A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement


Buy any book, get free camino shell

Keeping medication temperatures cool on the camino

Camino(s) past & future
April/May 2013
#1
Gday Folks! (not long NOW!!!) :lol: With just under a fortnight before we leave Melbourne, my wife has been told by the local pharmacist that her medication needs to be refrigerated/kept cool or will lose it's potency :shock: We're now looking frantically online (and every where else!) for some kind of pack that will maintain a cool temp for my darlin companions tabs! My personal instinct is that at the time of year we're walking the way, we shouldn't be bothered by heat too much? Does anyone out there in "pilgrim forum land" have any suggestions? love and kisses to all as ever
Daveyblue
 

davmik

New Member
#2
Here's a link to a distributor of some products designed to keep diabetes medication cool:

http://www.frioinsulincoolingcase.com/

I have not used the products but they are something I'm considering. They utilize evaporation cooling and will likely not be equivalent to refrigeration. Perhaps they can meet your needs, depending on the temperature your medication requires and the ambient temps you experience.
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
#3
We carried a 12" size plastic cool bag, which came from a supermarket and folded flat when not in use. With a small freezer block, if needed, it might work OK. We carried the pack for our travel food intending to ditch it but it was so light and useful we kept it for our snacks. We didn't have a freezer block but you can buy them in mini sizes in UK so you may be able to too.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2004.SJPP-SdC-Finisterre)(1998-2012 completed in sections). Norte (2006.122km) Inglés (2009)
#4
I am a diabetic who has walked the Camino from SJPP to Finisterre in 31 days.

I frequently return to the Camino. I am not an epxert but this is what I have learned.

My insulin was simply packed in the rucksack and it was fine. I always stored it on my right as the sun shines down upon you from the left!

There are cool bags that you can buy. Try the diabetes uk website.

If it is insulin I can post a bit more advice.

My other expeirience is that both doctors and hospitals exist all along the Camino, they are used to dealing with all sorts of medical issues. You may have to pay to see them, but they provide the safety net you need. I am amazed at how many pharmacies there are in comparison to Britain and even with my very limited Spanish I have coped. Its amazing what holding up a package or a bottle can do. If you need insulin you will need a doctor's prescription.

You can always get a taxi to the nearest large town or city to see a doctor and then get one back.

The only thing I do is that when I return I discard the insulin I carried as it will have started breaking down and even refrigerated it continues.

Check with your pharmicist how long they think insulin is stable at room temperature? One I spoke to said a couple of months.

Remember that freeszing some medicines is worse than keeping it at room temperature. DO NOT put it in the aircraft hold and be wary of placing it near frozen blocks of ice.

It is worth carrying a letter translated from English into Spanish saying what your wife's condition is, what medicine she takes, this is the phone and email of my doctor.

Any specific quesions?

In short, don't panic.
 

wayfarer

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-Santiago-Finistera-Muxia. April/May 2012
Sarria-Santiago Sept. 2013
SJPP - Almost Orrison April 2014
#5
davmik said:
Here's a link to a distributor of some products designed to keep diabetes medication cool:

http://www.frioinsulincoolingcase.com/

I have not used the products but they are something I'm considering. They utilize evaporation cooling and will likely not be equivalent to refrigeration. Perhaps they can meet your needs, depending on the temperature your medication requires and the ambient temps you experience.
Great link davmik, thank you.
They are also available on eBay.
 
#6
Im type 1 diabetic and spent 90days walking from bilbao to lisbon. i kept my insulin cool inside a thermos bottle with ice cubes at the bottom. the ice i replaced daily, getting it from bars, which ALWAYS have ice, or freezers/fridge in the albergues, if available. depending on outside temperatures (20 - 30 degrees celcius) this method will cool the insulin 12 - 18 hours. i also had a frio pack, but didnt use it. the largest frio pack doesnt hold the supply necessary for 90days, and it only maintains the temperature of the water used to soak it. the thermos bottle method works great and you will have no problem keeping the insulin perfectly cool!!! my thermos also had a freezer bag around it and i placed it inside my backpack which further insulated it.
if youre from the EU and have a EU insurance card, getting new insulin in spain/portugal is no problem whatsoever.
buen camino.
 
Last edited:

Lurlene

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
France (2018)
#8
I am a diabetic who has walked the Camino from SJPP to Finisterre in 31 days.

I frequently return to the Camino. I am not an epxert but this is what I have learned.

My insulin was simply packed in the rucksack and it was fine. I always stored it on my right as the sun shines down upon you from the left!

There are cool bags that you can buy. Try the diabetes uk website.

If it is insulin I can post a bit more advice.

My other expeirience is that both doctors and hospitals exist all along the Camino, they are used to dealing with all sorts of medical issues. You may have to pay to see them, but they provide the safety net you need. I am amazed at how many pharmacies there are in comparison to Britain and even with my very limited Spanish I have coped. Its amazing what holding up a package or a bottle can do. If you need insulin you will need a doctor's prescription.

You can always get a taxi to the nearest large town or city to see a doctor and then get one back.

The only thing I do is that when I return I discard the insulin I carried as it will have started breaking down and even refrigerated it continues.

Check with your pharmicist how long they think insulin is stable at room temperature? One I spoke to said a couple of months.

Remember that freeszing some medicines is worse than keeping it at room temperature. DO NOT put it in the aircraft hold and be wary of placing it near frozen blocks of ice.

It is worth carrying a letter translated from English into Spanish saying what your wife's condition is, what medicine she takes, this is the phone and email of my doctor.

Any specific quesions?

In short, don't panic.
Hello, please could you tell me a bit more about insulin storage during the walk?
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
#9
Hello, please could you tell me a bit more about insulin storage during the walk?
Sadly Methodist Pilgrim died some time ago but hopefully others will be able to help you.
 

laOro

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances
#10
Hello everyone, Im new to this forum. I am a 25 yo colombian, I want to do the camino portugues with my mom for the first time. She is 55 yo, she has had insulin dependent diabetes for 15 years, she has diabetic neuropathy but otherwise she is in good shape and walks for an hour everyday. I am afraid her feet will get blisters or infections during the camino as diabetic feet are very delicate. We chose this route because it seems easier and shorter than others. How was your experience as a diabetes patient on the camino? How did you take care of your feet and what could we do in case her feet get injured? Thank you in advance for your responses.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
#11
Hello everyone, Im new to this forum. I am a 25 yo colombian, I want to do the camino portugues with my mom for the first time. She is 55 yo, she has had insulin dependent diabetes for 15 years, she has diabetic neuropathy but otherwise she is in good shape and walks for an hour everyday. I am afraid her feet will get blisters or infections during the camino as diabetic feet are very delicate. We chose this route because it seems easier and shorter than others. How was your experience as a diabetes patient on the camino? How did you take care of your feet and what could we do in case her feet get injured? Thank you in advance for your responses.
IaOro, welcome to the forum; it is good to have you with us.

I think you should post this as a new thread titled something like: "Have any Insulin Dependent Diabetics walked the Camino". I believe you will get a much better response.
 

OLDER threads on this topic




A few items available from the Camino Forum Store




Advertisement

Booking.com

Latest posts

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 9 1.2%
  • February

    Votes: 4 0.5%
  • March

    Votes: 35 4.6%
  • April

    Votes: 112 14.6%
  • May

    Votes: 188 24.5%
  • June

    Votes: 54 7.0%
  • July

    Votes: 15 2.0%
  • August

    Votes: 12 1.6%
  • September

    Votes: 228 29.8%
  • October

    Votes: 93 12.1%
  • November

    Votes: 11 1.4%
  • December

    Votes: 5 0.7%
Top