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Kilts for Men - Clothing insights for the Newbie

Daxzentzu

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
FRANCES (2018) in planning
#1
I am considering wearing a kilt when I walk the Way of St James.

I welcome.advice from experienced kilt wearers. I am especially interested in the benefits and the concerns from the camino family.

Dax
 

tyrrek

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-SdC (4-5/2011), Ferrol-SdC (9/2011), Pamplona-SdC (3-4/2012), Camino Finisterre (10/2012), Ourense-SdC (5/2014)
#2
Hi Dax

It's certainly been done, and would be a good conversation starter. I think the kilt is recognisable enough to the Spanish that the locals would enjoy the novelty of it and perhaps have a bit of a smile, but I doubt there would be any disapproval!

Depending upon the length of the Camino and the season, cleaning it would be one of the biggest issues. I wouldn't fancy walking in a sweaty kilt for a month or more in high summer. Nor would I fancy carrying it if it was only to be used from time to time. You may struggle to find professional cleaners regularly enough who could do it quickly enough. You could try to get hold of a cheap second hand one that you don't mind damaging through hand washing. When I got mine there was a rail of second hand kilts in the outfitters. It might dry overnight or on a rest day if it was warm weather, but I don't know what it would look like by the end.

If you know someone who is good with a sewing machine they might be able to knock up a bespoke 'Camino kilt' out of a cooler and lighter fabric. OK, it wouldn't have the same shape or movement to it, but to the untrained eye it might be passable as a kilt.

As you're male a sporran would be fine for cash/pilgrim passport etc, but I'm unsure about the legality of sgian-dubhs in Spain. :D

Good luck and Buen Camino from a Hunting MacKay wearer.
 

nreyn12

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Walked (2005) (2007) (2008) (2009) (2010) (2011) (2012) (2013) (2014) (2015); Guide leading groups 2013-present
#3
Why not? I'm pretty sure this one was machine washable.

(Photo was cropped to protect identity of subject...although I doubt he'd care.)
 

Attachments

WayWalker63

Active Member
#5
Falcon- my guy has less hair on his lower legs than I do and it is very blond so what he has shows less. :roll: Even though my heritage is mostly Scandinavian mine is dark and very visible if I don't shave. :? For my Camino I'm going to the groomers and get my legs waxed before i leave so I hopefully won't have to bother with a shaver and razor.

Nreyn12- I love that kilt. I know my boyfriend would look super sexy in that. Not that he'd wear it. :roll:
 

RoryGentry

Follow me!!! (Where are we, anyway?)
Camino(s) past & future
Burgos to Santiago, Sept. 16-Oct. 3, 2013

Santiago to Finisterre to Muxia to Santiago, April 2014
#8
If you are worried about chafing, invest in a stick of Body Glide. It is available at most sporting goods stores, or runner's shops. It looks like a small deodorant stick. Just rub some in the areas you think might feel some friction, and don't worry! This stuff gets slick- I've never heard of someone calling it a failure.

I used to sell kilts for Utilikilts- I have 20+ of them in my closet and I've worn them all over the world, but I'm not taking one on the camino. Why? They are HEAVY compared to the lightweight pants/ shorts/ etc. you can buy. Every pleat in the kilt is basically 2 folds of material. Even the lightweight ripstop nylon ones I have are heavier than I prefer to take on the camino. Plus, the fabric in those pleats can take a while to dry.

On top of that, I'm not sure what the situation is with ticks, etc. over there. You wouldn't want to find one of those somewhere "up your kilt." In my opinion, wearing something under the kilt just makes it a skirt. Wearing shorts underneath basically defeats the "freedom" of wearing a kilt. To each his own on that matter, but I'm not gonna risk a tick down there!
Rory Survival F1 grid girls 01.jpg Rory Original camo heavily armed easily pissed.jpg Rory Workmans pits at indy 500.jpg Rory Survival rock and roll hall of fame.jpg Rory Mocker before Edinburgh Tattoo.jpg
 
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
#11
I am seriously thinking of wearing my kilt next time out, March-ish. Mainly for the practicality .. if you think of the human body design around the groin area and our ... eerrmmm ... protruding parts, you would think that women would wear trousers and men would wear skirts - manly skirts of course, so, the kilt. A dress kilt is wool and is heavy but you can get workaday kilts at a fraction of the cost that are synthetic and lighter and therefore dry really quickly.
You shouldn't need to clean it (wear underwear! - think of the refugios!) but, in France and Spain in the cities, in supermarket malls, you can find 1 hour dry cleaners ... so if you have a pair of trunks with you - no problem.

They are heavier than trousers of course but don't feel so when worn. All that fresh air!, no chafing ... socks up when it is cool and socks down to the ankles when it is hot ... and very easy if using the rest stop behind the bush ... my family are Scots, but I was brought up in England - verr odd at the rare family gatherings as they all had Scottish accents. I cannot get my clan tartan (Horsburgh) in a workaday kilt so use Peebles Royal Burgh Tartan, which is the clan Horsburgh county tartan.

Kilts are worn by men from all over the world and many countries have their own national tartan so it isn't necessary to try for a Scottish accent! - fellas, if you haven't tried one - DO! - kilt hem to mid knee now .. shorter and it looks like a skirt, longer and it rubs like mad and doesn't show off your knees! and! a low slung sporran is the perfect protection from a butting sheep or sharp-fanged hound. You need to buy an 8 yard kilt for the weight and swing, anything less doesn't do the job.

You can get a workaday 8 yard kilt from online shops such as this http://www.thescotlandkiltcompany.co.uk/ (No, Dougfitz, I am not advertising, just passing on information) -

and there is this site in support of men in kilts - http://www.kiltmen.com/index.htm - so if you feel that urge (talking to men here) then visit this site. They open with
"We are an international band of men who enjoy the freedom, comfort, pleasure, and masculine appearance of kilts or other male unbifurcated (skirt-like) garments, and who reject the absurd notion that males must always be confined to trousers. We are men in kilts, Utilikilts, and other kilt-like clothing. Our purpose is to liberate men from the "tyranny of trousers" that has been imposed upon us by Western society. We encourage and promote the wearing, acceptance, and availability of kilts and other unbifurcated garments for men.
Unbifurcated garments - including kilts, robes, caftans, sarongs, tunics, and other skirt-like garments - are traditionally male clothing that have been worn by men throughout history. They have been worn by all the men in the Bible, by Roman gladiators, Vikings, and Scottish Highlanders. They are still worn frequently by men in Scotland, throughout Africa, the Middle East, parts of Asia, and the Pacific islands, to name just a few examples. Unbifurcated garments are far more comfortable and suitable to the male anatomy than trousers, because they don't confine the legs or cramp the male genitals the way that trousers do."


After all, if it is ok for Sean Connery - well! need I say more? (p.s. you don't need the silly shoes).

celeb-connery2.JPG
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
#14
hahaha - kilts weren't made with refugios in mind! - Actually, seeing that you will be on a bike next year - not with bicycles in mind either! Though you would look good in a kilt - there are Australian national tartans (old and modern) ;) you know it makes sense!!

p.b. - will add a little excitement to those behind me (or in front of me, come to think of it!).
 
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tyrrek

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-SdC (4-5/2011), Ferrol-SdC (9/2011), Pamplona-SdC (3-4/2012), Camino Finisterre (10/2012), Ourense-SdC (5/2014)
#15
Great idea David. I got my kilt out a few weeks ago only to discover that the moths have been at it. I'm thinking of patenting it as a 'breathable airflow hiking kilt' now. Underwear is recommended.
 

pilgrim b

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Caminos Frances 2013
Ingles 2014
Frances 2015
St Cuthbert's Way 2017
Via Francegena 2018
#16
Great idea David. I got my kilt out a few weeks ago only to discover that the moths have been at it. I'm thinking of patenting it as a 'breathable airflow hiking kilt' now. Underwear is recommended.
Maybe you could have a word with LTfitt to see if she could get some camino kilts knocked up maybe to match the Buffs she is obtaining for pilgrims on the forum?:rolleyes:;) A kind of forum clan tartan!!!!
 
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tyrrek

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-SdC (4-5/2011), Ferrol-SdC (9/2011), Pamplona-SdC (3-4/2012), Camino Finisterre (10/2012), Ourense-SdC (5/2014)
#17
Maybe you could have a word with LTfitt to see if she could get some camino kilts knocked up maybe to match the Buffs she is obtaining for pilgrims on the forum?:rolleyes:;) A kind of forum clan tartan!!!!
That is a good idea. I wonder if there is already a Camino or pilgrims' tartan - I'll research it, but I doubt it. What colours should be included and why? (I'll start with red for the spring poppies.)
 

pilgrim b

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Caminos Frances 2013
Ingles 2014
Frances 2015
St Cuthbert's Way 2017
Via Francegena 2018
#18
That is a good idea. I wonder if there is already a Camino or pilgrims' tartan - I'll research it, but I doubt it. What colours should be included and why? (I'll start with red for the spring poppies.)
Next an orange/yellow stripe for the Meseta and a lighter yellow for the Galician Gorse.
 

pilgrim b

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Caminos Frances 2013
Ingles 2014
Frances 2015
St Cuthbert's Way 2017
Via Francegena 2018
#20
Kilt-wearers take note! The sporran is a FABULOUS receptacle for your trail mix! ... Very handy for spontaneous snacking! :)
Did I hear you right then Jenny, "Very handy for spontaneous snagging on the the Galician Gorse" did you say?
 
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tyrrek

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-SdC (4-5/2011), Ferrol-SdC (9/2011), Pamplona-SdC (3-4/2012), Camino Finisterre (10/2012), Ourense-SdC (5/2014)
#22
There are no official Camino tartans that I can find, with the only tenuous link being the tartan of the Pilgrim's School in Bedford, England. (???!!!) This leaves the way clear for us to design an official 'Camino de Santiago Forum' tartan. Here's a link to get you started:
http://www.scotweb.co.uk/tartandesign/design/4946
 
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
#23
There are no official Camino tartans that I can find, with the only tenuous link being the tartan of the Pilgrim's School in Bedford, England. (???!!!) This leaves the way clear for us to design an official 'Camino de Santiago Forum' tartan. Here's a link to get you started:
http://www.scotweb.co.uk/tartandesign/design/4946
Liking this!! there are a few Spanish Tartans - see here - http://www.scotweb.co.uk/tartan/Espana-Spanish/55917

but if I were going to design one for the Camino? hhmmm ... as background a dark shade of green for Galicia then a yellow stripe - for Camino signs, edged with the red of St James crosses ... tempted to go for the wine red of Riojan wine bordering the sand yellow of the Meseta .. which, funnily enough, is the same. ;)

Just found this site which Insists! that the origin of the kilt is Galician (though they seem pretty short to me!!) http://www.tartan.galician.org/kilts.htm
 

JennyH94

Pilgrim in progress
Camino(s) past & future
The Frances from Pamplona and part VF, first-aid helper and hospitalera
#26
Liking this!! there are a few Spanish Tartans - see here - http://www.scotweb.co.uk/tartan/Espana-Spanish/55917

but if I were going to design one for the Camino? hhmmm ... as background a dark shade of green for Galicia then a yellow stripe - for Camino signs, edged with the red of St James crosses ... tempted to go for the wine red of Riojan wine bordering the sand yellow of the Meseta .. which, funnily enough, is the same. ;)

Just found this site which Insists! that the origin of the kilt is Galician (though they seem pretty short to me!!) http://www.tartan.galician.org/kilts.htm
Hi David -
I saw something very similar to those short kilts in Harvey Nicks on my recent visit to the UK! BTW - the visit was completely wonderful; the short kilts weren't! :)
 

JennyH94

Pilgrim in progress
Camino(s) past & future
The Frances from Pamplona and part VF, first-aid helper and hospitalera
#27
There are no official Camino tartans that I can find, with the only tenuous link being the tartan of the Pilgrim's School in Bedford, England. (???!!!) This leaves the way clear for us to design an official 'Camino de Santiago Forum' tartan. Here's a link to get you started:
http://www.scotweb.co.uk/tartandesign/design/4946
Hi tyrrek -
If we were to have an official Forum tartan we would have to find out what Ivar's favourite colours are, and of course, each Mod would have to pick a colour too! ;)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Mar 2010, May/Jun 2016, Sep 2011, 2012, Apr 2014, St Olav's Way 2018
#28
Hola David - you may start a trend. I can just see a clan if Fijian Warriors walking the Camino in their "lap-laps"; or a Maasi in his red cloak.
You mention "underwear" - I thought that would have seen you drummed out of your clan!?
Buen Camino!
@Saint Mike II - four strikes on cultural awareness! Fijian traditional dress includes a sulu, while some people from PNG might still wear lap-laps. And the Maasai do wear a red sheet, but the people of Maasi probably don't.
 
Camino(s) past & future
cycled from Pamplona Sep 2015;Frances, walked from St Jean 2017.
#29
@Saint Mike II - four strikes on cultural awareness! Fijian traditional dress includes a sulu, while some people from PNG might still wear lap-laps. And the Maasai do wear a red sheet, but the people of Maasi probably don't.
Ok - I stand corrected on the Fiji/PNG dress naming - although they were referred to by that name last time I was in Fiji - 1982/.
But as for Maasai, (instead of Maasi) - typing on small laptops and tablets is not easy. So will claim a "typo" error and old larger fingers!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Roncesvalles to Sahagun Oct 2016
Sahagun to SDC April 2017
#31
I am seriously thinking of wearing my kilt next time out, March-ish. Mainly for the practicality .. if you think of the human body design around the groin area and our ... eerrmmm ... protruding parts, you would think that women would wear trousers and men would wear skirts - manly skirts of course, so, the kilt. A dress kilt is wool and is heavy but you can get workaday kilts at a fraction of the cost that are synthetic and lighter and therefore dry really quickly.
You shouldn't need to clean it (wear underwear! - think of the refugios!) but, in France and Spain in the cities, in supermarket malls, you can find 1 hour dry cleaners ... so if you have a pair of trunks with you - no problem.

They are heavier than trousers of course but don't feel so when worn. All that fresh air!, no chafing ... socks up when it is cool and socks down to the ankles when it is hot ... and very easy if using the rest stop behind the bush ... my family are Scots, but I was brought up in England - verr odd at the rare family gatherings as they all had Scottish accents. I cannot get my clan tartan (Horsburgh) in a workaday kilt so use Peebles Royal Burgh Tartan, which is the clan Horsburgh county tartan.

Kilts are worn by men from all over the world and many countries have their own national tartan so it isn't necessary to try for a Scottish accent! - fellas, if you haven't tried one - DO! - kilt hem to mid knee now .. shorter and it looks like a skirt, longer and it rubs like mad and doesn't show off your knees! and! a low slung sporran is the perfect protection from a butting sheep or sharp-fanged hound. You need to buy an 8 yard kilt for the weight and swing, anything less doesn't do the job.

You can get a workaday 8 yard kilt from online shops such as this http://www.thescotlandkiltcompany.co.uk/ (No, Dougfitz, I am not advertising, just passing on information) -

and there is this site in support of men in kilts - http://www.kiltmen.com/index.htm - so if you feel that urge (talking to men here) then visit this site. They open with
"We are an international band of men who enjoy the freedom, comfort, pleasure, and masculine appearance of kilts or other male unbifurcated (skirt-like) garments, and who reject the absurd notion that males must always be confined to trousers. We are men in kilts, Utilikilts, and other kilt-like clothing. Our purpose is to liberate men from the "tyranny of trousers" that has been imposed upon us by Western society. We encourage and promote the wearing, acceptance, and availability of kilts and other unbifurcated garments for men.
Unbifurcated garments - including kilts, robes, caftans, sarongs, tunics, and other skirt-like garments - are traditionally male clothing that have been worn by men throughout history. They have been worn by all the men in the Bible, by Roman gladiators, Vikings, and Scottish Highlanders. They are still worn frequently by men in Scotland, throughout Africa, the Middle East, parts of Asia, and the Pacific islands, to name just a few examples. Unbifurcated garments are far more comfortable and suitable to the male anatomy than trousers, because they don't confine the legs or cramp the male genitals the way that trousers do."


After all, if it is ok for Sean Connery - well! need I say more? (p.s. you don't need the silly shoes).

View attachment 15487
The hiking kilt...web site posted on this page, are super. They are very light, machine washable and very quick drying. They can fold up and be stored in a small space in your luggage or pack. They have the regular kilt apron across the front and the pleats at the back are securely sewn in and so don't wrinkle with wear. The biggest advantage for me is the lack of constriction across the thighs when walking.

I have worn mine over 1600 miles of the Appalachian Trail with no backlash. Most people are genuinely interested and you meet a lot of people
 

Ahsan

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016
#34
Hi Dax

It's certainly been done, and would be a good conversation starter. I think the kilt is recognisable enough to the Spanish that the locals would enjoy the novelty of it and perhaps have a bit of a smile, but I doubt there would be any disapproval!

Depending upon the length of the Camino and the season, cleaning it would be one of the biggest issues. I wouldn't fancy walking in a sweaty kilt for a month or more in high summer. Nor would I fancy carrying it if it was only to be used from time to time. You may struggle to find professional cleaners regularly enough who could do it quickly enough. You could try to get hold of a cheap second hand one that you don't mind damaging through hand washing. When I got mine there was a rail of second hand kilts in the outfitters. It might dry overnight or on a rest day if it was warm weather, but I don't know what it would look like by the end.

If you know someone who is good with a sewing machine they might be able to knock up a bespoke 'Camino kilt' out of a cooler and lighter fabric. OK, it wouldn't have the same shape or movement to it, but to the untrained eye it might be passable as a kilt.

As you're male a sporran would be fine for cash/pilgrim passport etc, but I'm unsure about the legality of sgian-dubhs in Spain. :D

Good luck and Buen Camino from a Hunting MacKay wearer.
you can check kilts
https://scottishkiltshop.com/modern-kilts-for-men
 
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
#35
Just a reminder - cheap 'workaday' kilts are great. They are made of polyviscose but hang and swing like the real thing and they are strong and yet soft - they are quite Fab! for some reason lost in the mists of recent times they tend to be made in Pakistan.
As long as you have a pair of shorts with you getting them cleaned isn't really a problem except in Galicia (where big shopping malls seem to disappear) - further upstream, as it were, in the big cities the shopping malls usually have a dry cleaners and they tend to offer a one hour cleaning service. Just turn up there, strip off the kilt (remember to put those shorts on that morning!) and hand it over - go and have a snack and a drink and return, and Voila! one cleaned and neatly pressed kilt!!

The other thing about the workaday kilts is that if you wear it to ruin on Camino they are so cheap that you can keep it at home for gardening or chopping logs (or scaring the postman). The link above from Ahsan is great, for US customers - for UK prices try here -
https://www.thescotlandkiltcompany.co.uk/kilt-shop/kilts-for-men - and they ship worldwide.
trust me here, these are not Ebay joke kilts, they are great and real kilts, the full 8 yards! - look the total thing, move and swing almost as well as heavy wool kilts, and are stunningly cheap.

If I could suggest? stay away from Clan tartans and military tartans if you don't belong - imagine meeting a Clan member, or even worse, someone from the Black Watch who has done battle time and lost comrades and finds you wearing their tartan! - so go, perhaps, for something like 'Scottish National' tartan. And don't worry about not having a Scottish accent or being 'from' Scotland. Many Scots have English accents (I do, for one) and with the great dispersion two hundred and more years ago Scots lineage is worldwide. For instance: there are more Scottish bagpipe bands in the southern island of New Zealand than there are in Scotland!

I noticed, on Outlander, deeply researched series, that the men tended to wear their sporrans or scrip pouches on the side - and I like that, placing it at the front, apart from the protection of the errmmm - family jewels?? is a bit in the way really.

One other thing (two other things) about wearing a kilt on Camino - for some reason, whether you are young or old, handsome or ugly, female humans, of all ages, tend to sit up like Meerkats when a kilt wearer heaves into view, and for some completely unknown reason many Spanish males will ask to be photographed with you.

Chaps - if you haven't worn a kilt you just do not know the comfort and freedom of finally not having all that tight cloth around the groin and genital area!! (and you look pretty cool too!). Sure, you will wear it indoors at first and like the comfort and the 'swing' but eventually you will venture out and you will feel really self conscious, as if everyone is looking at you (they are), but very soon, really soon, it will seem quite normal and, well, empowering I guess - you will love it!

Oh - couple of thing about wearing them. Too high and they look like a girl's skirt, too low and they look ridiculous, so wear them mid knee. At first you can get this right by kneeling down and allowing the kilt to just touch the floor, when you stand up it will be the right height. Once you have done this a couple of times you will know without even looking.
Americans have been seen wearing them with white synthetic ankle or lower calf length white socks - do not do this!!! Ever!!!! You can just about get away with wearing no socks in summer heat but it doesn't really look right so go with proper kilt 'hose'. Pull up when cool (you will need hose garters to keep them up - make sure the tabs that show are the same tartan), push down so that it bunches above your footwear when hot - looks really good too.
Whatever you do, do not wear any other tartan with a tartan kilt - no tartan shirts, ties, hats, hose (socks) - the only tartan is the kilt!

Finally, sitting down! Use both hands at the back as you sit to bring the kilt under your bum when sitting, so that it stays smooth and pleated, and then immediately strike down at the front with the edge of your hand as this will push the middle of the front of the kilt down and modestly hide whatever it is that you only usually show your loved one.
And if anyone ever asks if anything is worn under the kilt never tell the truth (I wear black briefs), just say that "no, nothing is worn under the kilt, it is all in perfect working order".

Buen KiltCamino!!!
 
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Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
#36
Hmmm. An interesting thought.
I'll need to run this past 'her indoors' I suspect ;)
And track down the Co Wicklow tartan as that is where my folks and very extended family were from.
Though sadly whilst I carry a very Irish name I was not born in the Emerald Isle......
 
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Ahsan

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016
#37
Finally, sitting down! Use both hands at the back as you sit to bring the kilt under your bum when sitting, so that it stays smooth and pleated, and then immediately strike down at the front with the edge of your hand as this will push the middle of the front of the kilt down and modestly hide whatever it is that you only usually show your loved one.
You can check best utility kilts for men
https://scottishkiltshop.com/modern-kilts-for-men
 
Camino(s) past & future
please see signature
#39
I wear the kilt (with the tartan told me by my father) as an everyday garment. I find it warm in winter and comes with inbuilt air conditioning in summer.

But I would not wear that near 2 kg kilt day in day out with a backpack etc. Keeping it clean and presentable would be an insurmountable issue for me.

Not wanting to dispense with the advantages I went to the web and found a very light weight polyester garment that sufficed, with adaption, on camino in both 2016 and 2017.

And the young Spanish men were quick to show off their recognition with either (as I heard them) an "Ecosse" or "Scotland". To which I would reply "Si"
 

Daxzentzu

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
FRANCES (2018) in planning
#40
I’m starting from St Jean on October 26 and my new kilt is in its way

I’ll wear it in by sleeping and walking in it fir the two weeks before I leave
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
#41
Thanks to a slightly odd Facebook conversation with a Scottish friend living in Santiago I recently discovered that there is an online shop in Galicia specialising in Galician-themed souvenirs. Including kilts and dress outfits in a rather fetching blue Galician tartan. A recent Swedish pilgrim to Santiago wanted to buy one. How's that for a cultural soup? ;) Given the low cost I would imagine they are in lightweight synthetic material.

http://www.galicianshop.com/kilts/galician-kilts

https://www.magazin24.se/insant/pilgrimsresan-karl-for-sin-kilt/repriB!5LSHc3atQbkjtx6RmrrqhQ/
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Roncesvalles to Sahagun Oct 2016
Sahagun to SDC April 2017
#45
I'm not sure that a piece of clothing needs a break in period. :)
Indeed it does not. As a veteran of three Camino walks in a light weight hikers kilt, I heartily endorse anyone's plan to wear a kilt. Lightweight, washable and quick dry, airy :) and very comfortable. I got tired of the stretch of long pants across my thighs on hills etc. The hiker kilt has velcro waist band and so can be tightened when you lose weight and loosened when you find the weight again.

Just be prepared for posing for a lot of pictures. I have no interest in this company but have a look at this https://sportkilt.com/category/52/Hiking-Kilt.html
 

Daxzentzu

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
FRANCES (2018) in planning
#46
Thanks for the encouragement

When I receive it, I’ll be wearing the kilt 24x7 for the next two weeks, prior to departure

This is to test its durability and fit to mitigate the effects of a “failure” in which case I’ll revert to rugby shorts
 

nathanael

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Via de la Plata
#51
I am considering wearing a kilt when I walk the Way of St James.

I welcome.advice from experienced kilt wearers. I am especially interested in the benefits and the concerns from the camino family.

Dax
I wouldn't if I was you. I walked with an American and he wore one and got a lot of eyebrows over it and questions and whys. PLus the fact of washing it was a chore and it was of no comfort. Why he wore it was a puzzlement to us, his Scotish ancestry was as far removed as my Roman ancestry is to me .
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
#52
Why he wore it was a puzzlement to us, his Scotish ancestry was as far removed as my Roman ancestry is to me .
Was his Scottish ancestry his sole reason for wearing a kilt? Perhaps he simply felt it would be a comfortable practical option? We Scots do not have sole rights to the kilt.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Newbie (Nov, 18)
#53
Dax's supplier has been very useful...

However, FYI, I've emailed Mountain Hardware to see if that's the end of the run and it's looking hopeful. However, us euro's may have to order from US (like REI...)

Unfortunately, I don't think it's going to work before I head out but for summer...
 
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy and Camino Frances. Via Francigena. Tro-Breiz in progress.
#56
Hi,

Another suggestion here.

Not 100% clear for me whether they still sell them as specific designs for men, as they used to do.
 

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