from Nijmegen to Koln and liked to share this little report with the forum.

I actually attempted to walk this Jakobsweg two years ago, but ended up doing nice walks near the river Rhine, watching the boats float by.. Now I tried again, as I had an urgent desire to follow shells.

Nijmegen is an interesting town but - as I have visited it many times before - I decided to start in Emmerich/Elten and join the Jakosbweg in Kleve (this stretchis actually also waymarked).

I walked app 120 km in the following stages: Emmerich/Elten – Kleve – Appeldorn (just behind Kalkar) – Vinjen (just before Xanten) - Rheinberg/Ossenberg – Orsoy – Moers – Krefeld, From there it is another 70 km to Koln (via Neuss and Dormagen), but I did not have enough time for this. Koln, of course though, is very much worth visiting.

The Jakobsweg more or less follows the course of the old Roman road (no traces of it are visible though). The city of Xanten may be particularly of interest for those interested in Roman history, as it hosts the Archaeological Park, one of the largest archaelogical open air museums in the world, built at the site of the Roman settlements Colonia Ulpia Traiana.

It was a pleasant walk. The landscape may not be spectacular, but I was mainly walking through forests and open lands, without any serious elevatons, and some little old towns with a nice laidback feel such Kalkar, Xanten, Rheinberg and Orsoy. The industrial Ruhr area is nearby, particularly once you have passed Rheinberg. For me it gave an interesting contrast of walking on quiet paths – but sometimes seeing chimneys and factories on the other ( east) side of the river Rhine.

As expected, there were no other pilgrims, at least I did not see them. I was invited in for a coffee by someone who was actually really pleased to see someone walking this Jakobsweg. He said there were more people walking in the past – I do not know if and why this is the case. However, this area of Germany is mostly very popular for cycling.

Waymarking

Waymarking is excellent. There is no shortage of stickers with a yellow shell on a blue blackground.

In addition, I used the German guide book – which is excellent on providing background information, but rather outdated on the practicalities (it is from 2009). https://www.amazon.nl/Jakobswege-Wege-Jakobspilger-Rheinland-Band/dp/3761621914

Another Invaluable source of information (also providing GPS tracks) is of course: http://www.jakobswege-europa.de/wege/nordrhein.htm

Accomodation

Pilgrim infrastructure is virtually non-existing. Although there actually is a pilgrim Herberg (three beds) in Emmerich. http://jakobus-camino-emmerich.de/ (for some reason, it is not mentioned in any listings)

For the first time ever I completely pre-booked my accomocation. I stayed in hotels and Gasthofe in the 50-60 euro range (including breakfast). I noticed no significant increase in prices as compared to pre-covid times two years ago. It is possible to find cheaper accomodation, when staying in hostels, Pensionen and private rooms.

My general advice when walking in Germany (and aiming to keep costs down) is not to rely solely on booking.com, but also check local tourist information offices: they often have more (and cheaper) options – listings are usually available on their websites. When visiting them, I have found the local tourist information offices to be very friendly and helpfull.
Excellent information. Thank you very much for sharing this!
 
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