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2019 Camino Guides

La Lana. Stages and Observations.

Camino(s) past & future
Frances 04-16
Norte/Primitivo 09-16
VdlP/ Sanabres 02/3-17
Levante 09/17
#1
It took a leisurely 32 days (31/8/ -01/10/18) to walk the full and wonderful distance from Alicante to Burgos. This included a wholly worthwhile diversion to Siguenza with rest days both there and at Cuenca. It also included a short, very short, day when the effort proved too much and I gave up to the sun, the woods and my copy of Graham Greenes " A Journey without Maps". I may also have fallen asleep before waking up and going off to find somewhere else to sleep as by then it was getting late. Such things can happen with age.

It was a walk of geographical contrasts. From the arid land behind Alicante, through vine and olive fields climbing up to dwarf oak, high pasture and then through recently harvested wheat fields. Rocky gorges they were aplenty. Cuenca was spectacular in it's setting; the sections from Mandayona to Siguenza and Tarancuena to Caracena memorable highlights in their own right.

It was a walk giving plenty of time for solitude and contemplation. By way of illustration, whilst at Burgos I was heading into town from my hotel at about 7.30 am, my path crossed the Camino Frances. In the space of only a few minutes I counted 7 pilgrims in two groups. That is 6 more than I saw walking the La Lana in over a month and the one "kitted up" walker I did see was probably a local weekender . Granted, I knew there were two peregrinos 2 days ahead of me with two more 3 or 4 days behind* and I did share albergues with two others (one heading back to Majorca and the other "losing" a day before heading to Barcelona). But for the rest of the time I was on my own, even the final run into Burgos on the GR railway path I had only local runners and cyclists around me. ( *Kevin and Hans - if you are reading this maybe you can post your stages and observations).

Some stages were long and very rural. I made a point of carrying 3 litres of water plus at least a day's worth of food. Bars were sometimes open and sometimes not. Shops, if there were any, were very often stocked with only basics and even the bread was frozen. Spontaneous gifts of fresh fruit from local people together with generous and warm hospitality from Pepe and Antonio at Villaconejos de Trabaque thoroughly enriched this camino for me. Alatoz, Caudette Albergue and Albergue de Siguenza also a big thanks.

There has been a lot of questions on the forum about route marking on the La Lana. For the most part the arrows are obvious, freshly painted and easily followed. However there were a couple of places where, on farmland tracks between arrows, the paths became confusing and I had to check the GPS mapping on my phone. This though was the exception rather than the rule.

All in all, my favorite camino to date.

My stages, all distances approx. ( Alb = Albergue, Hos = Hostel, Biv = Bivvy)

1. Alicante - Monteforte del Cid, 28 klm, Biv.

2. Sax, 26 Klm, Hos.

3. Caudette, 29 Klm, Alb.

4. Almansa, 27 Klm, Alb.

5. Alpera, 22 Klm, Alb.

6. Alatoz, 25 Klm, Alb.

7. Casas Ibanez, 30 Klm, Hos.

8. El Herrumbla, 27 Klm, Hos.

9. Graja de Iniesta, 30 Klm, Hos.

10. Nth of Paracuellos de la Vega, 16 Klm, Biv.

11. Sth of Fuentes, 36 Klm, Biv.

12. Sth of Cuenca, 10 Klm, Biv.

13. Cuenca, 12 Klm, Alb. Days 14 and 15 Rest Days Cuenca.

16. Torralba, 30 Klm ? , Alb.

17. Villaconejos de Trabaque, 14 klm, Alb.

18. Salmeron, 28 Klm, Alb.

19. Trillo, 23 Klm, Alb.

20. Cifuentes, 13 Klm, Hos.

21. Mandayona, 26 Klm, Hos.

22. Siguenza, 23 Klm, Alb. Days 23 and 24 Rest Days Siguenza.

25. Atienza, 31 Klm, Hos.

26. Retortillo de Soria, 22 Klm, Alb.

27. Nth of Fresno de Caracena, 27 Klm ?, Biv.

28. San Estoban de Gormez, 15 Klm ? , Hos.

29. Quintanarraya, 30 Klm, Alb.

30. Santo Domingo de Silas, 24 Klm, Hos.

31. Mecerreyes, 23 Klm, Alb

32. Burgos, 33 Klm.

Buen Camino,

Don.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Caminos Madrid, Frances and Finisterre (2015)
Camino Norte-2017; Camino Ingles from A Coruna - 2017
#2
Thank you for your very thorough post.

When you say 'Bivvy,' does that mean sleeping out in the bushes in your sleeping bag somewhere? And if so, did you do that because you enjoy it or because there were no other accommodations anywhere to be found?
 

Magwood

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (15 April 2013)
Camino Portuguese (1 May 2014)
Camino Mozárabe from Málaga (8 April 2015)
Camino del Norte & Camino Ingles (April 2016)
#3
When you say 'Bivvy,' does that mean sleeping out in the bushes in your sleeping bag somewhere? And if so, did you do that because you enjoy it or because there were no other accommodations anywhere to be found?
I have the same question. And the same thanks
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 04-16
Norte/Primitivo 09-16
VdlP/ Sanabres 02/3-17
Levante 09/17
#4
Thank you for your very thorough post.

When you say 'Bivvy,' does that mean sleeping out in the bushes in your sleeping bag somewhere? And if so, did you do that because you enjoy it or because there were no other accommodations anywhere to be found?
"Bivvy" means a waterproof (mostly) and breathable sleeping bag cover. Used with a sleeping mat either in the bag or outside of it the bivvy allows you to sleep out almost anywhere you can stretch out flat. It does not offer as much protection as a tent but can be used where a tent cannot. Also it is very low profile so does not draw attention to itself. Lightweight at around 750 g. You can (in UK) buy top spec branded ones but a new military surplus bag set me back £30 (Euros 33). Not for everyone but a good piece of kit.
I have used one for years now, they are useful in that you do not have to bother planning to be at point A for somewhere to sleep but just keep on walking if you want to. It is not the end of the world if an albergue happens to be full.
At the end of a days walk it is hard to better falling asleep in your bivvy bag looking up at the stars. Down side is that if you catch the weather all that can turn into a nightmare (spent night under a canal bridge earlier this year when it went wrong weather wise). On balance a cheap insurance policy that releases you from any set itinerary.
Specifically on the above.
Day 1. Only Hotel I could find would only sell me a room for 2 nights at 40 euro - as it was weekend. The price was fine for two nights but too much for one. Found wasteland/woodland just out of town and before next town so slept out.
Day 10. No accom in that village only one bar. Slept under oak trees down in gorge with view of castle.
Day 11. Long day which was all rural and hunting estate. Just kept going and decided to sleep out.
Day 12. Hot and sunny , fell asleep in woods - probably due to Day 11 -then slept out knowing I was sorted for an Alb the night after.
Day 27. This was after the gorge walk, Fresno was meant to be my perch for the night but could not find anything so kept on up into the fields. Found a corner of field, spread some of the cut straw that had been left behind to even things out and set up for night.
Final point. Sleeping out like this offers almost complete freedom. You have to be careful and discrete about it and of course you will not get woken up by snoring or 6am bag rustling.
Hope this helps.
Don.
 

Magwood

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (15 April 2013)
Camino Portuguese (1 May 2014)
Camino Mozárabe from Málaga (8 April 2015)
Camino del Norte & Camino Ingles (April 2016)
#5
Many thanks Don for such a thorough response. I fear that, as a very recent recruit to the world of roughing it, a mixed dorm and bunk beds with a roof over my head is probably as far as my comfort zone will stretch.
Fellow forum member @marilyn van graan and I took a diversion from the Mozarabe via Trujillo this year, but found at two stage ends our only option was a 'warehouse floor with toilet' and something similar. No mattress or sleeping mat. After much deliberation we decided that we were way too long in the tooth to subject our weary bones to this treatment and sadly ended up bussing ahead as taxiing to and fro was too complicated an option.
So, no bivvy for me on the Lana or any other camino - getting up from the ground after stopping for a wayside rest is enough of a trial!
I may well have more questions for you about this camino as I plan my way.
Thanks again
Maggie
 
Last edited:

Harington

una abuelita inglés
Camino(s) past & future
Vézelay/Francés 2011, Primitivo 2012, VdlP 2013, Via Domitia 2014, Inglés 2015, Francigena 2016
#6
"Bivvy" means a waterproof (mostly) and breathable sleeping bag cover. Used with a sleeping mat either in the bag or outside of it the bivvy allows you to sleep out almost anywhere you can stretch out flat. It does not offer as much protection as a tent but can be used where a tent cannot. Also it is very low profile so does not draw attention to itself. Lightweight at around 750 g. You can (in UK) buy top spec branded ones but a new military surplus bag set me back £30 (Euros 33). Not for everyone but a good piece of kit.
I have used one for years now, they are useful in that you do not have to bother planning to be at point A for somewhere to sleep but just keep on walking if you want to. It is not the end of the world if an albergue happens to be full.
At the end of a days walk it is hard to better falling asleep in your bivvy bag looking up at the stars. Down side is that if you catch the weather all that can turn into a nightmare (spent night under a canal bridge earlier this year when it went wrong weather wise). On balance a cheap insurance policy that releases you from any set itinerary.
Specifically on the above.
Day 1. Only Hotel I could find would only sell me a room for 2 nights at 40 euro - as it was weekend. The price was fine for two nights but too much for one. Found wasteland/woodland just out of town and before next town so slept out.
Day 10. No accom in that village only one bar. Slept under oak trees down in gorge with view of castle.
Day 11. Long day which was all rural and hunting estate. Just kept going and decided to sleep out.
Day 12. Hot and sunny , fell asleep in woods - probably due to Day 11 -then slept out knowing I was sorted for an Alb the night after.
Day 27. This was after the gorge walk, Fresno was meant to be my perch for the night but could not find anything so kept on up into the fields. Found a corner of field, spread some of the cut straw that had been left behind to even things out and set up for night.
Final point. Sleeping out like this offers almost complete freedom. You have to be careful and discrete about it and of course you will not get woken up by snoring or 6am bag rustling.
Hope this helps.
Don.
Do you think it's safe for a lone woman?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 04-16
Norte/Primitivo 09-16
VdlP/ Sanabres 02/3-17
Levante 09/17
#7
Do you think it's safe for a lone woman?
That is a really difficult one. Is it safe for a lone woman or indeed anyone else on their own on any isolated camino or pathway anywhere in any country? It has to come down to what you feel comfortable with. If you have reservations or doubts about it then it is not for you.
Hope this helps,
Don.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Caminos Madrid, Frances and Finisterre (2015)
Camino Norte-2017; Camino Ingles from A Coruna - 2017
#8
"Bivvy" means a waterproof (mostly) and breathable sleeping bag cover. Used with a sleeping mat either in the bag or outside of it the bivvy allows you to sleep out almost anywhere you can stretch out flat. It does not offer as much protection as a tent but can be used where a tent cannot. Also it is very low profile so does not draw attention to itself. Lightweight at around 750 g. You can (in UK) buy top spec branded ones but a new military surplus bag set me back £30 (Euros 33). Not for everyone but a good piece of kit.
I have used one for years now, they are useful in that you do not have to bother planning to be at point A for somewhere to sleep but just keep on walking if you want to. It is not the end of the world if an albergue happens to be full.
At the end of a days walk it is hard to better falling asleep in your bivvy bag looking up at the stars. Down side is that if you catch the weather all that can turn into a nightmare (spent night under a canal bridge earlier this year when it went wrong weather wise). On balance a cheap insurance policy that releases you from any set itinerary.
Specifically on the above.
Day 1. Only Hotel I could find would only sell me a room for 2 nights at 40 euro - as it was weekend. The price was fine for two nights but too much for one. Found wasteland/woodland just out of town and before next town so slept out.
Day 10. No accom in that village only one bar. Slept under oak trees down in gorge with view of castle.
Day 11. Long day which was all rural and hunting estate. Just kept going and decided to sleep out.
Day 12. Hot and sunny , fell asleep in woods - probably due to Day 11 -then slept out knowing I was sorted for an Alb the night after.
Day 27. This was after the gorge walk, Fresno was meant to be my perch for the night but could not find anything so kept on up into the fields. Found a corner of field, spread some of the cut straw that had been left behind to even things out and set up for night.
Final point. Sleeping out like this offers almost complete freedom. You have to be careful and discrete about it and of course you will not get woken up by snoring or 6am bag rustling.
Hope this helps.
Don.
Thank you for your very thorough explanation. While I totally understand the freedom aspect, not having access to a shower at the end of the day would be a deal breaker for me. Clearly, I am not the sort of person you'll ever find on the likes of the PCT.
 

Harington

una abuelita inglés
Camino(s) past & future
Vézelay/Francés 2011, Primitivo 2012, VdlP 2013, Via Domitia 2014, Inglés 2015, Francigena 2016
#9
That is a really difficult one. Is it safe for a lone woman or indeed anyone else on their own on any isolated camino or pathway anywhere in any country? It has to come down to what you feel comfortable with. If you have reservations or doubts about it then it is not for you.
Hope this helps,
Don.
What I meant was not is it safe to walk there, I meant sleeping in a bivvy bag "wild". Would that be safe, do you think?
 

bjorgts

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Caminos in Spain, France, Portugal, Germany since 2003. 2018: Finish Levante + Zamora - Verin
#10
It took a leisurely 32 days (31/8/ -01/10/18) to walk the full and wonderful distance from Alicante to Burgos. This included a wholly worthwhile diversion to Siguenza with rest days both there and at Cuenca. It also included a short, very short, day when the effort proved too much and I gave up to the sun, the woods and my copy of Graham Greenes " A Journey without Maps". I may also have fallen asleep before waking up and going off to find somewhere else to sleep as by then it was getting late. Such things can happen with age.

It was a walk of geographical contrasts. From the arid land behind Alicante, through vine and olive fields climbing up to dwarf oak, high pasture and then through recently harvested wheat fields. Rocky gorges they were aplenty. Cuenca was spectacular in it's setting; the sections from Mandayona to Siguenza and Tarancuena to Caracena memorable highlights in their own right.

It was a walk giving plenty of time for solitude and contemplation. By way of illustration, whilst at Burgos I was heading into town from my hotel at about 7.30 am, my path crossed the Camino Frances. In the space of only a few minutes I counted 7 pilgrims in two groups. That is 6 more than I saw walking the La Lana in over a month and the one "kitted up" walker I did see was probably a local weekender . Granted, I knew there were two peregrinos 2 days ahead of me with two more 3 or 4 days behind* and I did share albergues with two others (one heading back to Majorca and the other "losing" a day before heading to Barcelona). But for the rest of the time I was on my own, even the final run into Burgos on the GR railway path I had only local runners and cyclists around me. ( *Kevin and Hans - if you are reading this maybe you can post your stages and observations).

Some stages were long and very rural. I made a point of carrying 3 litres of water plus at least a day's worth of food. Bars were sometimes open and sometimes not. Shops, if there were any, were very often stocked with only basics and even the bread was frozen. Spontaneous gifts of fresh fruit from local people together with generous and warm hospitality from Pepe and Antonio at Villaconejos de Trabaque thoroughly enriched this camino for me. Alatoz, Caudette Albergue and Albergue de Siguenza also a big thanks.

There has been a lot of questions on the forum about route marking on the La Lana. For the most part the arrows are obvious, freshly painted and easily followed. However there were a couple of places where, on farmland tracks between arrows, the paths became confusing and I had to check the GPS mapping on my phone. This though was the exception rather than the rule.

All in all, my favorite camino to date.

My stages, all distances approx. ( Alb = Albergue, Hos = Hostel, Biv = Bivvy)

1. Alicante - Monteforte del Cid, 28 klm, Biv.

2. Sax, 26 Klm, Hos.

3. Caudette, 29 Klm, Alb.

4. Almansa, 27 Klm, Alb.

5. Alpera, 22 Klm, Alb.

6. Alatoz, 25 Klm, Alb.

7. Casas Ibanez, 30 Klm, Hos.

8. El Herrumbla, 27 Klm, Hos.

9. Graja de Iniesta, 30 Klm, Hos.

10. Nth of Paracuellos de la Vega, 16 Klm, Biv.

11. Sth of Fuentes, 36 Klm, Biv.

12. Sth of Cuenca, 10 Klm, Biv.

13. Cuenca, 12 Klm, Alb. Days 14 and 15 Rest Days Cuenca.

16. Torralba, 30 Klm ? , Alb.

17. Villaconejos de Trabaque, 14 klm, Alb.

18. Salmeron, 28 Klm, Alb.

19. Trillo, 23 Klm, Alb.

20. Cifuentes, 13 Klm, Hos.

21. Mandayona, 26 Klm, Hos.

22. Siguenza, 23 Klm, Alb. Days 23 and 24 Rest Days Siguenza.

25. Atienza, 31 Klm, Hos.

26. Retortillo de Soria, 22 Klm, Alb.

27. Nth of Fresno de Caracena, 27 Klm ?, Biv.

28. San Estoban de Gormez, 15 Klm ? , Hos.

29. Quintanarraya, 30 Klm, Alb.

30. Santo Domingo de Silas, 24 Klm, Hos.

31. Mecerreyes, 23 Klm, Alb

32. Burgos, 33 Klm.

Buen Camino,

Don.
The distances on day 8 and 9, are they right? I have much shorter distances. I am on Lana now, and will have problems if you are right.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 04-16
Norte/Primitivo 09-16
VdlP/ Sanabres 02/3-17
Levante 09/17
#11
The distances on day 8 and 9, are they right? I have much shorter distances. I am on Lana now, and will have problems if you are right.
I have double checked my journal and the distances I wrote in my post are what I recorded in that. However I took these distances from notes that were obtained from the various camino sites I researched on the internet so may not be wholly accurate. What I can say with accuracy is that the Hostel at El herrumbla (opp the Ayubt in main plz) at 20 euros a room and at Graja de Iniesta ( opp right as you cross the main road into town) at 25 euros are both fine , good value and a good way to finish the day.
Buen Camino
Don.
 
Last edited:

bjorgts

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Caminos in Spain, France, Portugal, Germany since 2003. 2018: Finish Levante + Zamora - Verin
#13
I have double checked my journal and the distances I wrote in my post are what I recorded in that. However I took these distances from notes that were obtained from the various camino sites I researched on the internet so may not be wholly accurate. What I can say with accuracy is that the Hostel at El herrumbla (opp the Ayubt in main plz) at 20 euros a room and at Graja de Iniesta ( opp right as you cross the main road into town) at 25 euros are both fine , good value and a good way to finish the day.
Buen Camino
Don.
Thank you for the information. Just to inform other walkers, ny distances are: Casas Ibanes - Herrumbla 20 km. Herrumbla - Graja de Iniesta 17 km. I use the spanish pdf-guide. There are some problems with it in some place, but I will give some information about that when I am back home. Nice walk and nice weather now. May be the temperature will fall before we finish in Cuenca.
 

Bad Pilgrim

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
09 CFrancés, CFisterra 10 VPodiensis 11 CNorte 12 VPlata 13 VPlata, CSanabrés 14 CLevante, CSanabrés 15 CSureste, CInvierno, CMuxia 16 CMadrid, CSalvador, CPrimitivo (17 RLana, CInterior)
#14
It took a leisurely 32 days (31/8/ -01/10/18) to walk the full and wonderful distance from Alicante to Burgos. This included a wholly worthwhile diversion to Siguenza with rest days both there and at Cuenca. It also included a short, very short, day when the effort proved too much and I gave up to the sun, the woods and my copy of Graham Greenes " A Journey without Maps". I may also have fallen asleep before waking up and going off to find somewhere else to sleep as by then it was getting late. Such things can happen with age.

It was a walk of geographical contrasts. From the arid land behind Alicante, through vine and olive fields climbing up to dwarf oak, high pasture and then through recently harvested wheat fields. Rocky gorges they were aplenty. Cuenca was spectacular in it's setting; the sections from Mandayona to Siguenza and Tarancuena to Caracena memorable highlights in their own right.

It was a walk giving plenty of time for solitude and contemplation. By way of illustration, whilst at Burgos I was heading into town from my hotel at about 7.30 am, my path crossed the Camino Frances. In the space of only a few minutes I counted 7 pilgrims in two groups. That is 6 more than I saw walking the La Lana in over a month and the one "kitted up" walker I did see was probably a local weekender . Granted, I knew there were two peregrinos 2 days ahead of me with two more 3 or 4 days behind* and I did share albergues with two others (one heading back to Majorca and the other "losing" a day before heading to Barcelona). But for the rest of the time I was on my own, even the final run into Burgos on the GR railway path I had only local runners and cyclists around me. ( *Kevin and Hans - if you are reading this maybe you can post your stages and observations).

Some stages were long and very rural. I made a point of carrying 3 litres of water plus at least a day's worth of food. Bars were sometimes open and sometimes not. Shops, if there were any, were very often stocked with only basics and even the bread was frozen. Spontaneous gifts of fresh fruit from local people together with generous and warm hospitality from Pepe and Antonio at Villaconejos de Trabaque thoroughly enriched this camino for me. Alatoz, Caudette Albergue and Albergue de Siguenza also a big thanks.

There has been a lot of questions on the forum about route marking on the La Lana. For the most part the arrows are obvious, freshly painted and easily followed. However there were a couple of places where, on farmland tracks between arrows, the paths became confusing and I had to check the GPS mapping on my phone. This though was the exception rather than the rule.

All in all, my favorite camino to date.

My stages, all distances approx. ( Alb = Albergue, Hos = Hostel, Biv = Bivvy)

1. Alicante - Monteforte del Cid, 28 klm, Biv.

2. Sax, 26 Klm, Hos.

3. Caudette, 29 Klm, Alb.

4. Almansa, 27 Klm, Alb.

5. Alpera, 22 Klm, Alb.

6. Alatoz, 25 Klm, Alb.

7. Casas Ibanez, 30 Klm, Hos.

8. El Herrumbla, 27 Klm, Hos.

9. Graja de Iniesta, 30 Klm, Hos.

10. Nth of Paracuellos de la Vega, 16 Klm, Biv.

11. Sth of Fuentes, 36 Klm, Biv.

12. Sth of Cuenca, 10 Klm, Biv.

13. Cuenca, 12 Klm, Alb. Days 14 and 15 Rest Days Cuenca.

16. Torralba, 30 Klm ? , Alb.

17. Villaconejos de Trabaque, 14 klm, Alb.

18. Salmeron, 28 Klm, Alb.

19. Trillo, 23 Klm, Alb.

20. Cifuentes, 13 Klm, Hos.

21. Mandayona, 26 Klm, Hos.

22. Siguenza, 23 Klm, Alb. Days 23 and 24 Rest Days Siguenza.

25. Atienza, 31 Klm, Hos.

26. Retortillo de Soria, 22 Klm, Alb.

27. Nth of Fresno de Caracena, 27 Klm ?, Biv.

28. San Estoban de Gormez, 15 Klm ? , Hos.

29. Quintanarraya, 30 Klm, Alb.

30. Santo Domingo de Silas, 24 Klm, Hos.

31. Mecerreyes, 23 Klm, Alb

32. Burgos, 33 Klm.

Buen Camino,

Don.
Hi Don Camilo,

First of all, sorry for not responding to your private message, about the Lana stages. I saw your post in August, then went back to work… and then rediscovered it when coming back to the Forum!

I am so glad that you liked the Lana and that your wrote that it has been your favorite Camino so far - I totally agree!!! I long to get back there, doing it aaall again a second time! I am thinking about Walking it already next summer! I will certainly follow in your footsteps through Sigüenza. I took the other alternative that day, not going through Sigüenza before reaching Atienza.

Pepe and Antonio in Villaconejos were cool, right? I assume they took you for a dinner in one of the cuevas! I admire their hospitality and the effort they put into it. They were in contact with me both before and after that stage, to check on me if I had safely arrived at other villages and so on.

Thanks for the observations!

/Bad Pilgrim
 

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