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Kindle the perfect pilgrim gadget?

ivar

Administrator
Staff member
A few days ago Amazon announced that the Kindle will work in over 100 countries if you have the International version. This include Spain.



This means that for the gadget pilgrims out there, one could browse amazon and buy any book from them in Spain. It weights less than 300 grams and can store tons of books.

You can also read pdf documents on it, so guidebooks can be added maybe? Since you have internet connection (although limited) I think you can check your e-mail on it (not 100% sure).

Have a look aver at Amazon.com.

Is this a good pilgrim gadget?

Greetings from Santiago,
Ivar
 

evanlow

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
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http://www.tomsguide.com/us/amazon-kind ... -4801.html

There''s roaming charges for using the Kindle. May be expensive.

I guess the cheapest and lightest way for connectivity for a pilgrim is still....

1. A wifi capable phone.

Free but must be near a hotspot like a library or cafe. VOIP not so good, either you must be quiet (library) or the environment is too noisy (cafe).

2. A local sim prepaid sim card.

Good for checking emails where there is no hotspot. Still expensive to call overseas. I've discovered a service that may make it cheaper to make that oversea call through skype.

http://www.iskoot.com/

Spain is supported. You pay just for the local call and the Skypeout charges. No messing around with VOIP. Have to try that the next time in the camino.
 
too expensive, IMO. You can read e-books on several smartphones now, so why carry a separate gadget just for that? I would see it as part of a trend towards hybrid devices, larger than a phone but smaller than a netbook, capable of carrying documents, music, navigation systems, accessing email, websites, etc etc
 

ivar

Administrator
Staff member
Peter Robins said:
too expensive, IMO. You can read e-books on several smartphones now, so why carry a separate gadget just for that? I would see it as part of a trend towards hybrid devices, larger than a phone but smaller than a netbook, capable of carrying documents, music, navigation systems, accessing email, websites, etc etc
Well, I know what you mean..

... I plan to get an "El Pais" subscription and get the odd "Time" or "NewsWeek" edition... in addition to the books of course. Since it will be available in Norway as well, I know the Norwegian papers are working on a Kindle version as well, so living in rural Spain it will be quite useful.

I still think it might be useful for pilgrims, but you would need to be a "geek"... :)

Saludos,
Ivar
 

omar504

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016,2017,2018
I'm a staunch believer in taking books on the camino. From Vezelay this year for the first 10 days I was the only person in the gites. I also find it relaxing to read after walking. The problem is of course the weight so an electric device would interest me-but I'm by no means techo savvy. Perhaps someone could set me straight: the kindle downloads books so you have to 'buy' the book but what I would like is something I can scan my own books into, yes I know there would be copyright implications but I assume it would be ok because I would be copying a book I legally own for my own use. Anyway,is there anything out there?
 

evanlow

Veteran Member
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Omar,

All smartphone have some kind of reader, Nokia, Windows Mobile, iPhone, etc.

On my Nokia, it was preinstalled with Mobipocket (http://www.mobipocket.com). There a Mobipocket creator software for download that is free on the pc. You can convert text, word document, html and even pdf files to the mobipocket format to read. Here's a snapshot of the books and the screen from my phone.



And the reading page.
 

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omar504

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
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Evanlow....thanks for that but the link seems to be to buy e books-is there a way I ca scan my own books and copy them to an electronic device? Sorry for the dumb questions but as I said I'm not very tech savvy!
 

evanlow

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
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On the site, click on the last tap ('Software').

1. Download the book reader for your device. (windows mobile or symbian - Nokia smartphone)
2. Download the book reader for your PC (optional, but you might want to do that so you can see how your converted books will look like).
2. Download the Mobipocket Creator, also only for the PC.

Then you can use the Creator to create your own books from text, html, rtf, pdf files. You can even add an book cover image. After the creation, go to your Documents\Publications directory on your PC. Your convert book will be under another sub directory. Of all the files you have in the subdirectory, you are only interested in the generated book which is the only file with the .prc

Copy the .prc file to your device. Repeart the steps for all your books you want to convert. Have fun!

* This is only for Nokia and Windows Mobile only. I am not the expert but I believe that they have several options for a book reader/creator for the iPhone. I personally carried a nokia smartphone with a headset for my camino that is my communication tool, internet tool, alarm clock, ear plugs :), music player, ebook reader (read Paulo Coehlo's Pilgrimage on my last camino), blogging tool ....

** Nokia has both smartphone and non-smartphone. It's hard to tell the difference. Ask any geeks about it if you don't know. Alternatively, shutdown down your phone and turn it on again. If it takes 20 seconds to boot up your phone as oppose to 5 seconds, you'd probably have a smartphone.
 

omar504

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016,2017,2018
Evanlow...thanks for that,have a beer on me!
 

Portia1

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2009, Portuguese 2012
Frances 2016, (Frances 2019)
I took my Kindle with me on my Camino. It was great. I was able to take my prayer book, bible and assundry other books at 10 oz versus the weight of paper. It held a charge for over three weeks (without the wireless turned on) and it was easy to recharge since it only required an adapter (not a power converter). I read six books while I was in Spain. When you are an English speaker, it is helpful to have something to do while everyone else around you is speaking another language.
 

vinotinto

Active Member
ivar said:
Is this a good pilgrim gadget?

I have a 2nd gen Kindle (not the international one), and while I love it, I'm not sure I'd take it with me on the Way. That's because it's not color, and the screen needs an outside light source to be readable (it's not back-lit).

If it was color and I could download Brierley's guidebook, then I'd bring it along even if it was still not back-lit because I like his color maps and the color pictures (and I have a small clip-on reading light). It would also be a lighter alternative to carrying regular books in my pack.

For now, I could see an iTouch or iPhone as a nice, light pilgrim take-along gadget. It comes with a Kindle application that links to the owner's main Kindle, or it can be a stand-alone reader. Plus, it's small, back-lit, and can be used as a music player and for internet/email.

I wonder if the new iPad would be a nice pilgrim accessory? It comes with a reader, is back-lit, and can also be used as a regular computer. Perhaps someday it will become a pilgrim staple?

VT
 

grayland

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Yes
I took my Kindle in 2009 and enjoyed having a large number of books to read at 10 0z.
Brierley is not yet available so that was not an option..color or not.
Small clip on light works for the no back lit.
I do have the international version and will take it this month when I go again...but have downloaded all of the books I wanted here in the U.S.
You can also download any information you want in Kindle format or as PDF now. That means you can take along a lot of lists and other information if you want with no paper.
For me it is great.
 

vinotinto

Active Member
grayland said:
For me it is great.

Well, Ivar did say perfect gadget... :wink: But I'd probably bring mine as well, since I think I'd get withdrawals being separated from it too long. I wonder if there will be a firmware update that will make the 2nd gen int'l? That would be cool...

VT
 
a new updated version has just been announced for the uk http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B002Y27P46 and with wifi and the ability to download your own mp3 and images, and also browse the web - all for £109 - this looks a much better proposition to me. If batteries really do last for 3-4 wks, might even be the solution for maps :)
Doesn't state whether browser can also do SSL, and sadly it doesn't seem able to make tea.
 

JohnnieWalker

Nunca se camina solo
I love the Kindle I bought. It is a walker's dream.

The problem is resisting the temptation to buy books. But that facility is excellent. You simply register a credit card with Amazon then from anywhere in the world log on with the Kindle, select a book, press "buy" and 3 seconds later you are reading it.

You can transfer word documents from a PC so I have transfered the CSJ online guides with no difficulty. They are extremely useable.

All my MP3's are on the device and it will play music whilst you read if you wish.

It has a simple web browser - enough for doing e mail. Internet connection costs nothing.

All for 10 ozs.
 

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-19
Yes the Kindle is a godsend for traveling readers - mine got me through 4 months in Afghanistan last year. Just to clarify a couple of points in this discussion:
- There is a difference in connectivity arrangements between US and Euro-located purchasers. For US-based owners, carrying the new International version, book downloads are no charge while in Europe, but there is a data charge for email and other data uses (just as we pay a separate data charge with our smartphones). I assume (blithely) there are different pricing structures for those based in Europe.
- All models are capable of USB or wifi book downloads at any location worldwide.
- The Kindle screen does not require a supplemental light source to be read ... unless you are in a dark room. If you have enough light to read a paperback book, you can read a Kindle. Just fine. If you are in bright sunlight, you will be able to read your Kindle very comfortably. iPads, smartphones and other back-lit color screens are difficult-to-impossible to read in direct sunlight.

My geek contribution on this year's upcoming Camino segment is to test the Solio Charger. http://www.solio.com/charger/
 

DylanRomero

Member
I'm surprised by all the positive feedback for the Kindle. For some reason I assumed there would be more "old school" book lovers on the Camino.

I never thought I'd purchase something like a Kindle, but after reading this thread perhaps it's the perfect travel option.

As for home use, give me a regular book with that great book smell!
 
Kitsambler said:
There is a difference in connectivity arrangements between US and Euro-located purchasers. For US-based owners, carrying the new International version, book downloads are no charge while in Europe, but there is a data charge for email and other data uses (just as we pay a separate data charge with our smartphones). I assume (blithely) there are different pricing structures for those based in Europe
AFAICS, there is now a difference between UK and other European countries. The UK now has its own Kindle store, with what they claim is 400,000 books (I've not counted) plus UK newspapers and mags to subscribe to. There is some other language content (searching for 'El Pais' reveals not only the Spanish newspaper, but also 'Alicia en el pais de las maravillas' :) ) but it's mainly for English speakers. I assume that at some point, amazon.fr and amazon.de will get their own Kindle stores/content (there is no amazon.es).

Again AFAICS, the only charge with the UK service is if you send a file to your email acct at kindle so you can download it to your kindle. This is irrespective of what country you are in. Given the large drop in price as well, this is now a very good deal, and it's hardly surprising they have run out of stock before even starting shipping :-(
 
JohnnieWalker said:
All my MP3's are on the device and it will play music whilst you read if you wish.
tho the snag seems to be it only plays files in one sequence - you can't just pick one
JohnnieWalker said:
All for 10 ozs.
the new one is even lighter - around 250g - about 8oz

have you (or anyone) done any 'serious' reading with it - meaning reading a book from start to finish? How does the actual 'reading experience' compare with reading a 'proper' book?
 

JohnnieWalker

Nunca se camina solo
Peter

It is clear that it is still in development. The MP3 function is primitive as you say. The browser is slow and limited. Graphics are not good when browsing. E mail is perfectly doable but again very slow. Patience is needed. But you can increase the font size very easily and I find the page turning function easy to use. It will read the book to you as well and that may be useful for some who can tolerate the voice on a GPS!

To tread with I find it excellent. All books out of copywright are free toi download and the download is instant, almost. I´ve just finished re'reading the Adeventure of Sherlock Holmes which I downloaded in a bar much to the astonishment of PO colleagues. I´ve read several novels. Great for travelling. It has a newspaper subscription function which I have as yet resisted. The big thing is avoiding temptation with the daily e mails from Amazon with book offers. Literally one click and the book is on the kindle and your credit card is charged!

best regards

John
 

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-19
Yes, I have had my Kindle2 for nearly 18 months, so I've read quite a few books on it. I have 16 pages of titles listed, so that must be over 150 books. About half those are the "free sample" downloads (one can order the first chapter of any available book at no charge) I use now instead of trying to keep a list of books I want to read one day. While I resisted the newspaper subscription, I did take three magazine subscriptions. So I guess you could call that serious reading.

It's a very easy read. Easy to hold in the hand - either hand - leaving one free for that mug of coffee or tea. It remembers how far I read, so I can pick up where I left off on the Kindle-for-iphone, or the Kindle-for-desktop. The darned thing got me through my four months in Afghanistan in fine shape last year (altho I must admit to being crushed when I saw someone else had one at the mess hall; I liked thinking I had the only one in the country). For any traveller, especially on any lengthy trip, it simply can't be beat. And the device runs for two weeks without recharging, if you turn off the wireless.

Still under development? Well, I suppose the automobile is still under development too. But make no mistake about it, this is no experimental device. Almost any well engineered product these days continues to see periodic upgrades and continued development is normally considered a good thing. Using the memory for audio files is not what it was designed for, after all. That it plays audio at all is a serendipitous byproduct. I am disappointed that Amazon has rescinded the text-to-speech (read aloud by computer) conversion for books that are available as audiobooks (read aloud by actors); I understand the legal quibble, but I am disappointed nevertheless.

Some of my friends admit to being fetishists for cellulose paper and leather bindings - I leave them to their compulsion. As for me, I'll take my Kindle whenever I travel. There's only so much weight allowed in the bag, after all.
 
thanks for the info

Kitsambler said:
I did take three magazine subscriptions
I see this as a major advantage. Print subscriptions are great if you're at home to receive them, but are less practical if you're away a lot. With an e-reader you receive the new edition wherever you happen to be
Kitsambler said:
And the device runs for two weeks without recharging, if you turn off the wireless.
This too is a major advantage compared to smartphones (especially in countries where the electricity supply isn't too reliable)
Kitsambler said:
disappointed that Amazon has rescinded the text-to-speech (read aloud by computer) conversion for books that are available as audiobooks (read aloud by actors); I understand the legal quibble, but I am disappointed nevertheless.
the blurb says: "Kindle can read English newspapers, magazines, blogs, and books out loud to you, unless the book's rights holder made the feature unavailable"

what does it do with non-English texts? If you download say a Spanish text and get it to read out load, do you get some half-baked anglicised version, or does it tell you it can't read it? It would be a good way of learning a language if you got a proper native voice reading it.
 
JohnnieWalker said:
All books out of copywright are free toi download
yes, and it's not just the fact that they're free. Many of the texts in the Internet Archive for instance are old books that are virtually unobtainable through normal channels or are very expensive if a 2nd-hand copy is put up for sale. In the past many of them could only be read by arranging with a library that happened to have a copy or some such. Now you can download a pdf with no problem. You can read these on your normal computer, but monitors aren't very good for serious reading (tho the screen on my netbook is much better for that than my desktop monitor). E-readers seem to solve this problem, and now the price has been reduced seem to me a serious contender for removing the need for paper books at all. I have shelves full of books that I keep in case I want to read them again, but if I can at any time download a copy to a device that is comparable with reading a paper book I no longer need the paper copy and can free up some space in my home.
 

vinotinto

Active Member
Luves my Kindle, but I'm coveting the iPad 2 (with Kindle app, of course)...still waiting to see if anyone's done the Way with an iPad, cuz it would be pretty handy depending on how much free wireless there is on the trails nowadays (the 3G fees would probably be horrendous)... :arrow:
 

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-19
The new iPad2 weighs in at 1.5 lbs I believe, versus the 8 oz current Kindle. The charge lasts 10 hours on an iPad and up to 2 weeks on a Kindle. Ipads cannot easily be read in direct sunlight. Plus there is a considerable monthly data plan charge for international coverage.

Thanks, I'll stick with my Kindle + iPhone combination for lighter weight. But if you take an iPad along on your pilgrimage, please let us all know how it worked out for you.
 

newfydog

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pamplona-Santiago, Le Puy- Santiago, Prague- LePuy, Menton- Toulouse, Menton- Rome, Canterbury- Lausanne, Chemin Stevenson, Voie de Vezelay
I took one one a recent trip in India Bhutan and Nepal. I found it not so great for guide books, but OK once you learn how to search. I also read nine books, and found it to be a better way to read boooks than a paperback. Keeps, your place, battery runs for ever, font can be enlarged as your eyes tire. I checked email on Wi-Fi, and found it works well enough to tell you there is something important enough to find a computer to answer on.

We liked it well enough that we got a second one for my wife. This one has 3G, and as I understand it, we can check email in France for free. The French make it horribly inconvenient and overpriced to use a foreign smart phone, and without a French bank account, you have no access to some of the local options.

The Herald Tribune shows up each morning for 30 cents, not 3 Euros.

As smart as the phones are, I think this device is light enough and good enough at what it does to be worth bringing as a stand alone device. I'll stick with my cheapo dumb phone for now.

From an Amazon rep:

We do not expect to introduce fees for using the 3G network. Of course, as my colleague mentioned, it might be subject to changes. However, as you probably know, Customers who purchased Kindles of the Amazon.com have been enjoying free access to the Whispernet within the US for almost 3 years.
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
JohnnieWalker said:
I love the Kindle I bought. It is a walker's dream.

The problem is resisting the temptation to buy books. But that facility is excellent. You simply register a credit card with Amazon then from anywhere in the world log on with the Kindle, select a book, press "buy" and 3 seconds later you are reading it.

You can transfer word documents from a PC so I have transfered the CSJ online guides with no difficulty. They are extremely useable.

All my MP3's are on the device and it will play music whilst you read if you wish.

It has a simple web browser - enough for doing e mail. Internet connection costs nothing.

All for 10 ozs.

I took my Kindle3 WiFi only model to Malta last week. Wonderful to be able to take so much choice of reading, Bible etc and music on one device. With the WiFi turned off the charge will last for 3-4 weeks.
Being concerned about having my credit card registered on Amazon while abroad I simply bought myself a gift token, then de-registered my card.

Weight issues mean that I will not expect to take it on the Camino, I would rather take my drawing pad. However if I wanted a book then the Kindle is the easiest way to take one IMHO, and I now have a set of earphones courtesy of a bus tour. :D
 

vinotinto

Active Member
Kitsambler said:
The new iPad2 weighs in at 1.5 lbs I believe, versus the 8 oz current Kindle. The charge lasts 10 hours on an iPad and up to 2 weeks on a Kindle. Ipads cannot easily be read in direct sunlight. Plus there is a considerable monthly data plan charge for international coverage.

Good points, except that one can go with the Wi-Fi only iPad and avoid any data charges at all. Plus, I never did much reading in the hot Spanish son - instead, I read in bars, cafes, restaurants, and albergues in the cool shade.

Anyway, I see the iPad as a device for the pilgrim who wants to have consistent wireless internet access for blogging, emailing, and web surfing, in addition to a reader. And if I ever do the Way again w/an iPad, I'll certainly post about it here - or perhaps even do so w/the iPad during my trek! :)
 

renegadepilgrim

Veteran Pilgrim and Traveler
Camino(s) past & future
2010: Camino Frances, 2011: Santo Domingo de la Calzada (Hospitalera), 2012: Camino Portuguese from Porto, 2015: Camino Norte
The Blackberry Playbook will be coming out soon, too.

Weighs in at just under 1lb.

http://us.blackberry.com/playbook-tablet/

I still don't think I would take one unless I could get my guidebook on there plus some e-books, like Liturgy of the Hours and my bible. I can't justify the extra weight, not to mention the paranoia of it getting wet or damaged (not worried about it getting stolen).

Now, for my other traveling RTW, most definitely would consider it. I have a Nook and am still trying to decide if I like it enough to keep for my next Camino.
 

pablo.m

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (09-10.12) Portuguese(05-06.13) Norte (05-06.15)
y'know i find myself in a real bind here.

an avid reader, a lover of books, one of the rituals i have come to relish when i'm on the road is that of exchanging books with other travellers; coelho's alchemist is a book one should be given, for example & it was given to me; that chance read that falls into yr hands,
or not haha
but still a certain nostalgic fondness clings to the notion...
i have friends who kindle, & brag about how good they are, & the 'k'word seems to be a word often mentioned lately...truth be told i'm on the cusp of buying one cos they seem like such a good idea all round. fitting it should be here on this forum, too

but then theres a but.

my pilgrimage is largely a stepping off the radar thing. of course it's good to find an internet cafe or something from time to time, but to think myself still plugged in to the life i leave behind me while i camino, well, it feels as if something intrinsic & essential is compromised
& i know if i take a reading device with internet access, i'll find myself sucked in.
like most guys, i'm a gadget junky too!
ie, i dont see the point of buying a kindle that doesnt email, when i can buy one that does lol

tough choice...

speaking as one who has travelled quite a bit, this is not just another journey for me
i'm not religious, but i recognise there is a sacred aspect at work which blends the toils of the road, physical with psychological
& philosophy happens
as its been happening along these routes for over a thousand years.
for me, at least, the computers stay at home; i'll plug back in when i get back.
my copy of 'the prophet' goes with me always & for this trip i think, 'hamlet' to study, 'jitterbug perfume', to swap

here endeth the sermon
(now, amazon or the bookshop)
 

Abbeydore

Veteran Member
Re: Kind(le) the perfect pilgrim gadget?

Kind(le) the perfect pilgrim gadget?

....sorry couldn't resist, all electronics staying @ home; well said Pablo.

@ the end of the day it's your Camino.......
 

k1ypp

Member
The advantage to the Kindle is that you can carry many books in one package. I'm a convert, and I love traditional books, but did carry the Kindle on my Camino. One thing that many Kindle owners don't know is that it can be used to read your Yahoo email. If you use other online email services, check, they may have something similar:

Turn on the wireless first. Then go to "Menu", then "Experimental," then select "Browser." Once the browser starts up, type in the URL "m.yahoo.com" as opposed to mail.yahoo.com for standard PC's. This will take you to a text version of the mail. They have this for portable devices with limited computing power.

The debate about electronic vs. books has been around for some time, it has been going on with Appalachian Trail hikers for years. I recall finding a book at one of the shelters on the AT and someone had cut all of the margins off of the book to reduce weight. The Kindle is a giant leap forward in the reading experience...Gutenberg would be impressed.
 

anniethenurse

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances.Vasco del Interior.Camino Finisterre& Muxia. Camino Portugues. Ruta del Ebro.
I am an old- fashioned book lover BUT hear now I just ordered "Kindle, Wi-Fi, 6" E Ink Display - for international shipment" and now I am wondering if there is a way to do skype or/and blog with it?
 

Freetime

Member
Camino(s) past & future
0 currently. Shooting for 2014
I've been a lurker for a few months. My camino plans are for about 3 years from now but I thought I should respond to this thread.
I have an Android phone that has my Kindle, Barnes and Nobel, GOOGLE Books, Adobe pdf and many other files on. The screen is 2 inches by 3.5 inches which is plenty big enough when flipped sideways for reading. It is my phone, book reader, diary, internet connecting device, MP3 player, GPS, language translator/tutor and so many other functions that I plan on taking that as my sole piece of electronics.
The Gorilla screen is virtually scratch and shatter proof even in the hands of my grandchildren. It uses a SIM card and has a slot for external storage.
I think to travel light you need to take things that serve multiple functions.

Tony

Sent from my SAMSUNG-GALAXY-S
 

Arn

Veteran Member
I took my kindle and it was just the perfect companion on days when I just wanted to take a good break and chill. I loaded several "camino related" books, some on reflections, etc. Initial concern was how it would hold up...and no problems. Very sturdy, light weight and the battery charge lasted the entire two weeks on the CP.
 

dkenagy

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
April-June 2009 (Frances) (little bit of bus-riding)
March-May 2012 (Frances) (walked every inch)
April 2017: VDLP: I'll be 75
"A Pilgrim's Guide to the Camino de Santiago" by John Brierley is not available via Kindle. PLEASE, EVERYONE, ask for it at this site: http://www.amazon.com/Pilgrims-Guide-Ca ... 529&sr=8-1.
Click on the link below the photo, where it says "Tell the Publisher I'd like to read this book on Kindle! Then we could put in on the iPhone (using the Kindle app) and not carry the 11 oz book!
 

sharmuk

New Member
anniethenurse said:
I just ordered "Kindle, Wi-Fi, 6" E Ink Display - for international shipment" and now I am wondering if there is a way to do skype or/and blog with it?

There's no built-in microphone on the Kindle so I don't think Skype will work. You might be able to blog using the experimental browser but it's likely to be a slow and laborious process that will drain the battery quickly.
 

Sansthing

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
French Camino (2009), French Camino (2011), Via de la Plata (2012), Camino Inglês (2014),
Does anyone know if it is possible to access a hotmail account on the 3G Wireless Kindle? I'm taking my Kindle (luv it!) with me on the VDLP this year and hope I can use it to check for urgent emails from home since I believe places with internet are few and far between. Any help much appreciated.
Sandra :arrow:
 
M

Maya2

Guest
I have no problems accessing my Googlemail account while travelling, so you likely could get to Hotmail. Someone else said they can use Yahoo. It is slower (the keys are tiny on the Kindle 3G) than a computer, but better than lugging the laptop. Not a big phone person, so e-mail is plenty for me.

I've made 3 trips thus far using my Kindle. I'm really enjoying the extra space in my bag now that the several books I usually take are tucked into my Kindle. Enjoy taking along my own library. I'm a convert.
 

+@^^

Active Member
hmmm
a kindle is nothing more than a modern library card
but thats the wrong answer
the right question is why do you want to go to a library
its a lovely day, now get outside and play with the other children
.
on my camino
i disconnect from the great world wide information grid
and connect with the essence of the pilgrimage
bad 8oz of distraction
.
here endith the lecture...
 

Abbeydore

Veteran Member
+@^^ said:
hmmm
a kindle is nothing more than a modern library card
but thats the wrong answer
the right question is why do you want to go to a library
its a lovely day, now get outside and play with the other children
.
on my camino
i disconnect from the great world wide information grid
and connect with the essence of the pilgrimage
bad 8oz of distraction
.
here endith the lecture...


I enjoy your lectures Prof :)
Yes are you doing your camino or going to the library.........
now ducking for cover.
 

Sansthing

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
French Camino (2009), French Camino (2011), Via de la Plata (2012), Camino Inglês (2014),
Many thanks for the information Johnny Walker, precisely what I needed.

+@^^ said:
a kindle is nothing more than a modern library card
but thats the wrong answer
the right question is why do you want to go to a library
its a lovely day, now get outside and play with the other children

I may not want to use a library on a sunny day, but a quiet read on my bunk before going to sleep at night is the perfect way to relax...for me, at least.

Sandra :arrow:
 

bromeliad

Member
Sansthing said:
Many thanks for the information Johnny Walker, precisely what I needed.

+@^^ said:
a kindle is nothing more than a modern library card
but thats the wrong answer
the right question is why do you want to go to a library
its a lovely day, now get outside and play with the other children

I may not want to use a library on a sunny day, but a quiet read on my bunk before going to sleep at night is the perfect way to relax...for me, at least.

Sandra :arrow:

Sandra, I don't need to relax before sleeping on the Camino: I'm usually so tired that as soon as I hit the sack, I fall asleep immediately.

I agree with the above posts: I walk the Camino in part to get away form computers, technology, the illusion that you are "connected" when you are connected. I want to disconnect from illusion and connect to the real life around me, the people in the pueblos, the peregrinos from so may walks of life... To listen to the sounds of nature, the cuckoo, to see the light changing throughout the day...
For me the Camino is leaving everything behind, my normal life, my worries, my routines, my comforts, and experiencing change, being open for the unforeseen, the unknown.

I LOVE reading, I also have a Kindle, but wouldn't dream of taking it on the Camino for all these reasons, besides the extra 200 gr, plus charger... The only electronics I take is a small 144 gr, 12 Mpx Canon...

PS: também sou brasileira...
 

k-fun

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (2011), Camino Portugués (2013), Camino St. Jaume (2013)
I carried my Kindle on the Camino. I used it while traveling or waiting for buses, trains, etc. Once I started walking, I was usually too tired to do much reading, enjoying conversations with other pilgrims, or writing in my journal. If you have the newer kindle, you can use it to journal and upload to your website if there is WIFI as well as read.

On the Camino, I was reading the Canterbury Tales and did not finish it during the 41 days I walked.
 

Sansthing

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
French Camino (2009), French Camino (2011), Via de la Plata (2012), Camino Inglês (2014),
I'm not into gadgets, I just love reading. On my last Camino I was able to read 3 books because I was walking with two friends and we had a book each which we swopped with each other when read. Taking a Kindle this time just means I can read if I want to without having to ration the number of books I carry.

I'm don't walk with my nose in a book, so I do actually appreciate nature, birdsong and flowers while I am going along, as well as meeting and interacting with fellow pilgrims. To each his own...

Sandra :arrow:

PS Não sou brasileira, sou inglesa mas moro no Brasil
 

colinPeter

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-SDC (2009) Somport-Jaca, Burgos-SDC, Cee-Muxia (2012) Le Puy - Aumont-Aubrac (2014) SJPP-SDC (Oct 2015)
+@^^ said:
.....the essence of the pilgrimage..
I think we might find some divergence of opinion on what this actually is.
Is the “essence of the pilgrimage” about kindles, phones and cameras?
Is the “essence of the pilgrimage” about prayer, faith and God?
Am I a real pilgrim if I have no faith? Am I a real pilgrim if I have no gadgets?
Let everyone walk the “Way of Saint James” according to their own measure.
Buen Camino.
Col
 

colinPeter

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-SDC (2009) Somport-Jaca, Burgos-SDC, Cee-Muxia (2012) Le Puy - Aumont-Aubrac (2014) SJPP-SDC (Oct 2015)
falcon269 said:
The essence of the pilgrimage is patatas fritas.
Sorry, but I disagree.
Real pilgrims eat patatas bravas.
 

+@^^

Active Member
imho
the essence of the camino, is being on the camino
and not somewhere else
electronica can take you somewhere else
if i wanted to be somewhere else, then id watch The Way movie
while fiddling on my kindle
as they say - its just about preferences
 

JohnnieWalker

Nunca se camina solo
or live and let live
respecting the right
of others
to have their camino
the way they
wish it
to be
without judging
or imposing your own opinion
on them
if people wish to read
let them read
without comment
That's what I say
 

+@^^

Active Member
this is interesting
the OP has con-joined the words pilgrimage and kindle
with the word perfect
and ive dragged myself into the am i a better pilgrim than you debate
so seriously - thanks for pointing it out to me gently
i was a lawyer once, but have now become a judge
 

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