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Late sunrises and leaving early...how does that work?

pnwPilgrim

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Dreaming about 2014.
Hi folks,

I'm gathering info and thinking about a 2014 Camino. A question for you all:

I've read in many posts about walkers who like to rise at 5am and be on the road by 6am or sooner. I'm a bit anxious about this as (a) I generally hate being up that early, let alone active, and (b) from sunrise calendars is seems that in early May that's about 30 mins in pitch black before twilight (let alone sunrise) and in early Sep that's 1 hour in pitch black. I'm looking at a May or Sep Camino.

This makes the Camino start to feel like a rat race. To me, a key point of doing a Camino would be to get *away* from such craziness.

So...my questions to you:
- Why *do* people walk this early? Is it required? Or do they just like walking in the dark?
- Can I have a successful Camino sleeping a bit longer and walking from 7:30 or later?

Thanks
 
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NoQ

Guest
In the summer there is the issue of the heat. I like the warmer weather, but many prefer the cooler very early morning.

Also, when some pilgrims set their alarms so early and then cause others to get up, usually one by one too, there is no way, unless you are a very heavy / fortunate sleeper, that you will get much more rest.

Speaking of alarms, on our summer Camino we heard so many different alarms that we spent almost a day discussing our top ten during a later stage.

We concluded that number 3 was what we could only describe as a fire alarm type alarm beep beep beep very loud and rapidly at 4.30 in an albergue in Ponferrada (it made the lofty position of number 3 because it was utterly pointless anyway, owing to the albergue not opening out until 6)

Number 2 was in the first albergue we stayed at - Roncesvalles. It came on at about 5 and was a sheep, clearly in a lot of pain with pitiful bleating, that went on and on and on as it had been put in a rucksack and must have fallen deeper as the pilgrim responsible clattered around desperately trying to grasp it.

Number 1. This one won by a huge margin. The albergue was in Astorga. Not only did it sound off at 4.15 am (yes, 4.15!) and belonged to one member of a big group that made no pretense to quiet as all members went about packing and chatting with lights on, it was also loud and the tune was so catchy and cheery that we were humming it all day. To make matters worse, my wife has decided to use it as her alarm tone now so there'll never be any escaping. This is it:-

 
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Yodapsy

Rob Blinn
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances July 2013, Planning July 2018 Camino Portugues.
In my experience, the sun rises fairly late on the camino. That is partly due to European summer time and Spain's placement on the western side of the time zone. Now in mid-October I show the sun rising today at 8:20 am in Pamplona and at 8:48 am in Santiago de Compostela. When I was walking in July, I believe the sun was rising at about 6:00am. You may be just fine!
 

nellpilgrim

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
SDC-Fisterra 08/Camino Frances SJPP to SDC 09/Nuremburg-SDC 11- ongoing
In the summer there is the issue of the heat. I like the warmer weather, but many prefer the cooler very early morning.

Yep cooler is always better for me and I'm also a slow (as in geological time) walker. But I also find walking at dawn and greeting the sunrise so beautiful I'd probably be an early starter anyway even if I could take the heat and/or was a racing class pilgrim.

Don't worry though you'll be able sleep on to a reasonable hour and some of that " I get up so early I eat my breakfast the night before" talk is just that......talk;). Though I presume even the most hardened of 'night owls' may find that, as they have to go to bed well before their usual time in the albergues, this benefits them with regard to getting up a bit earlier than usual.
 
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Yodapsy

Rob Blinn
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances July 2013, Planning July 2018 Camino Portugues.
Even in July this year, we were always able to find a bed until after Sarria. There was no need to race. Next time, I think we will do shorter stages after Sarria, so we can avoid racing. We would leave early but that was to avoid the intense heat not to race for a bed. 2 hours walked between 5:30am and 7:30am are very different from 2 hours walked between noon and 2:00 !
 
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MendiWalker

Guest
These people all take part in what is know as "The Bed Race". they run like hell in order to catch a cheap bunk at the next public albergue.
They also use a headlamp in order to walk those kms. in the dark.
Funny don´t you think , people travel from all over the world to walk the Camino and see a new place but do it in the dark......... don´t see a thing.:(

Buen Camino!
 

pnwPilgrim

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Dreaming about 2014.
In my experience, the sun rises fairly late on the camino. That is partly due to European summer time and Spain's placement on the western side of the time zone. Now in mid-October I show the sun rising today at 8:20 am in Pamplona and at 8:48 am in Santiago de Compostela. When I was walking in July, I believe the sun was rising at about 6:00am. You may be just fine!

Agreed about July. My point is that my preferred dates would be to start early May or early Sep when sunrise is significantly later, making the early morning craziness seem even crazier.
 

pnwPilgrim

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Dreaming about 2014.
These people all take part in what is know as "The Bed Race". they run like hell in order to catch a cheap bunk at the next public albergue.
They also use a headlamp in order to walk those kms. in the dark.
Funny don´t you think , people travel from all over the world to walk the Camino and see a new place but do it in the dark......... don´t see a thing.:(

Buen Camino!


MendiWalker, can one successfully opt out of the "bed race" and still find a bed? That's my real fear. If the camino is just a bed race it seems a lot less interesting... As you say, why spend all that money, travel half way around the world, only to have all that stress...!
 

NicoZ

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2013
How fast do you walk?

How far do you expect to go every day?

If you're a slow walker you'll have the choice of starting early or having short stages.

Remember to factor in lunch and rest breaks.
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999, now living in Santiago de C
Past OR future Camino
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Santiago - Muxia 2019

Now: http://egeria.house/
..., can one successfully opt out of the "bed race" and still find a bed? That's my real fear. If the camino is just a bed race it seems a lot less interesting... As you say, why spend all that money, travel half way around the world, only to have all that stress...!

Yes! You wrote that you want to walk either May or September, which are busy months, but nothing compared to July / August. You could also consider to walk another route, the Camino del Norte for example, which is anyway quieter or to start in Somport and take the Aragones Way until Puente la Reina. I wouldn't stress myself out over the question of a bed, the Camino provides. Buen worry free Camino, SY
 
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fortview

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino frances Sept/oct 2012 , Salvador, Primitivo 2013
Cotswold Way July 2014
European Peace Walk August 2014 (John)
Apparently, there is a possibility that Spain may change its clocks ! The sunrise is so late now because of Franco, who wanted Spain to be in line, time-wise, with Germany. So IF the clocks do change eventually, maybe pilgrims will have a whole extra hour in bed! :D
 
D

Deleted member 3000

Guest
This makes the Camino start to feel like a rat race.
Keep in mind that this perception is yours to control. In May and September particularly, there are always beds. It is hard to resist the feeling. I remember on my second camino sitting at a bar for second coffee and counting over fifty pilgrims walking by. My thought with each one was "there goes another bed." Yet I never have had a problem getting a bed. I advise that you simply force yourself to ignore the bed race. It really is only in your mind.

Albergues will escort pilgrims out the door by 0830, which is a problem in winter and early spring when sunrise is after that. For the times you plan to walk, there will be visible light by the time you must leave. As for other pilgrims, you can agonize over "why" they leave early, but you cannot control it. Your reaction can be either irritation or acceptance. Irritation will only lessen your experience, so I recommend acceptance. You may even eagerly join them after a few days, if an early start has helped you avoid the blistering sun in the afternoon.

Buen camino!
 
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biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
To coin a phrase brilliantly uttered by one not so illustrious US politician several years, I can see "Spain" from my house. If you get a start in the summer between 6 and 6:30 you will be walking in the morning glow and currently in October the same light level is available around 8 as long as there is no major cloud cover. No need for a headlamp, I walked in Portugal last July and was usually out the door by 6:15 and could see at least a km ahead of me. As far as the race for beds, it doesn't exist in Portugal due to the small number of pilgrims on CP but I've decided to go back to the CF this coming June just to participate in that "ultimate challenge" to get my backpack in the front of the queue at the albergue everyday around noon.
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
Keep in mind that this perception is yours to control. In May and September particularly, there are always beds. It is hard to resist the feeling. I remember on my second casino sitting at a bar for second coffee and counting over fifty pilgrims walking by. My thought with each one was "there goes another bed." Yet I never have had a problem getting a bed. I advise that you simply force yourself to ignore the bed race. It really is only in your mind.

Albergues will escort pilgrims out the door by 0830, which is a problem in winter and early spring when sunrise is after that. For the times you plan to walk, there will be visible light by the time you must leave. As for other pilgrims, you can agonize over "why" they leave early, but you cannot control it. Your reaction can be either irritation or acceptance. Irritation will only lessen your experience, so I recommend acceptance. You may even eagerly join them after a few days, if an early start has helped you avoid the blistering sun in the afternoon.

Buen camino!
Falcon, I missed the "casino" on the Way:rolleyes:
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
These people all take part in what is know as "The Bed Race". they run like hell in order to catch a cheap bunk at the next public albergue.
They also use a headlamp in order to walk those kms. in the dark.
Funny don´t you think , people travel from all over the world to walk the Camino and see a new place but do it in the dark......... don´t see a thing.:(

Buen Camino!

And then there are those of us who don't need an alarm to wake up, quietly sneek out and actually enjoy the early morning hours. I have experienced incredible peace and spectacular sunrises (don't forget to look behind you on the CF) which I would not want to have missed!

Whether you participate in "The Bed Race" is entirely up to you.
 
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biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
And then there are those of us who don't need an alarm to wake up, quietly sneek out and actually enjoy the early morning hours. I have experienced incredible peace and spectacular sunrises (don't forget to look behind you on the CF) which I would not want to have missed!

Whether you participate in "The Bed Race" is entirely up to you.
Exactament, some of my best photos and most memorable moments are walking in the early morning and it's must that you have at least one of those 20 foot tall shadow photos from your walk.
 
M

MendiWalker

Guest
MendiWalker, can one successfully opt out of the "bed race" and still find a bed? That's my real fear. If the camino is just a bed race it seems a lot less interesting... As you say, why spend all that money, travel half way around the world, only to have all that stress...!

Of course you can.
You won´t find a bed at the public albergue but you can find one at a private albergue ( a bit more expensive) or a pension or small family run hotel, etc............

Buen Camino!
 

jpflavin1

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Madrid/San Salvador/Primitivo-2021
Hi folks,

I'm gathering info and thinking about a 2014 Camino. A question for you all:

I've read in many posts about walkers who like to rise at 5am and be on the road by 6am or sooner. I'm a bit anxious about this as (a) I generally hate being up that early, let alone active, and (b) from sunrise calendars is seems that in early May that's about 30 mins in pitch black before twilight (let alone sunrise) and in early Sep that's 1 hour in pitch black. I'm looking at a May or Sep Camino.

This makes the Camino start to feel like a rat race. To me, a key point of doing a Camino would be to get *away* from such craziness.

So...my questions to you:
- Why *do* people walk this early? Is it required? Or do they just like walking in the dark?
- Can I have a successful Camino sleeping a bit longer and walking from 7:30 or later?

Thanks


New Pilgrim:

I have walked all my Camino's in the early Spring (starting between March 23rd and April 7th). I have never seen crowds (except Easter week) and never had a problem finding a bed. That said, there were still those whose rose, prior to lights on, and rustled about making noise. There is not much you can do about them. Though when they turn on the lights I have gotten up and turned them off. Most Albergues have times listed for lights on and off so I had no problem doing this.

You can make note of those individual/s and try to avoid them.

You can occasionally, frequently or always sleep in private Albergues.

You can stop in Albergues not on the standard stops or that sleep fewer people.

All these actions will reduce the chances of encountering less thoughtful Pilgrims but might add some stress to your Camino.

I would suggest you just walk your Camino at your pace and if there are issues lean toward Falcon's advice of acceptance or stay in Private Albergues.

You can have a successful Camino leaving at 7:30am.

Ultreya,
Joe
 
M

MendiWalker

Guest
I stand corrected.
I appologise to LTfit and Biarritzdon and any other who sneaks out in silence to take photos or what not.

But most are members of the "Bed Race" a pain for all.:mad:

Buen Camino!
 
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pnwPilgrim

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Dreaming about 2014.
Thanks for all the replies, folks! Consensus here seems to be firmly that the need to race for beds is an illusion and one can opt to leave later (albeit before 0830) and still have an enjoyable Camino.

Fortview, it would make tons of sense geographically for Spain to join the UK in GMT timezone. Wouldn't that make sunrise/sunset an hour *earlier* and let the bed racers start even earlier? *Shudder*
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Past OR future Camino
Many, various, and continuing.
I am not sure if pilgrims are racing or the sun is setting earlier or what, but in the eight years I have walked my dogs on the camino in the morning, the pilgrims themselves have changed.
There are notably more pilgrims out there now.
We always greet the pilgrims we pass. We always have.
Pilgrims used to consistently greet us back. They´d hunker down to talk with the dogs, chat with us, even sometimes come home for a coffee.
Nowadays a large number of them are utterly engaged in whatever is playing on their earphones, or what their companions are saying. They do not respond to us. The ones not plugged-in usually still say hello, and they occasionally slow down if a dog asks them directly for a pat on the head.
But most pilgrims we see nowadays are obviously in a hurry to get somewhere. They don´t stop and chat.
And if you don´t stop and chat, you don´t get coffee.

Maybe it´s not the pilgrims. Maybe it´s us... or our vast pack of ill-assorted curs!
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999, now living in Santiago de C
Past OR future Camino
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Santiago - Muxia 2019

Now: http://egeria.house/
...
And if you don´t stop and chat, you don´t get coffee.
Maybe it´s not the pilgrims. Maybe it´s us... or our vast pack of ill-assorted curs!

Important rule on the Camino ;-) I have and always will stop to chat to every dog (and other animals) I meet, but then I have what DH calls 'dog / animal activated attention disorder ;-) SY
 
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whariwharangi

Guest
I liked the albergues that locked the doors so the 'early risers' couldn't get out, thus removing any reason to get up and wake everyone at some ungodly cow milking hour.

Further, some of the narrow twisting roads the camino follows occasionally had drivers seemingly bent on suicide. I wouldn't want to find myself avoiding such in a dark time of the day.

It is said the early bird gets the worm. Hardly a reason for me to get up.
 
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jirit

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances 2007,
Via Francigena Italy, 2008,
Jakobsweg Austria 2010,
Camino Frances 2011,
Le Puy to Lourdes 2012,
Via de la Plata 2013,
Future:
Ökumenischer (Via Regia), Germany,
Lycian Way, Turkey
Apparently, there is a possibility that Spain may change its clocks ! The sunrise is so late now because of Franco, who wanted Spain to be in line, time-wise, with Germany. So IF the clocks do change eventually, maybe pilgrims will have a whole extra hour in bed! :D

You are correct and I am surprised that the authorities have not considered it earlier. Makes perfect sense given Spain's geographical location to the rest of Europe.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-24294157
 
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Thornley

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances x 2 , Norte x 2 , Le Puy x 3 , Portuguese x 2,
Mont St Michel , Primitivo .
I am not sure if pilgrims are racing or the sun is setting earlier or what, but in the eight years I have walked my dogs on the camino in the morning, the pilgrims themselves have changed.
There are notably more pilgrims out there now.
We always greet the pilgrims we pass. We always have.
Pilgrims used to consistently greet us back. They´d hunker down to talk with the dogs, chat with us, even sometimes come home for a coffee.
Nowadays a large number of them are utterly engaged in whatever is playing on their earphones, or what their companions are saying. They do not respond to us. The ones not plugged-in usually still say hello, and they occasionally slow down if a dog asks them directly for a pat on the head.
But most pilgrims we see nowadays are obviously in a hurry to get somewhere. They don´t stop and chat.
And if you don´t stop and chat, you don´t get coffee.

Maybe it´s not the pilgrims. Maybe it´s us... or our vast pack of ill-assorted curs!

I think you are 100% correct Rebekah,
The people have changed but i still think you get a rough idea well before they speak , or in your case * pass you buy.
The secret of the old way is the less walked routes.
Imagine someone hurrying on the Madrid & Invierno or the Le Puy way in France and not speaking or stopping ....... a very lonely path.
We found no early risers on the Norte until some spanish girls left @ 5.00am seeking a bed at Miraz.
They got there very early , got reprimanded and were given jobs cleaning .
They were then @ noon given beds with the rest of the pilgrims .
They apologised to all over the day and we realised they had only started in Ribadeo .

These people all take part in what is know as "The Bed Race". they run like hell in order to catch a cheap bunk at the next public albergue.
They also use a headlamp in order to walk those kms. in the dark.
Funny don´t you think , people travel from all over the world to walk the Camino and see a new place but do it in the dark......... don´t see a thing.:(

Buen Camino!

Some great photos in the morning but 99.99% are the bed runners.
Many had a smile on their face when a group [ and not young ones ] were told @ Ruitelan over dinner the singing will awake you and then the doors are opened.
Just little smiles and a wink over raised tinto.

Allow 36-43 days and its a wonderful experience with no pressure............you will get that on your return home.
The noise i can't stand at home is the phone ringing , especially around dinner or when reading a book...............so imagine travelling around the world for a walk and having the same apps that we left behind ...........can't believe them mate to be honest.
 

Yodapsy

Rob Blinn
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances July 2013, Planning July 2018 Camino Portugues.
I think you are 100% correct Rebekah,
We found no early risers on the Norte until some spanish girls left @ 5.00am seeking a bed at Miraz.
They got there very early , got reprimanded and were given jobs cleaning .
They were then @ noon given beds with the rest of the pilgrims .
They apologised to all over the day and we realised they had only started in Ribadeo .

LOL!:D There is something very satisfying in this. I was at a yoga retreat once and the leader had me clean up around the center. She called this "Karma Yoga." It sounds like some good karma yoga was happening on the Norte!:):)
 
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2022
I fell into a group which consistently liked to sleep late. We found that people who arose early tended to leave things behind in the albergues. Most early risers were very quiet and polite, but it only takes one noisy person to wake everyone up.
Learned that even if the early risers were up by 0500, they were pretty much out by 0600. This meant a surprising amount of "quiet time" ocurred at about 0600, 0630, so often there was another quiet half hour/hour of sleep to be had. Plus, the bathrooms were emptier, less of an undercurrent of frantic "gotta get out the door!!!"
I used an eye mask to keep out the morning sun and any lights that had been turned on (by that one inconsiderate peregrino/a). I only stayed at one albergue which had the rule that no one left before a certain time, but it was bliss!
I didn't have trouble finding a bed at the end of my day. In May/June, heat and cold were consistently inconsistent and unpredictable.
My advice, do your Camino your way. Sleep in and enjoy the quiet solitude if you are a late riser. Enjoy the sunrise if you are an early bird (but don't fault those of us who bury our heads deeper into our sleeping bags as you finish packing in the a.m.). It's your Camino. Be considerate of everyone and drink in the morning air, whatever hour.
 

fortview

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino frances Sept/oct 2012 , Salvador, Primitivo 2013
Cotswold Way July 2014
European Peace Walk August 2014 (John)
Alex, a hospitalero, in a truly great albergue , Bodenaya, on the Primitivo, had a wonderful solution.
At dinner, there was a discussion with everyone to come to an agreement about the time we would get up. 7 am was agreed. Alex then woke us up with music, and breakfast was served 10 mins later:)

Obviously this wouldn't work everywhere, in every albergue, but it was very civilised!
 

Stephen Nicholls

Steve Nicholls, Suffolk, U.K.
Past OR future Camino
Too many caminos to list in the permitted 100 characters!!
Alex, a hospitalero, in a truly great albergue , Bodenaya, on the Primitivo, had a wonderful solution.
At dinner, there was a discussion with everyone to come to an agreement about the time we would get up. 7 am was agreed. Alex then woke us up with music, and breakfast was served 10 mins later:)
Obviously this wouldn't work everywhere, in every albergue, but it was very civilised!
Crumbs! That sounds better than being at home! :)
 

kmrice

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Santiago - Fisterra 2008
St. Jean Pied de Port - Santiago 2013
On a clear day on the Meseta (the only kind we had last month) the stars can be spectacular before dawn. Orion seemed to be beckoning us. We also enjoyed the sensation of the sun slowing starting to warm us up as it rose. I wouldn't recommend walking in the dark on roads or difficult terrain, but we found leaving early in the Meseta gave us an hour or so of very enjoyable walking, and allowed us to reduce the time spent in the very hot mid-day by a like amount.

Karl
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
I remember a young couple from Germany who told me one night at dinner that there are pilgrims who walk the Camino at night guided by the stars and moon. I took the bait up to the point they finally told me those pilgrims receive a Compostela printed on a piece of black paper.
 
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wayfarer

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
2012
Don't like the idea of locked doors!!.........Vicrev
While we walked to Finisterra last year we stayed in a very new Hostal, we were told breakfast would be at seven am so we were down at about 07.10 and found the place in darkness so we decided to leave but could not as all the doors were locked. The son of the people who owned the hostal strolled in at 07.30 and was a little surprised when we weren't staying for desayuno. I said nothing to him about the doors but was a bit miffed, what if there had been a fire????
 
While we walked to Finisterra last year we stayed in a very new Hostal, we were told breakfast would be at seven am so we were down at about 07.10 and found the place in darkness so we decided to leave but could not as all the doors were locked. The son of the people who owned the hostal strolled in at 07.30 and was a little surprised when we weren't staying for desayuno. I said nothing to him about the doors but was a bit miffed, what if there had been a fire????
Yikes! I just "watched" that episode on CSI! The bar was locked and a fire broke out! Ugly!:eek:
 

piogaw

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino frances (05/06 2012) sjpdp-sdc; vdlp/camino sanabrea (02/03 2013) sevilla-sdc; hospitalero sdc june 2013, august-september 2013; caminho portugues (03 2014) lisboa-sdc
I hope the albergues that lock their doors at night have emergency exit for evacuation in case of fire. The albergue that i worked as a hospitalero in santiago have emergency exits that are clearly marked in case of emergency.

I also hope at least they have some exits for peregrinos to get out instead of being complacent waiting for something to happen before taking any action. I noticed when walking the camino frances and vdlp, everytime i registered into a public or private albergue. nothing was ever mentioned whether there are emergency exits or if so, where the locations are located.

I wish everyone a safe buen camino and also be safety concious. God bless you all.
 
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I hope the albergues that lock their doors at night have emergency exit for evacuation in case of fire. The albergue that i worked as a hospitalero in santiago have emergency exits that are clearly marked in case of emergency.

I also hope at least they have some exits for peregrinos to get out instead of being complacent waiting for something to happen before taking any action. I noticed when walking the camino frances and vdlp, everytime i registered into a public or private albergue. nothing was ever mentioned whether there are emergency exits or if so, where the locations are located.

I wish everyone a sage buen camino and also be safety concious. God bless you all.
Something to ask when we check in....
 

lucindasculptor

New Member
Past OR future Camino
october 2013
I'm walking on the camino del norte now. Sunrise is around 8 am. People in the alburgues start to rustle around 7:20 in the morning and are out the door at 8 or 8:15. We don't get walking til after a nice coffee and a tortilla with baguette. ..around 9 am. We get to the alburgue around 5 pm or 6 with time to explore, wash clothes, eat dinner and relax.
 
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dougfitz

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
I must admit that I assumed that there would be fire or emergency safety laws at some level of Spanish, regional or municipal government that would apply to albergues. I cannot see that these would allow for the circumstance where people might be locked into a building during an emergency. Does anyone know what building regulations are applied to albergues?
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I must admit that I assumed that there would be fire or emergency safety laws at some level of Spanish, regional or municipal government that would apply to albergues. I cannot see that these would allow for the circumstance where people might be locked into a building during an emergency. Does anyone know what building regulations are applied to albergues?

I'm with you, Doug, I cannot believe that it's lawful to leave people locked inside an albergue, yet it has happened to me more than once, and annie had the same experience in a pension this summer: http://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/no-fire-laws-in-madrid.19414/#post-144495
 
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MendiWalker

Guest
It´s illegal to lock the doors of an albergue as it is illegal to lock the front door of a block of flats as well in Spain. Unfortunately in some blocks of flats neighbors do it and from what I´ve seen posted here it happens in some albergues as well.

Buen Camino!
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Past OR future Camino
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
I must confess: I am a very late sleeper: I love to sleep long. I was infuriated by the early risers at the beginning of my first camino, but I learned after some days to get up early, enjoy the sunrise, walk before it got too hot, and have a lazy afternoon in the next albergue. So I must admit I am biased: I want to sleep, but I see the advantages of getting up early. Now, I do not mean 4.30 :) but 6.00 is OK with me. I thoroughly enjoyed the sunrises on the trail.
 

jirit

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances 2007,
Via Francigena Italy, 2008,
Jakobsweg Austria 2010,
Camino Frances 2011,
Le Puy to Lourdes 2012,
Via de la Plata 2013,
Future:
Ökumenischer (Via Regia), Germany,
Lycian Way, Turkey
I refused to stay at an albergue in Villafranca del Bierzo, because their policy was to keep the doors locked until 7.00 am.

I looked around and saw old timber floors and ceilings and decided to leave. The fact that the. alberque itself was run down did not help matters.

I would learn much later that this albergue had been built on the site of an older albergue that had previously burnt down (not once but supposedly 3 times).

One should not assume that laws that may exist at home, exist in other places. The only law that makes sense is your common sense.
 
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getter

New Member
Past OR future Camino
French way 2013
I walked Camino this year in August. Everyday were the last who left the albergue and started like eight. Yes, it is hot and sometimes hard but for me perfect. I took my time, visited churches and had some nice breaks on the way. So I would recommend also for you this. Just enjoy and don't think about the early roosters. I was all the time so annoyed of the people who woke up at six or earlier and started packing the bag in the sleeping area. If you want to wake up early just be respectful with the others. And about walking with the sun. You know what does not kill makes you stronger and I have to say that I have some crazy and amazing memories about walking under the sun. My biggest recommendation is that but away your book and just walk, don't think about how others are walking the Way - just take your time and make it yours.
 

Thornley

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances x 2 , Norte x 2 , Le Puy x 3 , Portuguese x 2,
Mont St Michel , Primitivo .
I walked Camino this year in August. Everyday were the last who left the albergue and started like eight. Yes, it is hot and sometimes hard but for me perfect. I took my time, visited churches and had some nice breaks on the way. So I would recommend also for you this. Just enjoy and don't think about the early roosters. I was all the time so annoyed of the people who woke up at six or earlier and started packing the bag in the sleeping area. If you want to wake up early just be respectful with the others. And about walking with the sun. You know what does not kill makes you stronger and I have to say that I have some crazy and amazing memories about walking under the sun. My biggest recommendation is that but away your book and just walk, don't think about how others are walking the Way - just take your time and make it yours.

Wonderful comments Getter.
And NOBODY would have had a better walk than you .
 

jennyb

Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances [May 2012]
VDLP (September 2015)
Hola, I walked the Camino Frances in May last year from SJPDP to SDC. I am an early riser and prefered to walk at sunrise which meant getting up in the dark. I always tried to keep the noise of rustling sleeping bag and clothes down and would pack my gear outside if possible. In the beginning, I would worry about not getting a bed, but I soon calmed down. The Camino provides, when albergues are completo, most hospitaleros would find or advise of other places still available. At one place the albergue was full, so the sport hall was opened for pilgrims, or there was a choice of being taxied at no charge to a private albergue off the route. My problems with finding a bed was that I always seemed to get the TOP bunk - not easy to climb at my age, especially if there is no ladder. One time, I had the top bunk on a 3 tier bunk bed!
To Rebekah Scott - I would love to meet you - I am planning to walk the Camino next year in September. Please tell me where you are. It would be great to meet a lot of you in person!
Buen Camino to new pilgrim - the WAY is yours!
 

Jane Erasmus

Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances ('14)
Portuguese ('17)
Ingles ('17)
Muxia/Finisterre ( 14 & '17 & '18)
Del Norte ('18)
I am not sure if pilgrims are racing or the sun is setting earlier or what, but in the eight years I have walked my dogs on the camino in the morning, the pilgrims themselves have changed.
There are notably more pilgrims out there now.
We always greet the pilgrims we pass. We always have.
Pilgrims used to consistently greet us back. They´d hunker down to talk with the dogs, chat with us, even sometimes come home for a coffee.
Nowadays a large number of them are utterly engaged in whatever is playing on their earphones, or what their companions are saying. They do not respond to us. The ones not plugged-in usually still say hello, and they occasionally slow down if a dog asks them directly for a pat on the head.
But most pilgrims we see nowadays are obviously in a hurry to get somewhere. They don´t stop and chat.
And if you don´t stop and chat, you don´t get coffee.

Maybe it´s not the pilgrims. Maybe it´s us... or our vast pack of ill-assorted curs!

I do hope to meet up with you and your dogs and maybe even for a cup of coffee... :) I will be walking un-plugged and at the speed that suits me...slow...and plan to enjoy every step of this journey. I plan to be walking in September 2014 :) :)
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
Likewise for me Rebekah, you are going to find me on your doorstep around 28 June next year. I just had coffee with MS yesterday in Bayonne before she started her 9th Camino and we had a wonderful conversation. I grew up in Cincinnati so we have some common Ohio roots, since leaving there in the 60's I have seen much to much of the world.
 
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I walked Camino this year in August. Everyday were the last who left the albergue and started like eight. Yes, it is hot and sometimes hard but for me perfect. I took my time, visited churches and had some nice breaks on the way. So I would recommend also for you this. Just enjoy and don't think about the early roosters. I was all the time so annoyed of the people who woke up at six or earlier and started packing the bag in the sleeping area. If you want to wake up early just be respectful with the others. And about walking with the sun. You know what does not kill makes you stronger and I have to say that I have some crazy and amazing memories about walking under the sun. My biggest recommendation is that but away your book and just walk, don't think about how others are walking the Way - just take your time and make it yours.

Very good! I shall take your advice!!:D
 

robinflight

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances from SJPDP to Santiago, Sept-Oct. 2013
I may unwittingly throw a bit of a wrench in the mix as I have a slightly different opinion than some expressed. I just returned home from my first completed Camino a few days ago. I started in SJPDP, France on Sept. 4th and finished in Santiago on Oct. 11. I was told by many a hospitalero that this September was the busiest month in memory, even busier than July and August. There was indeed a bed race that most people found stressful. I had to work with myself to "walk my own camino, at my own pace" and not get caught up in this. One day I walked with a fair bit of knee pain and I limped into Villamayor de Jardin in the late afternoon. I truly could not go any further. I got the last mattress on the floor in the albergue's entryway where everyone took their shoes off (hey, I was happy for a bed!) but I watched with heaviness in my heart as those who arrived after me had to either walk to the next town or take a taxi.

After this experience I ended up walking for a few days with a woman from the Basque region of Spain. She refused to stress and made reservations each night at private albergues. A Spanish man I walked with did this as well. There is a debate about this on the camino, as many of you know. This Spanish man got into a big of an argument with others who felt that making reservations went against the spirit of the camino (they ended the debate by having a beer together, so all was well). Still, it was so crowded in early September, especially from France into the mid-Meseta area, that many people made reservations. Things lightened up after Leon, strangely enough. Even after Sarria, there was not as much of a race as I experienced at the beginning of the camino.

It makes me sad that Rebekah said that many pilgrims now pass by, plugged into their headphones, without saying hello. For me, one of the best parts of my camino experience was connecting with others, locals and pilgrims alike.
 
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whariwharangi

Guest
One should not assume that laws that may exist at home, exist in other places. The only law that makes sense is your common sense.

I would suggest that common sense is that you don't get up in the wee hours of the morning and unintentionally wake everyone up. Anyone with common sense reasonably would know that this is not socially acceptable behavior.

I liked the albergues that locked the doors as a means of prevention. But as pointed out there is a safety issue that needs to be addressed. I assumed there was an emergency exit or exit plan in these places but admit I didn't check it out. Plan B is to break a window; acceptable in emergency but not acceptable for leaving early.
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Past OR future Camino
Many, various, and continuing.
A word to people who want to stop in or stay here: Remind me you are coming once you get into the neighborhood, because I will not remember very far in advance.
I live in the present.
Just ask anyone who´s heard me speak Spanish.

We won´t lock you in, but if you get up at an ungodly hour you will not get breakfast eggs still warm from the hens. (they are sensible about waking hours.)
The clothes you leave on the line will still be damp. Or you will forget they are there because you can´t see them. Or you will take someone else´s socks.
The dogs will bark at you. Even if you are vewy vewy quiet, they will bark and wake up the entire village.
You will not see coffee for another nine kilometers.
 

NicoZ

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2013
I would suggest that common sense is that you don't get up in the wee hours of the morning and unintentionally wake everyone up. Anyone with common sense reasonably would know that this is not socially acceptable behavior.

What's wee? Some people think sleeping until sunrise is wasting the whole day.

The problem with threads like this is people have different ideas of "normal".
 
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Thornley

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances x 2 , Norte x 2 , Le Puy x 3 , Portuguese x 2,
Mont St Michel , Primitivo .
What's wee? Some people think sleeping until sunrise is wasting the whole day.

The problem with threads like this is people have different ideas of "normal".

You are correct Nico in relation to whats normal.
Yet if very person on the camino had regard for others there would be no early wakers.

On various walks [ Le Put/Norte etc] in some abodes people were placed in rooms according to their * when will i start.
Maybe this should happen in some albergues ............not the big ones.......impossible......but others ??
Common sense to ask.....what time do you rise .....
Good .....you are in with your mates............room >>>>>

QE can then all sleep,
 

Al the optimist

Veteran Member
I am fortunate. My Caminos have made me an even more relaxed person than before and so I am quite laid back about the behaviour of others in the mornings. I never (after a bad pre dawn experience) walk in the dark. I let others get on with it and am usually one of the last out of bed. Yes, the bathrooms are less crowded then. I have a few advantages though. I am blind in one eye;) so I sleep on the other side. Result? No light flashing worries me! I am hard of hearing. I take my hearing aids out. Result? Things are quieter (not silent though). I also have a poor sense of smell. Result? Someone overindulging on el vino tinto doesn't bother me either! Boy I was purpose built for albergue life. :) I am also a quick walker. Not that I don't llok around enjoy where I am walking, just that after a few days my legs have a life of their own and I just go with the flow. So even though I start later (usually 7 -7:30) I end up there with the rest for lunch. (Except the day I for some reason got too carried away and walked 68K into Muxia). All in all, each to their own, everyone has to do it their own way I think.
 
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whariwharangi

Guest
What's wee? Some people think sleeping until sunrise is wasting the whole day.

The problem with threads like this is people have different ideas of "normal".

"Wee" Check your dictionary. If I merely told you, you'd forget.

We're not talking 'normal' ... we are talking about common courtesy, a standard of conduct deemed to have the least effect on others.

And if you don't want to adhere to common standards of conduct then I would encourage you to make other plans for your accomodation .... one where you don't risk ruining everyone elses day in pursuit of not wasting your day.
 

AikidoSteve

New Member
I am an infrequent lurker on this forum and almost never a responder but this topic is so dear to me that I feel the need to reply.

One of my discoveries on my first (of two caminos) was my love of the dark. I never felt the need to race for a bed in either October or June but my very favorite part of the day was the hour before sunrise. To begin walking in the dark of night and to experience the world waking up is one of the very best parts of my camino experience. I insisted upon solitude for this part of the day and would stop sometime after sunrise for a cup of coffee and chocolate croissant and wait for my traveling companion(s) to join me for the day.

My preparation was to pack the night before and to organize my gear so I could quietly carry it all outside and get started without waking others. My alarm was set to vibrate and not ring. It really bothered me when others would be up at the same time and inconsiderately wake the whole albergue. It also really bugged me to be walking in peaceful solitude in the darkness only to feel intruded upon by others with headlamps or engaged in conversation. Yes, this was my own issue to deal with and I spent a lot of time practicing patience and forgiveness and learning to turn off my voice of judgement.

This past June, I took my love of the darkness to another level when I did a solo night walk under the full moon on the meseta. I began walking at 1am and walked through until mid-day the following day. I saw no one except an occasional owl and experienced the world in a very different way. Walking through sleeping villages, finding my way by moonlight, noticing and releasing the occasional fear, and feeling immense awe and gratitude for the gifts of darkness, solitude and life. For me, it doesn't get much better. The journey is, after all, a spiritual pilgrimage - at least for me it is - and part of that experience is best found in darkness and solitude. So, yes perhaps I did travel all the way to Spain to miss some of the scenery while walking in the darkness but what I found in that darkness was far more precious and far more important to my soul.

So, please, when you see me in the future walking before sunrise, please suspend your judgements of me. I am not racing for a bed; I am experiencing the camino in a way that is most meaningful for me.
 
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SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999, now living in Santiago de C
Past OR future Camino
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Santiago - Muxia 2019

Now: http://egeria.house/
I agree, wonderful post AikidoSteve, stop lurking please and share more of your thoughts! SY
 

NicoZ

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2013
.

And if you don't want to adhere to common standards of conduct then I would encourage you to make other plans for your accomodation .... one where you don't risk ruining everyone elses day in pursuit of not wasting your day.

Common courtesty would require you to get up and not force everybody else to wait for you. The idea that you're able to decree the correct time for people to wake up is interesting.
 

Dan

Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances 2013
Le Puy 2014
Pennine Way 2015
Del Norte 2016
Arles Route 2018
Way St Francis 2019
>>but my very favorite part of the day was the hour before sunrise. To begin walking in the dark of night and to experience the world waking up is one of the very best parts of my camino experience<<
exactly! the first calls of the cuckoo ... the rolling clouds revealing the peaks below as we walk above them in Galicia ... don't miss it

>>My preparation was to pack the night before and to organize my gear so I could quietly carry it all outside and get started without waking others. My alarm was set to vibrate and not ring. It really bothered me when others would be up at the same time and inconsiderately wake the whole albergue<<

vital on two fronts: you won't stuff it up in the dark - and it's good manners

>>I did a solo night walk under the full moon on the meseta<<
Wow! what a marvellous thing to do.
 
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Al the optimist

Veteran Member
Lovely post about walking at night. Personally I only ever started before dawn once on the Ingles, foolishly thinking it would be pre dawn light by the time I reached the end of town. I found myself in a forest walking by moonlight and trying to find markers using the light on my mobile. Like I say, foolish and never again. Besides which I like to let everyone else get on with it first.
 

Thornley

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances x 2 , Norte x 2 , Le Puy x 3 , Portuguese x 2,
Mont St Michel , Primitivo .
Mesata , full moon , the only safe place.
A wonderful post Dan.

Are you sure it was a cuckoo mate??
Don't answer , have a red and a smile.
 
M

MendiWalker

Guest
Lovely post about walking at night. Personally I only ever started before dawn once on the Ingles, foolishly thinking it would be pre dawn light by the time I reached the end of town. I found myself in a forest walking by moonlight and trying to find markers using the light on my mobile. Like I say, foolish and never again. Besides which I like to let everyone else get on with it first.

Wispers to Al............... They suffered the same fate as you did but they just don´t want to admit it.;)

Wait till the town authorities have laid out the pavement for the day. Enjoy the sights as you walk in daylight.:)

Buen Camino!
 

wayfarer

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
2012
Lovely post about walking at night. Personally I only ever started before dawn once on the Ingles, foolishly thinking it would be pre dawn light by the time I reached the end of town. I found myself in a forest walking by moonlight and trying to find markers using the light on my mobile. Like I say, foolish and never again. Besides which I like to let everyone else get on with it first.
Happened us twice this year, got up early to have breakfast and walk while it was still cool only to find no place open for breakfast so started to walk in the dark, found ourselves in a forest looking for markers with the light on the mobile. Good laugh, but I would not try and repeat it.
 
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mikevasey

Guest
I have heard of a few people walking on the Frances at night, its that whole thing about following the Milky Way and the association with this Camino. Someone who was in my camino group on the Frances started doing it on the Meseta almost by accident,he arrived at Hornillos quite late, this was mid November and realised the albergue was not for him, so he walked on in the dark, he started walking at night after that, I do not have the cojones for it, maybe on my next time on the Frances.
 
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LTfit

Veteran Member
I had two lovely night walks although neither were planned. I arrived in Pedrouzo July 2010 to a town packed with pilgrims. It was Holy Year and there was not a bed to be had so the authorities opened up a polideportivo. I had neither a mat nor a sleeping bag but a nice Frenchman gave me his mat and so with hundreds camped on the gym floor I tried to sleep. I tossed and turned and woke up so many times that I got up and at 3.30 a.m. made my way to Santiago. What a magical walk that was! I arrived at Monte de Gozo right before sunrise and as the sun came up I walked into Santiago...
The second time was the final day of my first Camino. I had slept at the wonderful albergue San Roque in Corbubión only 16 km from Finisterre. Once again I had problems sleeping so I got up and was out by 4.30 or 5.00 a.m. I had a head lamp and so was not concerned. Until about 10 minutes into my walk when the battery died. It had already lasted me almost 900 km! But to the light of a full moon (true!) I made my way to Finisterre. Sometimes walking in the dark can be a blessing.
 

Homer-Dog

Member
Many bad stories begin with Ï left the Albergue before dawn and I missed an arrow ...¨ I prefer leaving shortly after dawn (1/2 hr before sunrise) so I have enough light to see but still get to see the wonderful sunrises.
 

Pieces

Veteran Member
I have walked nights, or extremely early mornings. Left San Bol at just before four and loved it, this was probably the earliest except when leaving Burgos. I think everyone should do at least one really early just for the experience :p
 

Icacos

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2013)
...............This past June, I took my love of the darkness to another level when I did a solo night walk under the full moon on the meseta. I began walking at 1am and walked through until mid-day the following day. I saw no one except an occasional owl and experienced the world in a very different way. Walking through sleeping villages, finding my way by moonlight, noticing and releasing the occasional fear, and feeling immense awe and gratitude for the gifts of darkness, solitude and life. For me, it doesn't get much better. The journey is, after all, a spiritual pilgrimage - at least for me it is - and part of that experience is best found in darkness and solitude. So, yes perhaps I did travel all the way to Spain to miss some of the scenery while walking in the darkness but what I found in that darkness was far more precious and far more important to my soul.

So, please, when you see me in the future walking before sunrise, please suspend your judgements of me. I am not racing for a bed; I am experiencing the camino in a way that is most meaningful for me.
Thank you, Aikidosteve, for putting this so beautifully; it is wonderful to read. Particularly so, because this past April after I’d started my Camino, I realized that there was to be a full moon towards the end of the month (the 25th I think) when my companions and I expected to be on the meseta. I couldn’t imagine anything more magical, and soothing, than walking in the open under a full moon, and I immediately put the idea to my companions – both women. I had serious plans to make this work. Alas, it was not to be. By the time the 25th rolled around, I had left my companions walking on the meseta, and gone ahead to Leon to nurse the tendinitis in my leg. (I doubt if my proposed walk would have come to pass anyway because, as I heard it, the weather on the meseta at that time was horrendous). It is so good now to read of your experience this past June.

It would have been wonderful to have done this walk under the full moon – a 1:00 a.m. start sounds good. You speak of doing your walk in solitude, and “noticing and releasing the occasional fear”. Yes, solitude would be ideal, but I don’t think that, as a woman, I would feel at all comfortable heading out on my own at night, no matter how much light the moon provided.

If I were to be fortunate enough to be on the meseta again during a full moon, or anywhere on the Camino for that matter, I wonder if there might be other like-minded, solo peregrinas who would relish the idea, and yearn to have a moon-lit walk, but who might fear being completely alone out there. Perhaps we could agree to accompany each other, but still allow each her ‘space’, so each could have the ‘solitary’ experience. Are there other women out there who feel the same way I do? I know that pilgrims look after each other, but …… dare I ask you men if you would remain within shouting distance in such a situation?
 
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NoQ

Guest
This July we hit Hornillos around the full moon. While we stayed at the new albergue, many pilgrims who were staying in the muni had decided to walk the next stage by moonlight, so napped during the afternoon and early evening and set off before midnight. We met some of them again the next day and they were far less enthusiastic. While they reported the walk as being cool and comfortable, with no problems finding the route, they were bushed the next day having been up all night and then just sitting in the heat outside the albergue for ages, waiting until it opened. A couple of days later one of these pilgrims told us his body clock was still just about recovering and he also admitted that it wasn't that great as he had walked with quite a lot of people and didn't really feel any magic, just chatter.
 
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MendiWalker

Guest
This July we hit Hornillos around the full moon. While we stayed at the new albergue, many pilgrims who were staying in the muni had decided to walk the next stage by moonlight, so napped during the afternoon and early evening and set off before midnight. We met some of them again the next day and they were far less enthusiastic. While they reported the walk as being cool and comfortable, with no problems finding the route, they were bushed the next day having been up all night and then just sitting in the heat outside the albergue for ages, waiting until it opened. A couple of days later one of these pilgrims told us his body clock was still just about recovering and he also admitted that it wasn't that great as he had walked with quite a lot of people and didn't really feel any magic, just chatter.

Not only that but you miss all the sights worth seeing. But as the old Spanish saying goes ……………………….. - "Sarna con gusto no pica, mortifica!";)

Buen Camino!
 

hieudovan

DoVanHieu
Past OR future Camino
2021
I got a wonderful T-shirt in Berlin a few years ago inscribed "The late worm escapes the early bird." Priceless.
Actually it's the LATE worms that get eaten by the early birds. The other worms had gone to bed before the sun rises : )

Back to the topic at hand, I started the CF on April 1, 2012, from SJPDP and walked to Finisterre and Muxia. I usually left at 8 am and slept in public alberges almost every night for the whole camino.

Buen camino,

Hieu
 

Laliibeans

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2014)
Aikidosteve, I totally agree and thank you for sharing that. One of the best feelings in the world to me is to wake and go outside to watch the world wake up, as you say. Watching the colour slowly seep into everything and the mist clear away is heaven, and hearing the sounds of the day begin. Above all, the smell in the air of the fresh dawn is the most invigorating thing for me.

In the fine words of Bon Jovi: I'll sleep when I'm dead.

And I'm not a noisy morning person, I have absolute respect for others who prefer to sleep later, but I'm not going to lie awake counting the precious minutes of my life ticking by just so someone else can sleep their's away.
 

Icacos

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2013)
Thank you very much everyone for your responses re walking in the moonlight / early morning. I’ll admit that some decent sleep is crucial prior to setting off, if one is to get through the following day in any fit state - a 4:30 – 5:00 a.m. should be manageable for me on a moonlit night. And, of course, I would stay in private accommodation so as not to disturb my fellow pilgrims at such an early hour. Plus ….. the absence of chatter ……well, that is still a difficulty.

I’ve heard many arguments against an early morning start and missing all the sights worth seeing, however (and speaking of Bon Jovi) here are some other fine words: [from his song Bang a Drum]

But I'm gonna die believin'
Each step that I take
Ain't worth the ground that
I walk on
If we don't walk it our
Own way​

We may be in a small minority, but I am pleased to be among those few who seem to be blessed with the ability to enjoy the sights without the benefit of daylight :):):)
 
Last edited:

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Past OR future Camino
Many, various, and continuing.
Hospitalera here. Nightwalkers occasionally show up at the door after sunup, looking a bit worse for wear. We usually give them a bed if we don´t have plans to go shopping that day. But they have to tolerate without complaint all the racket we make cleaning up the place and getting on with the day they are sleeping through. Somehow, they always manage to revive in time for lunch! :rolleyes:
 
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SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999, now living in Santiago de C
Past OR future Camino
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Santiago - Muxia 2019

Now: http://egeria.house/
May Santiago bless you Rebekah! SY

Hospitalera here. Nightwalkers occasionally show up at the door after sunup, looking a bit worse for wear. We usually give them a bed if we don´t have plans to go shopping that day. But they have to tolerate without complaint all the racket we make cleaning up the place and getting on with the day they are sleeping through. Somehow, they always manage to revive in time for lunch! :rolleyes:
 

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