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Lightweight Tent Recommendations

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
[Posts moved from another thread]

While we’ve got you here @davebugg I’m love to know your top recommendations for a lightweight tent (truly lightweight, not a big box store 2kg offering that claims to be lightweight)
 
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davebugg

A Pilgrimage is time I spend praying with my feet
Past OR future Camino
2019
While we’ve got you here @davebugg I’m love to know your top recommendations for a lightweight tent (truly lightweight, not a big box store 2kg offering that claims to be lightweight)
I can offer some suggestions but it will be helpful to know:
How do you want to use the tent (camino, wilderness backpacking, car camping. .
How many people does it need to house
Do you want your backpack or other gear inside the tent or is it ok to leave outside under the tent door vestibule.
What type of budget allowance for purchase
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
One option would be solo, one would be for use with 6’2 husband as well.
To be carried in backpack, not car (hence lightweight). To be used on NZ trails where there are no huts - and hopefully Arctic Circle Trail in Greenland, perhaps Caminos etc.
I think my preference is for gear inside the tent - I’ve never been able to get my head around the idea of leaving it in the vestibule probably getting wet! But I’m open to learn.
Budget could be flexible - we’re not made of money but would be willing to spend what is needed. Thanks for your advice!
 

davebugg

A Pilgrimage is time I spend praying with my feet
Past OR future Camino
2019
One option would be solo, one would be for use with 6’2 husband as well.
To be carried in backpack, not car (hence lightweight). To be used on NZ trails where there are no huts - and hopefully Arctic Circle Trail in Greenland, perhaps Caminos etc.
I think my preference is for gear inside the tent - I’ve never been able to get my head around the idea of leaving it in the vestibule probably getting wet! But I’m open to learn.
Budget could be flexible - we’re not made of money but would be willing to spend what is needed. Thanks for your advice!

One last question; are you able to reasonably access backpacking gear from Europe and North America, including the USA?
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
One last question; are you able to reasonably access backpacking gear from Europe and North America, including the USA?
Being in NZ these are not the easiest options but I would not rule them out. My current interest is to find the best options (for my purposes) available. Shipping is always a possibility if there are no friends travelling here.
 
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davebugg

A Pilgrimage is time I spend praying with my feet
Past OR future Camino
2019
Being in NZ these are not the easiest options but I would not rule them out. My current interest is to find the best options (for my purposes) available. Shipping is always a possibility if there are no friends travelling here.

This was a bit tough because of international distribution stuff and availability. That and the fact that I do not get to do any hands on testing from either European, Australian, or New Zealand gear manufacturers.

Concerns:
  • Condensation created by two people on interior walls in wetter or more humid climates.
  • Space for two people if the tent needs to shelter from rain for prolonged periods.
  • Space for two people PLUS their gear.
Weight:

If you are always going to be with another person when you are using a tent, the increased weight of a 2+ person tent can be divided so that both people are carrying part of the tent system; typically the weight each person carries is actually lighter than what one person would carry if they had a 1 person tent. Because you are also wanting a tent for solo use, the tent's weight will need to be a compromise between interior space and weight. Maybe.

Most of the time, 2 person, budget-friendly tents means that many such tents will not allow for two people PLUS their gear to be inside the tent. this means that the vestibule space which shelters the door(s) will be important for not only sheltering backpacks, but also to allow cooking during rainy weather using a small backpacking stove.

Configuration:

A primary issue is the configuration of openings and materials to allow the best airflow in order to minimize condensation if a single walled tent is used. If it is a double walled tent, then the primary focus is ease of entrance and exit for two people.

Durability:

Inexpensive means compromises to both materials and construction: the manufacturer may make the purchaser seal the tent seams (easy to do). The bottom of the tent may be more liable to wear and tear so a 'footprint' will be desired to place between the tent and the bare ground (a 1 ounce sheet of polycro plastic is cheap and durable). Tent stakes might need to be upgraded (again, an inexpensive thing to do). Lines for tie outs and staking may also benefit from inexpensive upgraded material.

Budget Choice to Audition: The 3F UL Lanshan 2 tent

Cost: 90.00 to 156.00 USD depending on who you get it from.

I have had hands on with this tent and it surprised me with how decent it is. For the price, I cannot think of a better choice, so it will provide you with a model by which to compare other offerings in a similar price point. It is not a hyperlite tent, but it does fall into the ultralight category for a 2-person tent at 1158 grams (2.5 pounds).

It would require (as most tents at this level and weight would) your ability to be OK with close quarters for two people. Air mattresses or pads will be snug together. Backpacks will need to remain in the vestibule, which is roomy enough to also allow cooking.

The thing that made me focus on this tent among other choices, like some Tarptent models, was that I could find it listed at a New Zealand store https://vunohiking.co.nz/product/3f-ul-lanshan-2-tent-ultralight-weight/

There are other tents which have similar specifications on that store's website, but I have no hands on with them. But if you find that the other offerings seem comparable or better than the 3F UL tent model, then the 3F UL will give you a comparative by which to assess your other choices.

One of the things that I really like about the tent is the inner mesh tent body. If it is a nice night outside, but you want to avoid the biting bugs while looking at the stars, just leave off the rain fly and you are stargazing thru the roof. This is also is why condensation is well controlled. The condensation forms on the exterior rainfly and runs down to the ground outside.


The "I can stretch my budget" Choice to Audition: The Zpacks Triplex.

The Triplex is my Zpacks Duplex on steroids. This is a 2 person + their gear + their dog sized tent. If Zpacks did not offer international shipping, I would not have included it in the post. I did not confirm if New Zealand is included in shipping locations.

Weight: 622 grams (1.3 pounds). Yup. . it is lighter than the 2-person 3F UL Lanshan. So even though you have a very roomy tent for two, you are still lighter than a lot of 1-person backpacking tents. The tent also packs into a pretty compact bundle, so it can be carried inside a backpack if desired. As a solo tent, you could invite your Camino family in for a visit.

There are doors on both sides, so in the middle of the night when the other person needs to get out to take a nature break, the jostling and getting crawled over is absent. It also allows for wonderful cross ventilation.

Condensation is dealt with very efficiently for a single-walled tent. Any condensate that does form on the roof runs down and out the mesh space between the roof and the floor and onto the exterior ground outside.

It is pretty much ready to go out of the package; I cannot find anything that needs upgrading. I do not even use a ground cloth with my Duplex, which is the same material and construction as the Triplex.

Cost: $700.00 USD. Ouch!!! For that price you can buy 5 or 6 of the 3F UL Lanshan. But the Triplex is tough and durable and will last a long, long time. Plus you can throw dinner parties when it is wet out :)

Anyway, If I were looking at tents at either end of the budget spectrum, those two are what I could use as comparatives when shopping for a new tent.

If there are other thoughts or concerns you have, let me know.
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
This was a bit tough because of international distribution stuff and availability. That and the fact that I do not get to do any hands on testing from either European, Australian, or New Zealand gear manufacturers.

Concerns:
  • Condensation created by two people on interior walls in wetter or more humid climates.
  • Space for two people if the tent needs to shelter from rain for prolonged periods.
  • Space for two people PLUS their gear.
Weight:

If you are always going to be with another person when you are using a tent, the increased weight of a 2+ person tent can be divided so that both people are carrying part of the tent system; typically the weight each person carries is actually lighter than what one person would carry if they had a 1 person tent. Because you are also wanting a tent for solo use, the tent's weight will need to be a compromise between interior space and weight. Maybe.

Most of the time, 2 person, budget-friendly tents means that many such tents will not allow for two people PLUS their gear to be inside the tent. this means that the vestibule space which shelters the door(s) will be important for not only sheltering backpacks, but also to allow cooking during rainy weather using a small backpacking stove.

Configuration:

A primary issue is the configuration of openings and materials to allow the best airflow in order to minimize condensation if a single walled tent is used. If it is a double walled tent, then the primary focus is ease of entrance and exit for two people.

Durability:

Inexpensive means compromises to both materials and construction: the manufacturer may make the purchaser seal the tent seams (easy to do). The bottom of the tent may be more liable to wear and tear so a 'footprint' will be desired to place between the tent and the bare ground (a 1 ounce sheet of polycro plastic is cheap and durable). Tent stakes might need to be upgraded (again, an inexpensive thing to do). Lines for tie outs and staking may also benefit from inexpensive upgraded material.

Budget Choice to Audition: The 3F UL Lanshan 2 tent

Cost: 90.00 to 156.00 USD depending on who you get it from.

I have had hands on with this tent and it surprised me with how decent it is. For the price, I cannot think of a better choice, so it will provide you with a model by which to compare other offerings in a similar price point. It is not a hyperlite tent, but it does fall into the ultralight category for a 2-person tent at 1158 grams (2.5 pounds).

It would require (as most tents at this level and weight would) your ability to be OK with close quarters for two people. Air mattresses or pads will be snug together. Backpacks will need to remain in the vestibule, which is roomy enough to also allow cooking.

The thing that made me focus on this tent among other choices, like some Tarptent models, was that I could find it listed at a New Zealand store https://vunohiking.co.nz/product/3f-ul-lanshan-2-tent-ultralight-weight/

There are other tents which have similar specifications on that store's website, but I have no hands on with them. But if you find that the other offerings seem comparable or better than the 3F UL tent model, then the 3F UL will give you a comparative by which to assess your other choices.

One of the things that I really like about the tent is the inner mesh tent body. If it is a nice night outside, but you want to avoid the biting bugs while looking at the stars, just leave off the rain fly and you are stargazing thru the roof. This is also is why condensation is well controlled. The condensation forms on the exterior rainfly and runs down to the ground outside.


The "I can stretch my budget" Choice to Audition: The Zpacks Triplex.

The Triplex is my Zpacks Duplex on steroids. This is a 2 person + their gear + their dog sized tent. If Zpacks did not offer international shipping, I would not have included it in the post. I did not confirm if New Zealand is included in shipping locations.

Weight: 622 grams (1.3 pounds). Yup. . it is lighter than the 2-person 3F UL Lanshan. So even though you have a very roomy tent for two, you are still lighter than a lot of 1-person backpacking tents. The tent also packs into a pretty compact bundle, so it can be carried inside a backpack if desired. As a solo tent, you could invite your Camino family in for a visit.

There are doors on both sides, so in the middle of the night when the other person needs to get out to take a nature break, the jostling and getting crawled over is absent. It also allows for wonderful cross ventilation.

Condensation is dealt with very efficiently for a single-walled tent. Any condensate that does form on the roof runs down and out the mesh space between the roof and the floor and onto the exterior ground outside.

It is pretty much ready to go out of the package; I cannot find anything that needs upgrading. I do not even use a ground cloth with my Duplex, which is the same material and construction as the Triplex.

Cost: $700.00 USD. Ouch!!! For that price you can buy 5 or 6 of the 3F UL Lanshan. But the Triplex is tough and durable and will last a long, long time. Plus you can throw dinner parties when it is wet out :)

Anyway, If I were looking at tents at either end of the budget spectrum, those two are what I could use as comparatives when shopping for a new tent.

If there are other thoughts or concerns you have, let me know.
Thanks for that informative assessment. It is gratifying that my own search had lead me to the Zpacks as my “gold standard” - triplex for two of us and I was wavering between one of the single options or duplex for solo trips. I have time to ponder because I tore my Achilles three months ago and am having a slower-than-expected recovery.
 
Past OR future Camino
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
When this was on the other thread I posted the following to @Kiwi-family in a Private Message so not to clutter up @davebugg's thread. I'm posting publicly now partly to get Dave's thoughts and also to let others interested in tents see one that I like. I'll post more about it in a bit to reply to the questions that @Kiwi-family asked in the private conversation.

Tent - MSR Hubba Hubba NX

I picked up the Hubba Hubba about 6 years ago as a compromise backpacking/car camping tent. The double Hubba means it is a two person tent, the NX means second generation, MSR is Mountain Safety Research.

I'll just give some links now but I'm willing to discuss the tent later if you wish.

The manufacturer's product webpage:

This is a somewhat slow presentation but pretty good:
youtube video id: rALXJq1bPyk

Not said above but if you have a rectangle of cord with a few loops in it then it should be possible to use just the fly or the tent could be erected under the fly if it were raining.
 

peregrino_tom

Member
Past OR future Camino
.
Well Dave and Rachel
just when you thought you’d got this one done and dusted…. here’s an alternative perspective

First I think that if you identify a range of all-rounder uses for this tent that you should buy one that’s able to handle the more testing situations you describe, like the Arctic Circle Trail and NZ mountains, even though that could leave you with something a bit heavier than you could get away with in sheltered sunnier climes.

Also, if hiking hill or mountain trails in NZ is going to be the main use then I’d try and find some NZ forums to get a view as to how well the Z Packs Duplex/Triplex works in those conditions. Certainly for hill walking and high trails here in the UK, you rarely get a few days in a row without squally, hostile weather, and the Duplex doesn’t have much of a fan club here. Whatever you think about its durability, its fly just doesn’t come down low enough to protect you from the weather here, although this can be a positive ventilating feature in hot weather conditions elsewhere.
There are also questions about the longevity of DCF material - it’s looking like it has about half the useable life of nylon. So if longer term sustainability and handing the tent down to your kids is a consideration, that’s a further point for review, especially given the high purchase price.
I have that Langshan 2p UL tent (in white). It is well made and functional and if your budget is low then it’s OK, but the space, especially the headroom is not going to be very comfortable for 2 people. I paid about $120 USD in 2019. I was curious about it, but I’ve got better tents so I’ll put it up on ebay in the Spring.

My recommendation as the best compromise between price and useability in the conditions you mention is the Dan Durston X-Mid 2p https://durstongear.com/product/x-mid-2p https://www.adventurealan.com/durston-x-mid-2p-tent-review/
It’s out of stock at the moment, but that’s because it’s such a competitive price for a tent that so many serious hikers really rate. You can ask to be notified when it’s back in stock.
I’m on the trek-lite forum which is a really tough audience for any new tent. Whenever one comes along it gets a scrupulous testing in UK conditions and most don’t come up to scratch.
Dan Durston bravely came on the forum in 2018 when he was launching the 1 person X-Mid and has used more than 2 years (62 pages) of dialogue from some really pernickety critics to modify and improve his tents. http://www.trek-lite.com/index.php?threads/dan-durston-massdrop-x-mid.4960/

Otherwise, If you want to play it safe you might want to look at some over-engineered (but more expensive) options like the Hilleberg Anaris or the simple but incredibly durable pyramid configurations from Locus Gear and Mountain Laurel Designs (MLD) (if you don’t mind a pole sitting in the middle of the tent…)
cheers, tom
 

linkster

¡Nunca dejes de creer!
Past OR future Camino
2022
I have a Zpacks Duplex. It gets pretty good reviews from thru hikers. I live in Southwest Florida. I have used it in rain, and wind, but not a hurricane (lol). I think the fly that covers the doors is more than adequate. I do think that you would have to be careful with the vents that run along the head and foot. There is a shock cord attachment on the interior that can tighten up the vent, and it is important not to push on the edges of the tent. I can see how rain could enter the tent if the tent is not pitched correctly.

Here is a YouTube video that shows the potential for leaks at the head and foot vents.
 
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Jo Jo

Active Member
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Via di Francesco, July '15,
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Look at the American cottage manufacturers (I'm not sure about import fees to N.Z.). Zpacks (the standard), but I prefer Tarptent. Also Lightheart Gear. Yuma Gear. Hyperlight Mountain Gear. Mountain Laurel Designs.
 
Past OR future Camino
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
I bought our Hubba in 2014 shortly after the NX model came out. There could have been lots of other tents introduced since that may better suit your needs but, on the plus side, you have years worth of reviews and ratings on the tent to look at. Since buying our tent I really haven't looked at other tents except for the Zpack ones. Mostly online videos but one erected. The owners had great things to say about it but one was the only will happen once price they paid.

I wouldn't have mentioned the Hubba if I didn't think it would do well in NZ. We brought ours there in 2016 but Peg is into comfort more than she was and we only used it for a short stay at Tongariro NP. I'm also familiar with NZ weather from 5 to 6 months wandering there in the 70s. It may not be the best tent for the most extreme conditions but I'm not sure if that is where you may be spending most of your time. For Greenland though I have no idea.

The tent is freestanding except for staking at the vestibule ends but can be stacked all around and at guy lines for extra strength in the wind. It is screened so on the nice beach days without the fly you can get good views of all sand flys outside. I'm 5' 10", Peg 5' 2" so our packs go inside at her side and then there is still room at the feet. That is where our midsized, claustrophobic dog would sleep. He hated going inside but wasn't anxious unlike when forced into our 12' x 6' travel trailer (we gave up, he slept in the car). That gives you an idea of the roomingness of the tent.

Any questions?
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
I have the MSR Hubba NX 1 person tent. It is undoubtedly the best tent that I have ever had. the lightest, for what I was willing to pay for it, and the most comfortable. I always use it with the footprint, as an extra way to keep the floor and the tent contents dry. Also, after two days of National Park campsites at the borders of Banff National Park, I head into the backcountry, where I must find a place to pitch my tent each night and there are no campgrounds. The footprint weighs about 130 g. and protects the floor from punctures. One feature of this tent, which I did not expect and am delighted with, is that I never get any moisture on the inside of the tent, as I have had on all previous tents. But I would not take it on camino: too much for me to carry, and hopefully not necessary. There is now a new kind of expanded footprint available, where one can leave behind the main body of the tent in favour of an expanded tent floor, with no screening for bug and snake protection. I prefer not to consider this at present, but who knows what the future may bring? Happy Camping.
 

davebugg

A Pilgrimage is time I spend praying with my feet
Past OR future Camino
2019
Anyway, If I were looking at tents at either end of the budget spectrum, those two are what I could use as comparatives when shopping for a new tent.

I had hoped to avoid having what I posted be looked at as specific recommendations. They were not, as the sentence above indicates. My apologies for any confusion due to my being too vague in pointing that out.

I try to avoid pointing to specific bits of stuff and saying that THIS is what to buy. There are too many variables in both user and use to go in that direction. I had asked the OP some questions in order to try and ascertain how a tent might be used and in what conditions, then chose two tents at polar opposite end of the budget spectrum that I felt could serve as good examples of what to look for, at a minimum, when shopping for tents.

There is not a single tent or a tent manufacturer mentioned in this thread (to this point in the thread) that I have not used. All of the tents mentioned have good and not so good points. I cannot fault any of the tents mentioned as choices as all have performed at least adequately, though some are larger in usable space for two people than others, and some weigh more than others, and some require more care than others, and some are quicker or easier to set up and tear down than others.

There are tents which I prefer over others in specific conditions and situations over other tents. On my shelves, I have 22 models and brands of tents that are dated from 2012 to January 2021 (well, it is out of the box but hasn't been used in the field :) ). Most are still in production and manufacturer's inventories. I have the luxury of picking a tent based on a single 'best use' feature: from humid and wet climate to expected winds and cold, to rocky and treeless terrain where pitching a non-freestanding tent is difficult. The issue isn't what tent is the best at ONE feature as some in this thread have pointed out; it is about what tents are above average at handling the broadest range of conditions which its user wants it to handle.

That is why I looked at the features, weight, and prices of tents and fitted them into the stated needs of the user. I wanted useful comparative models from which the OP could look at ANY tent when evaluating a potential purchase, regardless of where a budget might lie.

If either of the tents I mentioned are used for comparisons to candidates for purchase, they provide a minimum set standard in usability and features by which to judge other tents based on what the OP wanted. In other words, does a Sierra Designs, MSR, Dan Durston, HMG, MLD, TarpTent, etc give AT LEAST the same value and features for the OP as the two I mentioned. This also would include tents that I have no hands on experience with due to where a manufacturer is located.

This is how I tried to approach either ruling in, or ruling out, any specific brand or model of tent.

I do want to address some stated concerns about Zpacks tents. These are concerns which I have a lot of experience and insight with, so hopefully this might be of help for this thread. This applies to any tent manufacturer who is using similar materials to Zpacks in their tents.

Let me start by saying that DCF/Cuben/Dyneema fabrics are not all created equal. It comes in different weights, like any other fabric, and is manufactured to differing standards. So a general critique of DCF must be based on a specific manufacturers product and on identical fabric construction. In fact, there are instances where 'DCF' fabric is sourced from counterfeit suppliers which is NOT DCF, but more common to the fabric used in utility tarps.

I have used the Zpacks tents on wilderness trails above 12,000 feet during intense thunderstorms, to desert conditions in Death Valley, to the wet and humid conditions of the Olympic Rain Forest, so its usability over a wide range of conditions, even during prolonged downpours of rain, is excellent. It does NOT use a fly system as it is a single walled tent. It has two generous vestibules which not only provide tons of room and protection, you can cook under it while leaning out of the door of the tent. Plus, one or both vestibules can be completely buttoned down in ultra extreme conditions..

I have run into the issue of some moisture not always draining out thru the mesh (which provides a huge benefit with ventilation thus condensation prevention and reduction). The correction is simple to make so that proper spacing is adjusted to the bathtub floor's tension. Most backpackers will run into moisture inside a tent - any tent - to some degree. Dealing with it when and if it occurs is simple.

The Dyneema fabric on my Duplex has 6 years and over 6,000 miles of wilderness terrain behind it, and durability is better than similar experiences with other common tent fabrics like silnylon or other polyester/nylon mixes. No tent, and I mean none, stay free from wear and tear. The question is how well does a tents useful longevity remain intact? Patching a small hole is quite different than fabric that is worn out and shredding, or rotting from UV exposure.

There is also the Commonsense Factor, which a few posts mentioned with regard to a tent that they use. No tent survives contact with a user who disregards basic tent placement when it is setup, nor laxity with basic tent care as part of its basic maintenance.

For all of the recommendations made, they are providing a good inventory of candidates to check out.
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
[Posts moved from another thread]

While we’ve got you here @davebugg I’m love to know your top recommendations for a lightweight tent (truly lightweight, not a big box store 2kg offering that claims to be lightweight)
I have used this Terra Nova tent, not sure how easy it is to buy outside the UK though.
Found it great. If terrain was rough I put my poncho underneath...
There’s also a version for 2 people.
 
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weradln

Member
Past OR future Camino
2019
For lightweight, small size for carrying, and inexpensive it's hard to beat a tarp. Telescopic hiking poles make great supports and about 8 small, T cross section, aluminum pegs like those sold by MSR and 30' of parachute cord gives you lots of flexibility to pitch the tarp lots of different ways. Under 1kg.
 
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Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
For lightweight, small size for carrying, and inexpensive it's hard to beat a tarp.
True. But there are reasons why I didn't suggest a tarp.

Edit: Sorry, a tarp is a very valid suggestion in general (I've not had good luck with them though). I was thinking only of the use the OP wanted suggestions for. @weradln's post is good for any future interested readers of the thread.
 
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weradln

Member
Past OR future Camino
2019
True. But there are reasons why I didn't suggest a tarp.
We are talking about the Camino here. Few bugs so a bug barrier isn't needed and temperate climate. The tarp is for rain, some protection from the wind (but will flap a lot more than a tent would).
 
Past OR future Camino
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
We are talking about the Camino here. Few bugs so a bug barrier isn't needed and temperate climate. The tarp is for rain, some protection from the wind (but will flap a lot more than a tent would).
About a minute after I posted I added an apology with an edit. The OP was looking for a tent for NZ and Greenland (post #3).
 
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davebugg

A Pilgrimage is time I spend praying with my feet
Past OR future Camino
2019
We are talking about the Camino here. Few bugs so a bug barrier isn't needed and temperate climate. The tarp is for rain, some protection from the wind (but will flap a lot more than a tent would).

A tarp could work very well for Camino, but that wasn't what the OP was asking about.
 
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Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
A quote taken from your excellent link:
"An average of about 7 metres of rain falls per year"
☔🌧️
A hut manager on the Milford Track said he saw 60 cm of rain fall in 24 hours (an inch an hour). We had four days with no rain though. The hikes the day before we started were cancelled due to a snowfall. We got to see the great waterfalls the rain creates but from melting snow. Peg rates it as the best hike she ever took.
 
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Past OR future Camino
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
My news feed must have noticed that I have had a spike in tent and camping web surfing. It told me that the Australian company Sea to Summit has recently introduced lightweight tents. Hope for lower shipping costs at least. The links I get bring up the USA version of the website so do your own search.
 
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Undermanager

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Madrid (x2)
VDLP
Salvador
Primitivo
Finisterra / Muxia
Lana
Just sold my Terra Nova Southern Cross 2 for 500 spondoolies. Bullet-proof it is, but didn't get any use to talk of, and it's fun to change tents :) So, with an eye on Camino-ing again perhaps next year, and realistically thinking that it's either hotels or camping rather than hostels, I've been doing a bit of research. I'm starting to think that the Lanshan Pro 2 3-season is the one to go for. Very lightweight (half the weight of the Southern Cross), can use treking poles, very inexpensive, two minutes to put and down, packs down to nothing, they look like they'll hold up to any weather but would be perfect for a hot country like Spain. A footprint is available, too, or Tyvek. The Youtube reviews look good. Another possibility is to make one as it doesn't look too hard.

Has anyone got one? Thoughts for Spain caminos?
 

peregrino_tom

Member
Past OR future Camino
.
I'm starting to think that the Lanshan Pro 2 3-season is the one to go for.
I've got the 2019 Lanshan 2, slightly smaller and 200g heavier. Well made and, although a pretty standard shape, it's well thought-out. If the new lightweight material is as good as they claim then the Pro is amazing VFM. The whole tent-on-the-camino business remains problematic IMHO, particularly trying to second-guess the future and what will be allowable and what will be prudent - and when...
But that shouldn't stop you getting it for general hiking - I recall you had some adventures on the PW a few years' back - and this tent looks like it'd work pretty well for that kind of thing.
As for MYOG - so many good component sellers out there and shared patterns on Backpackinglight - just need a sewing machine and a table...🤔
 

davebugg

A Pilgrimage is time I spend praying with my feet
Past OR future Camino
2019
For the money, the Lanshan 2 is a decent tent. If the tent is only for yourself, it will have plenty of room for the person model.

The only real problematic issue with new Lansham tents, which is a pretty infrequent complaint, is inconsistently sealed seams. That is really a minor complaint, and is simple to deal with. You just redo the seams with a seam sealer once you have the tent in hand. To be honest, if I purchase a fabric-based tent, like a silnylon or ripstop nylon, I will seam seal the entire tent myself, anyway, if it is a single walled tent, or the rain fly if it is a double walled model.

If you already have some clear, 100% silicone 'caulk' and some mineral spirits around the house, you can mix up a batch of homemade seam sealer. A 50/50 mixture of 100% silicone 'caulk' and mineral spirits and mix until it is a gel like consistency, then spread the sealer on all seams using a flux brush.

OR, you can purchase a bottle or two of the excellent Gear Aid seam sealer in a brush bottle.

This YouTube video shows the basics of how to make and apply the seam sealer. Because the video shows resealing an older tent that had factory applied seam tape, just ignore the part where he is tearing off the seam 'tape'. I also prefer to use a canning jar, or a clear jar with a leak proof lid, to shake the mixture - with just a bit of stirring - into goo. I also prefer the use of flux brushes to apply the sealer due to their narrower and stiffer bristles so that I have better control as to where the seam sealer needs to be spread, keeping a thinner layer of sealant on the seams, and to help make sure that the sealer is 'squeezed' into every needle puncture along a seam.

Oh, and because seam sealers dry to a kind of 'tacky' texture, a sprinkling of talcum powder and wipe where the sealer was applied will be nice.

Leftover homemade sealer can be stored in the jar with an airtight lid. Or you can pour the leftovers onto a pair of trail runners and have waterproof footwear that beat gortex :)

For a footprint, I prefer to use a polycro material. It is tough, lighter than tyvek, and cheaper, too. Interestingly, once I cut the polycro sheet to match the footprint of the tent, I will apply a bit of seam sealer to the polycro, painting a few criss-cross lines across the sheet. Once dry, the tackiness will add to keeping the footprint in place under the tent.

Tyvek may or may not be less 'crinkly' under the tent, but it never was an issue for myself or others that I know who have used it.

For a camino-only use, I would probably consider skipping a full blown tent, and using a tarp shelter. With trekking poles and some lightweight guylines (which can also be used to dry laundry), and stakes, a roomy and adequate rain shelter is easily pitched. For those who have never used a tarp shelter for camping, it is best to practice setting up in the backyard ahead of time.
 

filly

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
I see Greenland mentioned so I might as well add my input.

I bought a Hilleberg Akto to hike in the Arctic Circle in Northern Sweden and subsequently on the St Olav’s Way in Norway. Pairs its way in no time.

It is the Rolls Royce of Swedish tents (though amazingly ‘crafted’ in Estonia). Light and easy to set up. Double skinned which helps in cold climes. Did me proud in Romania.... and is ready for action on the Pennine Way when lockdown eases. Ideal for the smaller single.

Big Agnes also needs a mention from one of you experts!
 
Published on Amazon
Guide to the 16 main caminos with maps, pictures, hyperlinks and other information.
Learn Spanish for the Camino
Enhance your Camino experience by learning about the Spanish language and culture.
Past OR future Camino
cf (2), de la plata, cp. (2003 -2018)
I have used this Terra Nova tent, not sure how easy it is to buy outside the UK though.
Found it great. If terrain was rough I put my poncho underneath...
There’s also a version for 2 people.
Terra nova my tent of choice BUT the mere mention of ARCTIC has me going for HILLEBERG AKTO. Heavier than its competitors but will take ANYTHING! Have used footprints for both makes and value them highly. Configuration, purpose etc is highly important as has already been mentioned but of course availability is also an important factor. Good hunting and buen camino.

Samarkand.
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
I see Greenland mentioned so I might as well add my input.

I bought a Hilleberg Akto to hike in the Arctic Circle in Northern Sweden and subsequently on the St Olav’s Way in Norway. Pairs its way in no time.

It is the Rolls Royce of Swedish tents (though amazingly ‘crafted’ in Estonia). Light and easy to set up. Double skinned which helps in cold climes. Did me proud in Romania.... and is ready for action on the Pennine Way when lockdown eases. Ideal for the smaller single.

Big Agnes also needs a mention from one of you experts!
My walking partner used an Hilleberg Akto, nice tent, very sturdy.
 

davebugg

A Pilgrimage is time I spend praying with my feet
Past OR future Camino
2019
Big Agnes also needs a mention from one of you experts!

Here's part of a post I made just recently. it is based on doing QA gear testing for BA.
----------
"Maybe I shouldn't write this when I am hangry, and have skipped breakfast and am it is now a bit too early for lunch.

I do not remember which specific models of Roa I had tested a while back, but I hated them. Point blank, my unedited opinion. They were not a horrible feeling or fitting shoe, but they are not really good or bad at anything: cushioning, motion control, stability, traction, etc. It is like living in a room completely colored in beige; Bland and uninspiring.

But why did I despise them in such a visceral way? For wasting my time. For me, Roa means Regret On Arrival. It became apparent from the reactions they communicated to me about the reports I filed with them, that I was asked to gear test the two models they sent of a boot and a shoe NOT because they wanted actual QC testing, but because they thought I could lend credence to their veneer of claims about functionality for the wild.

I was upset enough with Roa that I donated their contract payment to one of the charities Jill and I support.

It is the same exact reason I despise certain models of 'stupid-lite backpacking tents, like the Big Agnes Tiger Wall Carbon. . .It was designed as a "Hey, look at me" statement, not as a significant upgrade over other functional and useful tents."

--------------


Certain models of BA tents are OK, but have been surpassed by cottage manufacturers like Gossamer Gear and TarpTent. In the last few years, BA has, in my mind, ignored commonsense and craftsmanship in order to grab market share back from their competitors.

So, if I were to choose a BA tent as a candidate, for the money and quality, I would stick to their non stupidlite stuff.
 

janeen

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Sept 2015 sept 2018
[Posts moved from another thread]

While we’ve got you here @davebugg I’m love to know your top recommendations for a lightweight tent (truly lightweight, not a big box store 2kg offering that claims to be lightweight)
Zpack is online pricey but worth it. I've just brought the duplex 2 person and it's only around 659 grams
 

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