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Camping Lightweight camping gear

Barbara

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
Can anyone recommend a suitable tent, nominally for two people, but which I will be using solo? Properly waterproof, with a floor, sealed seams, and quick to put up. Preferably with the inner liner tent already attached and the pole or poles on the outside. Hooks not a channel for the poles. Needs to not blow away in a gusty wind. Not a full mountain spec, but not throw away rubbish. Weight as low as possible consistent with not needing to sell my house to pay for it?
The one I currently have meets all these requirements except for weight, plus it's bigger than I now need. I used to have a donkey to carry my stuff, and had to put her saddle and bags inside. Weighed 3.4 kg. I'd like to get down to under 2kg. Biking, so can go to 12kg all included. Tent, mat, sleeping bag and all usual stuff.

To see the tent I have. I need something like this but smaller.
 
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domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2020? Looks like.... nowhere! 😁
I used a Laser Competition 1 person tent.... Look it up. It was perfect.(Terra Nova).
i got it cheap(er) because they were launching another -even lighter - tent at the time.
Less than one kg but don’t trust their ‘2 can fit in’, unless you’re very, very friendly 😁
Have a look at Six Moon Designs they make some well regarded kit and pretty light weight.
 
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Ekelund

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
“It’s your road, and yours alone. Others may walk it with you, but no one can walk it for you.” Rumi
I have used Wild Country Zephyros 2 tent wildcamping in Scotland. It weighs 1800 gram, you can see specifications on their homepage.
It is supposed to be for two people, but it has to be two small, skinny persons who knows each other very well.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Can anyone recommend a suitable tent, nominally for two people, but which I will be using solo? Properly waterproof, with a floor, sealed seams, and quick to put up. Preferably with the inner liner tent already attached and the pole or poles on the outside. Hooks not a channel for the poles. Needs to not blow away in a gusty wind. Not a full mountain spec, but not throw away rubbish. Weight as low as possible consistent with not needing to sell my house to pay for it?
The one I currently have meets all these requirements except for weight, plus it's bigger than I now need. I used to have a donkey to carry my stuff, and had to put her saddle and bags inside. Weighed 3.4 kg. I'd like to get down to under 2kg. Biking, so can go to 12kg all included. Tent, mat, sleeping bag and all usual stuff.

To see the tent I have. I need something like this but smaller.
I'd be happy to try and make some suggestions; feel free to send me a PM, if you'd like. There are some ways to go with backpacking shelters that will go under 1 pound and be very inexpensive
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
I'd be happy to try and make some suggestions; feel free to send me a PM, if you'd like. There are some ways to go with backpacking shelters that will go under 1 pound and be very inexpensive
Perhaps you could post these publicly - I would be also interested in your take on this. I don't regularly tent camp any longer - perhaps only a couple of overnight walks in a nearby National Park each year. And camping there is no longer permitted while it recovers from the recent bushfires. Mind you, under the current measures in place here, the furthest I will get is down the stairs into my back yard.
 

Barbara

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
Thank you all. Bit of home study coming up. Davebugg, yes, please do post your suggestions publicly. Personally I prefer a full tent to a shelter even if it means more weight. I don't want to use hiking poles as part of the structure, as I don't use them. I've had some unhappy experiences with carbon fibre poles, too.
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
I know absolutely nothing about lightweight tents .. but if I was choosing one for Camino I would go for one that can also be used not pegged down so that I could put it up on hard surfaces such as refugio porches, rear of closed factory buildings, etc.

The Outdoor Megastore (online) in the UK has these tents, all very cheap - though you have to search a particular tent elsewhere to find the weight ....


and this one is freestanding and weighs 1.7kg.

 

Barbara

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
Another idea. I don't think the Outdoor world shops' tents would suit me, though. I've camped quite a lot and find that you really do get what you pay for. Some of the others are indeed expensive, and not all will ship to France.
The laser tent and the Zephyros look interesting, sensible money and good design. Pity about having to thread the pole through a channel, though. It's all too easy to rip the channel if you are in a hurry.
I exclude free standing tents completely. No way would I rely on my weight to keep a tent in place. Ok if they can also be pegged, but even so I suspect they will be more likely to collapse in a strong wind. The orange tent in my original post has stood up to 50mph winds. And stayed dry inside. It's too big and heavy to carry on a bike, though.
Edit. Just looked at the MSR tents. Think I might be going for one of them.
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
Ah - by free standing I meant that once poles were in it was free standing and then was pegged down, which would mean it could be used on sheltered hard ground, such as a refugio porch, without pegging - the pegging being used when out in the countryside.
I agree with you re MSR tents - they do look the best so far.
 

Barbara

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
Ah, yes. I misunderstood you.
 

Bodi

For this breath, I am present.
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP to Najera Sept. 2017; Najera to Astorga Oct. 2018; SJPP to Pamplona May 2019
We have a Sierra Designs Lightning FL 2 tent that we use for backpacking. It fits 2 friendly people!
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I do not tent camp, but my son has backpacked 1000 miles on the Appalachian Trail, the full Colorado trail and the full John Muir trail. He researched for a good ultra-lite tent after the AT and chose one that used your hiking poles to save on weight. The downsides were that in rainstorms mud splashed on the pole handgrips, and also the sweat absorbed in them caused small varmits to chew on them causing damage...not good problems to have when you are using your $120 Leki hiking poles.
 

federico

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 11 & 14
Norte & Ingles 15
Portuguese 16
Via de la Plata 17
Madrid, Salvador, Primitivo 17
Here is a well thought out lightweight tent, used with hiking poles, that might meet your criteria. A walking friend was using it on the St. Olavsleden last fall. I was so impressed I ordered one when I got home. There is also a 2-person version available.
 

Barbara

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
No problem. I may have found what I want, I'll post again when I've made a final choice.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
The OP doesn't use hiking poles.
That is a good point.

Fortunately, there are hiking pole substitutes that can be used as tent poles, which are very compact and ultralightweight, which are used in place of trekking poles. They will easily fold apart and can be put into the same stuff sack as the tent and pegs.

Most of the manufacturers who have tent designs that utilize trekking poles, will offer those substitute poles for consumers who do not use trekking poles.

So if someone likes all other aspects of an ultra lightweight tent, minus the trekking poles, they can still get the tent and all the advantages that it offers. :)
 

Barbara

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
Well, thank you all for some great input. I'm refining my long list now, decided not to go for a tunnel or anything that requires me to pitch the inside first. That's from experience of getting self and bag soaked while I put the rain protection layer over the mesh in a Galician rain shower. The one I'm looking at right now is pretty much a smaller version of my existing tent in a lighter fabric. I found it while looking at the MSR zoic. I'm just waiting on an email from outdoor gear in the UK to answer some questions. There is some great stuff in the USA but postage makes it difficult, and not all sellers are happy to post to Europe anyway. And of course duties...
So if anyone has experience of this Jack Wolfskin tent please let me have your thoughts.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Well, thank you all for some great input. I'm refining my long list now, decided not to go for a tunnel or anything that requires me to pitch the inside first. That's from experience of getting self and bag soaked while I put the rain protection layer over the mesh in a Galician rain shower. The one I'm looking at right now is pretty much a smaller version of my existing tent in a lighter fabric. I found it while looking at the MSR zoic. I'm just waiting on an email from outdoor gear in the UK to answer some questions. There is some great stuff in the USA but postage makes it difficult, and not all sellers are happy to post to Europe anyway. And of course duties...
So if anyone has experience of this Jack Wolfskin tent please let me have your thoughts.
It looks like the total weight is 4.6 pounds / 2070 grams. It requires the inner tent shell to be pitched first, and then the rain fly is placed over the shell separately.
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
Here is a well thought out lightweight tent, used with hiking poles, that might meet your criteria. A walking friend was using it on the St. Olavsleden last fall. I was so impressed I ordered one when I got home. There is also a 2-person version available.
Looks fascinating. I don’t want to sign up - so can you tell us the price please?
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
@davebugg could you post your thoughts publicly with a wee caveat “these are my opinions on such and such a date but may change if I find other information in the future”. Many of us value your insight.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
@davebugg could you post your thoughts publicly with a wee caveat “these are my opinions on such and such a date but may change if I find other information in the future”. Many of us value your insight.
I think this is the best course for me right now. I wish I could go back and update a lot of older stuff I've posted, but that isn't possible. And regardless of any caveats given, I still feel uneasy with old and outdated information in a post with my name attached.

I wish providing email addresses was allowed, as I have an email account that is different from that of my personal email, and I do not mind emails.

I really enjoy the Forum, and there are a lot of folks who share a lot of excellent advice.
 

wayfarer

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-Santiago-Finistera-Muxia. April/May 2012
Sarria-Santiago Sept. 2013
SJPP - Almost Orrison April 2014
I think this is the best course for me right now. I wish I could go back and update a lot of older stuff I've posted, but that isn't possible. And regardless of any caveats given, I still feel uneasy with old and outdated information in a post with my name attached.

I wish providing email addresses was allowed, as I have an email account that is different from that of my personal email, and I do not mind emails.

I really enjoy the Forum, and there are a lot of folks who share a lot of excellent advice.
1. You can request changes to any review you have written in any thread at any time if you so wish.
2. Useing emails IS allowed. You can use any email that you are happy to have on a public forum.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
1. You can request changes to any review you have written in any thread at any time if you so wish.
2. Useing emails IS allowed. You can use any email that you are happy to have on a public forum.
Thank you for the clarification. Given the large number of my past posts, it is impractical to think that this would be simple to do, hence the 'wish' :)

It was not meant as an indictment of Forum rules or usability, just a personal realization that one cannot keep track of all the re-posts and quotes made of one's original posts. Once posted, the history of that posting has a life of its own. :)

I appreciate the Moderator's helpfulness and the challenges of keeping the Forum working smoothly. All of the Members owe you guys a lot of thanks for your work. 👍 🙏
 

wayfarer

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-Santiago-Finistera-Muxia. April/May 2012
Sarria-Santiago Sept. 2013
SJPP - Almost Orrison April 2014
Reviews are one's personal opinion of a product based on their experience of the product at that time, if that opinion changes over time due to new experience, write a new review. Old reviews are normally in old posts and no one is going to start comparing them to new ones IMO, this is just a forum after all where we all have differing opinions.
We are gone off topic, back to the OP.
 

Barbara

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
It looks like the total weight is 4.6 pounds / 2070 grams. It requires the inner tent shell to be pitched first, and then the rain fly is placed over the shell separately.
Yes, I think the weight is acceptable, a little over what I was looking for but a nice roomy tent. I saw a description of the inner and outer going up together, did I misread this? The Jack Wolfskin Exo light III is the one I'm looking at in the link I posted. This is in the UK, no problem with postage. I was wondering about overall build quality and speed of erection.
I've more or less ruled out all the really tiny tents, I'm not keen on getting dressed lying down or reversing in. I would actually prefer only one entrance but all the two person tents seem to have two.
I see your point about outdated reviews. Thank you for your help with this, it's not easy choosing when you can't look at stuff. Oh well. Looks like another month before I could use it, anyway.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
Useing emails IS allowed. You can use any email that you are happy to have on a public forum.
I am a little confused by this. I thought I've noticed several times when someone has given their personal email publicly on the forum they are told to send it in a PM instead. Am I misunderstanding?
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Yes, I think the weight is acceptable, a little over what I was looking for but a nice roomy tent. I saw a description of the inner and outer going up together, did I misread this? The Jack Wolfskin Exo light III is the one I'm looking at in the link I posted. This is in the UK, no problem with postage. I was wondering about overall build quality and speed of erection.
I've more or less ruled out all the really tiny tents, I'm not keen on getting dressed lying down or reversing in. I would actually prefer only one entrance but all the two person tents seem to have two.
I see your point about outdated reviews. Thank you for your help with this, it's not easy choosing when you can't look at stuff. Oh well. Looks like another month before I could use it, anyway.
Looking more closely, you are correct, although I am puzzled as to how that design actually works. Normally to created airspace to prevent condensation, the shell is put up separate from the rain fly. In single walled tents, strategically placed venting is used to accomplish condensation control.

I have never felt that there was a disadvantage, in terms of speed of putting up a tent, to either single-walled or double-walled tents. Oftentimes, there is more attention needed to staking a tent with single-walled structures due to ventilation placements. So in the long run, clipping a rainfly onto a two-walled setup takes similar amounts of time.

I also spend time in the backyard with any new tent practicing setups and takedowns. I do it until I can set it up in the dark :) That probably helps me with the speediness of the setup process.
 
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wayfarer

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-Santiago-Finistera-Muxia. April/May 2012
Sarria-Santiago Sept. 2013
SJPP - Almost Orrison April 2014
I am a little confused by this. I thought I've noticed several times when someone has given their personal email publicly on the forum they are told to send it in a PM instead. Am I misunderstanding?
New members are advised not to post their email or phone numbers as they may not be aware of the dangers involved, long standing members know the risks and we normally leave that decision to them.
 

Barbara

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
Short rubber bands between the two on my current tent. I suspect it's similar. The poles are assembled and then the outer tent is hooked onto them with the poles going onto short pegs on the corners. I can take the inner and outer apart for drying etc. Hope this makes sense to you..... Everything hangs off the poles, then the corners get pegged down, and a short slightly curved pole stiffens the assembly. Then guy ropes. It's worked well for me but it's too big and heavy without the donkey to carry out.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
@davebugg could you post your thoughts publicly with a wee caveat “these are my opinions on such and such a date but may change if I find other information in the future”. Many of us value your insight.
This shouldn't be necessary. This is a forum, where it is implicit but abundantly clear that we are expressing personal opinions. As for those opinions changing, for whatever reason, that is only to be expected. There are any number of reasons for this. Looking back over the decade since my first camino, there have been some substantial changes in all areas of the camino - the gear technology, IT services, pilgrim services, etc, etc. Of course our advice is going to change as we better understand the environment that has emerged.

And this will happen as we adjust again. The pundits are already predicting what the camino will look like as national restrictions are lifted. It would be a sad day if we didn't contribute because it will become evident that we might be offering new (and better?) advice over time.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
This shouldn't be necessary. This is a forum, where it is implicit but abundantly clear that we are expressing personal opinions. As for those opinions changing, for whatever reason, that is only to be expected. There are any number of reasons for this. Looking back over the decade since my first camino, there have been some substantial changes in all areas of the camino - the gear technology, IT services, pilgrim services, etc, etc. Of course our advice is going to change as we better understand the environment that has emerged.

And this will happen as we adjust again. The pundits are already predicting what the camino will look like as national restrictions are lifted. It would be a sad day if we didn't contribute because it will become evident that we might be offering new (and better?) advice over time.
In being truthful, you are correct, Doug. It is not the Forum that is out of step with how information is posted and re-posted, it is me that is out of step with the Forum. I appreciate the wisdom of your post.
 
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dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
@Barbara I will go out on a limb here. I have used tents from Macpac, MSR, Kathmandu, Mont and some others over the years. The Kathmandu I have is a one person tunnel, and I don't like it very much. And as you are looking for a two person tent, its limitations won't really be a worry. The Macpac and Mont might be difficult to get in Europe, but they illustrate the sorts of characteristics you might want to consider in your selection.

The Macpac is my favourite - but at 2.8kg it is too heavy for extended walks, I can tolerate carrying it for overnighters or for a long weekend where it gets set up in a base camp, but wouldn't be my choice for extended walks over several days. Their current offering here is the Apollo. It is the least cramped and most versatile of the two-person tents that I have used recently, with good waterproofing (10,000 mm hydrostatic head on the floor, 1500 mm on the walls).

I have used the precursor to the MSR Zioc (the Hubba Hubba). This was a good design let down somewhat by the waterproofing of the floor, which did start to get damp when used on wet grass. I think of this almost as a summer tent, although I have seen it described as three-season on some sites. Perhaps I am being a little harsh here, but I suspect that if you are using it to camp in someone's fields (with permission of course) that will involve a fair bit of camping on damp grass or similar damp surfaces. The floor and walls seem to have the same water resistance, at 5,000 mm hydrostatic head. At around 2.2 kg in the configuration I tried, it was also a little heavier than I wanted.

Having tried the MSR Hubba Hubba, I looked for an alternative, and selected the Mont Moondance 2. Mine is an older model which has a slightly tapered floor plan rather than the rectangular plan of the current version. It can be erected fly first, or even fly only if you have a suitable groundsheet, are comfortable 'cowboy camping' or just want to do a quick erection to get out of the rain. This has a more reasonable waterproof floor for three-season use (10,000 mm hydrostatic head, and 2000 mm on the walls). Mine is just on 1.9 kg with a full set of pegs. It can be erected with as few as two pegs, but I have never tried that.

I had a quick look at the ZPacks Duplex specifications, and it certainly stacks up well, as one might expect with products from that company, when looked at from the specifications alone. It is also expensive. @davebugg or others who have used it might be able to share their experience with its utility and durability.

There are clearly compromises here between weight, cost, waterproofing, spaciousness, accessibility, etc, etc. If you don't need a three-season tent, you will find plenty of reasonably inexpensive and relatively lightweight options. @David has provided a link that illustrates that. Really lightweight options, under 2 kg, will be getting more expensive, and even then still might not have the waterproofing to be reliably more than a one-season tent. Good floor waterproofing (10,000 mm of hydrostatic head or greater) and reasonable wall waterproofing seem to be the features that separate the really good lightweight tents from the rest at this end of the market.

As for my tunnel tent, I can only just sit up in it, and my old body no longer has the flexibility to change clothing without stepping outside. For me, it is little better than using a swag/bivvie, which would be around half the weight.
 
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Barbara

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
Dougfitz, that's an excellent summary of what's available. The zPacks looks very good, but my budget would be very stretched. Also availability in Europe is a problem, as would the Mont. Having said that, my current tent cost nearly 400 euros in 2012.
I like my comfort. I think a three season tent is the way to go for me, and I'm willing to accept the extra bulk of a footprint. I usually use packing sheet, disposable and ultra light, which adds a surprising amount of insulation. Yes, it tears easily but is usually free and easy to obtain.
I'm not very happy about being too obviously female when camping. It's astonishing how safe a donkey makes one feel when wandering around near the tent. That rules out bivvy bags and shelters. At the moment I'm liking the Zoic and Jack Wolfskin. Or I suppose I could suck up the extra weight and leave my clothes behind, and keep my very nice Ferrino Makalu tent. Or get a smaller one from the same maker. Or go and bang my head against the wall for a while....
 

MikeyC

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF - September 2016
CF - April May 2017
Shikoku - October 2017
Kumano Kodo - October 2017
CF - 2019
I find this site useful as the weight of all products is clearly shown. You can even rank by weight.

 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
@Barbara I will go out on a limb here. I have used tents from Macpac, MSR, Kathmandu, Mont and some others over the years. The Kathmandu I have is a one person tunnel, and I don't like it very much. And as you are looking for a two person tent, its limitations won't really be a worry. The Macpac and Mont might be difficult to get in Europe, but they illustrate the sorts of characteristics you might want to consider in your selection.

The Macpac is my favourite - but at 2.8kg it is too heavy for extended walks, I can tolerate carrying it for overnighters or for a long weekend where it gets set up in a base camp, but wouldn't be my choice for extended walks over several days. Their current offering here is the Apollo. It is the least cramped and most versatile of the two-person tents that I have used recently, with good waterproofing (10,000 mm hydrostatic head on the floor, 1500 mm on the walls).

I have used the precursor to the MSR Zioc (the Hubba Hubba). This was a good design let down somewhat by the waterproofing of the floor, which did start to get damp when used on wet grass. I think of this almost as a summer tent, although I have seen it described as three-season on some sites. Perhaps I am being a little harsh here, but I suspect that if you are using it to camp in someone's fields (with permission of course) that will involve a fair bit of camping on damp grass or similar damp surfaces. The floor and walls seem to have the same water resistance, at 5,000 mm hydrostatic head. At around 2.2 kg in the configuration I tried, it was also a little heavier than I wanted.

Having tried the MSR Hubba Hubba, I looked for an alternative, and selected the Mont Moondance 2. Mine is an older model which has a slightly tapered floor plan rather than the rectangular plan of the current version. It can be erected fly first, or even fly only if you have a suitable groundsheet, are comfortable 'cowboy camping' or just want to do a quick erection to get out of the rain. This has a more reasonable waterproof floor for three-season use (10,000 mm hydrostatic head, and 2000 mm on the walls). Mine is just on 1.9 kg with a full set of pegs. It can be erected with as few as two pegs, but I have never tried that.

I had a quick look at the ZPacks Duplex specifications, and it certainly stacks up well, as one might expect with products from that company, when looked at from the specifications alone. It is also expensive. @davebugg or others who have used it might be able to share their experience with its utility and durability.

There are clearly compromises here between weight, cost, waterproofing, spaciousness, accessibility, etc, etc. If you don't need a three-season tent, you will find plenty of reasonably inexpensive and relatively lightweight options. @David has provided a link that illustrates that. Really lightweight options, under 2 kg, will be getting more expensive, and even then still might not have the waterproofing to be reliably more than a one-season tent. Good floor waterproofing (10,000 mm of hydrostatic head or greater) and reasonable wall waterproofing seem to be the features that separate the really good lightweight tents from the rest at this end of the market.

As for my tunnel tent, I can only just sit up in it, and my old body no longer has the flexibility to change clothing without stepping outside. For me, it is little better than using a swag/bivvie, which would be around half the weight.
Such a helpful, detailed reply you have given to Barbara, Dougy. I am always warmed when members go above and beyond when trying to answer questions to offer help.
 

NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
Or go and bang my head against the wall for a while....
That sounds like my shopping strategy as well.🤔

Confusion happens when we don’t like our choices.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Ingles 2016 Camino Portuguese 2017 Considering Invierno late (2020) In lieu of VdlP (2020)
Can anyone recommend a suitable tent, nominally for two people, but which I will be using solo?
Depending upon your requirement for space against weight. You could also consider a bivi bag? These are basically a waterproof sleeping bag cover. The weight starts from around 200grams and then go upwards depending upon the size and toughness of the material. They also go from compact to a generous tent size.

I have used them in sub zero arctic conditions. However I now prefer a five star establishment with room service and a bar.

 

Barbara

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
Hi Marcus. Thanks but I don't think a bivvy bag would suit me. I like more privacy and space than that would give me.
 

jcat

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria - Santiago 2016
Camino Ingles 2019
My favorite is the Big Agnes Fly Creek HV UL2. Total weight is 2lbs 5 ounces.

I've been using mine for 2 years now and it's the best tent I have ever owned. Waterproof for the rain and plenty of venting to stay cooler in the summer. You can ditch some stakes and the rain fly to get it under 2lbs during the summer. They call it a 2-person tent, but it's more like a very roomy 1-person.
 

Barbara

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
I stopped banging my head against the wall and put up three tents on the lawn. My old Ferrino Makalu, a new light supposedly two person tent I bought in a hurry from Mountain Warehouse last year when I needed two nights in UK, then didn't have to use. A single skin dome which I was given when someone had a clear out. Nice breezy day so a good test. I looked at my old Decathlon tunnel and put it straight on the rubbish trailer. It has nearly as much duct tape as fabric.
That was actually a big help. The Ferrino went up in very short time, which may have something to do with sleeping in it most nights on the Norte and the French coastal Camino, but it's far too heavy at 3.4 kg without a donkey to do the carrying. The dome tent packed up thin, but far too long a package for my bike, and might have held me plus a sleeping bag as long as I didn't want to breathe heavy or stay dry. The mountain Warehouse tent was a pain to pitch solo but did look fairly well put together and hasn't blown away. 2kg. For two people you would have to be very friendly. I paid £50.00 for it. I would need to get dressed outside.
I've just looked at the a Fly Creek tent. Very nice, and a little cheaper than the winner.
Which pitches in exactly the same way as my Ferrino, inner and outer hanging from the poles, weighs 2070 g, and I found it on the same site as the MSR Zoic tent.
SO, THANK YOU ALL for a lot of information, and helping me organise my thoughts. Maybe this autumn we will meet in some remote spot on one of the many Caminos.
It's been so good to meet with your patient help. This is a fantastic and constructive forum and thread. I'll go and fold all the tents up again now.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Dougfitz, that's an excellent summary of what's available. The zPacks looks very good, but my budget would be very stretched. Also availability in Europe is a problem, as would the Mont. Having said that, my current tent cost nearly 400 euros in 2012.
You can access a number of American made cottage manufacturer's tents from Gossamer Gear, MLD, zPacks, TarpTent, Big Agnes (although I do not like some BA tents for several reasons), HMG, etc.

Here is their offering of the zPacks Duplex.

I encourage people, who can afford the expense, to never consider the price of a piece of gear or clothing as the primary factor in determining actual value. My criteria is based on Cost Per Mile (kilometer).

If I am needing gear to ONLY walk a 500 mile Camino, ultra lightweight clothing and gear become much more expensive to me, than if I need that same clothing and gear to last for 5,000 miles.

Suddenly, that $125.00, two ounce cuben fiber poncho not only contributes to an ultralight load, but it goes from costing about 0.25 cents per mile, to costing only 0.025 cents per mile. That $600.00 tent goes from costing $1.20/mile to costing 0.12 cents/mile.

As with everything, each person's budget will determine how much one can invest in equipment. It does help to consider that a less expensive tent that needs replacing every three years, can be far more expensive than a more expensive tent that will last for 6 years.
 

Barbara

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
I'm too poor to buy cheap gear. My last tent has done eight years and many km. I'm only changing it because my walking partner who carried it is no longer with me. It doesn't have to come from the USA to be good quality.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
I'm too poor to buy cheap gear. My last tent has done eight years and many km. I'm only changing it because my walking partner who carried it is no longer with me. It doesn't have to come from the USA to be good quality.
No, it does not have to come from the USA to be good. I am sorry if my post implied that. I was trying to help with a source, based on your comment that accessing American made product, like zPlex, was difficult in the EU.

I should have stayed out of it. My apologies.
 

Barbara

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
Please, no apologies needed. I misinterpreted what you wrote. Thank you for your help.
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2020? Looks like.... nowhere! 😁
I find this site useful as the weight of all products is clearly shown. You can even rank by weight.

Love that shop, I bought quite a few things from them, including my tent.
 

MichelleElynHogan

Veteran Member
Many have done this research, myself included. The culmination to my work was a Tarp Tent Contrail. It is a single person tent but with enough room for two to sleep. What really sold me was the weight, only about 450g. It uses 1 walking pole to erect just about anywhere. The bad news is that the Contrail is no longer being made.

Now there are two ways to go. A Contrail may possibly be found in the used market, (where I found mine), or, take a look at https://www.tarptent.com/.

The good news is that the design has been revised into the Protrail, which is on sale right now in th blems and NOS section. If more room is needed, they have the Motrail.
 

GeorgeC

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Nov 2018 short segment SJPP to Lorca
Kuiu, a lightweight hunting equipment company, makes a tent called the "Mountain Star", a true 3 season double wall tent, attached fly, poles on the outside, 3 lbs.3 oz-- nice lightweight, not cheap, rugged tent.
 

ken2116

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Someday. But have hiked the Sierra and the Pyrenees.
Can anyone recommend a suitable tent, nominally for two people, but which I will be using solo? Properly waterproof, with a floor, sealed seams, and quick to put up. Preferably with the inner liner tent already attached and the pole or poles on the outside. Hooks not a channel for the poles. Needs to not blow away in a gusty wind. Not a full mountain spec, but not throw away rubbish. Weight as low as possible consistent with not needing to sell my house to pay for it?
The one I currently have meets all these requirements except for weight, plus it's bigger than I now need. I used to have a donkey to carry my stuff, and had to put her saddle and bags inside. Weighed 3.4 kg. I'd like to get down to under 2kg. Biking, so can go to 12kg all included. Tent, mat, sleeping bag and all usual stuff.

To see the tent I have. I need something like this but smaller.
We've been especially pleased with Big Agnus products, they're made from high quality materials, are very light weight, and they stand behind their products long after the initial purchase (they exchanged an inflatable pad for me after 10 years, and all I'd requested were suggestions for how to repair it). We have a 2-man tent from the Seedhouse series that's going strong after 10-12 years of 3+ season mountain backpacking, well over 100 nights, and acquired a Copper Spur HV UL2 several years ago for its double side entries. The inner tent is suspended by hooks with the fly laid over the poles, but when it's raining we can place the fly first for shelter before hanging the inner tent. The Copper Spur is in the 1.5kg range, free standing, and with external guys we've made it through some very strong, gusty winds, though one really should have a 4 season tent for those conditions. They also have lighter models. Other quality manufacturers offer similar products.

Stephenson Warmlite offers a series of very light 4-season tents with integrated inner and outer walls that are expedition ready. We've not used their tents but have seen a few in the wild whose owners treasure them. We do have Warmlite parkas and rain jackets that are made of silicon impregnated nylon, my large rain jacket is 4.4oz. (125g). and they may be the lightest there are. Rain parkas with side zippers are about 50% more weight and can be ordered longer in back to extend over ones pack (with a provision for folding up the extra when not needed) eliminating the need for a pack cover. Parkas are great for hiking because of their ventilation. We also have some of their vapor barrier clothing (shirt, glove liners) which function as advertised, have yet to fail the way "breathable" waterproof garments do, and are the only thing I take on high weather exposure trips.
 

Barbara

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
Thanks Ken, and all who have replied. I juggled the following considerations of weight, comfort, easy and quick pitching, availability (also including after sales service) privacy, and cost. Not necessarily in that order.
Of course everyone will have a different order of priority.
Remembering that none of the Caminos is very high altitude or requires mountaineering skills, and that I intend to camp most nights, I choose comfort and speed of pitching high on my list. Then weight, availability, cost, and privacy (which is probably a small part of the comfort factor)
Which left me looking for a three season tent which didn't require a second mortgage to purchase.
That eliminated all the tents under 1.5kg (cost), and all the tunnels ( comfort). I set 2.4kg as absolute maximum weight. I cycle, so walkers will probably choose a lower weight.
Then it got harder, looking at the fine detail of water resistance, speed and ease of pitching, including doing this in the rain without the inside getting wet.
Strangely enough, and probably because my requirements haven't changed much since my donkey Camino years, I ended up with a smaller and lighter fabric version of my existing tent. 2070g, poles on the outside, same good ventilation. Not the best floor probably, but I'm unlikely to be putting it on stoney ground. I might add four triangular section pegs and remove four round ones.
I got it on sale, (£351 reduced from £500) which helped with the cost. Speaking of which, although I will always go for the best quality I can afford so that I only have to buy once, some of the very light tents are way beyond my price range. Four figure prices. I reckon my last tent complied with the too poor to buy cheap, too mean to buy expensive, mantra. I used it for eight years, and it's still good to go. Just too heavy for changed circumstances. I can't put sheepskins on top of the sleeping mat now, either.
New tent due tomorrow. I'll put it up in the garden and post a photo. Now I just need to think about sleeping bags. I have several, just need to choose, with the same considerations in mind. I'm trying very hard to convince myself that one of them will be just fine. For the rest, everything I already have will work. I've got the titanium cooking stuff and tiny stove already. Down jacket, check. Waterproof saddlebags, check. Self inflating mat, check. Bike tools. Not a lot to be done to reduce weight there. Tubes weigh what they weigh. All the tools are already as light as possible.
I do think that anyone planning to camp, as a walker or a cyclist might do well to team up with another person.. There are economies of weight to be made sharing some of the gear. I'll be going alone despite this thought, though.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Many have done this research, myself included. The culmination to my work was a Tarp Tent Contrail. It is a single person tent but with enough room for two to sleep. What really sold me was the weight, only about 450g. It uses 1 walking pole to erect just about anywhere. The bad news is that the Contrail is no longer being made.

Now there are two ways to go. A Contrail may possibly be found in the used market, (where I found mine), or, take a look at https://www.tarptent.com/.

The good news is that the design has been revised into the Protrail, which is on sale right now in th blems and NOS section. If more room is needed, they have the Motrail.
Yes. . the Motrail. That is a terrific tent with an excellent space to weight ratio.
 

malingerer

samarkand
Camino(s) past & future
cf (2), de la plata, cp. (2003 -2018)
That sounds like my shopping strategy as well.🤔

Confusion happens when we don’t like our choices.
I know nothing about donkeys but am constantly intrigued by those who use them. I want one, as soon as I win the lottery. Bit of a job getting it up the stairs tho and into my flat! I remember being passed under the belly of a donkey three times as a child which was supposed to be the cure for one of my many ailments! Sorry dear moderator if that was off post but I use a Laser comp tent as my back up accommodation and if I could learn how to acquire a donkey and look after it properly then bejasus we would both be happy! Me and the donkey
that is! :)

Walk soft and stay safe.

The Malingerer.

:) :)
 

MikeyC

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF - September 2016
CF - April May 2017
Shikoku - October 2017
Kumano Kodo - October 2017
CF - 2019
I know nothing about donkeys but am constantly intrigued by those who use them. I want one, as soon as I win the lottery. Bit of a job getting it up the stairs tho and into my flat! I remember being passed under the belly of a donkey three times as a child which was supposed to be the cure for one of my many ailments! Sorry dear moderator if that was off post but I use a Laser comp tent as my back up accommodation and if I could learn how to acquire a donkey and look after it properly then bejasus we would both be happy! Me and the donkey
that is! :)

Walk soft and stay safe.

The Malingerer.

:) :)
One of the first Camino books I read was Spanish Steps: Travels with my Donkey. The author, Tim Moore, humorously recounts his experience of taking a donkey with him on the Camino Frances. Published 2004. Well worth a read in times of lockdown. Which reminds me I had planned to look up R.L. Stevenson's Travels with my donkey.
 

ken2116

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Someday. But have hiked the Sierra and the Pyrenees.
Thanks Ken, and all who have replied. I juggled the following considerations of weight, comfort, easy and quick pitching, availability (also including after sales service) privacy, and cost. Not necessarily in that order.
Of course everyone will have a different order of priority.
Remembering that none of the Caminos is very high altitude or requires mountaineering skills, and that I intend to camp most nights, I choose comfort and speed of pitching high on my list. Then weight, availability, cost, and privacy (which is probably a small part of the comfort factor)
Which left me looking for a three season tent which didn't require a second mortgage to purchase.
That eliminated all the tents under 1.5kg (cost), and all the tunnels ( comfort). I set 2.4kg as absolute maximum weight. I cycle, so walkers will probably choose a lower weight.
Then it got harder, looking at the fine detail of water resistance, speed and ease of pitching, including doing this in the rain without the inside getting wet.
Strangely enough, and probably because my requirements haven't changed much since my donkey Camino years, I ended up with a smaller and lighter fabric version of my existing tent. 2070g, poles on the outside, same good ventilation. Not the best floor probably, but I'm unlikely to be putting it on stoney ground. I might add four triangular section pegs and remove four round ones.
I got it on sale, (£351 reduced from £500) which helped with the cost. Speaking of which, although I will always go for the best quality I can afford so that I only have to buy once, some of the very light tents are way beyond my price range. Four figure prices. I reckon my last tent complied with the too poor to buy cheap, too mean to buy expensive, mantra. I used it for eight years, and it's still good to go. Just too heavy for changed circumstances. I can't put sheepskins on top of the sleeping mat now, either.
New tent due tomorrow. I'll put it up in the garden and post a photo. Now I just need to think about sleeping bags. I have several, just need to choose, with the same considerations in mind. I'm trying very hard to convince myself that one of them will be just fine. For the rest, everything I already have will work. I've got the titanium cooking stuff and tiny stove already. Down jacket, check. Waterproof saddlebags, check. Self inflating mat, check. Bike tools. Not a lot to be done to reduce weight there. Tubes weigh what they weigh. All the tools are already as light as possible.
I do think that anyone planning to camp, as a walker or a cyclist might do well to team up with another person.. There are economies of weight to be made sharing some of the gear. I'll be going alone despite this thought, though.
Thanks for the note and it sounds like you've made a fine choice. Best wishes for your trip.
 

Barbara

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
I hope to have it arrive tomorrow. It's actually made in Germany. I apparently am in the wrong country to open your link, so here is another
 

ken2116

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Someday. But have hiked the Sierra and the Pyrenees.
Barbara: The US link I sent is a considerably shortened version of yours which showed more of the fun stuff. I appreciated how the poles didn't break when things went wonky at 24.5m/S (55mph), not all companies perform this level of testing. This looks to be a truly nice tent.
 

Barbara

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
Well here it is in all its glory. Nicely put together and comes with a bottle of seam sealer, repair kit, and 11 triangular section pegs. The poles are all spring tensioned. It needs 5 more pegs to use the guy lines, which apparently aren't needed except in strong winds. It must have taken me a bit over five minutes to pitch, then about an hour working out how to use the little plastic tensioners on the guy linesP_20200422_170608_vHDR_Auto.jpg.
I may just sleep in it tonight.
First tent I have owned that has an instruction manual.
P_20200422_170530_vHDR_Auto.jpg
 

Swift3

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CP, Porto to SdC, May/June 2016
I recently bought Dan Durston's X-Mid 2P from Drop for $280 USD. It's a great, double wall, sil/poly tent and light weight (~2.75 lbs, or a bit over 1,100 gms) for 2 people and roomy. But it is a "trekking pole" tent and for both it and the 1P, you need 2 poles that can be adjusted in height to property tension the tent. The OP does not use trekking poles, so I don't think these would be a good choice for her, though she could purchase inexpensive trekking poles of her choice separately or purchase the inexpensive Fizan poles ($60USD) via Drop that are recommended with the tent. See here on the Tent: https://drop.com/buy/drop-x-mid-2-person-tent-designed-by-dan-durston and see here on the Fizan poles: https://drop.com/buy/massdrop-fizan-compact

Note that Drop is now back ordering the 2P and expects to ship around Aug. 31, so that may not work for the OP.

An alternative might be the Henry Shires designed Tarptent Stratospire II, a sil/nylon double wall that I also have and is also a great tent and light weight at 2.8 lbs for about $360USD. See here: https://www.tarptent.com/product/stratospire-2/ But it too is a trekking pole tent, though Henry will also sell, separately, two 50" shock-corded Easton aluminum poles that fold to 16" that weight 4.3 oz each that are specifically designed for use on this tent for about $16USD each. So, with poles, around 3 lbs for a pretty bulletproof, hugely roomy 2 person tent that in a pinch can sleep 3 inside the mesh inner and with only the fly, shelter 4 people.

Or alternatively, the Tarptent Double Rainbow might work. See here: https://www.tarptent.com/product/double-rainbow/

On the higher price, but lower weight, end would be a Dyneema fabric tent.

Tarptent is now also working with Dyneema fabrics. Far more expensive, but for the weight conscious, may be worth it. The Dynneema version of the Stratospire is called the Lithium, weighs less than 2 lbs including stakes, but sells for ~$690USD. If not using trekking poles, the OP would still need to buy the poles separately, adding about 8.6 oz and $32USD to the weight and total price. See here: https://www.tarptent.com/product/stratospire-li/#tab-id-2

Their newest 2P Dyneema tent is their Double Rainbow Li, with carbon fiber single arch pole and short cross strut at 1.8 lbs for $679USD. See here: https://www.tarptent.com/product/double-rainbow-li/

A very popular Dyneema tent similar to the Tartptent SS Li would be the Z-Packs Duplex, a single wall hybrid trekking pole style tent at 19 oz (yes, 539 g) plus stakes (included) for $599USD and the cost and weight of separate poles. See here: https://zpacks.com/products/duplex-tent

HMG has some good Dyneema pyramid style tents that use a single pole. The OP should check those out.

There are lots of other good tent makers in the US with costs and weights and construction quality in the middle ranges including REI, Nemo, Marmot, Big Agnes, Six Moons Designs, Sierra Designs, Mountain Safety Research (MSR), and Hyperlight Mountain Guide (HMG) who should have a wide range of 2 person tent configurations with price and weight considerations to consider.
 
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Barbara

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
Thats a splendid sélection, and i am sure will help others. I've tried my Jack Wolfskin tent in some nasty wind and cold rain and I'm very happy with it.
 

Swift3

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CP, Porto to SdC, May/June 2016
Thats a splendid sélection, and i am sure will help others. I've tried my Jack Wolfskin tent in some nasty wind and cold rain and I'm very happy with it.
I see now you made your pick with the ExoLight. Looks like a good tent. I think you'll enjoy it.

Just FYI, it's was the wind shedding ability that sold me on the Tarptent SSI. Here is video of it in the Alps in 70 k/ph gusts in an elevated location. In the text below the video, the owner says they should have pitched it with the wind in the same direction as the tent peak line, or, in other words, a 90 degree turn from the orientation you see in the video, rather than broadside to the wind, though clearly the extra guy out line helped with the "wrong" orientation configuration. I was impressed by this, and other reviews. It has not disappointed:
I also thought this was an interesting review by Dan Durston on the SSII. Durston liked it, but wanted to improve on it, so designed his own, the X-Mid, in 1P and 2P sizes, available on Drop. https://intocascadia.com/2015/11/30/long-term-review-tarptent-stratospire-2/ Here's another testament to it's light weight, space, and wind shedding ability, in what the owner guessed was 30 mph, gusting to 60 mph, winds:
.
 
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P Rat

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino VDLP/Sanábres April 2019
Camino Mozárabe when we can again...(2021?)
Another idea. I don't think the Outdoor world shops' tents would suit me, though. I've camped quite a lot and find that you really do get what you pay for. Some of the others are indeed expensive, and not all will ship to France.
The laser tent and the Zephyros look interesting, sensible money and good design. Pity about having to thread the pole through a channel, though. It's all too easy to rip the channel if you are in a hurry.
I exclude free standing tents completely. No way would I rely on my weight to keep a tent in place. Ok if they can also be pegged, but even so I suspect they will be more likely to collapse in a strong wind. The orange tent in my original post has stood up to 50mph winds. And stayed dry inside. It's too big and heavy to carry on a bike, though.
Edit. Just looked at the MSR tents. Think I might be going for one of them.
Hello Barbara!
We own the MSR Hubba Hubba. Extremely happy with it as you can put it up in the rain without the inner tent getting wet. (luckily only needed this twice). On a hot and clear night you can leave the fly totally off, lovely to watch the stars.
We had an initial issue with the coating of the fly flaking after 2 years, which it was said was our own fault (not storing properly?) but we got it replaced FOC. The replacement is now 6 years old, still waterproof and being stored correctly. Though there is some small amount of flaking happening the last few times it was put up. Didn't seem to affect the usability.
A friend bought the same tent, single person version, and had one of the carbon fibre poles snap twice. Always when least convenient! (Replaced under warranty) So she has now decided against another one and lost faith. We never had any issues with that at all.
If you decide for an MSR, I would strongly suggest getting a footprint tarp as well. Super light weight but extra peace of mind that the floor of your tent is protected.
Whatever you decide, happy camping!
Buen Camino
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2022)
Many have done this research, myself included. The culmination to my work was a Tarp Tent Contrail. It is a single person tent but with enough room for two to sleep. What really sold me was the weight, only about 450g. It uses 1 walking pole to erect just about anywhere. The bad news is that the Contrail is no longer being made.

Now there are two ways to go. A Contrail may possibly be found in the used market, (where I found mine), or, take a look at https://www.tarptent.com/.

The good news is that the design has been revised into the Protrail, which is on sale right now in th blems and NOS section. If more room is needed, they have the Motrail.
The ProTrail looks good.
This was another one I found on Dave's links. Slightly lighter and the design looks easier to get in and out of. Though not cheap!
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF in sections 2019/2020
For the superlight option of 218 gr. /7,7 oz (my knees are not the strongest) I had this in mind, used with my poles and then attach light tent mesh cover (velcro fasteners) on the two open sides:

 

Barbara

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
I'm interested by the concept but think an emergency tent isn't really an item I would consider on what is really a walk in a civilised country. I prefer the concept of emergency taxi. I doubt if this would be useable more than once or twice.
For the superlight option of 218 gr. /7,7 oz (my knees are not the strongest) I had this in mind, used with my poles and then attach light tent mesh cover (velcro fasteners) on the two open sides:

 

MichelleElynHogan

Veteran Member
The ProTrail looks good.
This was another one I found on Dave's links. Slightly lighter and the design looks easier to get in and out of. Though not cheap!
Zpacks makes just about all of their products with Cuben, an extremely light and expensive material. The Sil/nylon material is less expensive and a touch heavier.

It is like most things. You can have a $50 tent but it will be heavy and / or poorly constructed. When the cost of the material rises, usually, the weight drops and the quality rises as no one wants to waste good material. There is too much invested.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Zpacks makes just about all of their products with Cuben, an extremely light and expensive material. The Sil/nylon material is less expensive and a touch heavier.

It is like most things. You can have a $50 tent but it will be heavy and / or poorly constructed. When the cost of the material rises, usually, the weight drops and the quality rises as no one wants to waste good material. There is too much invested.
Michelle raises some good points.

Another thing about silnylon (a light-weight denier, silicone impregnated nylon fabric), which I have used in tents from a variety of manufacturers, including TarpTents, is that silnylon will absorb some of the moisture from rains, and while remaining watertight as long as seams are properly sealed, will start to sag a bit. Additionally, you will carry that moisture-weight with you until the tent fully dries. . . which in dry weather takes very little time IF you can leave the tent pitched for a couple of hours before packing it up.

Dyneema / cuben fiber composites do not retain any moisture, remain taught and tight when pitched in the rains, and are at least as tough, if not tougher than a silnylon material in a tent.

For those that are going to be using and carrying a tent for many hundreds or thousands of miles, the price per mile for a good tent drops considerably, when that of a lesser tent can require several replacements, as well as adding more weight to the pack.

For car camping, mule-packing, and trolley pulling, the number of kilograms /pounds is not quite as critical :). For one time Camino use, or a few overnights, quality is also less of a concern. :)
 
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Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
The tent which I use for backpacking is undoubtedly the lightest which I have ever carried. It is a MSR Hubba NX, single person tent, and has several qualities which are important to me. The support system does not require trekking poles, which I do not use, and keeps the tent upright and at full usable size. The tent is small, but the vestibule is adequate for boots, bear spray, and a few other possible nighttime necessities. I never put my food bag in my tent or vestibule, as there are many hungry bears in the parks. I recently saw the damage that a porcupine can do to a pile of hikers shoes/boots left outside under a tarp, and so far porcupines have not entered my tent, so I keep my boots in shelter. I bought a footprint to protect the tent floor. To keep the weight down, I never take the stuff sack for backpacking. The detachable hood on my Osprey 65 litre pack is big enough to hold the tent and pegs, with the poles in a side pocket. The main quality of this tent is one which I have never had in another tent: no moisture on the inside, regardless of the weather. I borrowed an ultralight tent from a cousin in New Zealand when my pack did not arrive. The inside was always wet. The relatively separate hood on my pack serves as a good location to pack a wet tent in case of rain, without getting pack contents wet. I am thinking of all this at present because a friend has just telephoned to offer to drive me to a trail in the mountains in August or early September. This is currently looking like a good plan for this year's walk. There are undoubtedly lighter tents available, but not in my budget at present.
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2020? Looks like.... nowhere! 😁
If you decide for an MSR, I would strongly suggest getting a footprint tarp as well. Super light weight but extra peace of mind that the floor of your tent is protected.
Whatever you decide, happy camping!
Buen Camino
This reminded me: IF weight is an issue and IF you use a poncho, you can use said poncho opened up under your tent. That is what I did and it worked really well 🙂
Happy camping!
(Just typing this gives me pangs of longing 😁)
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2020? Looks like.... nowhere! 😁
I am thinking of all this at present because a friend has just telephoned to offer to drive me to a trail in the mountains in August or early September. This is currently looking like a good plan for this year's walk.
Oh, how wonderful! 😎
 
D

Deleted member 67185

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This reminded me: IF weight is an issue and IF you use a poncho, you can use said poncho opened up under your tent. That is what I did and it worked really well 🙂
Happy camping!
(Just typing this gives me pangs of longing 😁)
Absolutely!!!! :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (14), Portuguese (15), Le Puy (17), Ingles (17), VDLP (18), Lana (18), Madrid (19) + more
This is just some general advice in regards to lightweight camping tents:

For the person who wants to go the lightest way possible - you can't beat Dyneema Composite Fabric (DCF), formerly known as 'Cuben Fiber". It is the top choice for American long-distance trail hikers because the price is worth the comfort of a 5-6 month hike in the wilderness.

I caution purchasing a DCF tent for a beginner because it is much more expensive, and is usually more difficult to pitch. Most of the DCF tents are not free-standing and set up by positioning trekking poles. Tent site selection is more of a concern due to wind and a less durable tent floor. Any new tent owner should practice set up with different weather conditions at home, before taking the tent out in the wild.

If purchasing from a cottage manufacturer, take a look at the reviews for customer support and repairs. Some companies are fantastic, others... well not so much. ;)

I personally use a Six Moon Design DCF tent called the "Skyscape X". Unfortunately, the model is discontinued. When I was trekking in Patagonia, I was laughed at several times because other hikers thought my tent looked "nothing". I must admit, it was more of a challenge for me to set up in the violent winds than the others with free-standing MSR and Big Agnes models. Still, it did the job, and is definitely worth the 15 oz. weight penalty in my backpack. I carried the tent on the Camino Salvador, Camino Primitivo, Camino Invierno, and my Camino Mozarabe section, but never needed to set it up because of fantastic albergues.

*** To be transparent- I am an ambassador for Six Moon Designs Feel free to ask me if you have any questions about any of their stuff
83457B72-1363-452D-B45D-B99D96FD888B.jpeg
 
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martin1ws

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Somport to Finisterre Jul-Aug 2018; Munich to Lindau (Germany) Sep 2020
I never paid attention to camping gear because I thought there are the albergues... until recently, when I thought... oh, maybe travelling to Spain may be allowed before albergues will be opened again.

Which camping mat / sleeping pad are you using? I think for sleeping well the right sleeping pad is essential. Maybe you can comment your "best choice" and a good price-quality-alternative.
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2020? Looks like.... nowhere! 😁
I never paid attention to camping gear because I thought there are the albergues... until recently, when I thought... oh, maybe travelling to Spain may be allowed before albergues will be opened again.

Which camping mat / sleeping pad are you using? I think for sleeping well the right sleeping pad is essential. Maybe you can comment your "best choice" and a good price-quality-alternative.
I don’t know about ‘best choice’ but I used one like this (or similar - I bought it 6 yrs ago).
Not cheap but did the job 🙂

Thinking out loud now....apologies if a bit off-thread:
IF we were allowed to travel but the albergues were closed....It would probably mean all cafes, restaurants would be closed too... ? So cooking gear would also be required.... Ah but wait, lighting fires in Spain is forbidden and extremely dangerous.... Food for thought (or lack of 😉)
 

martin1ws

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Somport to Finisterre Jul-Aug 2018; Munich to Lindau (Germany) Sep 2020
I don’t know about ‘best choice’ but I used one like this (or similar - I bought it 6 yrs ago).
Not cheap but did the job 🙂
...
Thank you for the sleeping mat tip.

...
Thinking out loud now....apologies if a bit off-thread:
IF we were allowed to travel but the albergues were closed....It would probably mean all cafes, restaurants would be closed too... ? So cooking gear would also be required.... Ah but wait, lighting fires in Spain is forbidden and extremely dangerous.... Food for thought (or lack of 😉)
At the moment the bars and restaurants are closed in Germany... but many offer something to-go or for delivering. So there may be a time when the albergues are still closed but you can buy food at some cafes or restaurants in Spain as well... even if these cafes or restaurants are closed for normal use and you cannot sit there for eating and drinking.
I would be more worried about the accessibility of toilets and showers... but it is much too early to really plan such details... it is more about hoping and dreaming...
 
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domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2020? Looks like.... nowhere! 😁
Thank you for the sleeping mat tip.



At the moment the bars and restaurants are closed in Germany... but many offer something to-go or for delivering. So there may be a time when the albergues are still closed but you can buy food at some cafes or restaurants in Spain as well... even if these cafes or restaurants are closed for normal use and you cannot sit there for eating and drinking.
I would be more worried about the accessibility of toilets and showers... but it is much too early to really plan such details... it is more about hoping and dreaming...
i am right here with you about the dreaming 😎🙂
 

Barbara

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
I think I'll be using my Thermarest rolled up round my tent. I've had it for a long time. If you want light and cheap and don't mind the bulk you could use a foam yoga mat. Otherwise I found some on Amazon under 500 grams, not self inflating but easy to inflate by mouth for around 30 euros. Yoga mats don't get punctures, though.
 

swilcox

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Norte (2019)
Can anyone recommend a suitable tent, nominally for two people, but which I will be using solo? Properly waterproof, with a floor, sealed seams, and quick to put up. Preferably with the inner liner tent already attached and the pole or poles on the outside. Hooks not a channel for the poles. Needs to not blow away in a gusty wind. Not a full mountain spec, but not throw away rubbish. Weight as low as possible consistent with not needing to sell my house to pay for it?
The one I currently have meets all these requirements except for weight, plus it's bigger than I now need. I used to have a donkey to carry my stuff, and had to put her saddle and bags inside. Weighed 3.4 kg. I'd like to get down to under 2kg. Biking, so can go to 12kg all included. Tent, mat, sleeping bag and all usual stuff.

To see the tent I have. I need something like this but smaller.
Check out Big Agnus tents. They are awesome!! And lightweight and roomy and durable 3 season tents
 

Barbara

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
Thank you, Swilcox, I've already found my tent, but if anyone else is looking then I'm sure they will find that of interest.
 
Camino(s) past & future
"2000" StJPdeP to Hunto
2016 Roncesvalles to Burgos
2019 GR Maspalomas to Gandar
2019 Burgos to Leon
I used a Vango Hogan on the GR10 from Henday to SJPDP in 2000, still being manufactured today but pricey £200 to £350, weight 1.8 Kg but roomy for 1 and comfortable. I am going to carry it on my next camino towards Santiago due to my not liking to have no reliable shelter and prefering to not book ahead.
 

Barbara

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
Hi William. I take it you are planning the Frances? You'll probably be able to put your tent next to Albergues once they are open and use some of their facilities.
 
Camino(s) past & future
"2000" StJPdeP to Hunto
2016 Roncesvalles to Burgos
2019 GR Maspalomas to Gandar
2019 Burgos to Leon
Barbara, Yes planning as such but for when? I want to finish from Leon to Finisterra, but the numbers of walkers on the Frances is off-putting. and there is so much fantastic walking and facilities on the different caminos that it is difficult to choose which to do! and the people, and food, !
 

Barbara

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
Barbara, Yes planning as such but for when? I want to finish from Leon to Finisterra, but the numbers of walkers on the Frances is off-putting. and there is so much fantastic walking and facilities on the different caminos that it is difficult to choose which to do! and the people, and food, !
Well, that's the big if, isn't it? I'm not keen on the Frances because of the lack of solitude myself. The problem is of course that the facilities are there because of the walkers, and the walkers are there because of the facilities. Umm. I'm happy to meet other people, just not all the time. And I need my sleep. I don't cope well with bag rustlers at stupid o'clock, so I often stay in small hotels. I find the less frequented routes more to my taste, and not invariably in Spain. There are a lot of pilgrimages in many countries, after all.
 


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