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"less popular" albergues

catfishonrye

New Member
I've seen lots of posts which recommend staying at the "less popular" albergues in July and August in order to avoid the crowds. My question is, how does one know what the less popular places to stay are? Anyone have suggestions or an itinerary which kept them away from huge crowds during those months? Since I have to go at the most populous time I am doubly interested in finding what little peace and quiet I can.

Megan
 

elzi

Active Member
Hi,
It's sometimes good to stop just before the major stops or the ends of the stages
Being that when the albergues fill up people tend to walk on ahead to the next few stops
(rather than go back to the previous albergues)
So many people simply walk the stages given out at St Jean or follow the stages set in their guide book without thinking too much about it (especially big groups who are often on a set schedule) that if you steer clear of those stops you should have a much easier time getting beds :D
 

Javier Martin

Veteran Member
elzi said:
Hi,
It's sometimes good to stop just before the major stops or the ends of the stages
Being that when the albergues fill up people tend to walk on ahead to the next few stops
(rather than go back to the previous albergues)
So many people simply walk the stages given out at St Jean or follow the stages set in their guide book without thinking too much about it (especially big groups who are often on a set schedule) that if you steer clear of those stops you should have a much easier time getting beds :D

Absolutely agree

Buen Camino,

Javier Martin
Madrid, Spain
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
Megan, many pilrims avoid the small, basic albergues - those that don't have beds (they nearly all have mattresses though) or electricity, or running water. From my experience, these are often the 'best' albergues.
Just to name a few: Villamayor Monjardin - mattresses on a platform: Tosantos - matresses on the floor: Granon - mattresses on the floor: San Bol - double bunks but no electricity or running water: Manjarin - mattresses on a platform - no electricity, no running water (both of the latter serve a communal dinner cooked on a gas stove): San Anton, Hospital de San Nicoloas etc.
 

Javier Martin

Veteran Member
sillydoll said:
Megan, many pilrims avoid the small, basic albergues - those that don't have beds (they nearly all have mattresses though) or electricity, or running water. From my experience, these are often the 'best' albergues.
Just to name a few: Villamayor Monjardin - mattresses on a platform: Tosantos - matresses on the floor: Granon - mattresses on the floor: San Bol - double bunks but no electricity or running water: Manjarin - mattresses on a platform - no electricity, no running water (both of the latter serve a communal dinner cooked on a gas stove): San Anton, Hospital de San Nicoloas etc.

Yes Sil, I'll never forget when in Manjarin ... on july, 1,997. "The day of the big storm..."

.... I was in front of the Cruz de Ferro, when a enormous drop of water fell on mi nose giving me no time to take refuge under the broad eaves of the nearby chapel. A summer downpour, I thought. But not ended and was still falling hard.

In just minutes pilgrims began to arrive, his condition was regrettable, had not given them time to take shelter. As the roofs were filling up, I had finished adjusting the Raincoats and my backpack and went to Manjarín, under the porch and could not let anyone else and thus a free slot.

The waterspout prevented any visibility. I felt I was almost Manjarín when I heard the bell. Thomas recognized me, last year we had talked enough. Even remembered my friend George, my partner in this Way, and asked me about it. From the outset, let me stay, with that horrible weather I could not continue. When he knew I came from Astorga, almost forced me to stay.

I managed to find a mat on the top still had free site. Clean, clean what is said, can not say that was that, but between the mat, coat, and a little ingenuity was all set.

The arrival of supposed soaked pilgrims throughout the ground floor of the house ended up full of water, footsteps etc. Thomas could not keep up. Almost no one dared to follow pilgrim. Soon pilgrims filled the top and the bottom end also.

I had the chance to talk to Thomas at least a couple of hours, which is not just seen what was outside. Thomas also allowed me to consult the books preserved, some interesting, and at about eight or nine, taking advantage of the clouds were taking a little break (to take forces) Thomas pulled out an old radiocasette with an equally old tape motif Templars, put on his white jacket with a large red Templar cross and began his ceremony. The wide-eyed, of course, for which all that we knew nothing about.

As the storm raged with renewed strength, it was time for dinner. Thomas said he would make dinner and a couple of ladies quickly offered to help. I abstained in the kitchen I'm rather clumsy. There rabbit with potatoes, delicious. Those who wanted, Tomas gave us !!!!! wine ¡¡¡¡¡ Yes, it's true, there was wine at dinner. Only a cup, and enjoy it all you want and a little more.

Seas was still raining when we went to bed. And when at 5 in the morning rain stopped, the sudden disappearance of the patter of rain on the roof of the house suddenly woke everyone. Everyone was gathering their things and we left shortly afterwards Manjarín. Thomas focused on whoever wanted to could take a hot coffee before leaving. I thanked him for everything and I went to ....


(...From my memories...)

Sorry for the bad translating, Google is not enough for that and neither do I.

Buen Camino, always, if possible, in little towns and it's little and not well known albergues ...

Javier Martin
Madrid, Spain.
 

Rocknroll

Member
Well, I've been sleeping in some of the "less popular" albergues on the Camino, but I WILL NEVER EVER FORGET those, especially Granon and Tosantos, which I recommand to all pilgrims who wants to experience truly and deepest CAMINO FEELINGS...
 

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