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Looking for input on difficulty, stages and your collective wisdom!

Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2013), Primitivo (2015), Muxia/Fisterra (2015), Haervejen (2017)
Hi all,

I have just started planning our next Camino beginning in early September 2020. We will be volunteering at Miraz on the Norte for the second half of August and then making our way to the beginning of our walk. I have had a total ankle replacement since our last walk on the Haervejen in Denmark and my husband has had two artificial discs in his neck. We sound like we are falling apart but we are pretty fit! I am trying to gauge the difficulty of the Aragones, the level of isolation and also trying to work out what our stages might be.

We have walked the Camino Primitivo. Is the Aragones from Somport more difficult? Downhill walking is somewhat difficult with my new ankle also. In terms of ruggedness, how does the walk compare to the Frances stage down from Cruz de Ferro to Molinaseca?

If I have a bad day with my ankle or Tom has neck issues would we be able to get a cab?

Also -- how much pavement walking is involved. My new ankle does not like pavement! If the trail is on and off the pavement, that is OK. But if I end up walking entire days on pavement, my ankle will revolt!

Here is what I am thinking for our route:
Somport to Villanua 16.6 k
Villanua to Jaca 15.4 k
Day off to visit the old monastery
Jaca to Arres 25.4 k
Arres to Ruesta 27.3 k
Ruesta to Sanguesa 22 k
Sanguesa to Monreal 27.2k
Monreal to Obanos 28.6
Obanos to Estella 23.6

We really prefer to walk 25 k or less (18-22 is ideal :)) so any thoughts on reorganizing the stages to shorten those three longer days would be appreciated. We would especially like to shorten to two long back-to-back stages from Sanguesa to Monreal to Obanos.

We were originally thinking of walking the Camino del Norte but the amount of pavement has scared me off. We are also considering deviating to the Camino de Invierno. Given that we go slow, we would not likely reach the Invierno until October and I am concerned about whether albergues may be closed for the season. I don't think we have time to do both the Aragones and the Invierno so thoughts on the pros and cons of each would also be welcome.

Thanks for sharing your wisdom,

Liz
 

MichaelF4

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese Coastal 2017
Camino Frances 2018
Camino Frances, Camino Invierno 2019
I can't offer an opinion on the Aragones but I too am curious. Interesting what you say about the Norte, I would like to do that walk as well but didn't realize there was so much asphalt. I do have some experience with the Invierno having walked it this summer. It is beautiful, well marked but under utilized. Expect to see little to no pilgrims and have days where there will be little open outside of the larger towns and cities. There where some fairly long stretches on asphalt as well as some days with some pretty tough up and down.
 

NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
I did the Aragon late in the season in 2016 when some albergues had already started to close. I like shorter stages and did these as my night stops:

Somport to
1 Villanua. 16.5
2 Jaca. 15.5
3 Santa Celia 15.2
4 Arres. 10.2
5 Artieda 18.2
6 Undues de Lerda 21.9
7 Sanguesa. 10.6
8 Izco 23.4
9 Tiebas 21.8
10 Obanos 14.9

I stayed in albergues in each spot. Izco’s albergue had a tiny shop from which you could purchase stuff to make dinner. If Izco is closed as another poster has indicated, you could do Sanguesa to Lumbiar (about 13 km), then Lumbiar to Monreal (about 22 km) via the gorgeous gorge to shorten that stage. Everywhere had either a communal dinner or a bar where you could get dinner. I carried more snacks and water with me as lunch/snack infrastructure isn’t as plentiful as on the Frances.

The trail from Somport to Villanua paralleled the road and a highway, so you could choose whether to have asphalt or path.
The trail from Jaca to Arres generally paralleled a very quiet road. The trail in some places had lots of roots to watch for, but it had shade. The trail from Arres to Ruesta was a mix of asphalt and dirt path, and after Artieda it worked hard to move you through and around road construction.

There seemed to be a lot of minor up and down - not hard or strenuous, just a lot. The area between Ruesta and Undues de Lerda involved a longish slog up a wooded hill. At the top, the forest disappears and a wide open downhill appears.

None of the downhills were like the descent after the Alto de Perdon or the descent into Molinaseca on the Frances.

After Obanos/Puenta la Reina, there are four villages with alberges before Estella.

It’s a great route.

Edited to amend the Izco info.
 
Last edited:

lindam

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, VDLP, Invierno, Portuguese, Madrid, Ingles, Fisterra, Muxia, Catalan/Aragones/Loyola Norte
Hello Liz,
Given your aversion to walking long stretches on pavement, I think you are wise to avoid walking the del Norte. It is a splendid route in terms of scenery, but oh too much pavement. Having walked the Invierno this past October, I can assure you that we did not have any difficulties with the albergues being closed for the season at that time.

I have walked part of the Aragones route (from where it joins with the Catalan Camino) and stayed in Artieda before walking to Sanguesa the next day. While this does not really help you in terms of shortening your proposed stages, I just wanted to mention that as the albergue in Artieda remains as one of my favourite albergues. I've stayed there twice and loved the warm hospitality, the food and its beautiful location. You may also take a look at options for accommodation on AirBnB. From time to time, I've been pleasantly surprised at what I have been able to find there as a pilgrim.

Happy planning!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2013), Primitivo (2015), Muxia/Fisterra (2015), Haervejen (2017)
Thanks! It was hard for me to give up my hope to walk the Norte. But since I got my new ankle, I’ve done some longer walking here in the states on the California Mission Walk. It’s almost all pavement and after two days I was miserable! The new ankle is a gift in almost all ways, but it can be touchy. I am learning to listen to it! Liz
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2016; Mansill de las Mulas to Finisterre/Muxia 2017; Aragones 2018; Suso/Yuso, Meseta 2019
Hello, I walked the Aragones-Somport to Puenta la Reina and beyond- in September/October 2018. Some people have commented that you either have shortish or longer stages. I prefer the shorter stages because there is just so much that should not be missed, the Monasteries at San Juan de la Pena, the Monastery at Leyre and the Foz de Lumbier. For me, the steepest part was the initial descent from Somport to Canfranc Station, after that the difficulty is with some of the rocks. I tripped on one and had a head injury shortly before Jaca. Some of the information in one of the posts on this thread possibly is out of date. I had read on Gronze that anything in Izco was closed and information was that it would not reopen, there were conflicting experiences.

I walked Somport- Canfranc Station - Jaca - Arres - Artieda - Ruesta- Sanguesa - Leyre - Lumbier- Monreal - Tiebas - Puente la Reina. Some people will walk the Aragones like thru hikers in just six stages. I and others believe that it warrents greater attention, but not too much, do not want it to loose the ambiance there. There were 3 days when I did not see any other pilgrims, not even in my chosen lodging, Sanguesa to Monreal. I was walking a diversion from the main path. It was a help that I speak Castellano.

Just for fun I stopped at Santa Celia for a sailplane ride.

There is some pavement, but not too much and the only road construction that I saw was on the new highway, not where I was walking.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2013), Primitivo (2015), Muxia/Fisterra (2015), Haervejen (2017)
Thanks for all this great advice.

It does appear that the albergue in Izco closed in 2017. Too bad -- It was in the perfect spot for short stages! Taking into account some of the other advice here, what is the walk from Sanguesa to Lumbier and then back to the camino like? Gronz shows it as a dotted line. It looks like we could walk from Undues to Lumbier (22.9 km) and then from Lumbier to Monreal (21.8). Is lumbier the kind of tourist destination where we would need to book in advance?

We would like to see San Juan de la Pena. Could we take the bus from Jaca that other have mentioned, and then walk from San Juan to Santa Cilia? Would we have enough time at the monasteries? Or would it be better to take a full day to go up to San Juan. Several people have mentioned the difficulty of the walking around San Juan. Given my ankle and Tom's neck should we attempt this?

Liz
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2016; Mansill de las Mulas to Finisterre/Muxia 2017; Aragones 2018; Suso/Yuso, Meseta 2019
Hello Liz, I believe that there is a bus that goes to the monasteries from Jaca at 10am in the summer and returns to Jaca at 5:30 in the afternoon. Perhaps someone who has used the bus this year can give you better information. When in doubt, the tourist information office in Jaca is very helpful. Because of my fall, I took a taxi which was wonderful. I do not always choose the least expensive way but rather the way that suits my needs at the time. The driver picked my up in Jaca, took me to both monasteries with an hour to explore the older monastery. We stopped at two overlooks to look back over at the mountains then down to Santa Cruz de la Seros to visit both churches. The cost was 50euros. The tourist office gave me phone numbers and I called to make arrangements, though the tourist office will call for you.

I have heard and read from others that walking to San Juan de la Pena both up and down, is hard on the knees. Indeed, I talked with a man who fell and was badly scraped up and was rescued by the Spanish army training in the area wearing full gear and weapons.

I did not walk the exact route that Gronze shows. I believe that Gronze's dotted line is a combination of tracks. Mid point starting at Sanguesa I walked to Javier, Yesa then up the mountain to Leyre, about 16 kilometers. There is a very nice hosteria at Leyre. The monks sing Gregorian chant at the evening mass. The crypt was the resting place of the kings of Navarra. There was not a tour at the time I was there but I was given the key to the church and crypt and told to lock myself in. There are lovely views across the Yesa swamp to the pre-Pirreneos on the other side. In the morning I walked down the mountain then along the old highway to Liedena and into the foz.

I may not have chosen the most efficient route but this worked for me. I wanted to visit certain places for which there was no ideal route. There are a few other forum members who might offer other ideas that may help you.
 

NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
My recollection is that from Sanguesa to Liédena was alongside a fairly busy road. From Liédena to Lumbier, it’s a well groomed footpath.

The path is way-marked, just ignore the turnoff to Rocaforte.
 

NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
The Lumbier route will be easier on the knees than the Rocaforte.
 

NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
As I reminisce about this Aragones route, I am remembering that there were stretches -particularly if you take the trails rather than roads - that are fairly remote. I think someone commented a year or so ago about feeling isolated on this route. I loved it, but you may want to read more of the old threads on this route, given your health issues.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2016; Mansill de las Mulas to Finisterre/Muxia 2017; Aragones 2018; Suso/Yuso, Meseta 2019
The foz de lumbier is another world, a canyon formed by an ancient river, populated by various vultures. At the base of the canyon is the river along the bed of an old railway which was long ago abandoned. You enter and leave through 2 tunnels, unforgetable! No tickets or reservations, just go.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Liz, HI!! It’s been a few years, so good to see you back here.

I think you will love the Aragonés. I walked years ago, so my memory is fuzzy about the amount of asphalt, but I do remember some stretches along roads and on hard pavement. Not to dissuade you from the Aragonés, but I think that the camino with the least amount of asphalt is probably the Madrid. Great albergue infrastructure, no spectacular scenery, however. But as some recent threads have focused on, the “locals” on this route are kind, engaging, and interested in talking to you. So maybe you should put it on your list.

Back to the Aragonés, one of my big regrets is that I knew nothing about the Lumbier alternative when I walked. I have seen pictures and it is gorgeous, and no asphalt! Lucky you to have the chance to do this.

As far as shortening stages — the albergue in Artieda looked nice (10 km before Ruesta) and the town itself is pretty. That might be an option. Then the next day you could walk 21 from Artieda to Undués de Lerda, which I remember as another nice town (didn’t stay there either). I really enjoyed Ruesta, though. It is an abandoned and falling-down town, eerie to walk around (and lots of fencing to keep you out of collapsing structures). The albergue has a real lefty-vibe, built by one of the left-wing comisiones. The hospitalero when I was there was the son of one of those who built the place and he had a lot of stories. It’s a fun place, but those other two towns, ARtieda and Undués de Lerda are both pretty little hill towns, so you might consider that change. That would leave you with only 10 into Sangüesa, but there are some things to see and do there, so you won’t be bored.

From Sangüesa, I would definitely take the Foz de Lumbier alternative. I am so bummed that we didn’t know anything about it when we walked, and it looks beautiful. Gronze shows a casa rural in Abínzano, which is about 7 before Monreal so that would shorten it a bit. But if you’re going to walk the Lumbier, it might be fun to stay in the town, there is a hotel there. That would be a very short day, but maybe there’s lots of good walking nearby, I don’t know. Then the next day to Monreal would be about 21.

Monreal to Puente la Reina is 30, but Gronze shows several places in between with private accommodation. (In case you haven’t seen Gronze, here’s their section on the Aragonés. And there is an albergue in Tiebas, where I stopped for a coffee and it seemed nice.

And the Invierno — many of us are fanatical Invierno fans. I think there is a fair amount of road walking, though. I used to have asphalt radar because of how my feet suffered, but since I changed to silicone orthotics and Altra trail runners, it really doesn‘t bother me much, so I don’t pay as much attention as I used to.

You’ve got a lot of choices to make! I’m happy to hear that you are adjusting so well to your new body part. I’m sure it was no fun, but hey, as my mom used to say — ”I figure that if I wake up one morning and nothing hurts, I’m dead.” Happy planning, buen camino, Laurie
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2013), Primitivo (2015), Muxia/Fisterra (2015), Haervejen (2017)
Thanks! We will have to think about the remoteness. Generally we don’t mind the quiet. We met only about 5 pilgrims on our 14 day walk on the Danish Haervejen trail. And who knew central Jutland was one big deserted pattern of forest preserves, sand dunes and peat bogs! We loved it! But we do worry about neck and ankle issues so......
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2013), Primitivo (2015), Muxia/Fisterra (2015), Haervejen (2017)
Hi Laurie! Yes I am back and can’t wait for this next adventure. I’ve looked at the Madrid and will do so again. I read your blog about the Aragones — it definitely piqued my interest! I’ll keep you posted!
 

NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
I’d be asking the hospitaleros (some of whom had minimal English) about each upcoming stage and have enough € to pay for taxis in case. Taking the roads where they parallel the footpaths means you could flag down a car or a taxi could find you, but there is no shade on the roads. There was next to no traffic on the road from Santa Celia to Artieda, or from Monreal to Tiebas. I opted for the road in many places as the footing was smoother.

ATMs are in Jaca and Sanguesa.
 

Vacajoe

Traded in my work boots for hiking ones
Camino(s) past & future
2019 Biarritz-Pamplona-Lourdes
2018 Aragon/Frances/Finis
2018 Operation Sabre
2018 Marin Ramble
This link was recently shared on Ivar, but it’s worth a second post since it’s about the Aragón route:

 

Silverton

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2003- CF ( various), Portugués (various), Aragonés, Inglés, Sanabrés
I wrote a summary of my Camino Aragonés (spring 2019) in the Camino Society Ireland e-magazine Shamrocks and Shells. If you google that, you may find it--I imagine it was in the summer edition, perhaps autumn--sorry to be vague. The rockiness of many of the paths may be an issue for your joints, but otherwise, the route is not too challenging for this 79-yr-old. I need your advice about the Primitivo, since I'm hoping to tackle it in April. Buen camino!
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999, now living in Santiago de C
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Santiago - Muxia 2019

Now: http://egeria.house/
I wrote a summary of my Camino Aragonés (spring 2019) in the Camino Society Ireland e-magazine Shamrocks and Shells. If you google that, you may find it--I imagine it was in the summer edition, perhaps autumn--sorry to be vague. ...
And here is the link (hope I found the right article!) ;-)


BC SY
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2013), Primitivo (2015), Muxia/Fisterra (2015), Haervejen (2017)
Hi Silverton, We loved the Primitivo. I blogged about our walk — link in my signature. It was difficult because it was so much up and down. But we took it slow ( about 14 days) and did just fine. The trail is very well marked and is mostly off road so the surfaces were generally good. The hills are pretty continuous for the first 6-7 days or so. We joked that we walked up to the windmills and down to the valleys. I suspect it could be pretty muddy in April and May. There was still some mud in mid June. Also, the elevation is high and I suspect the chance of snow extends into May and threatens again in October.

We walked the hospitals route which was really spectacular, but long — about a 32 km day. if you don’t want that, I hear that the alternate is also lovely.

I know it’s become more popular in the last few years. When we walked in 2015, we never stayed in a full alberue. The food was wonderful — often home cooked even in cafes and bars. During the day we were mostly on our own, but evenings were spent with a small group of wonderful pilgrims from Spain, Belgium, Sweden, Germany and Argentina. there weren‘t a lot of options for places to stay so us slow walkers were definitely traveling together. It was just the right amount of alone-ness and company!

Liz
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2013), Primitivo (2015), Muxia/Fisterra (2015), Haervejen (2017)
Silverton, I just read your informative article on the Aragones! Thanks so much. I am making a trip file on my iPad which I will take on the walk and will definitely add notes from your article. Thank You.
 

Beeman

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo,2017,Argonne and salvador,sept.2019
Hi all,

I have just started planning our next Camino beginning in early September 2020. We will be volunteering at Miraz on the Norte for the second half of August and then making our way to the beginning of our walk. I have had a total ankle replacement since our last walk on the Haervejen in Denmark and my husband has had two artificial discs in his neck. We sound like we are falling apart but we are pretty fit! I am trying to gauge the difficulty of the Aragones, the level of isolation and also trying to work out what our stages might be.

We have walked the Camino Primitivo. Is the Aragones from Somport more difficult? Downhill walking is somewhat difficult with my new ankle also. In terms of ruggedness, how does the walk compare to the Frances stage down from Cruz de Ferro to Molinaseca?

If I have a bad day with my ankle or Tom has neck issues would we be able to get a cab?

Also -- how much pavement walking is involved. My new ankle does not like pavement! If the trail is on and off the pavement, that is OK. But if I end up walking entire days on pavement, my ankle will revolt!

Here is what I am thinking for our route:
Somport to Villanua 16.6 k
Villanua to Jaca 15.4 k
Day off to visit the old monastery
Jaca to Arres 25.4 k
Arres to Ruesta 27.3 k
Ruesta to Sanguesa 22 k
Sanguesa to Monreal 27.2k
Monreal to Obanos 28.6
Obanos to Estella 23.6

We really prefer to walk 25 k or less (18-22 is ideal :)) so any thoughts on reorganizing the stages to shorten those three longer days would be appreciated. We would especially like to shorten to two long back-to-back stages from Sanguesa to Monreal to Obanos.

We were originally thinking of walking the Camino del Norte but the amount of pavement has scared me off. We are also considering deviating to the Camino de Invierno. Given that we go slow, we would not likely reach the Invierno until October and I am concerned about whether albergues may be closed for the season. I don't think we have time to do both the Aragones and the Invierno so thoughts on the pros and cons of each would also be welcome.

Thanks for sharing your wisdom,

Liz
I walked the Aragone in september of 2019,starting in Lescar and walking over the the palo de pau,ending in Berdun,which has no albergue. So I did not see any of the path before Arres. In Sanguesa the lady at the albergue said to ride the bus 5km to Liedena as the walk was very dangerous,so we did. After Lumbier you need to cross the road and head south to walk along the river as the alternative means much road walking. The gorge was nice but my companion from Barcelona was dissapointed. I suggest that you take the bus,as I did,and the walk will be about the same distance as the other way. Get the German App Komoot,and do not rely on those you meet for directions. We got all kinds of advice,most of which was not helpful. Buen Camino!
 

Beeman

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo,2017,Argonne and salvador,sept.2019
Hi all,

I have just started planning our next Camino beginning in early September 2020. We will be volunteering at Miraz on the Norte for the second half of August and then making our way to the beginning of our walk. I have had a total ankle replacement since our last walk on the Haervejen in Denmark and my husband has had two artificial discs in his neck. We sound like we are falling apart but we are pretty fit! I am trying to gauge the difficulty of the Aragones, the level of isolation and also trying to work out what our stages might be.

We have walked the Camino Primitivo. Is the Aragones from Somport more difficult? Downhill walking is somewhat difficult with my new ankle also. In terms of ruggedness, how does the walk compare to the Frances stage down from Cruz de Ferro to Molinaseca?

If I have a bad day with my ankle or Tom has neck issues would we be able to get a cab?

Also -- how much pavement walking is involved. My new ankle does not like pavement! If the trail is on and off the pavement, that is OK. But if I end up walking entire days on pavement, my ankle will revolt!

Here is what I am thinking for our route:
Somport to Villanua 16.6 k
Villanua to Jaca 15.4 k
Day off to visit the old monastery
Jaca to Arres 25.4 k
Arres to Ruesta 27.3 k
Ruesta to Sanguesa 22 k
Sanguesa to Monreal 27.2k
Monreal to Obanos 28.6
Obanos to Estella 23.6

We really prefer to walk 25 k or less (18-22 is ideal :)) so any thoughts on reorganizing the stages to shorten those three longer days would be appreciated. We would especially like to shorten to two long back-to-back stages from Sanguesa to Monreal to Obanos.

We were originally thinking of walking the Camino del Norte but the amount of pavement has scared me off. We are also considering deviating to the Camino de Invierno. Given that we go slow, we would not likely reach the Invierno until October and I am concerned about whether albergues may be closed for the season. I don't think we have time to do both the Aragones and the Invierno so thoughts on the pros and cons of each would also be welcome.

Thanks for sharing your wisdom,

Liz
Oh yes,after Lumbier be sure to water up.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
I've walked the Aragones several times. It's one of my favorite routes.
Your stages look fine to me but personally I'd walk from Jaca to Sta. Celia, then Sta. Celia to Arres.

Just be sure to get the bus from Jaca to and from the Monastery.
The one time I tried to walk there from Jaca was quite an adventure and I never made it there.
It IS possible, however, to walk to and from the Monastery from Sta Celia if you wanted.
Or take a taxi up and walk back down.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2013), Primitivo (2015), Muxia/Fisterra (2015), Haervejen (2017)
So -- Here is what I think we are going to do with our stages -- I'm still struggling with one place!
1. Somport to Vilanua 16.2 k
2. Villanua to Jaca 15.4 k
3. Bus from Jaca to San Juan de la Pena. Walk down via the road to Santa Cruz de la Seros -- which seems to be about 7.2 k
4. Santa Cruz de la Seros to Arres 16.8 k
5. Arres to Artieda 18.2 k
6. Artieda to Undues de Lerda 21.6 k
7. Undues to Lumbier -- taking the variant route that goes from Rocaforte 23.5 k
8. Lumbier to Monreal -- 21.8 k
9. Monreal to ????
10. ??? to somewhere on the Frances -- maybe Lorca which is 21.7 from Eneriz -- depends on where we stay.

There are a couple of apartments in Eneriz that are fairly expensive --60 euros. Also they can't be booked in advance and be refundable. Has anyone stayed here? In Olcoz there is Hostal Arriero and Casa Rural El Arriero. I don't know the pricing on these -- Has anyone stayed at either one?

Liz
 

lindam

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, VDLP, Invierno, Portuguese, Madrid, Ingles, Fisterra, Muxia, Catalan/Aragones/Loyola Norte
We walked from Monreal to Óbanos. Looking at Gronze.com, there appear to be a few options for accommodation there. According to Gronze, it would require about 28 km of walking. If you want to make a shorter day, there is a municipal albergue in Tiebas about 13 km from Monreal.
 

NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
Tiebas is about 15 km before Obanos and had both a municipal and a private albergue in 2016.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2013), Primitivo (2015), Muxia/Fisterra (2015), Haervejen (2017)
Thanks All. Tiebas would only be a 13 k day and it didn’t look like there was very much in the town. I am considering walking to Obanos, but 28 k is fairly long for us. Eneriz and Olcoz are right in our sweet spot! Thanks Peregrina2000 for contacting Arriero. I’ll look forward to what you find out!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2013), Primitivo (2015), Muxia/Fisterra (2015), Haervejen (2017)
Mmmmm, I’ve been sitting here googling. It looks like Editorial Buen Camino says that the Hostal has 16 beds And is open 1 April to 30 Oct. that would be great. The site gives an email and phone number. I just emailed.

one question, When I was getting back to checking this forum a couple month ago, I thought I read that something might have happened with the Buen Camino App. Is that true? I wonder if this info is up to date?

Liz
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2013), Primitivo (2015), Muxia/Fisterra (2015), Haervejen (2017)
I haven't heard from my email. I assume Laurie that you haven't heard either. According to Editorial Buen Camino the hostel doesn't open until 1 April. Its possible they aren't monitoring contacts until re-opening. Lus
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I haven't heard from my email. I assume Laurie that you haven't heard either. According to Editorial Buen Camino the hostel doesn't open until 1 April. Its possible they aren't monitoring contacts until re-opening. Lus
No response. I also called their land line and got no answer so I assume that’s right.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances x5, Portuguese VdlP12, Sanabres, Aragones, Norte,Salvador,Primitivo, VdlP 17,Madrid18Norte
In 2013,early May we took the bus to Somport and walked down to Canfranc Estacian for our first night and to shorten next day's walk to Jaca. Day 3,the amazing albergue in Arres. Day 4 to rustic Ruesta.
Day 5 to Sanguesa. Day6 to Izco via Foz de Lumbier. Day 7 to Tiebas Day8 walked on past Eunate to Puente la Reina.
Don't remember any difficulties and really enjoyed it.
 

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