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Looking for a review of these hiking boots.


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alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
#2

alaskadiver

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017-Camino Primitivo
2019- Invierno
#3
These aren’t made for serious walking or hiking. They are overpriced everyday shoes.
 
Last edited:

Marbe2

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 SJPD to Burgos
2017 Leon to Santiago
Pamplona to Santiago Mar. 2018
Burgos - SCDC (Oct 18)
#4
Personally,
I stay away from GTX shoes as they make the feet sweat..and when they get wet inside...they take longer to dry.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
#5
If you are committed to boots, fine, but if you are going for boots just because you think boots are the way to go, you should read some of @davebugg’s posts on shoes. He is one of several forum members who have actually walked long distance wilderness trails (AT and PCT), which the Camino is not. He is also extremely up to date on the research, the construction of shoes, the pros and cons of all different types. His recommendation is trail runners, which I had never heard of till I started reading his posts. In my 18th year of caminos, I finally gave up on hiking boots and hiking shoes and took a chance with trail runners. Every major shoe company has various models. I am now a born-again trail runner user, and I will never wear anything else on the camino.

Signed, a @davebugg acolyte

Some posts to get you started:

https://www.caminodesantiago.me/com...-boots-for-cf-october-2018.56516/#post-636400

https://www.caminodesantiago.me/com...ew-old-modality-of-walking.56153/#post-630471

https://www.caminodesantiago.me/com...shoes-or-hiking-boots.7621/page-5#post-615701
 

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lt56ny

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013-Frances SJP-Finisterre, 2015 Camino Le Puy-Santiago, 2017 Portugues Lisbon-Santiago 2018 Norte
#7
Leave the boots in the mud room at home
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 13
VdlP 14
LePuy 15
Invierno DosFaros CP 16
The 88, Japan 17
Sicily. Arles-Santiago Fall 18
#8
If you have foot concerns then trail runners may not be for everyone. Don't jump on this band wagon until you have a very good idea about what works for you. There are many factors to consider. :cool:
 

Tincatinker

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
#9
Well sticking the name in Google and ignoring the marketers and secondary sellers reviews they seem to get fairly poor reviews. Perhaps because they seem to be mainly marketed and reviewed as 'runners', not even 'trail runners', for which they look fairly impracticle. They are certainly not marketed as being suitable for long-distance hiking with a 6-10kg pack on your back, probably because they weren't visioned or designed for that kind of usage.
 

Hallonis

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances May/June 2018
#10
I haven't tried them. 500 grams, that's light for boots so that's a big plus. It seems the sole is sturdy enough but it shouldn't be too stiff, hard to say just from a picture. Also can't tell if there is enough protection around the toes when hitting pebbles and rocks. One concern I have is with the lacing, yeah that mechanism looks all smart and modern, but also breakable - and what you gonna do then?
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
#12
If you have foot concerns then trail runners may not be for everyone. Don't jump on this band wagon until you have a very good idea about what works for you. There are many factors to consider. :cool:
I have way more than my fair share of “foot concerns” and was skeptical as recently as 3 months ago. Are you referring to some specific ailment? I won’t list all of mine but trail runners have been almost miraculous.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" camino
Porto to SdC May 2019
#13
Mukluks for a walk in light snow? You might have a problem fitting the toe box into your showshoes.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 13
VdlP 14
LePuy 15
Invierno DosFaros CP 16
The 88, Japan 17
Sicily. Arles-Santiago Fall 18
#14
I have way more than my fair share of “foot concerns” and was skeptical as recently as 3 months ago. Are you referring to some specific ailment?
Hi Laurie. I hear you about foot injuries and also what you've discovered that works for you, and apparently for others. There may be issues where some folks might not find them the best solution. I'd like to wear something lighter, and have, but in Japan I went over on an ankle coming down off a steep peak and I'm pretty sure that if there wasn't the support of a mid high Salomon boot that my Henro could well have been over as I really pulled the tendons ahead of my ankle. Of course stabilizing one area like an ankle can cause the damage elsewhere higher up...like a knee. I've discussed this in with podiatrists, kinesiologists and others, and their advise for this injury is a boot. Any way, this is my situation. Pleased to hear that you've found a solution for yours as it's an ongoing debate in our walking circle here.

I have a 1500 km Camino For Alzheimer's Awareness (small plug!) coming up September 21st and I'm still trying to sort out what footwear to use as I'll complete by November 20th when its colder with potentially rain and possible snow higher up. Always it's "what do I wear on my feet this Camino?".
 

Malachiuri

New Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
St Jean to Burgos 2017
St Jean to Fisterra 2018
St Jean to Fisterra 2020 or Chemin Piemont
#15
I know of at least 2 professional elk guides that swear by the UA Fat tire series boots. One of which spent 30 days solo backpack hunting in 3 states wearing them.

I personally don't like em but there is no way to know if you will unless you try em for yourself.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
#16
Hi Laurie. I hear you about foot injuries and also what you've discovered that works for you, and apparently for others. There may be issues where some folks might not find them the best solution. I'd like to wear something lighter, and have, but in Japan I went over on an ankle coming down off a steep peak and I'm pretty sure that if there wasn't the support of a mid high Salomon boot that my Henro could well have been over as I really pulled the tendons ahead of my ankle. Of course stabilizing one area like an ankle can cause the damage elsewhere higher up...like a knee. I've discussed this in with podiatrists, kinesiologists and others, and their advise for this injury is a boot. Any way, this is my situation. Pleased to hear that you've found a solution for yours as it's an ongoing debate in our walking circle here.

I have a 1500 km Camino For Alzheimer's Awareness (small plug!) coming up September 21st and I'm still trying to sort out what footwear to use as I'll complete by November 20th when its colder with potentially rain and possible snow higher up. Always it's "what do I wear on my feet this Camino?".
I certainly don’t intend to challenge your medical diagnosis. Really, my comments are only directed to the many forum members (like me for the past 17 years) who don’t have any medical diagnosis, yet we gravitate instinctively towards boots and hiking shoes without full information. And as so many others have said, that is likely not to be the best choice of shoe for a Camino.

@falcon269 has long said that the only effective way to get enough support to protect the ankle is with a brace, and @davebugg recently confirmed that. https://www.caminodesantiago.me/com...ew-old-modality-of-walking.56153/#post-630471

So my suggestion for the newbies without a medical condition is simple —don’t just assume hiking shoes or hiking boots are best. Expand your horizons and throw trail runners into the mix.

And p.s., @High Endeavours, having just lost a very good friend to Alzheimers on Wednesday (though in reality she left us more than 5 years ago), I wish you much success on your walk.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Done the full Camino Francais last year and plan to do an extended Portuguese this year.
#17
As a UK hiker I did the 800km Francais in my favourite boots. I actually don't like wet feet at all. These always keep my feet dry (with waterproof trousers overlapping) and I only ever got one blister. I don't like trail runners, but each to their own eh!
This is from my blog in November last year.
"
Walking boot recommendation.
..................................................
Okay, so if I start singing 'These boots were made for walking', you will all instantly know who sung it won't you. Actually it doesn't matter because you don't get any points.
In May 2017 my old walking boots (which to be fair were very cheap and were never really 'tested'), finally died as the stitching started failing. Knowing I was in Iceland in July I needed to buy some new quality boots.
My criteria:
Waterproof, Durable, Long lasting, Commfortable, All leather, Over ankle height, Goretex lined, As light as possible.
My old ones were cheap and had various fabric sections as a lot of trendy looking boots seem to have these days. This time I wanted ones there were totally leather so that they would stand more chance of surviving walks that involved a lot of rock work. Price was not important if the boots were right. As they were likely to be quite expensive (for me) I knew that I would have to take care of them. This involves washing them down as often as practical, and applying the necessary creams to keep the leather in good condition.
I then spent a lot of time in various specialist stores trying on boots that fitted my specifications. Once I had narrowed it down to a few, I spent ages, on multiple occasions, walking around the various stores with them on...wearing the right socks!!!
In the end I chose Scarpa Terra GTX boots. They are very 'traditional' looking all leather boots that Scarpa actually list as 'Entry Level'. At the time they were only about £130 although if you shop out of season then you could probably get them for quite a bit less.
To me, they felt really good. Every time I tried them on and walked around in the store, they just gave me all the right messages. I sized them for very cold environments where I would be wearing thick socks. I also tried them with thinner socks for warm weather work and was perfectlg happy with the extra space and movement available.
So, were they the right choice? Damn right they were...100%. I have to say they were one amazing investment that I will get years of good use out of if I continue to look after them properly! I am in fact so pleased with them, I think one can pretty well guarantee that I will do...me buying two Scarpa creams for that very purpose.
Firstly I did some short walks in the Lancashire hills and then I did the Iceland trip in them. They were perfect for the job.
Then I did the 500 mile Camino in them, involving not only a lot of 'normal' walking but also a lot of rock climbing up and down. They endured some really tough ground conditions and also some very very bad weather...at times even walking in inches of water. On that long Camino, when I think of all the foot problems and maintenance of seasoned walkers, then I knew I had a winner having had just one blister on the entire trip...that being due to a sock anyway. My feet were always TOTALLY DRY, and this was clearly very unusual. With what I have put these through so far, if Scarpa call them entry level, then I can't possibly imagine what any more expensive boot could do. I mean, these were perfect in every way. This coming year, with what I have planned, they will be one thing I do not have to worry about at all. Oh, and another thing...for the guys out there, they also have men's versions.
I would totally recommend these boots!
41vBsky5mPL.jpg
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances/Finest September 2013
VDLP September 2016
Salamanca to Santiago/Finesterra/Muxia 2017
Camino(s) past & future
2016 Frances , 2017 Portuguesa , ( 2018 planning.. possibly Norte )
#20

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata.
#21
@Jane Farmer it is always good to get individual reviews but everyone has different feet; what worked on your first camino may not work for everyone. Scarpa boots nearly crippled me. I wore them for one camino, carried them for half of the next camino, and threw them in the bin thereafter. I've just completed the Via de la Plata (1,000km) in sandals.

The sad fact is that most of us won't know what shoes/boots/sandals we like until we have tried them on a camino. And even then we won't know if there is something better until we have tried that something better.
 

wcsjms

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2016) ; 1st Camino ; Frances Way ; 2017 Camino Frances begins August 10,2017
#23
If you have foot concerns then trail runners may not be for everyone. Don't jump on this band wagon until you have a very good idea about what works for you. There are many factors to consider. :cool:
This is so true...they are glorified sneakers on steroids and I have two pairs. Worn them on two caminos and probably again in 2019...but, if you need ankle support ..they have none...there are many places on the Frances and Norte that warrant ankle support...the rest of the time hikers are fine. So I bring both..if one gets wet or isn't needed I wear the other.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 13
VdlP 14
LePuy 15
Invierno DosFaros CP 16
The 88, Japan 17
Sicily. Arles-Santiago Fall 18
#24
And p.s., @High Endeavours, having just lost a very good friend to Alzheimers on Wednesday (though in reality she left us more than 5 years ago), I wish you much success on your walk.
Thanks for your well wishes and very sorry to hear of your loss. It's an ugly disease without cure. In this case it's my sister who was diagnosed with early on-set Alzheimer's over two years ago. I'll be posting on this Forum about our camino with a link to a new blog in September before departing. Jirit will also be placing the blog on the Canadian Company of Pilgrims website and Facebook page. It's all about increasing the awareness. We will begin on World Alzheimer's Day, September 21st from just north of Montpellier. My sister will be joining us with her husband at Castrès for parts of the 5 stages into Toulouse.

From what I can see, you are walking the Portuguese. I hope you are enjoying it. Certainly quieter in the hot summer months, but the local people and the food are wonderful. Bom Caminho!
Geoff
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances “2019”
#25
If you are committed to boots, fine, but if you are going for boots just because you think boots are the way to go, you should read some of @davebugg’s posts on shoes. He is one of several forum members who have actually walked long distance wilderness trails (AT and PCT), which the Camino is not. He is also extremely up to date on the research, the construction of shoes, the pros and cons of all different types. His recommendation is trail runners, which I had never heard of till I started reading his posts. In my 18th year of caminos, I finally gave up on hiking boots and hiking shoes and took a chance with trail runners. Every major shoe company has various models. I am now a born-again trail runner user, and I will never wear anything else on the camino.

Signed, a @davebugg acolyte

Some posts to get you started:

https://www.caminodesantiago.me/com...-boots-for-cf-october-2018.56516/#post-636400

https://www.caminodesantiago.me/com...ew-old-modality-of-walking.56153/#post-630471

https://www.caminodesantiago.me/com...shoes-or-hiking-boots.7621/page-5#post-615701
I am getting ready for my first Camino in September will be doing the Frances. I do have terribly high arches, arthritis, a hammertoe and the list goes on but nothing that my peers don't have, 'age and stage' I guess.
My question is that for me a trail runner is a good option but of course shoes are full of technical specs so I am looking at Altra Lone Peak with a 0mm heel drop but a wide toe box or New Balance Kaymin also a generous toe box but a 10mm heel drop ..I know its personal but would I be correct in assuming that a zero heel drop will demand more movability from the ankle, the knee and eventually the hip ? I am in Calgary, Canada and we don't have all the options available here..
Tomorrow I will be going to try both of these shoes on as they had to ship them in from a bigger city. So if anyone have experience with these shoes I would appreciate input.
 

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