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Keto on the Camino???

Camino(s) past & future
May-June (2018) Camino Frances
#1
Greeting All,

I'm starting my Camino Frances on May 22. To prepare for my adventure, last summer I lost 55 pounds (25kg) while on the Keto diet. This is a high fat, moderate protein, and very low carb diet. My caloric intake is roughly 60% fat, 30% protein, and 10% carbs. I aim for ~10g of carbs per meal OR 30g of carbs for the day. YEAH, I know it sounds crazy, but it worked for me & there is lots of science behind it.

I got to my desired weight last fall, but have remained on the Keto diet because I feel much better while on it. I just take in more calories (mostly fat) to maintain my weight.

So, I have a couple questions:
  1. Have any of you done the Camino while on the Keto diet? How did it go for you?
  2. Are the "pilgrim's meals" heavy carbs???
  3. What can I expect on pilgrim's meal?
THANKS!!!


-jj
 
Camino(s) past & future
May-June (2018) Camino Frances
#3
My friend, no matter what you eat, you will lose weight! I ate everything I could possibly get my hands on, and lost several kgs. It didn't last ha ha.
:) Yes!

But I'm more concerned about how I will feel after a few days/weeks walking the Camino while on the Keto diet... and what kinds of food are on the pilgrim's menu...

Thanks!

-jj
 

Tincatinker

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
#4
The menu peregrinos tends to be carb heavy - pasta or soup, protein, chips, milky pudding, wine or beer, salad sometimes. The menu del dia will have more options but still may not meet your strict dietary requirements so be prepared to to put more effort into getting fed than most pilgrims have the energy to do.
A diet of chorizo, jamon, lomo and vino tint might do you nicely but you may also be intrigued by the impact on appetite of 35Km and a 8Kg rucksack day on day.

Buen provecho
 
Camino(s) past & future
May-June (2018) Camino Frances
#5
The menu peregrinos tends to be carb heavy - pasta or soup, protein, chips, milky pudding, wine or beer, salad sometimes. The menu del dia will have more options but still may not meet your strict dietary requirements so be prepared to to put more effort into getting fed than most pilgrims have the energy to do.
A diet of chorizo, jamon, lomo and vino tint might do you nicely but you may also be intrigued by the impact on appetite of 35Km and a 8Kg rucksack day on day.

Buen provecho
Thanks!!! I thought the menu meals would be like you stated.

I'm thinking I will be eating lots of salads with cheese, salami and lots of olive oil :)

Is the chorizo spicy OR like salami???

Is salami readily available? ??

Thanks!
 

nidarosa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Yes please!
#6
Chorizo can be hot or mild. Eggs and bacon can often be found on the platos combinados menu, or ask for a tortilla francesa, which is an omelette. There is a lot of bread and carbs on the menu though but I think maybe keto is easier than vegetarian on the camino. Ignore the pilgrim menu and look at the normal menu for plates of cured meats, cheeses etc. But then again if you come off the diet you will still burn all food off and feel tired/exhausted/happy/elated/free!
 

Tincatinker

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
#7
Chorizo comes picante or dulce, spicy or not. Salami comes from Italy :0) (other cured meat products are available).
Enselada mixta comes with canned Tuna and as much olive oil as you care to add.
@JJinWI , I'll be intrigued to learn how you get on. Much that I've read suggests the keto diet is excellent for establishing life changing weight-loss but I also read of significant detrimental impacts on endurance athletes and high risk of pancreatitis in long term exposures and high demand activity. Early research focused on the Sans who we're famous for their ability to spend 24 hours running down an antelope and were apparently reliant on Ketosis for their endurance and athleticism but later stuff seems to suggest that researchers ignored their reliance on nuts, berries and roots overwhelmed by the spectacle of a bushman in pursuit of a bushbuck. Please let us know how it goes.
 

november_moon

Veteran Member
#8
I wouldn't count on eating anything you want and still losing weight - some people do, some people don't. It really depends on a person's individual body - chemistry, fitness, fat ratio, etc. Like they say, YMMV :)

Getting what your body needs is important though - whatever that is - not just calories in vs calories out, but the nutrition too.

For someone on a keto diet, I think breakfast can be a challenge since it is usually fairly carb-heavy - often toast with butter and jam. But you can buy your own food. There are supermercados and small stores along the way where you can buy things. Albergues often have some kind of refrigerator for pilgrims to use. Hardboiled eggs are common - you can find them at supermercados and small stores. A breakfast of hard boiled egg, some nuts, and dried fruits should do you well. Then stop later for a coffee and a tortilla (egg and potato omlet) a little later for 2nd breakfast. The potatoes will be more carbs than you might otherwise eat, but it should balance out. With all the walking, your body might tolerate the extra carbs better than at home anyway.

Lunches shouldn't be too hard - often I'd eat a green salad - ensalada mixta - which usually comes with tuna on it - good protein hit. Normally I don't like tuna, but it was good on the salads. Soups are often available too - lentejas are a great option - it's a thick lentil soup, usually with chorizo or ham hock. Lentils, of course, have carbs, but they are complex carbs, so your body will probably like them better than things like bread.

Spain has bunches of choices when it comes to cured meats - some spicy, some not - Spanish food overall is not particularly hot when it comes to spices.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Norte (2015), Frances (2016)
#9
I low carb, 50ish. grm carbs per day but periodically keto, less than 30 grm. per day, for weight control and I found it tricky. I usually carried canned fish, tuna or sardines in olive oil, sliced peppers, cheese, olives, plain or stuffed with anchovies, nuts, salamis, chicken, small packs of pate, chorizo, and a variety of other dried meats. You can also add eggs to this. I did not as I have an aversion to them. Some if not all of this is available in village shops but you may need to stock up for a couple of days at supermarkets to ensure you have something. iplocks and couple of 300/400 sealable plastic boxes are useful. All cities and most medium sized towns will have a supermarket of some sort.

The meals, as said above, tend to be carb heavy which will not be a problem if you don't mind coming out of ketosis whilst you walk and then re-establish it when you finish, possibly the easiest solution. Eggs and a variety of dried meats along with oils and fish are fairly readily available but you may need to carry your own stash for lunches and breakfasts. For oils it may be wise to carry a bottle and decant oil into it for carrying, a half litre of olive oil can be heavy. You may find part full bottles of oil in albergues. Cafes and bars tend to serve carb heavy food for breakfast and lunch. Evening meals, menu del dia or menu peregrino, tend to be carb heavy but you can often pick from the menu and end with a reasonably low carb meal, often based around a salad.

As I was low carb, was not not in ketosis and therefore not worried about maintaining ketosis I could and did eat occasional carb heavy meals. I neither lost nor gained weight during the whole of the walk from SJPD to Santiago.

If your keto diet is for weight control and not blood glucose control you could come out of ketosis whilst walking, probably not gain weight, and re-enter ketosis on completion, blood glucose control will possibly take care of its self with a raised carbohydrate input because of the high level of exercise.

Having said all that if you are used to a keto diet the higher carb input may be positively unpleasant.

With planning, flexibility and learning as you go it is possible to do, I'd be interested to see how you get on..
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances SJPdP (June 2017)
Camino Frances Sarria (June 2018)
Camino Ingles (July 2018)
#11
I walked the CF last summer whilst eating a 'normal' diet, and now I am on a keto diet and also thinking about my next camino trip. My personal experience last summer was that everything I ate I seemed to just burn up - I ate things I never usually eat like biscuits and fizzy drinks and I still lost weight and toned up.
I have been thinking about an adapted lowish carb diet this time around. Cafe con leche is pretty close to my breakfast style right now. A slice of potato omelette for brunch, tuna salad for lunch or a plate of sausage or cheese and skip the bread (sigh). The pilgrim menu usually offered a salad starter and the possibility of a meaty main, just skip the chips/potatoes. Personally, I don't like eating a heavy meal late at night, so i rarely ate a pilgrim menu.
I hike a lot and since going keto in March have experienced a couple of bonks - when I suddenly lost all energy like hitting a wall. I therefore plan to access carbs at crisis moments.
I'd be interested to read how you get on. Buen camino!
 
Camino(s) past & future
May-June (2018) Camino Frances
#13
Chorizo comes picante or dulce, spicy or not. Salami comes from Italy :0) (other cured meat products are available).
Enselada mixta comes with canned Tuna and as much olive oil as you care to add.
@JJinWI , I'll be intrigued to learn how you get on. Much that I've read suggests the keto diet is excellent for establishing life changing weight-loss but I also read of significant detrimental impacts on endurance athletes and high risk of pancreatitis in long term exposures and high demand activity. Early research focused on the Sans who we're famous for their ability to spend 24 hours running down an antelope and were apparently reliant on Ketosis for their endurance and athleticism but later stuff seems to suggest that researchers ignored their reliance on nuts, berries and roots overwhelmed by the spectacle of a bushman in pursuit of a bushbuck. Please let us know how it goes.
Will do... FYI... I'm not Keto Crazy and try to drive my body into deep ketosis. Rather, I try and stay in a very mild state of ketosis. I find this works best for me.

I know that my endurance seems much better when I'm in ketosis. In the old carb-burning days, when I would do multi-day wilderness hiking/camping trip, I would have to eat carbs every 2 hours to keep my energy up.

Now that my body is keto-adapted, I can hike for 3-4 hours between food stops (which is now cheese, salami, nuts and a few dried berries).

The only downside I see for Keto and this adventure is when your body runs on ketones, the process uses more minerals than burning carbs. So I will have to mindful to take extra salt and electrolytes.

Cheers,
 
Camino(s) past & future
May-June (2018) Camino Frances
#14
I wouldn't count on eating anything you want and still losing weight - some people do, some people don't. It really depends on a person's individual body - chemistry, fitness, fat ratio, etc. Like they say, YMMV :)

Getting what your body needs is important though - whatever that is - not just calories in vs calories out, but the nutrition too.

For someone on a keto diet, I think breakfast can be a challenge since it is usually fairly carb-heavy - often toast with butter and jam. But you can buy your own food. There are supermercados and small stores along the way where you can buy things. Albergues often have some kind of refrigerator for pilgrims to use. Hardboiled eggs are common - you can find them at supermercados and small stores. A breakfast of hard boiled egg, some nuts, and dried fruits should do you well. Then stop later for a coffee and a tortilla (egg and potato omlet) a little later for 2nd breakfast. The potatoes will be more carbs than you might otherwise eat, but it should balance out. With all the walking, your body might tolerate the extra carbs better than at home anyway.

Lunches shouldn't be too hard - often I'd eat a green salad - ensalada mixta - which usually comes with tuna on it - good protein hit. Normally I don't like tuna, but it was good on the salads. Soups are often available too - lentejas are a great option - it's a thick lentil soup, usually with chorizo or ham hock. Lentils, of course, have carbs, but they are complex carbs, so your body will probably like them better than things like bread.

Spain has bunches of choices when it comes to cured meats - some spicy, some not - Spanish food overall is not particularly hot when it comes to spices.

Thanks for the great info...
 

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-18
#15
I have been doing the keto diet for the past year, including three weeks of walking the Geneva route last July. My regimen is about 50 net carbs per day. In France, for breakfast I added butter to my coffee (ersatz Bulletproof) and ate a Sola seed cracker with Justin's almond butter. For lunch, picnicked on cheese and nuts. For dinner, I took the demi-pension meal, eating the meat, salad and green veg, but avoiding the potatoes and bread. Skipped dessert, enjoyed the wine. Everything went fine, weight maintained at the reduced level and energy level during the day was much better than when I was carb-heavy.

TLDR: You will need to carry more of your own food supplies if on a keto-Camino.
 
Camino(s) past & future
May-June (2018) Camino Frances
#16
I low carb, 50ish. grm carbs per day but periodically keto, less than 30 grm. per day, for weight control and I found it tricky. I usually carried canned fish, tuna or sardines in olive oil, sliced peppers, cheese, olives, plain or stuffed with anchovies, nuts, salamis, chicken, small packs of pate, chorizo, and a variety of other dried meats. You can also add eggs to this. I did not as I have an aversion to them. Some if not all of this is available in village shops but you may need to stock up for a couple of days at supermarkets to ensure you have something. iplocks and couple of 300/400 sealable plastic boxes are useful. All cities and most medium sized towns will have a supermarket of some sort.

The meals, as said above, tend to be carb heavy which will not be a problem if you don't mind coming out of ketosis whilst you walk and then re-establish it when you finish, possibly the easiest solution. Eggs and a variety of dried meats along with oils and fish are fairly readily available but you may need to carry your own stash for lunches and breakfasts. For oils it may be wise to carry a bottle and decant oil into it for carrying, a half litre of olive oil can be heavy. You may find part full bottles of oil in albergues. Cafes and bars tend to serve carb heavy food for breakfast and lunch. Evening meals, menu del dia or menu peregrino, tend to be carb heavy but you can often pick from the menu and end with a reasonably low carb meal, often based around a salad.

As I was low carb, was not not in ketosis and therefore not worried about maintaining ketosis I could and did eat occasional carb heavy meals. I neither lost nor gained weight during the whole of the walk from SJPD to Santiago.

If your keto diet is for weight control and not blood glucose control you could come out of ketosis whilst walking, probably not gain weight, and re-enter ketosis on completion, blood glucose control will possibly take care of its self with a raised carbohydrate input because of the high level of exercise.

Having said all that if you are used to a keto diet the higher carb input may be positively unpleasant.

With planning, flexibility and learning as you go it is possible to do, I'd be interested to see how you get on..

Thanks for great info/insights...

Do the restaurants have olive oil on the tables (like in Italy)? If yes, that would be awesome!

Cheers,
 
Camino(s) past & future
May-June (2018) Camino Frances
#17
I hike a lot and since going keto in March have experienced a couple of bonks - when I suddenly lost all energy like hitting a wall. I therefore plan to access carbs at crisis moments.
I'd be interested to read how you get on. Buen camino!
I hit the wall last summer hiking in Arizona. I found out I wasn't getting enough electrolytes & minerals. Burning ketones uses up more minerals than burning carbs. After taking some mineral tablets and adding electrolytes to my water... all was good.

You might try the same... and see how it goes.
 
Camino(s) past & future
May-June (2018) Camino Frances
#18

MichaelC

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
August 2017: Le Puy to Santiago
July 2019: Cammino di Assisi (La Verna to Assisi)
#19
Congrats on losing all that weight.

As for following that diet on the Camino, just let me share this: I used to assist with coaching an outrigger paddling team. We'd have guys come out who were on keto / extreme low-carb diets. They'd look great, leaned and muscled and what you'd think an athlete should look like. None of them ever lasted a season. Not a single one.

You're on a diet now to help you lose weight. In Spain you will need a diet that will help you walk 500 miles and stay healthy.
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
May-June (2018) Camino Frances
#20
I have been doing the keto diet for the past year, including three weeks of walking the Geneva route last July. My regimen is about 50 net carbs per day. In France, for breakfast I added butter to my coffee (ersatz Bulletproof) and ate a Sola seed cracker with Justin's almond butter. For lunch, picnicked on cheese and nuts. For dinner, I took the demi-pension meal, eating the meat, salad and green veg, but avoiding the potatoes and bread. Skipped dessert, enjoyed the wine. Everything went fine, weight maintained at the reduced level and energy level during the day was much better than when I was carb-heavy.

TLDR: You will need to carry more of your own food supplies if on a keto-Camino.
Great info... THANKS!

I'm thinking the same as you... ~50g of carbs per day (I'm currently running @ 30g/day now). The 5-7 hours of hiking should easily burn the extra carbs while still keeping me in ketosis. I guess I will find out soon enough as I start walking on May 22.

Cheers,
 
Camino(s) past & future
May-June (2018) Camino Frances
#21
Congrats on loosing all that weight.

As for following that diet on the Camino, just let me share this: I used to assist with coaching an outrigger paddling. We'd have guys come out who were on keto / extreme low-carb diets. They'd look great, leaned and muscled and what you'd think an athlete should look like. None of them ever lasted a season. Not a single one.

You're on a diet now to help you loose weight. In Spain you will need a diet that will help you walk 500 miles and stay healthy.
YIKES!!!!

Thanks for the info... As I mentioned before, I'm not a Crazy Keto. My plan is to introduce enough carbs to my diet (to deal with the extra stress/output required for the walk) yet stay mildly in ketosis.

If all else fails... I'm going for the giant bowl of pasta every night :cool:
 

Guemes

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
None
#22
Greeting All,

I'm starting my Camino Frances on May 22. To prepare for my adventure, last summer I lost 55 pounds (25kg) while on the Keto diet. This is a high fat, moderate protein, and very low carb diet. My caloric intake is roughly 60% fat, 30% protein, and 10% carbs. I aim for ~10g of carbs per meal OR 30g of carbs for the day. YEAH, I know it sounds crazy, but it worked for me & there is lots of science behind it.

I got to my desired weight last fall, but have remained on the Keto diet because I feel much better while on it. I just take in more calories (mostly fat) to maintain my weight.

So, I have a couple questions:
  1. Have any of you done the Camino while on the Keto diet? How did it go for you?
  2. Are the "pilgrim's meals" heavy carbs???
  3. What can I expect on pilgrim's meal?
THANKS!!!


-jj
We ate ensalada mixta (lettuce tomato boiled eggs and tuna mainly) and a meat for the second course. You can eat the potatoes if you’re still hungry. I saved the tomatoes and bread and bought salami for lunch. I always ate my dessert for the extra calories. Once in a while you can find bacon and eggs too. I never ate pasta.
 

Harington

una abuelita inglés
Camino(s) past & future
Vézelay/Francés 2011, Primitivo 2012, VdlP 2013, Via Domitia 2014, Inglés 2015, Francigena 2016
#23
Please speak with a health care professional how a Keto diet and heavy exercise will mix. Your muscles will need the carbs to recover from the exercise ...
Buen Camino, SY
Oh, at last! Some good nutritional SENSE.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Inglés (from Ferrol June 2014)
Camino Portuguese (from Tui May 2015)
#24
I don't recall seeing olive oil on the tables like in Italy (except at breakfast where it may be out to pour on toast with tomato 'sauce'), but you can always ask for them to bring you some from the kitchen (aceite de olivo).

For meat-centric snacks to take with you, the generic word for cured meats is "embutidos", which refers to all kinds of cured meat in tube form. Chorizo has been mentioned, but also look for Chistorra in the Rioja region. We stayed at a hotel in that region that served eggs fried with chistorra for breakfast, it was heaven!

Be sure to try some of the great jamón ibérico as you make your way through Spain. Probably not featured on the menu del día or pilgrim's menu, but regular restaurant menus often offer plates (tablas) of jamón (bellota is the best, serrano is very good), and you can also find packages in grocery stores to take to-go.

Buen camino to you!
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times, but soon again I hope....
#25
I did not know what "Keto" was. Initially I thought you were inquiring if anyone knew the whereabouts of someone named "Keto" who is currently walking the Camino, lol.
You will have no problems smashing through plenty of protein and carbohydrates while walking the Camino. I never gave any thought to what I ate or drank everyday on it, and always lost at least 10 kilos every time I have walked it. It has always put me in the best shape I have been since I was a younger lad in the army.
cheers
 

Saren

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning for september 2017.
#26
For me Keto is a lifestyle! I feel great, all blodtests are perfect. I plant to stay Keto on the Camino to. For me elektrolyts will be importany during the day.
I plan to prepare breakfast the day before, eggs, avocado, cheese, veggies, chorizo.... what I can find.Nuts will be my trailsnack - so carbs will be more than when I’m at home anyway.
As long as i keep away from sugar and gluten i’m ok with eating the odd potato during the camino - even if thats not Keto
Please - post and tell how you get along! I’m leaving in september.
Buen Camino
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, September/October 2014; Portugues, October 2015; Frances planned June 2018
#27
I was thinking about this thread as I took a training walk today. I am gluten free, which I realize is not keto, but I was able to make adjustments to make my Camino work, though I admit I ate plenty of (carb heavy) potatoes. However, I thought I'd mention that Spain is heaven for canned fish. They do all kinds of gourmet varieties of it. You could use this as an opportunity to experiment. I walked with a can of sardines in my back pocket. And the Spanish like to put tuna on everything. So roasted peppers with tuna, ensalada mixta with tuna. And boquerones -- pickled white anchovies. You'll have to work harder than those who can eat whatever is put in front of them, but it can be done.
 

Laura F

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sept 2018
#28
I am heading off on the Camino in September and am also keto. How'd you make out? Wisdom to share?
 

Laura F

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sept 2018
#29
For me Keto is a lifestyle! I feel great, all blodtests are perfect. I plant to stay Keto on the Camino to. For me elektrolyts will be importany during the day.
I plan to prepare breakfast the day before, eggs, avocado, cheese, veggies, chorizo.... what I can find.Nuts will be my trailsnack - so carbs will be more than when I’m at home anyway.
As long as i keep away from sugar and gluten i’m ok with eating the odd potato during the camino - even if thats not Keto
Please - post and tell how you get along! I’m leaving in september.
Buen Camino
I'm also leaving in September and am also keto.
 

Morgan Holmes

Every day is a path to walk.
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances to Santiago from SJPDP (2014); Fromistá to Santiago (2018).
#30
Thanks!!! I thought the menu meals would be like you stated.

I'm thinking I will be eating lots of salads with cheese, salami and lots of olive oil :)

Is the chorizo spicy OR like salami???

Is salami readily available? ??

Thanks!
My standard way of eating tends to be more like "kept" than anything else. I was raised that way by parents who would now be in their late 80's, and for whom carbs were "fillers" to be avoided. Family weight tends toward the slimmer-stable... no diabetes, etc.

BUT... on Camino I ate the standard pilgrim fare on most days.

Here is one major exception: I drank about 1.5 to 2 L of whole fat milk every day, and only about 500 ml of water (plus my cortados and occasional OJ). I found out early (at Pamplona to Ponte de le Reigna) that water could not keep me hydrated, actually -- no salts, no sugars for me to hold onto.

And the minor exception is that I would gorge on the cheese and cured meats, yogurts etc. that were on offer for breakfast when I stayed in actual hotels (in Cariion de los Condes, in León, and and Astorga). They offered breakfast buffets and I'd toss that stuff into me like it was going out of style.

Every night though, I had the Insalata Russa (potato salad), and the fries. Every morning I had the potato and egg frittata....

I started out slim (about where I am now, with a BMI of 22.3, and I cam home *skinny* at about 20 BMI). Weight staying on was more the issue for me.

My thinking on Camino foods is that they are designed to combine high fats and carbs for both long-burn energy and over-night recovery.

I'm headed back this summer, and we will see if 4 years on my body still responds the same way, but at the time, I felt *great*.

Buen Camino!
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF - April/May 2017
CP Central - Sep./2017
CP Coastal - Sep./2018
#31
I was on a keto diet for weight loss/control before walking the CF last year. I added carbs to my diet a week before my trip to get my digestion adjusted to the higher level of carbs I expected to find in Spain. Ate lots of carbs in Spain (pasta and bread) and still lost 10 pounds. The pilgrim diet means lots of bread, pasta, rice, etc. I found that most pilgrim meals also include a generous serving of protein (chicken, beef, fish, pork). The challenge is finding protein in the morning. After a few days I did get skilled at locating bacon and eggs after about 10 am. Have fun.
 
Camino(s) past & future
May-June (2018) Camino Frances
#32
Greetings All,

I finished my Camino 10 days agos... 34 days (1 rest day).

Here are some of my thoughts...

For the first 10 days, I was trying to stay in ketosis but it was difficult especially for dinners. PLUS, I was losing too much weight (note: I was nordic walking so I was burning more calories than just hiking. FYI... according to the interweb, nordic walking burns about 30-40% more calories AND you use ~90% of your muscle groups... hiking only uses ~50-60% of your muscle groups. I estimated I was burning ~3-4,000 calories a day).

So... I ended up eating lots of nuts (or eggs & bacon) for breakfast. Lunch was usually salami, ham, cheese and an apple and/or orange. Dinners... what ever was on the menu. NOTE: I also had to eat an ice cream bar almost every night (to get my calories up since I was losing too much weight)

I didn't bring any keto test strips, but I imagine I was bouncing in and out of ketosis thru the trip.

In the end, I lost ~4 pounds. (I'm 5"9" and weigh 162 pounds... so I was not interested in losing too weight on the Camino)

Bottomline... YES, you could eat/stay in ketosis, but I found it difficult. PLUS, focusing on keto takes away from the Camino experience. So, I split the difference, I would eat keto if it was available (like eggs and bacon) for breakfast... BUT I didn't freak out if dinner was just a salad, some chicken and french fries (I would just eat it all to get my calories up). What ever carbs surplus I had at dinner were burned-up the next day within a couple hours of hiking.

Hope this helps!!

-jj
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (Sept 2016)
SDC/ Finesterre/ Muxia (2016)
#33
because I am wheat intolerant, I ate mostly meats veggies lentil soup cheese etc- almost no cards except some sugars from fruits.
Very easy do-able - I ordered mostly off menus or appetizers or half pilgrim meals ( yes they do have 1 entree pilgrim meals if you ask )

that said by the time, I got out 450+ miles ,(my total trek with side trips and Muxia was 580 miles ) I was quite underweight and began craving carbs- I don't think I had any glycogen reserves left to burn off
 
#34
Thanks!!! I thought the menu meals would be like you stated.

I'm thinking I will be eating lots of salads with cheese, salami and lots of olive oil :)

Is the chorizo spicy OR like salami???

Is salami readily available? ??

Thanks!
I hope you did well on Camino. I just learned about keto and realized that during my 5 Caminos, I was inadvertently on keto. I had to force myself to eat because I lost my appetite from all the walking. I eventually was able to stabilize and lose only 1/2-lb per day on my first Camino. But every single Camino I've done, with lots of effort, still causes me to lose a lot of weight because of the lack of appetite. (I don't care for potatos or bread so the abundance of french fries and the lack of rice was a factor).
 

Denisealldridge

Camino Frances 2014- 2015 Camino Portuguese 2017
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2014 first half
2015 Camino Frances Completed -
Camino Portuguese 2017.
#35
I am on a keto diet, more for health as it helps me as I have lymphoma . I walk the Camino every year for the past 4 years and I will be this September again. I just don't worry about sticking to it on the walk. I feel you need as much energy as you can get as some days are very challenging. Plus the bread over in Spain is NON GMO. I find I do not get any of the inflammation that the wheat and bread does here in north america. So my advice is , enjoy the wonderful that Spain has to offer , especially the croissant :) .
 

Kiwi Mike

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis planned, (Leon to Santiago, 2020)
#36
First post on this forum, and planning to walk the Camino in 2020. I’m 70 and have been on a keto diet since being diagnoses with diabetes in January of this year. My diabetes is now reversed, but will return if I go crazy and up the carbs too much, for too long.. I’ve found that, to initially lose weight, I drove the carb intake down to under 20 per day. However, as I approached “normal” BMI territory, I had to primarily base my keto food intake around calories. I’m currently I taking 2800 calories per day with a self-imposed carb ceiling of 25 per day. To achieve my calorific goal, my macros are currently around carbs, 20, fat, around 180, and protein, around 130. Fat comes from avocado, olive oil, eggs and nuts. In the training I’ll need to do for the Camino, my carb ceiling probably won’t change much, but my calories per day will, and more of my energy requirements will be met from fat-heavy sources.just as well I enjoy munching on nuts as I walk! Please don’t tell me that keto-friendly nuts are not easily found on the Camino!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Inglés (from Ferrol June 2014)
Camino Portuguese (from Tui May 2015)
#37
Nuts should be easy to find in a grocery store. The general word for nuts in Spain is "frutos secos". Spain is a world-wide top producer of almonds, particularly delicious are Marcona Almonds (no idea where they fall in the "keto-friendly" category). Hazelnuts are also grown in the Mediterranean. Walnuts are common, as are pine nuts and pistachios. If chestnuts are on your list, they are abundant in the fall. Are sunflower seeds in? If so, those are EVERYWHERE as individual serving bags of "pipas" (also the number one snack at soccer matches!).

Here's a listing from a Spanish grocery chain to show their offerings, by way of example:
https://supermercado.eroski.es/es/supermercado/2059987-conservas-y-cocina/2060076-frutos-secos/
 

Kiwi Mike

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis planned, (Leon to Santiago, 2020)
#38
Thank you very much. Most reassuring. Almonds, macadamias Brazil nuts and pecans are my “mainstay” snacks as they are high fat and low in carbs. Pistachios are also good, but they are expensive here, so I don’t know their nutritional makeup. Sunflower seeds don’t have a high fat content but are packed with nutrients and iron, so they are valuable for overall nutritional balance. Cheers, Mike
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Inglés (from Ferrol June 2014)
Camino Portuguese (from Tui May 2015)
#39
I saw Macadamias in that grocery store ad, so you might be in luck there too! Pistachios look to be in line price-wise with some of the other nuts, so maybe an opportunity to give them a try. Buen camino to you!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Caminos Madrid, Frances and Finisterre (2015)
Camino Norte-2017; Camino Ingles from A Coruna - 2017
#40
Nuts should be easy to find in a grocery store. The general word for nuts in Spain is "frutos secos". Spain is a world-wide top producer of almonds, particularly delicious are Marcona Almonds (no idea where they fall in the "keto-friendly" category). Hazelnuts are also grown in the Mediterranean. Walnuts are common, as are pine nuts and pistachios. If chestnuts are on your list, they are abundant in the fall. Are sunflower seeds in? If so, those are EVERYWHERE as individual serving bags of "pipas" (also the number one snack at soccer matches!).

Here's a listing from a Spanish grocery chain to show their offerings, by way of example:
https://supermercado.eroski.es/es/supermercado/2059987-conservas-y-cocina/2060076-frutos-secos/
FWIW, if you're wanting to remain in ketosis/eat low carb, it would be a good idea to go easy on the chestnuts. Even though they have "nut" in their name they are carb dominant, not fat dominant like most nuts.
 

Laura F

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sept 2018
#41
First post on this forum, and planning to walk the Camino in 2020. I’m 70 and have been on a keto diet since being diagnoses with diabetes in January of this year. My diabetes is now reversed, but will return if I go crazy and up the carbs too much, for too long.. I’ve found that, to initially lose weight, I drove the carb intake down to under 20 per day. However, as I approached “normal” BMI territory, I had to primarily base my keto food intake around calories. I’m currently I taking 2800 calories per day with a self-imposed carb ceiling of 25 per day. To achieve my calorific goal, my macros are currently around carbs, 20, fat, around 180, and protein, around 130. Fat comes from avocado, olive oil, eggs and nuts. In the training I’ll need to do for the Camino, my carb ceiling probably won’t change much, but my calories per day will, and more of my energy requirements will be met from fat-heavy sources.just as well I enjoy munching on nuts as I walk! Please don’t tell me that keto-friendly nuts are not easily found on the Camino!
Hi there. I’m currently walking and am keto (2 years in). I am not having any problems staying keto so far. Almonds, walnuts and Brazil nuts are in many grocery stores. Also there are lots of dried, cured meats that keep well. I’ve been eating canned tuna and sardines as well. Hard cheese travels good. Avocados are expensive but available in the stores too. I haven’t been eating out much so not sure the restaurant situation. I did have a salad the other night that had egg, ham and cheese in it.

Good luck.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances April-May 2018
Planning 2019
#42
I would be interested in JJinWI results. I did much the same preparing for my april camino from St Jean. Most of my carbs came from wine. I lost 40 pounds and 4 inches off of my waist. On the camino, I avoided pasta and such but did eat bread and drank beer almost every day. I gained 5 pounds but my waist stayed the same and I feel great.
 

Kiwi Mike

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis planned, (Leon to Santiago, 2020)
#43
Thank you all for your helpful suggestions and observations. Much appreciated.
 
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