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Anik2001

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Past: Camino Frances (2017), future: Frances again (2020)well hopefully 2021...
I was wondering if there was an online basic course for volonteering as hospitalero, something I could do while in confinement. I understand it’s better and more complete in person, but it would be as a basis, before we can go back to meeting people and take a complete course.
Thanks!
Anik
 
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Deleted member 67185

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Hi, Anik2001, ,

My thought would be to also consider going to the website for the Canadian Company of Pilgrims. Through that site will be a resources page and a faq page. If that does not have what you are looking for, then consider looking at the contact information and sending an email inquiry.

Given the depth of knowledge on this Forum about resources, I am sure someone may have other suggestions. :)

 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2018
However good the course they can't teach compassion and kindness.

When I did my "stint" at Rabanal we just had a lunch hosted by the CSJ and a talk through the daily routine, were told about the main characters in the village (Gaspar, Antonio and Toni, Maria and her brother Jose, Brother Xavier next door and Angela who had the only shop in the village in those days) and wished good luck.

the main skills you need include:
  • the ability to listen to Pilgrims' stories and sympathise with their trials
  • being able to wield a broom and a floor mop*
  • the patience of one of the lesser Saints - St Monica of Hippo for example
  • the ability to welcome Pilgrims in different languages - start off with maybe 6, you will learn more as your stay progresses
  • simple first aid skills
  • having commonsense
It might be useful to have some simple DIY skills too - in my time these included changing a washer on a dripping shower, unblocking a toilet bowl (seriously people, if it's blocked stop using it!), fixing a broken rucksack strap and working out why the electrics had tripped and getting the power back on*

It's not difficult but it is rewarding!


*we had a Hospitalero who had never done any housework in all of his 50 odd years so didn't know you added a cleaning agent to the water when mopping the floors - the kitchen floor got stickier and stickier until we realised. The same person immersed the electric milk heater in a bowl of water to clean it. The water got inside the electrics so when it was used the next day it tripped out the circuit and kept tripping it out until I came down and unplugged it. Perhaps "commonsense" should be top of the list?
 

SabineP

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
some and then more. see my signature.
I was wondering if there was an online basic course for volonteering as hospitalero, something I could do while in confinement. I understand it’s better and more complete in person, but it would be as a basis, before we can go back to meeting people and take a complete course.
Thanks!
Anik

Hi @Anik2001

HOSVOL , Spanish based . Hospitaleros Voluntarios.


You might want to pm forummember @LTfit who can give you more information regarding their program.
 
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Charbias

New Member
Past OR future Camino
St James Way ( 2011)
Portuguese Way - Lisbon to Porto ( 2020)
However good the course they can't teach compassion and kindness.

When I did my "stint" at Rabanal we just had a lunch hosted by the CSJ and a talk through the daily routine, were told about the main characters in the village (Gaspar, Antonio and Toni, Maria and her brother Jose, Brother Xavier next door and Angela who had the only shop in the village in those days) and wished good luck.

the main skills you need include:
  • the ability to listen to Pilgrims' stories and sympathise with their trials
  • being able to wield a broom and a floor mop*
  • the patience of one of the lesser Saints - St Monica of Hippo for example
  • the ability to welcome Pilgrims in different languages - start off with maybe 6, you will learn more as your stay progresses
  • simple first aid skills
  • having commonsense
It might be useful to have some simple DIY skills too - in my time these included changing a washer on a dripping shower, unblocking a toilet bowl (seriously people, if it's blocked stop using it!), fixing a broken rucksack strap and working out why the electrics had tripped and getting the power back on*

It's not difficult but it is rewarding!


*we had a Hospitalero who had never done any housework in all of his 50 odd years so didn't know you added a cleaning agent to the water when mopping the floors - the kitchen floor got stickier and stickier until we realised. The same person immersed the electric milk heater in a bowl of water to clean it. The water got inside the electrics so when it was used the next day it tripped out the circuit and kept tripping it out until I came down and unplugged it. Perhaps "commonsense" should be top of the list?
I totally agree with your advice - I have actually done a 2 day course (unfortunately haven't had the chance to use it yet) It was great fun and interesting - but boiled down to exactly the pointers you have given.
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
Hi @Anik2001

HOSVOL , Spanish based . Hospitaleros Voluntarios.


You might want to pm forummember @LTfit who can give you more information regarding their program.

No on-line courses are available through HOSVOL. Although the course is advised (and you get to meet fellow hospitaleros), if you are unable to do so it is sometimes possible to arrive a few days early to your post so that you have some extra time to learn the ropes.

Years ago during a HOSVOL yearly reunion I was told that the course is also used to weed out those they feel unfit for the task!
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
In 2008 Rebekah Scott and the Canadian Pilgrims devised an online Hospitaleros training course. They consisted of a series of weekly assignments based on the Spanish HOSVOL course. I was fortunate to be asked to be a part of testing the online course, but in the end, it was never accepted by HOSVOL. (On the basis of having done it I was assigned to an albergue in 2009),
After serving in two albergues I agreed to run HOSVOL courses in South Africa and have trained close to 130 South African peregrinos.
The problem with online training is that you have no idea if the trainee is an alcoholic, aggressive, confrontational, a bossy boots, selfish, cruel, lacking in compassion and so on. These are the things you look out for during the 2.5 days training, which includes lots of role play. Based on what you see, you can recommend a person or suggest that they are not suitable for certain albergues.
I've only had to include qualifying comments with three applications in 11 years. One person didn't want to be assigned to an albergue where cleaning, cooking, washing linen, or other housework was required. (He ended up serving in Salamanca which was perfect for him!) Another had very strong esoteric opinions and practices and mentioned that she would be taking her Tarot cards, crystal balls and an Ouija board to use with the pilgrims. The Camino is essentially Catholic and most of the albergues are parochial. All of her 'tools' would be frowned upon and not welcomed in the albergues. I suggested that she keep them in her bag until she got back to walking the Camino. The third person suffered from sleep apnea and needed her own room so an albergue with suitable private accommodation for the hospitalera would have to be found (one usually shares).
I suggest you read as much as you can about being a hospitalero. Here are a few links: https://americanpilgrims.org/hospitalero-training/
 

Anik2001

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Past: Camino Frances (2017), future: Frances again (2020)well hopefully 2021...
@sillydoll thank you for this information. I agree with what you say about knowing the kind of person who will be sent to work in albergues. My research for an online course was more a way to wait for a time when I can have a face to face course. The links you gave me will do the trick!
thanks again!
 
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