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Jakobsweg routes in Southwest Germany?

2020 Camino Guides

mla1

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2000); Ch St. Giles (2013); Le Puy to SJPP (May/June 2015); vdlp 2016
Hello,
I am trying to plan a 21 day trip in late April/early May this year and I am hoping to walk somewhere other than France or Spain. I am wondering if anyone has experience walking any of the Jakobsweg routes in SW Germany that go over the border to France. I am thinking in particular of routes in the Black Forest region from Würzburg (or Rothenburg) to Strasbourg or down through Freiburg and over the border to Thann. I am wondering about difficulty and accommodation. And, yes, I have already searched this forum for everything related to Germany. And I have found the posts by Kitsambler extremely helpful! :)
Thanks!
Mary Louise
 

Marc S.

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Since 2012: CF, CdN, CP, Salvador, Aragones, Via Regia, Elisabethpfad, Jakobsweg NRW, Jakibspaad.
I have walked in Germany several times, but not in the South West, so can't be of specific help.

Perhaps you know this website already, but it is a really good starting point for finding information about all German Jakobsweg routes: http://www.deutsche-jakobswege.de/wege-uebersicht.html

If you click through on the map, you will get to more specific information about any particular route.
For example there is a specific website for the Jakobsweg Rothenburg - Thann (with height profiles, accomodation options, etcetera) http://www.jakobswege-nach-burgund.de/Rottenburg-Thann/
(all information is in German though)
 

mla1

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2000); Ch St. Giles (2013); Le Puy to SJPP (May/June 2015); vdlp 2016
Yes -- that's the map that got me thinking about the bottom left-hand corner and the paths that go over the border! What an incredible resource.
My German is rusty but I can muddle through -- that's part of the reason I am thinking of these routes!
Thanks!
 

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-19
I am wondering if anyone has experience walking any of the Jakobsweg routes in SW Germany that go over the border to France. I am thinking in particular of routes in the Black Forest region from Würzburg (or Rothenburg) to Strasbourg or down through Freiburg and over the border to Thann. I am wondering about difficulty and accommodation. ... And I have found the posts by Kitsambler extremely helpful! :)
Thank you for your kind words, and I'm glad my "trail of breadcrumbs" is paying off.
Although I haven't walked the Jakobswege in that part of Germany, I have been there on other travels. The terrain was the same gently rolling, with forested hills, I saw in Bavaria. The routes are well-maintained and well-marked, but a map-app is always helpful here, as elsewhere. That is a well-settled part of Germany, so the distances between towns is small, and accommodation is plentiful. The price at Gasthauses was running me EUR 50-60 for a single room with private bath and robust breakfast; dinner was ala carte. I did not seek kitchen facilities so don't know about that situation. On occasion, lodging might be available at monasteries or similar church-related institutions; check the guidebooks and websites for details. I would not expect to find any other walkers in that timeframe, except on weekends near the larger cities.
The ubiquitous little yellow books from Conrad-Stein-Verlag are your most applicable; available from the publisher's website or from Amazon.de or possibly Amazon UK (or every single bookshop in Germany).
https://www.conrad-stein-verlag.de/buecher-shop/jakobsweg-franken-schwarzwald/
https://www.conrad-stein-verlag.de/...e-donau-vacha-fulda-wuerzburg-rothenburg-ulm/
https://www.conrad-stein-verlag.de/buecher-shop/jakobswege-zwischen-schwarzwald-und-vogesen/
https://www.conrad-stein-verlag.de/buecher-shop/deutschland-frankreich-jakobsweg-trier-vezelay/

Germany has suburbs and industrial zones that are no fun for walking; I recommend taking advantage of bus or S-bahn (surface light rail) lines to get to the edge of town. Lots of daily details (in a part of Germany you are not walking, but still useful) in my blog.
 

mla1

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2000); Ch St. Giles (2013); Le Puy to SJPP (May/June 2015); vdlp 2016
If you come to the Lake of Constance, Marie-Louise, please stay in our Albergue:

Greetz from a bar 3 km before Santiago,
Andrea
Hallo Andrea -- thanks! I may end up going that way. I will put this in my notes! Cheers, ml
 

mla1

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2000); Ch St. Giles (2013); Le Puy to SJPP (May/June 2015); vdlp 2016
Thank you for your kind words, and I'm glad my "trail of breadcrumbs" is paying off.
Although I haven't walked the Jakobswege in that part of Germany, I have been there on other travels. The terrain was the same gently rolling, with forested hills, I saw in Bavaria. The routes are well-maintained and well-marked, but a map-app is always helpful here, as elsewhere. That is a well-settled part of Germany, so the distances between towns is small, and accommodation is plentiful.
Hi Kitsambler! Thanks for all this! I have been looking at the various yellow guides -- and also the red ones. Of course they give different routes. For the options that I am thinking of you would need two yellow books but just one red book. And of course the routes each publisher prioritizes are not quite the same. I had originally been thinking of doing the Munschner weg -- but watching videos it looks like a LOT (i'm okay with some) of asphalt. The route you took from Nurnberg could also be an option. I realize any of the options will be pretty solitary. If the scenery is good and the towns are interesting -- I'm okay with that. I had thought about the Via Regia --- with the better pilgrim infrastructure -- but I think I would rather see some forests and more hills. Would you have any sense of whether there would be much difference (in terms of landscape, I guess) between the route that goes through Freiburg and the route that goes a little further north to end up in Strasbourg? I've never been in that part of Germany. Thanks again for the info and advice! ml
 

FooteK

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP to SdC, 2013; Lourdes to SdC, 2015; ??? to SdC (2020)
What a wonderful idea. When I was preparing for my first Camino, we were stationed in Stuttgart. I was in Rothenburg one weekend on a volksmarch. Imagine my shock to view, for the very first time, my very first yellow arrow pointing the way to SANTIAGO (do you know how FAR that is from Rothenburg???!!!) I took a zillion pictures. My companions must have thought I was a crazy person because they did not get the significance and my overwhelming delight in seeing my very first sign of my planned trek which would begin a few months later.
 

Michael; Camino-addicted

Take your time to enjoy a beautiful moment
Camino(s) past & future
A few Caminos
Next plan - Camino de Baztan
Hallo Mary Luise,

Unfortunately I could give you only little information about the the Jakobswege in Germany, although I am German. So far I have only walked the Way from Cologne to Trier.

But I know a wonderful hiking trail in southwest Germany - the "Saar-Hunsrück-Steig" (Saar-Hunsrück-climb). The Saar is a river in the border area Germany - France and the Hunsrück is a low mountain range between the rivers Saar and Rhine. It is not a climb in the alpine sense, although it is so called, it is a very natural long distance hiking trail.

It begins in Perl, in the border triangle Germany-Luxemburg-France, runs through beautiful landscapes and ends in Boppard on the river Rhine. You can walk it also in the opposite direction

I have hiked a lot in Germany, but I think this trail is by far the most beautiful of the many beautiful hiking trails we have in Germany, perhaps with the exception of the Alps.

The route runs through the low mountain range and avoids very well paved paths, so it often really goes right through the nature. The marking is very good, there are a lot of villages, so you can organize the stages longer or shorter if you want. The stages on the website are quite short, so it looks like you need more time as it really is.

The journey would be very well possible via Luxembourg or Frankfurt am Main, there is also the "cheap airport Frankfurt-Hahn".

Here is the link.


Unfortunately I don't know if there is information in English language.

Something for you?;)
 

mla1

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2000); Ch St. Giles (2013); Le Puy to SJPP (May/June 2015); vdlp 2016
Hello Michael,

This is really interesting! I had not seen this. The website is also in English - so much easier for me. I am going to spend some time looking at the site later this evening! Thank you so much! I really like the idea of walking in the border regions. :)

cheers,
Mary Louise
 

jl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances('05, '07), Aragonese ('05), del Norte / Primitivo ('09), Via Tolosana (Toulouse '05), Via Podiensis (Le Puy '07), Via Lemovicensis (Troyes '09), VF ('12), Winter Camino ('13/'14) Cammino d'Assisi ('14) Jakobseweg (Leipzig - Paris '15) San Salvador/Norte ('15) Ignaciano ('16) Invierno ('16)
from Würzburg (or Rothenburg)
I have walked a number of Jakobweg routes. The one that had the most pilgrim specific accommodation was from Leipzig to Köln. I have walked from München to Rome, but I didn't find much pilgrim specific accommodation there (it was a few years ago). When I walked on the Via Romea Germanica I did not see any yellow arrows in Würzburg, but I did see them in (and a pilgrim statue!) outside Jakobs Kirch in Rothenburg. There is a VERY active amigos group near Donauworth, and a delightful albergue next to the bell tower in Jakobs Kirch in Augsburg. You will find a bit of info from my travels here.

From München http://janetthehappywanderer.blogspot.com/2014/06/munich.html
From Leipzig http://janetthehappywanderer.blogspot.com/2015/02/snow-snow-and-for-good-measure-more-snow.html
Rothenburg https://wanderingyetagain.blogspot.com/2018/04/rothenburg-ob-der-tauber-day-32-and-33.html
Augsburg https://wanderingyetagain.blogspot.com/2018/05/harburg-donauworth-augsburg-day-39-40.html
 

mla1

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2000); Ch St. Giles (2013); Le Puy to SJPP (May/June 2015); vdlp 2016
Hi jl -- thanks for this! I am afraid I lost some time at work this morning reading through your blog posts. Super helpful. Your photos are good inspiration for a trip to that part of the world!
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
Both the Via Baltica and Via Regia in the North East of Germany have a great network of pilgrim specific accommodation.
I understand the Mosel Camino is fab and has some pilgrim accommodation, but also an abundance of commercial guesthouses and hotels.
I met a guy on the Le Puy route, who had walked from Germany to France and through the Vosges. He said it was spooky through the Vosges area. Very sparsely populated, difficult to find places to sleep, long distances and got lost often...he liked it once he got to Le Puy....
 

mla1

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2000); Ch St. Giles (2013); Le Puy to SJPP (May/June 2015); vdlp 2016
I understand the Mosel Camino is fab and has some pilgrim accommodation, but also an abundance of commercial guesthouses and hotels.
The Mosel Camino does look beautiful! It is on the list for some point! I think for this trip I have decided to do a route that goes from Würzburg through Rothenburg and Rottenburg (how confusing is that?) and then goes across the Kinzigtäler camino to Strasbourg in France. It is about 21 days - so fits my timeframe perfectly - and is described in this guide book: https://www.rother.de/rother%20wanderf%FChrer-jakobswege-4363.htm

The Kinzigtaler route seems to have a good friends' group: https://www.jakobusweg.com/.

Looks like a fair bit of both pilgrim-specific accommodation (in homes) and guest houses, small hotels.
Easy access to Frankfurt for the airport both coming and going. Hills and a good mix of big and small towns. And the border! All of this appeals!

Thanks for all the info and suggestions!
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
The Mosel Camino does look beautiful! It is on the list for some point! I think for this trip I have decided to do a route that goes from Würzburg through Rothenburg and Rottenburg (how confusing is that?) and then goes across the Kinzigtäler camino to Strasbourg in France. It is about 21 days - so fits my timeframe perfectly - and is described in this guide book: https://www.rother.de/rother%20wanderf%FChrer-jakobswege-4363.htm

The Kinzigtaler route seems to have a good friends' group: https://www.jakobusweg.com/.

Looks like a fair bit of both pilgrim-specific accommodation (in homes) and guest houses, small hotels.
Easy access to Frankfurt for the airport both coming and going. Hills and a good mix of big and small towns. And the border! All of this appeals!

Thanks for all the info and suggestions!
Great! Like the look of this myself!
 

mla1

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2000); Ch St. Giles (2013); Le Puy to SJPP (May/June 2015); vdlp 2016
I will definitely report! It looks beautiful -- across the top of the Black Forest. I spent a few months in Berlin once -- but I have never been anywhere else in Germany. And even in this small corner of the country - there are a lot of camino options.

If anyone is interested, here's a site for some guide and info about some of the routes: https://www.jakobsweg-team.de/shop/index.htm
 

lovingkindness

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
.
Hello,
I am trying to plan a 21 day trip in late April/early May this year and I am hoping to walk somewhere other than France or Spain. I am wondering if anyone has experience walking any of the Jakobsweg routes in SW Germany that go over the border to France. I am thinking in particular of routes in the Black Forest region from Würzburg (or Rothenburg) to Strasbourg or down through Freiburg and over the border to Thann. I am wondering about difficulty and accommodation. And, yes, I have already searched this forum for everything related to Germany. And I have found the posts by Kitsambler extremely helpful! :)
Thanks!
Mary Louise
Hi there, @mla1
There is a lovely trail between Freiburg im Breisgau and Taizé in France which passes through the Alsace (Haut-Rhin), Franche-Compté, Bourgogne + La Saône. It takes three weeks to walk.

Resource (sign in to download):
Cheers
Lovingkindness
 

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