• This section is a collection of FAQs on the Camino. No new questions can be posted here, but questions that are asked often will be move here by a moderator.
  • Missing the daily forum e-mail? Subscribe again.
A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

Luggage Transfer Correos

Learning Easy Spanish

C

Castilian

Guest
And with Spanish there really is no excuse. Unlike English and French it is consistent and without silent letters
Umm, h is silent:)
...almost always (see below). And the u in gue and gui... always. OTOH, in güe and güi, the u is pronounced.

Exceptions: The words where the h is pronounced? Apparently the only such word that is recognized by the Royal Spanish Academy as fully Spanish is hámster, a cognate of the English word for "hamster,"
Other words that come to my mind (recognized by the RAE) are: saharaui, sahariano and sahárico (all of them meaning from/or/relative to the Sahara or the Western Sahara).

In some areas of Spain (mainly rural areas of the West of Andalucía) the h is pronounced aspirada; mainly in words that started by f in Latin.
 
C

Castilian

Guest
you can learn to pronounce say...'pescado' absolutely perfectly (soft d etc) and find the locals say what seems a different word altogether ie : peca'o
There are several Spanish dialects and accents in Spain so locals from one area speak Spanish different than locals from another area...

P.S.: Don't forget there are also several languages in Spain so if you are in any of the bilingual (or plurilingual) areas of Spain and you don't understand what it's said/written, check first if it's Spanish what it's spoken/written or if it's another language.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - Sarria to Santiago (2015)
Camino Frances - Sarria to Santiago to Fisterra (2016)
...almost always (see below). And the u in gue and gui... always. OTOH, in güe and güi, the u is pronounced.



Other words that come to my mind (recognized by the RAE) are: saharaui, sahariano and sahárico (all of them meaning from/or/relative to the Sahara or the Western Sahara).

In some areas of Spain (mainly rural areas of the West of Andalucía) the h is pronounced aspirada; mainly in words that started by f in Latin.
oh I know guys, I was over simplifying but its STILL easier than French or English!!!
 

Coreyna

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria-Santiago (May 2016)
Really appreciate all the tips in this thread everybody. Using this and other sources I've made a public Google sheet of key phrases by category, with English/Spanish and a phonetic pronunciation column. In case it would help anyone else, the link is: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1suzvvpo6rMkCC9vpezFbgjfTKsSXQn5KSENl5AA5D-A/edit?usp=sharing
I also highly recommend the volumes from Earworms Rapid Spanish - they include a a set of audios as well as a printable pronunciation guide so you can follow along.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - Sarria to Santiago (2015)
Camino Frances - Sarria to Santiago to Fisterra (2016)
Also.... nothing in the world will help you with Basque but when you get to Galicia having a basic idea of Portuguese will help with Gallego.
 
C

Castilian

Guest
Using this and other sources I've made a public Google sheet of key phrases by category, with English/Spanish and a phonetic pronunciation column.
I won't comment about the phonetic pronounciation because it'll take too much time and open too many arguments. I won't comment either about the missing accent marks on the document as well as the missing ¿ but I'll comment about some wrong translations, some typos and some other things.

Sometimes you quote the male and female forms (what it's a great idea) but other times (e.g.: 105, 116, 180...) you just quote one of them... I would suggest you to follow the same rule(s) always.

I also suggest you to make a brief explanation about why you used the usted instead of the tú.

When you is involved, you could provide the translation both for you as singular and for you as plural.

Can I/I Can = Puedo
Is it/It es = está or es
I don't know = no sé. No lo sé = I don't know it
Can you tell me? = ¿Puede decirme?
What is that? = ¿Qué es eso?
Can you stamp my passport? = ¿Puede sellar mi credencial?
call up a taxi = llamar a un taxi
Can you give me a discount? = ¿Me puede hacer un descuento?
It's nice has many translations depending on the context. It would be a good idea to specify a context (and in that case, está bueno may not be the translation)
35 and 36 Cuánto
67 Iglesia
64 Estación de autobuses
70 Rotonda (rotunda is another thing)
75 Derecha
77 another possible translation would be gire
78 another possible translation would be junto a
106 una botella de vino
111 In Spain, a sandwich is a sándwich and a bocadillo is a bocadillo.
125 not necessarily bravas
127 not necessarily from Padrón
129 tortilla de patatas or tortilla española (you must specify the name of the tortilla because there are many types of tortillas)
161 encantado (a) de conocerle
173 no importa (another possible translation)
175 vámonos
176 caminamos (another possible translation)
200 tengo dolor aquí
213 mañana
204 ampolla = blister. Pronounced... well, I know what it means but I don't see it as a camino (related) word so I may be missing some meaning...
210 Ayúdeme
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(x4), Fisterra/Muxía(x2), VdlP, Jerusalem, VF, Walsingham,
C inglés. Next: Toulouse to Lourdes
There are several Spanish dialects and accents in Spain so locals from one area speak Spanish different than locals from another area...

P.S.: Don't forget there are also several languages in Spain so if you are in any of the bilingual (or plurilingual) areas of Spain and you don't understand what it's said/written, check first if it's Spanish what it's spoken/written or if it's another language.
I had Spanish as spoken in Andalucia in mind when I wrote that
:)
 

Coreyna

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria-Santiago (May 2016)
I won't comment about the phonetic pronounciation because it'll take too much time and open too many arguments. I won't comment either about the missing accent marks on the document as well as the missing ¿ but I'll comment about some wrong translations, some typos and some other things.
Thanks Castilian, that helps a lot, everyone on this forum is so helpful and generous :) I've gone through and updated the document according to your list.

Pronunciation: The pronunciations I've written are based on how the words sound on my audios and how best I can describe them to myself with my Australian accent.

Lack of accents was just my laziness, I've been mainly practicing through speaking and listening and just didn't take the time to write them properly. I've fixed up all that I can see.

Male/Female forms - Where there is just female quoted it's usually because my travelling companion (my Mum) and I are both female and it's all I was expecting to use. I've updated those couple you mentioned.

Tu vs usted - I figured it it's always better to be safe than sorry and use the formal form. I've added tu to those instances as an alternative.

RE: está bueno - I was trying to talk about the weather, have added the context.

Singular/plural "you" - I'm terrible at grammar, I think this might be a bit much for me with only 2 weekish till I go.

Thanks!
 
Camino(s) past & future
2013, 2014, 2015, 2016
Thanks Castilian, that helps a lot, everyone on this forum is so helpful and generous :) I've gone through and updated the document according to your list.

Pronunciation: The pronunciations I've written are based on how the words sound on my audios and how best I can describe them to myself with my Australian accent.

Lack of accents was just my laziness, I've been mainly practicing through speaking and listening and just didn't take the time to write them properly. I've fixed up all that I can see.

Male/Female forms - Where there is just female quoted it's usually because my travelling companion (my Mum) and I are both female and it's all I was expecting to use. I've updated those couple you mentioned.

Tu vs usted - I figured it it's always better to be safe than sorry and use the formal form. I've added tu to those instances as an alternative.

RE: está bueno - I was trying to talk about the weather, have added the context.

Singular/plural "you" - I'm terrible at grammar, I think this might be a bit much for me with only 2 weekish till I go.

Thanks!
@Coreyna, thank-you very muchfor sharing your document (#204). Am I OK to use the same link, or is there a new one I should use now you've updated it?
 
Camino(s) past & future
None
It is just great to hear from so many of you and to learn that you have been having such a spiffing time on the Camino. From all your comments it is clear that our sense of humour is not dead!
I did not realise that there were so many linguists amongst our pilgrims. Must write up a few more flash cards as none of this is in my Berlitz, Spanish Phrase Book!
Not a splicing time then
 
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria to Santiago May 2018
Is there an Android app to hear-and-speak enough Spanish for the Camino? I'd like to learn as I walk laps inside the mall. Earphones to the cell phone would be great, but not if I must walk staring at the screen. Duolingo says I'm 35% fluent but that's reading - still don't know how to ask "Where do I catch the bus to Santiago?" and couldn't understand the answer if I got one.
 

thesmiths2

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Madrid (2018)
Is there an Android app to hear-and-speak enough Spanish for the Camino? I'd like to learn as I walk laps inside the mall. Earphones to the cell phone would be great, but not if I must walk staring at the screen. Duolingo says I'm 35% fluent but that's reading - still don't know how to ask "Where do I catch the bus to Santiago?" and couldn't understand the answer if I got one.
I would love to know an app that doesn't need connectivity to translate. I have Google Translate (I'm on an iPhone)? I use it ALL THE TIME with my gardener who doesn't speak english. I speak or write what I want, it translates it, then audibly speaks to Jose for me. :) Couldn't live without it. Unfortunately, you have to be connected via wifi or network.
 

thesmiths2

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Madrid (2018)
I'm looking online now and there are non-connectivity apps available. Would love feedback from others on the best ones.

I just noticed Google Translate has offline translations that can be downloaded. It seems to work, but won't speak it for me without a network connection, so we have to read it or show it to the person to read. :)
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
CF April 4- May 12, 2018
CP April 2019
Hello fellow pilgrims, i walked the CF this past spring now planning for #2! I was a pre-school teacher in California so I learned “kid Spanish” it served me pretty well. Now as I am planning my next Camino I understand not all the Caminos are as English language friendly as the Frances. I now have the time and desire to learn conversational Spanish. I know of Rosetta Stone and Babbel, have any of you used either or have any recommendations? Thanks Dee
 

nycwalking

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF: (2001, 2002, 2004, 2014). Hospitalera: 2002, Ponferrada. 2004, Rabanal del Camino.
Hello fellow pilgrims, i walked the CF this past spring now planning for #2! I was a pre-school teacher in California so I learned “kid Spanish” it served me pretty well. Now as I am planning my next Camino I understand not all the Caminos are as English language friendly as the Frances. I now have the time and desire to learn conversational Spanish. I know of Rosetta Stone and Babbel, have any of you used either or have any recommendations? Thanks Dee
Also, tune into Spanish language channels.

My👂improves when I watch Spanish news. Rapid-fire initially but after a time I understand.

In Los Angeles we have no dearth of said channels.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
Coffee Break Spanish is good and centres around a young, Scottish student learning from scratch (spoiler, she learns so well she ends up with a Spanish boyfriend!) - short podcasts you can learn while you drink your coffee!
 

witsendwv

Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2015)
Duolingo, then Notes in Spanish with Ben and Marina. Their podcasts range from beginner to advanced, and finally as I am going to try and test - Lengalia. Lengalia costs, but they have sales. In the summer I bought a year for half price. Buena suerte!!
 

notion900

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
>
There's the Duolingo Spanish Podcast on Spotify. Pretty easy (an english speaker keeps interjecting!) but good for a variety of accents.
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
I understand not all the Caminos are as English language friendly as the Frances.
From my language impaired perspective, the Camino Frances is not English language friendly. Admittedly, many pilgrims spoke English, but I did not find anything beyond the exchange of food and beverage for money in English.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF April 4- May 12, 2018
CP April 2019
From my language impaired perspective, the Camino Frances is not English language friendly. Admittedly, many pilgrims spoke English, but I did not find anything beyond the exchange of food and beverage for money in English.
why that’s too bad. I had many 1/2 English 1/2 Spanish conversations I think it could be even better with a bit of work.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
Hello fellow pilgrims, i walked the CF this past spring now planning for #2! I was a pre-school teacher in California so I learned “kid Spanish” it served me pretty well. Now as I am planning my next Camino I understand not all the Caminos are as English language friendly as the Frances. I now have the time and desire to learn conversational Spanish. I know of Rosetta Stone and Babbel, have any of you used either or have any recommendations? Thanks Dee
I have been using www.duolingo.com for more than a year now. It is FREE and is very good.

When I return to volunteer at the Pilgrim Office in Santiago each summer, the staff is always surprised that my Spanish continues to improve. One day... they may let me do Compostelas... But for now I am cinderfella...

Try it...

Hope this helps.
 
Camino(s) past & future
I have walked part of the Camino Frances and plan to start over in April 2018.
Hello fellow pilgrims, i walked the CF this past spring now planning for #2! I was a pre-school teacher in California so I learned “kid Spanish” it served me pretty well. Now as I am planning my next Camino I understand not all the Caminos are as English language friendly as the Frances. I now have the time and desire to learn conversational Spanish. I know of Rosetta Stone and Babbel, have any of you used either or have any recommendations? Thanks Dee
Look into the Olly Richards program. Also iTalkie for practice online with a native speaker of your choice.
 

cindyjo

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2012
Camino del Norte /Primitivo (2014)
Chemin la Puy (2016)
Camino Portuguese (2017)
Hi Caligirl, I used some of Rosetta Stone before my first Camino in 2012 and have used Duolingo for practice as well. I certainly got by in the most basic way. But, I’ve had the most success using Fluenz. It teaches using situations you may find yourself in and takes advantage of what you know about your own language. I’ve used Fluenz Spanish through all levels, but what most impressed me was going through level 3 in Fluenz French and managing better than I ever thought possible while walking the Chemin du la Puy. I find French difficult. There’s also an old program on the internet called Destino. It’s actually a Spanish novella, with a guide. It helps with listening and reminds you to listen to the whole as well as focus on the content and situation rather than getting stuck trying to translate every word. I still have lots to learn in Spanish so your question has also given me lots of new resources to explore. Good luck with your language learning...it’s a fun life long endeavor.
 

jmcarp

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2013
Camino del Norte a Chimayó (USA), 2015
Camino Portugues, 2017
This is an old and ongoing thread, and I'm lazy and don't want to plod through the whole thing to see if this has been mentioned before, but here's a source for common Camino words and phrases:
http://www.caminoguide.net/pages/camino-spanish
Click on the "...download it here" highlight, and if you're so motivated, you can make a donation to the link on the same page.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
Hi Caligirl, I used some of Rosetta Stone before my first Camino in 2012 and have used Duolingo for practice as well. I certainly got by in the most basic way. But, I’ve had the most success using Fluenz. It teaches using situations you may find yourself in and takes advantage of what you know about your own language. I’ve used Fluenz Spanish through all levels, but what most impressed me was going through level 3 in Fluenz French and managing better than I ever thought possible while walking the Chemin du la Puy. I find French difficult. There’s also an old program on the internet called Destino. It’s actually a Spanish novella, with a guide. It helps with listening and reminds you to listen to the whole as well as focus on the content and situation rather than getting stuck trying to translate every word. I still have lots to learn in Spanish so your question has also given me lots of new resources to explore. Good luck with your language learning...it’s a fun life long endeavor.
Fluenz seems rather expensive. Do they have any special offers that you know of?
 

Theresa Brandon

Artist, photographer, dreamer
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Inglés (2018)
Check with your local library to see if they subscribe to Mango. If so, then you can download it yourself. I like it because it is very conversational with useful phrases and common words.
 

cindyjo

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2012
Camino del Norte /Primitivo (2014)
Chemin la Puy (2016)
Camino Portuguese (2017)
Trecile, Sometimes, around Christmas, Fluenz has a sale. They have great customer service, flash cards, and a forum for language learners. You are right, it is more expensive than some programs so I suspect it’s a resource for folks who want to learn more Spanish than what’s needed on the Camino. For me, Spanish is like walking caminos, once I got started I can’t seem to stop. :)
 

IngridF

Intrepid Peregrina
Camino(s) past & future
2012, 2015 ,2017, 2019
Yes, I used to have a copy I lend out post first Camino. ..still waiting for return... not sure who has it. It was helpful!
 
Last edited:

Book your lodging here

Booking.com



Advertisement

Booking.com

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 12 1.3%
  • February

    Votes: 5 0.5%
  • March

    Votes: 41 4.3%
  • April

    Votes: 142 14.9%
  • May

    Votes: 236 24.8%
  • June

    Votes: 72 7.6%
  • July

    Votes: 20 2.1%
  • August

    Votes: 15 1.6%
  • September

    Votes: 277 29.1%
  • October

    Votes: 114 12.0%
  • November

    Votes: 12 1.3%
  • December

    Votes: 5 0.5%
Top