Search 58,412 Camino Questions

A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it


Advertisement
Camino Cups
Browse our selection of Camino Cups on the forum store
Learn how to Get "Camino Ready " 2nd Edition. In English, Spanish, German and Korean

Le Puy or Not Le Puy?

HappyValerie

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Le Puy to SJPP(or however far I get) (2020)
I walked from SJPP to Santiago in Autumn of 2018 and loved it!!! I am Caminoing again, flying out of Sydney in 7 and a half weeks' time . I am undecided whether to walk from Le Puy to SJPP, or to walk Camino Frances again staying in different places and enjoying Springtime.
Pros: I will enjoying reviving my schoolgirl French from quite a few decades ago; the scenery sounds exquisite: and it will be experiencing a different part of the Camino world. Also the Pilgrim ceremony to farewell pilgrims in Le Puy sounds like a lovely start & way to meet fellow pilgrims straight away.
Cons: It seems that it may not be as well marked, and may intertwine with a regular main bushwalking trail; I have to "listen to my body" re when to stop for the day ( My research suggests there are less gites/albergues & it is recommended to book accommodation two nights ahead); and that the cost of living in France is quite a bit more than Spain which can add up over 5-6 weeks.
I am spending a week in Germany first, catching up with peregrinos from last camino, and have nothing booked after that except my flight home from Madrid mid-June.

Suggestions welcome :)

PS. I read heaps & heaps of forum threads, & listen to Camino podcasts as I go for walks around the streets near my home. The countdown is on. I just want to refine my research.
 
Camino Way Markers
Original Camino Way markers made in bronze. Two models, one from Castilla & Leon and the other from Galicia.
Camino Maps
A collection of Camino Maps from the Camino Forum Store

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999, now living in Santiago de C
Past OR future Camino
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Santiago - Muxia 2019

Now: http://egeria.house/
I walked the Le Puy route in 2014 and found it very well marked, also I only booked max one day ahead and never run into a problem finding a bed and yes, France is a bit more expensive than Spain ;-) Also, I recommend the MiamMiam DoDo guide, you can buy it in Le Puy, it contains all you need to know about the route.
BC SY
 

HappyValerie

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Le Puy to SJPP(or however far I get) (2020)
Thank you for your prompt reply. Last year I delved into the Le Puy route quite extensively, then baulked for some reason and felt more comfortable with doing Camino Frances again. I am not sure which route is calling me. I want to walk as pilgrim, not just a bushwalker, & especially loved when I found Christian albergues.
 

Glenshiro

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Le Puy - León, Camino Frances (2012 - 2019)
The Puy route is different from the CF:
  • Far fewer other walkers
  • Long distances between services (you'll need to carry your lunch)
  • Few native English speakers - you'll need a smattering of French
  • Occasionally challenging terrain (I recommend a good pair of boots)
  • Beautiful, unspoilt scenery
  • Very pretty towns and villages
  • Really good food, with regional variations
  • Well waymarked
  • Friendly, hospitable people
It depends on what you're looking for - if you will be walking alone and want more or less constant company, it's not for you. If you like walking alone (not all the time - there will be other pelerins) and are comfortable in your own company, you'll love it.
I recommend starting from Le Puy as opposed to further along, as the first half is the more scenic. I enjoyed walking (Caminoing?!! - is there no noun that cannot be verbed?) this route and hope to do it again, DV.
 
Last edited:

AJGuillaume

Pèlerin du monde
Past OR future Camino
Via Gebennensis (2018)
Via Podiensis (2018)
Voie Nive Bidassoa (2018)
Camino Del Norte (2018)
We walked the Le Puy route in 2018 (as part of a 2178km walk from Switzerland to SdC).
We haven't walked the CF, so cannot compare, but we did walk the Camino del Norte.
We averaged 16km per day on the Voie du Puy, and we loved it. Very picturesque, beautiful little villages and towns. Often we would start walking with a picnic 'basket' provided by the host, and if not, there were plenty of places where we could buy bread (you'll love French bread) and other items for lunch. We stayed in a mix of accommodation, and you shouldn't have any problems with finding a bed. As @SYates suggested, buy the Miam Miam Dodo guide.
Your schoolgirl French will be enough to open doors, and it will be in very rare cases that no one would be able to understand English.
Bon chemin!
 
Donation to the Forum
A donation to this forum helps it continue to exists and also removes all ads for you.
Camino Magnets
A collection of Camino Fridge Magnets

OxFyrd

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Portuguese 2018, voie d'Arles 2019 (Arles -Santiago)
Scheduled : Le Puy-Bilbao - Primitivo
Hi,

as usual it depends ... But please take care to the weather.. In April, winter did not end in Velay and Aubrac. This means that snow may happen. Paradoxically, it is not uncommon to have very good weather for a week with very pleasant temperatures during the day. Night frosts are frequent above 800 m.

Do not compare to CF except if you made it winter...
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Past OR future Camino
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I walked the Frances twice and then chose the Le Puy route the following year in June of 2018. They have very few similarities; both are unique and lovely, but are very different. I always recommend the Frances as a "first" Camino, but the Le Puy is very beautiful. Whatever one you choose will be a win!
 

TMcA

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Pamplona to Santiago (2013)
Le Puy to Pamplona in segments (2013 - 2016)
Pamplona to León
PS. I read heaps & heaps of forum threads, & listen to Camino podcasts as I go for walks around the streets near my home. The countdown is on. I just want to refine my research.
[/QUOTE]


If you decide on the Voie du Puy, brush up on your French using some of that "spare" time. And one cautionary note...

7 and a half weeks from now is not even the middle of April and there might be snow on the Plateau d'Aubrac. The weather on this part of the route will be variable, same as it would be on the CF at that time of year. Just something to consider. I loved this route and have walked the early parts twice.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
I walked in 2014 as did Sally Yates. It is a completely different experience than the CF. As others have said much fewer pilgrims. The Pilgrims are, for the most part retired or close to retirement. I met less than 5 young Pilgrims the whole way. Most pilgrims are also French. There seemed to be a good number of German Pilgrims but predominately French. Virtually no one speaks anything but French and I have 0 French. I never felt alone or left out though. There were many days I saw either just a few pilgrims or none at all. The scenery to me, overall was much nicer than the CF and you don't walk through any large cities as you do on the CF. I had the Michelin guide and I found that to be almost useless. I do not know if it has improved in 6 years. As Ms Yates stated, and I agree but the Miam Miam Dodo guide. It was suggested to me in the Pilgrim office in Paris and I said no because it is all in French. I realized much later even with no French I could have easily navigated the guide. I had no French phrasebook or smartphone but people were very helpful and give owners would call for a reservation for me for the next night if I asked.
When I walked it was probably about 20% more expensive especially in the GItes. I was paying about 30 Euros a night then (2014) but was sleeping either in small rooms with a few pilgrims and I do not remember ever seeing a bunk bed. For that price I was always getting spectacular dinners every night. The best pilgrim menu in Spain never has equaled the worst Gite dinner in France. Often times I had a great breakfast also. I always thought that there was value in the price of any of the Gites I stayed at. I would always recommend taking food with you as you never know if a village you are supposed to pass (thanks to the Michelin guide, but not with Miam Miam Dodo) would have services. Even if they did, many of the village shops and cafes have very short hours that they are open in the late morning and afternoon, so always have food and plenty of water with you.
It is a completely different experience. The CF has fantastic infrastructure as you know. It is much easier to walk in terms of when you want to stop. If you are having a bad day or have a blister you almost never have to walk to far to get to another albergue. That is not the case in France.
It is really up to you. Take a look at Gronze and godesalco.com for distances as well as lists of places to stay. You don't need to carry or buy a book for either of these two as they are on the web. I am sure that Miam Miam Dodo has the most extensive lists of accommodations and villages and towns that have services. Make sure you carry enough cash with you. I don't remember alot of places that took credit cards. It is a really rural camino. Remember things have changed from my experience 6 years ago,
Buen Camino
 

Reklaw

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino de Santiago, 2011,2013, VdlP 2017
I have done both stretches twice. Yes Le Puy is dearer but much better value for money. I never had a problem sourcing lunch in France and it is right what others have said the average age of the walkers is much older than of the CF. None the less it is a lovely walk, and if the sun shines the scenery is unforgettable.
 
2022 Camino Guides
The 2022 Camino guides will be coming out little by little, most of them by the end of 2021. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
Pilgrim Pouch carry bags with different designs
A lightweight carry bag handy for walking, biking, traveling, & Caminos

NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
My first camino was from Le Puy, in 2012. It was well marked - red & white slashes, not arrows. You are not bushwacking, as I understand the term, but it is a nature trail as it follows the GR 65. It is possible to take short cuts to eliminate some of the roundabout wandering. I would wear trail runners, although most French walkers are in boots.

I never booked ahead and only once came close to not having a bed. But I was willing to stay in small hotels, pensions, & B&Bs as well as gîtes. Dinner was always wonderful, but I’m not a fan of French bread, so breakfast was usually underwhelming. Breakfast is never (or rarely) available early. Usually it isn’t served until about 8 am.

I found a mix of ages, families and nationalities on the route. French folks in southern France are happy to work with your attempts at speaking the language.

Always add Monsieur or Madame to your Bonjour when you greet people in shops etc. They are more formal than we are, and the lack of this greeting is considered rather rude.
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
I have done both stretches twice. Yes Le Puy is dearer but much better value for money. I never had a problem sourcing lunch in France and it is right what others have said the average age of the walkers is much older than of the CF. None the less it is a lovely walk, and if the sun shines the scenery is unforgettable.
I walked from SJPP to Santiago in Autumn of 2018 and loved it!!! I am Caminoing again, flying out of Sydney in 7 and a half weeks' time . I am undecided whether to walk from Le Puy to SJPP, or to walk Camino Frances again staying in different places and enjoying Springtime.
Pros: I will enjoying reviving my schoolgirl French from quite a few decades ago; the scenery sounds exquisite: and it will be experiencing a different part of the Camino world. Also the Pilgrim ceremony to farewell pilgrims in Le Puy sounds like a lovely start & way to meet fellow pilgrims straight away.
Cons: It seems that it may not be as well marked, and may intertwine with a regular main bushwalking trail; I have to "listen to my body" re when to stop for the day ( My research suggests there are less gites/albergues & it is recommended to book accommodation two nights ahead); and that the cost of living in France is quite a bit more than Spain which can add up over 5-6 weeks.
I am spending a week in Germany first, catching up with peregrinos from last camino, and have nothing booked after that except my flight home from Madrid mid-June.

Suggestions welcome :)

PS. I read heaps & heaps of forum threads, & listen to Camino podcasts as I go for walks around the streets near my home. The countdown is on. I just want to refine my research.
I walked the Frances first, loved it and since have walked many other routes including the entire Le Puy route x 3. It remains my favourite. It is a little more expensive than Spain, but very good value for money.
We stayed in lovely gites, often had twin rooms and opted for dinner and bfast to be included. The meals were delicious 3 to 4 courses, home cooked from fresh local ingredients with wine and herb tea. We would have some cheese baguette and fruit for a picnic lunch and a beer on arrival, occasionally a coffee, if we passed a place.
Our budget was 50 Euros per day all up, but you can do it for at least 10 or 15 less, if you share forms, cook the odd meal yourself and buy a can of beer, rather than have it at a bar.
I thought it was all really good value for money.
 

Garry Collins

New Member
Past OR future Camino
2014 Frances to Santiago de Compostella
I walked from SJPP to Santiago in Autumn of 2018 and loved it!!! I am Caminoing again, flying out of Sydney in 7 and a half weeks' time . I am undecided whether to walk from Le Puy to SJPP, or to walk Camino Frances again staying in different places and enjoying Springtime.
Pros: I will enjoying reviving my schoolgirl French from quite a few decades ago; the scenery sounds exquisite: and it will be experiencing a different part of the Camino world. Also the Pilgrim ceremony to farewell pilgrims in Le Puy sounds like a lovely start & way to meet fellow pilgrims straight away.
Cons: It seems that it may not be as well marked, and may intertwine with a regular main bushwalking trail; I have to "listen to my body" re when to stop for the day ( My research suggests there are less gites/albergues & it is recommended to book accommodation two nights ahead); and that the cost of living in France is quite a bit more than Spain which can add up over 5-6 weeks.
I am spending a week in Germany first, catching up with peregrinos from last camino, and have nothing booked after that except my flight home from Madrid mid-June.

Suggestions welcome :)

PS. I read heaps & heaps of forum threads, & listen to Camino podcasts as I go for walks around the streets near my home. The countdown is on. I just want to refine my research.
I walked from SJPP to Santiago in Autumn of 2018 and loved it!!! I am Caminoing again, flying out of Sydney in 7 and a half weeks' time . I am undecided whether to walk from Le Puy to SJPP, or to walk Camino Frances again staying in different places and enjoying Springtime.
Pros: I will enjoying reviving my schoolgirl French from quite a few decades ago; the scenery sounds exquisite: and it will be experiencing a different part of the Camino world. Also the Pilgrim ceremony to farewell pilgrims in Le Puy sounds like a lovely start & way to meet fellow pilgrims straight away.
Cons: It seems that it may not be as well marked, and may intertwine with a regular main bushwalking trail; I have to "listen to my body" re when to stop for the day ( My research suggests there are less gites/albergues & it is recommended to book accommodation two nights ahead); and that the cost of living in France is quite a bit more than Spain which can add up over 5-6 weeks.
I am spending a week in Germany first, catching up with peregrinos from last camino, and have nothing booked after that except my flight home from Madrid mid-June.

Suggestions welcome :)

PS. I read heaps & heaps of forum threads, & listen to Camino podcasts as I go for walks around the streets near my home. The countdown is on. I just want to refine
I walked from SJPP to Santiago in Autumn of 2018 and loved it!!! I am Caminoing again, flying out of Sydney in 7 and a half weeks' time . I am undecided whether to walk from Le Puy to SJPP, or to walk Camino Frances again staying in different places and enjoying Springtime.
Pros: I will enjoying reviving my schoolgirl French from quite a few decades ago; the scenery sounds exquisite: and it will be experiencing a different part of the Camino world. Also the Pilgrim ceremony to farewell pilgrims in Le Puy sounds like a lovely start & way to meet fellow pilgrims straight away.
Cons: It seems that it may not be as well marked, and may intertwine with a regular main bushwalking trail; I have to "listen to my body" re when to stop for the day ( My research suggests there are less gites/albergues & it is recommended to book accommodation two nights ahead); and that the cost of living in France is quite a bit more than Spain which can add up over 5-6 weeks.
I am spending a week in Germany first, catching up with peregrinos from last camino, and have nothing booked after that except my flight home from Madrid mid-June.

Suggestions welcome :)

PS. I read heaps & heaps of forum threads, & listen to Camino podcasts as I go for walks around the streets near my home. The countdown is on. I just want to refine my research.
I walked from SJPP to Santiago in Autumn of 2018 and loved it!!! I am Caminoing again, flying out of Sydney in 7 and a half weeks' time . I am undecided whether to walk from Le Puy to SJPP, or to walk Camino Frances again staying in different places and enjoying Springtime.
Pros: I will enjoying reviving my schoolgirl French from quite a few decades ago; the scenery sounds exquisite: and it will be experiencing a different part of the Camino world. Also the Pilgrim ceremony to farewell pilgrims in Le Puy sounds like a lovely start & way to meet fellow pilgrims straight away.
Cons: It seems that it may not be as well marked, and may intertwine with a regular main bushwalking trail; I have to "listen to my body" re when to stop for the day ( My research suggests there are less gites/albergues & it is recommended to book accommodation two nights ahead); and that the cost of living in France is quite a bit more than Spain which can add up over 5-6 weeks.
I am spending a week in Germany first, catching up with peregrinos from last camino, and have nothing booked after that except my flight home from Madrid mid-June.

Suggestions welcome :)

PS. I read heaps & heaps of forum threads, & listen to Camino podcasts as I go for walks around the streets near my home. The countdown is on. I just want to refine my research.
Hello Happy Valerie,....having just walked last October Le Put to Cahors 360 k's I believe Gleshiro has domed it up perfectly .I would add that it is a very tough walk / climb up and down mountains for the walk Le Puy to Cahors. Yes more expensive too. I'm 75 and very fit carried everything I.e. 9 kg pack and what I did notice was Other Pelegrinos were having their gear transported each day at a cost of 10 Euros per item . Well that certainly made their walk a lot easier but added to the cost each day. .....Burn Camino .
..Garry from Newcastle Australia.
 

billmclaughlin

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
SJPP/Burgos 2012; Le Puy/SJPP 2013; Aumont Aubrac/Aire sur l'Adour 2014; Burgos/Santiago 2016.
I really don’t know what bushwalking means after reading this thread. You’re never off trail on this route.

I’ve done the Le Puy route twice for sport. Many French are just on vacation, but you may be surprised to find some of them emerging from Mass as I was one day.

One of the things I most enjoyed was the fact that — instead of being part of an international troop in Spain — I was one of a minority of foreigners being hosted by the French. Time and time again I was not allowed to pay for my own coffee: Vous êtes en France! they said.

All of this is colored by the fact that I’m in France at the moment, exploring Toulouse and thinking about another hike. But I know if I do hike again it will be in France.
 
Past OR future Camino
Francés : Sarria-Santiago (2013)
Via Podiensis : (2014-17)
Via Tolosana : Arles-Toulouse-(2018-19)
I really don’t know what bushwalking means after reading this thread. You’re never off trail on this route.

I’ve done the Le Puy route twice for sport. Many French are just on vacation, but you may be surprised to find some of them emerging from Mass as I was one day.

One of the things I most enjoyed was the fact that — instead of being part of an international troop in Spain — I was one of a minority of foreigners being hosted by the French. Time and time again I was not allowed to pay for my own coffee: Vous êtes en France! they said.

All of this is colored by the fact that I’m in France at the moment, exploring Toulouse and thinking about another hike. But I know if I do hike again it will be in France.
I walked from SJPP to Santiago in Autumn of 2018 and loved it!!! I am Caminoing again, flying out of Sydney in 7 and a half weeks' time . I am undecided whether to walk from Le Puy to SJPP, or to walk Camino Frances again staying in different places and enjoying Springtime.
Pros: I will enjoying reviving my schoolgirl French from quite a few decades ago; the scenery sounds exquisite: and it will be experiencing a different part of the Camino world. Also the Pilgrim ceremony to farewell pilgrims in Le Puy sounds like a lovely start & way to meet fellow pilgrims straight away.
Cons: It seems that it may not be as well marked, and may intertwine with a regular main bushwalking trail; I have to "listen to my body" re when to stop for the day ( My research suggests there are less gites/albergues & it is recommended to book accommodation two nights ahead); and that the cost of living in France is quite a bit more than Spain which can add up over 5-6 weeks.
I am spending a week in Germany first, catching up with peregrinos from last camino, and have nothing booked after that except my flight home from Madrid mid-June.

Suggestions welcome :)

PS. I read heaps & heaps of forum threads, & listen to Camino podcasts as I go for walks around the streets near my home. The countdown is on. I just want to refine my research.
 
Create your own ad
€1,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
Peaceable Projects Inc.
Peaceable Projects Inc. is a U.S.-based non-profit group that brings the vast resources of the wide world together with the ongoing needs of the people who live, work, and travel on the Camino de Santiago pilgrim trail network in Spain.

LoriLosch

Member
Past OR future Camino
Le Puy to SJPP (Sept 2018)
I walked from SJPP to Santiago in Autumn of 2018 and loved it!!! I am Caminoing again, flying out of Sydney in 7 and a half weeks' time . I am undecided whether to walk from Le Puy to SJPP, or to walk Camino Frances again staying in different places and enjoying Springtime.
Pros: I will enjoying reviving my schoolgirl French from quite a few decades ago; the scenery sounds exquisite: and it will be experiencing a different part of the Camino world. Also the Pilgrim ceremony to farewell pilgrims in Le Puy sounds like a lovely start & way to meet fellow pilgrims straight away.
Cons: It seems that it may not be as well marked, and may intertwine with a regular main bushwalking trail; I have to "listen to my body" re when to stop for the day ( My research suggests there are less gites/albergues & it is recommended to book accommodation two nights ahead); and that the cost of living in France is quite a bit more than Spain which can add up over 5-6 weeks.
I am spending a week in Germany first, catching up with peregrinos from last camino, and have nothing booked after that except my flight home from Madrid mid-June.

Suggestions welcome :)

PS. I read heaps & heaps of forum threads, & listen to Camino podcasts as I go for walks around the streets near my home. The countdown is on. I just want to refine my research.

I walked LP to SJPP solo in 2018. Loved EVERY second of it. The terrain is gorgeous. Food incredible. Trail is very well marked (I read the Miam DoDo prior to leaving, but didn’t bring any guide books with me.) I didn’t wear hiking boot ... was just fine with my Hoka One One Speedgoat 2 day hikers. I was glad I sort of speak French, because I think fewer people speak English than along the CF. I only ever booked a night in advance. I adored this route. Absolutely adored. You will love it!
 

Sarah Hughes

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Planning to do French pilgrimage route from Le Puy April 2020
I walked from SJPP to Santiago in Autumn of 2018 and loved it!!! I am Caminoing again, flying out of Sydney in 7 and a half weeks' time . I am undecided whether to walk from Le Puy to SJPP, or to walk Camino Frances again staying in different places and enjoying Springtime.
Pros: I will enjoying reviving my schoolgirl French from quite a few decades ago; the scenery sounds exquisite: and it will be experiencing a different part of the Camino world. Also the Pilgrim ceremony to farewell pilgrims in Le Puy sounds like a lovely start & way to meet fellow pilgrims straight away.
Cons: It seems that it may not be as well marked, and may intertwine with a regular main bushwalking trail; I have to "listen to my body" re when to stop for the day ( My research suggests there are less gites/albergues & it is recommended to book accommodation two nights ahead); and that the cost of living in France is quite a bit more than Spain which can add up over 5-6 weeks.
I am spending a week in Germany first, catching up with peregrinos from last camino, and have nothing booked after that except my flight home from Madrid mid-June.

Suggestions welcome :)

PS. I read heaps & heaps of forum threads, & listen to Camino podcasts as I go for walks around the streets near my home. The countdown is on. I just want to refine my research.
My husband and I are planning to walk Le Puy to StJPP starting first week of April. Hope to see you on the trail!
 
Past OR future Camino
2021
I walked from SJPP to Santiago in Autumn of 2018 and loved it!!! I am Caminoing again, flying out of Sydney in 7 and a half weeks' time . I am undecided whether to walk from Le Puy to SJPP, or to walk Camino Frances again staying in different places and enjoying Springtime.
Pros: I will enjoying reviving my schoolgirl French from quite a few decades ago; the scenery sounds exquisite: and it will be experiencing a different part of the Camino world. Also the Pilgrim ceremony to farewell pilgrims in Le Puy sounds like a lovely start & way to meet fellow pilgrims straight away.
Cons: It seems that it may not be as well marked, and may intertwine with a regular main bushwalking trail; I have to "listen to my body" re when to stop for the day ( My research suggests there are less gites/albergues & it is recommended to book accommodation two nights ahead); and that the cost of living in France is quite a bit more than Spain which can add up over 5-6 weeks.
I am spending a week in Germany first, catching up with peregrinos from last camino, and have nothing booked after that except my flight home from Madrid mid-June.

Suggestions welcome :)

PS. I read heaps & heaps of forum threads, & listen to Camino podcasts as I go for walks around the streets near my home. The countdown is on. I just want to refine my research.
My wife and I walked the GR65 in 2016 and found it much different than the Camino. Typically, there are few villages between start and end for the day. The terrain is much more up and down than the Camino. The best part is the food. Can’t beet the food. Here is a list of where we stayed and miles walked for the day.
I walked from SJPP to Santiago in Autumn of 2018 and loved it!!! I am Caminoing again, flying out of Sydney in 7 and a half weeks' time . I am undecided whether to walk from Le Puy to SJPP, or to walk Camino Frances again staying in different places and enjoying Springtime.
Pros: I will enjoying reviving my schoolgirl French from quite a few decades ago; the scenery sounds exquisite: and it will be experiencing a different part of the Camino world. Also the Pilgrim ceremony to farewell pilgrims in Le Puy sounds like a lovely start & way to meet fellow pilgrims straight away.
Cons: It seems that it may not be as well marked, and may intertwine with a regular main bushwalking trail; I have to "listen to my body" re when to stop for the day ( My research suggests there are less gites/albergues & it is recommended to book accommodation two nights ahead); and that the cost of living in France is quite a bit more than Spain which can add up over 5-6 weeks.
I am spending a week in Germany first, catching up with peregrinos from last camino, and have nothing booked after that except my flight home from Madrid mid-June.

Suggestions welcome :)

PS. I read heaps & heaps of forum threads, & listen to Camino podcasts as I go for walks around the streets near my home. The countdown is on. I just want to refine my research.


My wife and I walked the GR65 in 2016 and found it much different than the Camino. Typically, there are few villages between start and end for the day. The terrain is much more up and down than the Camino. The best part is the food. Can’t beet the food. Here is a list of where we stayed and miles walked for the day.

1581786283495.png
 

Tandem Graham

Every new day an adventure
Past OR future Camino
Bike: Mont St Michel-SdC. Budapest-Vezelay. Alicante-Burgos
Walk: Le Puy-SJPdP. Dax-(CF)-SdC.
Another vote for the Le Puy route. I walked it in April 2018.
Yes, it is different from the CF:
  • Fewer walkers most of whom first language is French (though many can speak English too),
  • less infrastructure,
  • somewhat tougher terrain (though the route is well marked and I managed well in Goretex hiking shoes, not boots),
  • 25% more expensive.
The advantages are:
  • the food in the Gite d'Etapes (equivalent to private Albergues) is superb. I would take the communal dinner whenever it is available,
  • no bunk beds!
  • the scenery is varied and magnificent,
  • local communities are delighted to see you - there is no 'Camino fatigue' for them,
  • great camaraderie among the modest number of thru-walkers, who you inevitably get to know when you meet each evening,
  • Some lovely historic village churches, isolated chapels and ... a highlight ... Conques Abbey (I recommend the Abbey's own accommodation and the pilgrim mass).
Agree that Miam Dodo guides are the best. I usually only reserved a bed 24 hours ahead when there was only one option at my intended stopping place. I did however call each lunchtime (by then I knew how strong my legs felt) to my planned accommodation to inform them I was coming , so that there would be enough food prepared! Not once did I struggle to secure a bed.

Enjoy your planning and Bon Chemin!
.
 
Past OR future Camino
VDLP to Finisterre 2009
Le Puy to SJPDP 2013
Frances 2014
GR700 & Arles 2017
Norte 2019
Out of 5 Camino's Le Puy is my favourite, I did it solo and with no French language. I found the people extremely helpful, accommodation and food were fabulous.
 
Camino Magnets
A collection of Camino Fridge Magnets
2021 Camino Guides
Most all Camino authors have decided to use 2020 guides for 2021, with free PDF files with updates coming in the spring. Get yours today.

TDS

New Member
Past OR future Camino
2016
If you walked the Camino Le Puy, any recommendations or suggestions for potential rest days along the Le Puy? Any particular place worthy of spending a day and if so, why? Thx
 

Tandem Graham

Every new day an adventure
Past OR future Camino
Bike: Mont St Michel-SdC. Budapest-Vezelay. Alicante-Burgos
Walk: Le Puy-SJPdP. Dax-(CF)-SdC.
Conques is a beautiful village and the abbey worth a long explore. Cahors is a small historic city with much to see, including Roman remains, a grand cathedral and the mediaeval pilgrim bridge.
But the best places are the little ones, and I'm not sure I would recommend 36 hours in them.
Perhaps shorter stages occasionally, to give you more chances to explore?
 

billmclaughlin

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
SJPP/Burgos 2012; Le Puy/SJPP 2013; Aumont Aubrac/Aire sur l'Adour 2014; Burgos/Santiago 2016.
If you walked the Camino Le Puy, any recommendations or suggestions for potential rest days along the Le Puy? Any particular place worthy of spending a day and if so, why? Thx
From Figeac, which is worth exploring a bit itself, you can hop a train and easily visit Rocamadour. A great day at a great monument!

I wouldn’t spend extra time in Conque, which has a great church but it’s really a three-hour town. Perhaps Cahor, just because it’s big enough to have different neighborhoods and a few nice small gardens.
 

maruska89

Mary C.
Past OR future Camino
Porto to SdC-Sept 2017
Camino Frances-Apr/May 2019
Another vote for the Le Puy route. I walked it in April 2018.
Yes, it is different from the CF:
  • Fewer walkers most of whom first language is French (though many can speak English too),
  • less infrastructure,
  • somewhat tougher terrain (though the route is well marked and I managed well in Goretex hiking shoes, not boots),
  • 25% more expensive.
The advantages are:
  • the food in the Gite d'Etapes (equivalent to private Albergues) is superb. I would take the communal dinner whenever it is available,
  • no bunk beds!
  • the scenery is varied and magnificent,
  • local communities are delighted to see you - there is no 'Camino fatigue' for them,
  • great camaraderie among the modest number of thru-walkers, who you inevitably get to know when you meet each evening,
  • Some lovely historic village churches, isolated chapels and ... a highlight ... Conques Abbey (I recommend the Abbey's own accommodation and the pilgrim mass).
Agree that Miam Dodo guides are the best. I usually only reserved a bed 24 hours ahead when there was only one option at my intended stopping place. I did however call each lunchtime (by then I knew how strong my legs felt) to my planned accommodation to inform them I was coming , so that there would be enough food prepared! Not once did I struggle to secure a bed.

Enjoy your planning and Bon Chemin!
.
Hello, I am joining this conversation late, but see you walked Le Puy in April. I'm wanting to walk it next april and wondering how you found the weather. I understand it can be cold with snow in the higher aubrac region, but was it doable and was there any problem finding accommodation in the early part of your camino. Thanks and looking forward to your reply and any other info you might want to share. Merci.
 

Tandem Graham

Every new day an adventure
Past OR future Camino
Bike: Mont St Michel-SdC. Budapest-Vezelay. Alicante-Burgos
Walk: Le Puy-SJPdP. Dax-(CF)-SdC.
Hello, I am joining this conversation late, but see you walked Le Puy in April. I'm wanting to walk it next april and wondering how you found the weather. I understand it can be cold with snow in the higher aubrac region, but was it doable and was there any problem finding accommodation in the early part of your camino. Thanks and looking forward to your reply and any other info you might want to share. Merci.
Hi Maruska,
The weather varies year to year of course but for me it was mostly fine. In the month I had two days of rain, though some days were quite windy. However, walkers in May and June 2018 got quite wet and muddy. The Aubrac had some patches of lying snow and some 'bullets' of wind-driven hail, but I was more focused on the wild scenery than the weather!
I booked ahead only in Le Puy and a couple of places where there really was only one choice. Everywhere else I called ahead at lunchtime for the same evening.
Accommodation tends to open for the season at Easter, which in 2022 is mid-April. In 2018, I began walking on Easter Tuesday! On only two days did I not get my first choice accommodation, one of those being Figeac where there are a lot of non-camino hikers and a lot more room choices.
I took a down gilet to be warm in the evenings, but didn't use it during the day, when my walking jacket held in the heat I was generating through walking!
It's a lovely route. If you can manage a bit of French it is more sociable, but in most places there was at least one other English speaker.
Bon Chemin!
 
Camino Socks
Browse the Camino Socks collection on the forum shop
Original artwork based on your pilgrimage or other travel photos.

maruska89

Mary C.
Past OR future Camino
Porto to SdC-Sept 2017
Camino Frances-Apr/May 2019
Hi Maruska,
The weather varies year to year of course but for me it was mostly fine. In the month I had two days of rain, though some days were quite windy. However, walkers in May and June 2018 got quite wet and muddy. The Aubrac had some patches of lying snow and some 'bullets' of wind-driven hail, but I was more focused on the wild scenery than the weather!
I booked ahead only in Le Puy and a couple of places where there really was only one choice. Everywhere else I called ahead at lunchtime for the same evening.
Accommodation tends to open for the season at Easter, which in 2022 is mid-April. In 2018, I began walking on Easter Tuesday! On only two days did I not get my first choice accommodation, one of those being Figeac where there are a lot of non-camino hikers and a lot more room choices.
I took a down gilet to be warm in the evenings, but didn't use it during the day, when my walking jacket held in the heat I was generating through walking!
It's a lovely route. If you can manage a bit of French it is more sociable, but in most places there was at least one other English speaker.
Bon Chemin!
Wow.. thank you so much for your speedy reply! I was wavering on whether Le Puy was the right choice for an April start, but I'm more determined now that it will be great. I don't mind some snow on the ground and will just have to work around the weather. I do have my high school French which I will definitely work on improving over the coming months. Once again thanks for replying... it helps calm uncertainty. Bon chemin for any future camino you may go on.
 

Did not find what you were looking for? Search here

Popular Resources

“All” Albergues on the Camino Frances in one pdf ivar
  • Featured
“All” Albergues on the Camino Frances in one pdf
4.95 star(s) 101 ratings
Downloads
15,222
Updated
A selection of favorite albergues on the Camino Francés Ton van Tilburg
Favorite Albergues along the Camino Frances
4.83 star(s) 35 ratings
Downloads
7,893
Updated
Profile maps of all 34 stages of the Camino Frances ivar
Profile maps of all 34 stages of the Camino Frances
4.88 star(s) 24 ratings
Downloads
7,697
Updated

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Updates on YouTube

Camino Conversations

Most downloaded Resources

Top