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Low-hanging fruit

Train for your next Camino (or keep the Camino spirit alive) on Santa Catalina Island
This situation often gets a mention, particularly around harvest time. From memory the concensus was that a couple of apples, pairs or one small bunch of grapes was acceptable (happy for other to correct).
But you cannot take a whole lot and then sell them to other pilgrims (that imho is stealing).
Does this help??
 
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Yes. But I would only pick what would eat myself immediately.

I wouldn't feel any guilt picking fruit growing on public land (ie a road). When the tree is in someone's yard, I would only take a fruit if there were lots of ripe fruits on both the private side and the public side. Of course, if there is a person in the yard, I would ask permission too. edit to add: I wouldn't pick from a field that is a commercial crop. Camino-side mint and Kas Limon makes a nice virgin mojito.
 
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I would never feel comfortable picking any fruit that was not mine to pick.
Hence my question. Where I live (Oregon, USA), any vegetation that hangs over a neighbor’s property line becomes the neighbor’s. Is that true also in Spain? Then again, is the path sometimes on private property, so even over-hanging fruit might still be on private property?
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
Hence my question. Where I live (Oregon, USA), any vegetation that hangs over a neighbor’s property line becomes the neighbor’s. Is that true also in Spain? Then again, is the path sometimes on private property, so even over-hanging fruit might still be on private property?
I don’t own the path nor the fruit in this situation.
 
Ideal pocket guides for during & after your Camino. Each weighs only 1.4 oz (40g)!
Several times an older couple picking fruit in their fields waved me over to their fence and pushed fresh-picked cherries or grapes into my hands. Offers to pay for same were rejected, so I graciously accepted their generosity. The thought of taking something that appeared to be someone's crop would never have occurred to me otherwise. The fruits were as delicious as the kindness shown!
 
I would never feel comfortable picking any fruit that was not mine to pick.
Best answer yet.
It annoyed me to see pilgrims picking grapes along the path where there wasn't any fencing, had they known of the chemical concoction that had been sprayed on said grapes to prevent blight and insect damage they might have left them alone.
 
Where I live (Oregon, USA), any vegetation that hangs over a neighbor’s property line becomes the neighbor’s. Is that true also in Spain?
I don’t know whether it is true for Spain or not. I note however, that as a Camino walker I don’t own any property there … iow, any rule between two property owners does not apply to me.

I never touch fruit on trees or bushes in a village or town. Along the open road, the only fruit I pick sometimes are blackberries on bramble bushes that are obviously not cultivated and growing wild.

(I grew up in a very rural area and you learn to just not touch other people’s crops).
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
If it's on the ground, I can take.
Picking is not my way. Nor is it mine.
 
For me, it’s a hard no, no matter where the fruit is hanging.

I‘ve seem too many people walk straight into vineyards and taking massive amounts of grapes (in both France and Spain) AND then reason that it’s okay since they only take a few and there’s a whole vineyard full of grapes. Seriously, makes my brain explode.

So even it it were okay to take fruit hanging over the path, it'd be still no in my book since apparently, many people can't tell the difference.
 
Not acceptable to take what isn't yours, we must remember it's the local rules and customs rather than those at home. Same with the bread hanging on doors... it's not left there for the wandering pilgrims

I'd not bother with the bottles of water against the walls of peoples houses either :p

Seen too many wander into vineyards helping themselves, and like others ... it winds me up

Good on you for asking though :)
 
Train for your next Camino (or keep the Camino spirit alive) on Santa Catalina Island
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I see that the body of this conversation is ok with taking one...maybe two pieces of fruit. They discuss the legal side of things. The Author also emphasizes the legal side, with an attempt to discover how local law might compare to Spanish law.

But what of the moral side of this coin? Each Peregrino is obliged to follow certain requirements to walk the Camino and, with these requirements fulfilled, and upon surrender of the Pasaporte to the Pilgrim's Office in Santiago de Compostela, they receive certification that they have completed their Camino.

However, as a Pilgrim, there is one rule that has not been mentioned but only suggested. That rule is that you may have what has been offered. Hanging fruit is not offered. It may be in proximity to public ways but as some have said, it belongs to someone and the only way it may be had is if it were offered / given.

So, to the Author, my answer is that your question is not best answered with legalities but with moralities.

Hope this helps.
 
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Is it acceptable to pick fruit on trees that overhang the path?
We saw people picking cherries off of people’s yards- not farms or vineyards- and felt that was rude as down the road people were selling them. It is their yard and not a pilgrims walking by to pull down the branches to pick off fruit. As far as the orchards or vineyards I don’t know and didn’t see fruit being taken for the most part. Just our take on it.
 
The day before arriving in Santiago this magnificent fruit was on the ground amidst a pile of squished ones. I took a picture after the first juicy bite to remember the blessing that it was! I wouldn’t have considered plucking one from the tree even though it was over the street.
 

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Is it acceptable to pick fruit on trees that overhang the path?
I don't believe that is acceptable in any case. Why would we even contemplate taking something that is not ours? It belongs to the owner. If each of us picked one apple, and if there were 10 of us passing by each day, the farmer would lose 300 apples per month. We are there as visitors/guests. Would we appreciate it if someone came to our house and helped themselves?
 
I recall that between SJPdP and Roncesvalles there was a small orchard planted specifically for pilgrims. At the time (spring of 2017) there was no fruit on the trees and it was signposted. The signs may be gone now.

In the case there is an invitation to take fruit - go for it, otherwise you don't own it. Leave it alone.
 
Train for your next Camino (or keep the Camino spirit alive) on Santa Catalina Island
Even up in the mountains where you may think that nobody even knows the tree is there you can be assured that somebody does know. There is no wild fruit.
Would you make an exception for blackberries? I confess to having picked a lot of blackberries on the Salvador (particularly between La Robla and Pola de Gordón), and on some other caminos as well, and I always just assumed they were there for the picking.
 
I don’t think I would pick any fruit, but would always take what is offered. Outside of Triacastella on the way to Sarria, this lovely lady was picking apples off her tree with this basket and offering them to pilgrims over her wall. 💗
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In the UK, while it's still hanging from the tree over public path or your garden, it's not yours. You can only pick when it's fallen. But many people think you can. My apples hang over outside the fence still over my strip of land along the public footpath. I watch them carefully until they are ripen. I often have poor harvest. In some years, I only get a few. But before they are ready, passers-by pick them. They are cooking apples and green. They don't know what they are picking. They are not edible unless they are ripen and cooked. What a waste. It's infuriates me when people take my babies away. I'm glad to know there are sensible people here.
I have to add that the passers-by also pick my rosemary. I have plenty. I'm happy to offer if they ask. I know dogs often pee 🫣. If someone asks, I will give them the one facing inside.
 
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The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
Would you make an exception for blackberries? I confess to having picked a lot of blackberries on the Salvador (particularly between La Robla and Pola de Gordón), and on some other caminos as well, and I always just assumed they were there for the picking.
Yes, if they were growing wild. I would also make an exception for oranges on the VdlP. There are invariably hundreds of them rolling along the ground only to be trampled underfoot: sheer waste of wonderfully thirst-quenching fruit! They bear no resemblance to the often rather desiccated fruit I buy for making marmalade.
 
Without addressing whether it is right or allowed to the pick the fruit…
I wouldn’t pick fruit and then eat fruit right away from a tree in Spain - especially if I weren’t able to do a thorough washing. It has been reported that pesticide levels are high in Spanish fruits. According to a 2021 report from Ecologists in Action, 44.4% of fruits and vegetables in Spain contain pesticide residues. Another report from PAN Europe in 2022 found that 41% of samples were contaminated with 117 pesticides, with oranges and sweet peppers having the highest number of pesticides!
 
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Would you make an exception for blackberries? I confess to having picked a lot of blackberries on the Salvador (particularly between La Robla and Pola de Gordón), and on some other caminos as well, and I always just assumed they were there for the picking.
Yes, but only because most consider them to be weeds. Trees and production vines are what I had in mind.
 
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I recall several wild apple trees in Galicia growing on the verge and outside of the property so considered them fair game but always recall the time that the UK stopped putting lead in our petrol (gas) and somebody asked:

"Is it safe to eat roadside blackberries now there's no lead in fuel?"
To which another responded:
"You mean it wasn't safe before??"

Don't forget that the grapes in Rioja, Navarra and Bierzo are wine grapes and not dessert ones, they might not taste as nice as you'd wish - besides that's somebody's livelihood you're "sampling"
 
Sorry not a very inspiring set of answers. To me I think it fallen or about to fall all the wildl animals get food.
 
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This situation often gets a mention, particularly around harvest time. From memory the concensus was that a couple of apples, pairs or one small bunch of grapes was acceptable (happy for other to correct).
But you cannot take a whole lot and then sell them to other pilgrims (that imho is stealing).
Does this help??
What if every pilgrim took a little bit?. I would suggest leave it alone unless it's obvious it's growing wild - Stealing a little bit is still stealing. From my experience there are lots of small stands ( some are donativos or gratis) and lots of small markets that would like the business.
 
Best answer yet.
It annoyed me to see pilgrims picking grapes along the path where there wasn't any fencing, had they known of the chemical concoction that had been sprayed on said grapes to prevent blight and insect damage they might have left them alone.
Thats for sure. This year, as we were walking along a path with vineyards either side, I saw a cloud of mist, and realised that we were about to be sprayed along with the grapes. Backed up a bit, waited for it to settle, the wind carried it off a bit, then hoped my buff would filter out the particles. (Unlikely). Presumably insecticide - we made jokes about not being bed bug bait - but I was a little concerned about the lack of safety.
We would at home have to spray early morning, to avoid the wind spreading it, put warning signs out, and use safety gear.
We were a couple of pilgrims walking through the aftermath breathing through a doubled buff, but with bare arms and legs .
 
Several times an older couple picking fruit in their fields waved me over to their fence and pushed fresh-picked cherries or grapes into my hands. Offers to pay for same were rejected, so I graciously accepted their generosity. The thought of taking something that appeared to be someone's crop would never have occurred to me otherwise. The fruits were as delicious as the kindness shown!
Similar thing happened to us, two older ladies in the field called us over and gave some grapes. But then they wandered off themselves and we wondered were they pickers or just passing by like us ... they had no baskets or containers
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
Thats for sure. This year, as we were walking along a path with vineyards either side, I saw a cloud of mist, and realised that we were about to be sprayed along with the grapes. Backed up a bit, waited for it to settle, the wind carried it off a bit, then hoped my buff would filter out the particles. (Unlikely). Presumably insecticide - we made jokes about not being bed bug bait - but I was a little concerned about the lack of safety.
We would at home have to spray early morning, to avoid the wind spreading it, put warning signs out, and use safety gear.
We were a couple of pilgrims walking through the aftermath breathing through a doubled buff, but with bare arms and legs .
Could well have been "Bordeaux mixture" - a copper sulphate and lime mix which was originally used to spray the crops nearest roads and footways to prevent passers by from sampling the grapes by making them taste sour - sound familiar?

It also turned out to be good at controlling mildew . . .

However, "Bordeaux mixture has been found to be harmful to fish, livestock and—due to potential build up of copper in the soil—earthworms" so munch away at your own risk!
 
Would you make an exception for blackberries?
My first thought too, but many of the above comments would see you locked up with key thrown away and perhaps a mug-shot sent to the pilgrim office so they can refuse your Compostela request) - this discussion is a veritable fruit minefield.
 
My first thought too, but many of the above comments would see you locked up with key thrown away and perhaps a mug-shot sent to the pilgrim office so they can refuse your Compostela request) - this discussion is a veritable fruit minefield.
I have eaten blackberries on the perimeters of fields in Ireland a few times after our rental car was parked and we walked on a path to visit an Irish ring fort; an unusual circular set of stacked rocks out in the middle of nowhere. I didn't think I did anything wrong at the time and thought the blackberries grew wild like they do on my path at home.
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
Thank you for asking this question. As a grower, I'm glad most agree the answer is no, it's not okay. You would be surprised how much of my time is spent protecting our crop (avocados) from thieves. And yes, sometimes the fruit is sprayed with pesticides and in an avocado's case, cannot be consumed for at least two weeks. Farmers face many, many obstacles which affect our livelihood on a daily basis. Please do not take the fruit unless it is offered to you. I'm sure you would not appreciate it if everyone walking by your wallet grabbed a couple of bucks because it was sitting open under a tree. :)
 
What if every pilgrim took a little bit?. I would suggest leave it alone unless it's obvious it's growing wild - Stealing a little bit is still stealing. From my experience there are lots of small stands ( some are donativos or gratis) and lots of small markets that would like the business.
I agree with your basic premise but I think this is a situation where the fruit is obviously/well and truly "over the fence". If the farmer has "real concerns" then that fruit should be the first fruit harvested.
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
I have eaten blackberries on the perimeters of fields in Ireland a few times after our rental car was parked and we walked on a path to visit an Irish ring fort; an unusual circular set of stacked rocks out in the middle of nowhere. I didn't think I did anything wrong at the time and thought the blackberries grew wild like they do on my path at home.


Blackberries grow wild, rampant and uncultivated everywhere in Ireland.. on railway embankments in parks and on common grazing land, along public pathways and country lanes. Everywhere. They're there for the picking. We've done it since childhood, us and the birds.. and we always will.
 
Consider that if even half of the several hundred thousand pilgrims all just took a little.... :rolleyes:

The same math applies to those who complain that many bars now forbid or charge non customers from using the toilet facilities. The toilet paper alone would be a huge expense. You also have to add those who think that it is acceptable to take the toilet paper roll with them for later use on the way.
 
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There seems to be some confusion about helping yourself to fruit that is overhanging the public path and invading the farmers paddock to steal it. The former is fine, as long as one only takes a single piece or two, the latter is not.
 
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I guess that everybody assumes that what they know from their own country - be it tradition or law - applies to Spain.

Apparently, in some countries the owner of the fruit tree is also the owner of the fruit hanging on the tree - even when branches reach into a neighbour’s garden or onto to the pavement or street. In other countries this isn’t the case and you can pick fruit on branches that reach into the public space. And then there are countries without clear legal dispositions.

And so we are all convinced that we are right although we have no idea of what is right in Spain.
 
I guess that everybody assumes that what they know from their own country - be it tradition or law - applies to Spain.

I don't know that everyone assumes that. I was just responding to @Camino Chrissy's post regarding our tradition here. Our own farmers get fed up with inconsiderate walkers leaving gates open, trampling crops, worrying sheep etc and block access to them from time to time, but I'm sure it's on a whole other level for spanish landowners, particularly along the French Way where many new pilgrims, released into the countryside for the first time in their lives, have no comon sense and no understanding of how to behave..
 
many of the above comments would see you locked up with key thrown away
That's funny but actually I don't see a single post that says so.

For all practical purposes, it will come down to one's own personal ethics catalogue whether one picks fruit on a Camino in Spain or not. I was as appalled as others when I saw in the La Rioja region that Camino pilgrims had picked whole bunches of grapes from a vineyard only to throw them away a few yards later because the grapes were not tasty or not ripe. And although I wrote earlier that I myself don't pick any fruit other than non-cultivated wild growing blackberries I did pick a few grapes when I walked through the vineyards near Bordeaux where the very expensive red wines (Margaux!) are produced. It was after harvest and I had noticed that here and there a few small bunches had been left on the vines. The grapes were tasty btw.

As it frequently happens with a forum thread, I got interested in the topic and googled a bit. It is knowledge of no practical use but I am confident now in saying that what is allowed under common law in one country (say Australia) is not necessarily allowed under civil law in another country (say in Continental Europe where, obviously, each country has their own version of civil law). And even where your deed is classified as theft, you will not be prosecuted unless the owner files charges. And even when there is a court case you won't get fined unless it's a case of large scale theft. But not for an orange or five cherries or half a dozen grapes.
 
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Train for your next Camino (or keep the Camino spirit alive) on Santa Catalina Island
Consider that even half of the several hundred thousand pilgrims all just took a little.... :rolleyes:

The same math applies to those who complain that many bars now forbid or charge non customers from using the toilet facilities. The toilet paper alone would be a huge expense. You also have to add those who think that it is acceptable to take the toilet paper roll with them for later use on the way.
I've told the tale before about getting distracted for 5 minutes at Rabanal and having a brand new pack of toilet rolls - all 24 of them - looted with just the plastic wrapper left behind . . .

Hark, hark!
The dogs do bark,
Beggars (Pilgrims?) are coming to town;
Some in tags,
Some in rags,
And some in velvet gowns.

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Blackberries grow wild in parts of Texas
So one day i saw a patch of red and black ones..
Its all good until the big jurassic spider shows up un the briar patch....
 
...and ship it to Santiago for storage. You pick it up once in Santiago. Service offered by Casa Ivar (we use DHL for transportation).
I recall that between SJPdP and Roncesvalles there was a small orchard planted specifically for pilgrims. At the time (spring of 2017) there was no fruit on the trees and it was signposted. The signs may be gone now.
I have never noticed these mini-orchards for pilgrims on the ways of Saint James in France but I have been aware of the project. Here is a link to one of several articles about it: Orchards for pilgrims.

The project is at least 10 years old. The article - published in 2014 and updated in 2023 - says that volunteer teams have planted 307 trees in 56 cities and villages along the major Saint James routes (Tours, Vezelay, Le Puy, Arles and Piedmont) in their department.

As to the general situation in France, it is quite clear as numerous websites confirm, and this may surprise one or the other pilgrim from further afar:

Question: When the branches of a tree protrude on the street or in your garden, do you have the right to pick or collect the fruits?
Answer: French law is clear: It is forbidden to pick fruits from the branches of a tree or shrub planted on the property of others. So even if the branches protrude on the street or on your garden, for example over a fence or an adjoining wall, you are not allowed to pick the fruits.

And here is the link to an article with photo about the mini-orchard for pilgrims near Hunto on the way from SJPP to Roncesvalles:
 
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The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
I have been told, Yes. It is OK and part of how the Camino provides.
Who told you and where?

If a farmer was on his land and offered, it is one thing, but one farmer or local who allows this does not mean it is a blanket « yes » for all as who cross the country.

I agree with @Dani7.
 
I generally avoid picking and eating fruit unless invited. Sometimes, I admit, it is hard to resist but I do.

But there is the blackberry (or black raspberry, or mulberry) exception. I might very well have picked those and eaten them if they seemed to be growing wild by the side of the path, as they do by the sides of my practice walking paths at home. But if they appeared to be commercial crops or part of someone's garden, I wouldn't eat those, either.

However, whenever I see someone in a garden or field with fruit, I will shout out a hearty "Buenos dias" or "Bom dia". You never know what you might be offered. A fellow pilgrim on the Camino Primitivo last summer was successful after telling a local how nice her oranges looked.
 
In France wild mushrooms, nuts, blackberries and come to that, snails are available to anyone who finds them, as long as they are on public land. In Spain that may differ. I have often been freely given fruit. I have been told I can pick the grapes at the end of the row because the machine can't get them. If there is nobody to tell me then I leave them. I don't steal. Why would I make myself into a thief? Why would anyone do so unless they are starving. We aren't starving. Ask. If the answer is yes be grateful. If it is no accept it politely and walk on.
 
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Mushrooms.. I've picked, cooked and eaten rebullones or saffron milk caps, in Spain in late October a good few times (they're about the only wild mushroom I can safely identify). Apparently a licence is needed to pick them but nobody told me..😇
And also in autumn, walnuts. Sometimes we see piles of them along the path, surely a sinful waste to just crunch them underfoot without saving a few, regardless of who's tree they fell out of..
 
I believe that we are still hunter gatherers. Yet I will respect the laws of the land wherever I am. If I own a tree full of fruits, I would want lots of people to get them. However it would be wrong for me to get fruit from some else' property without consent. Hanging fruit over a public road is a confusing situation though. In some places they may just be free to be taken.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
Would you make an exception for blackberries? I confess to having picked a lot of blackberries on the Salvador (particularly between La Robla and Pola de Gordón), and on some other caminos as well, and I always just assumed they were there for the picking.
There were tons of blackberries also on the southern reaches of the Vadiniense last time I walked. I asked a local about picking some, she said they're not popular fruit, they leave 'em for the birds to eat, so I helped myself! I had purple hands for a couple of days... and one of my neighbors asked me if I'd been stealing from the hedgerows!
So it's true -- people are watching!
 
And so we are all convinced that we are right although we have no idea of what is right in Spain.

What we have here are numerous opinions and things that people have been told by others, but no primary sources that tell us what the rules really are. I too “have been told” that fruits from branches overhanging the public right of way are free for the taking, but thought it would be a good idea to try to find some support for that statement.

The closest I was able to get was this source, which states that Article 592 of the Spanish Civil Code deals with the relationship between neighbors where the branches of one neighbor’s tree extends across the property line and hangs over. Those owners do have the right to insist that the neighbor trim the branches so they do not cross the property line. The article then goes on to state that the code does not deal with the ownership of any fruit growing on those protruding branches. BUT because Article 254 of the Spanish Civil Code states plainly that fruit belongs to the owner of the tree that produces it, and because the code does not make an exception for the fruit of overhanging branches, the logical conclusion is that all fruit belongs to the owner of the tree. That strikes me as a good legal analysis.

Bottom line — the best interpretation of Spanish law that I have seen is that the owner of the tree owns all fruit hanging over the right of way. That means that taking it is stealing.
 
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Chiming in again as a farmer. If one sees a lot of fruit on the ground around a tree, one might assume the harvest is over or the farmer does not care about these trees. In reality, this drop is most likely due to excessive heat or wind or poor market conditions (the list goes on) and what is left on the tree may be the only fruit left for the farmer to sell. Please don't take.

Also, it's not up to me to harvest the fruit next to the road first. I have 50 or 60 trees next to public roads and they are currently loaded with avocados that may, to the random person walking by, look ready to pick. They're not. They have to be a certain size before the packing house will take them. Furthermore, I have to wait my turn for the harvesting crew (who works for multiple farms in the area) to be available.

Growing food for a living is more complex than it looks and also very stressful. If one is starving and has no money and desperate, then of course, take a piece of fruit, but please don't take it because it looks delicious and it fits into one's romantic notion that this fruit has serendipitously appeared for one's random consumption. Thanks for listening - it has been a very stressful week at the farm.
 
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Chiming in again as a farmer. If one sees a lot of fruit on the ground around a tree, one might assume the harvest is over or the farmer does not care about these trees. In reality, this drop is most likely due to excessive heat or wind or poor market conditions (the list goes on) and what is left on the tree may be the only fruit left for the farmer to sell. Please don't take.

Also, it's not up to me to harvest the fruit next to the road first. I have 50 or 60 trees next to public roads and they are currently loaded with avocados that may, to the random person walking by, look ready to pick. They're not. They have to be a certain size before the packing house will take them. Furthermore, I have to wait my turn for the harvesting crew (who works for multiple farms in the area) to be available.

Growing food for a living is more complex than it looks and also very stressful. If one is starving and has no money and desperate, then of course, take a piece of fruit, but please don't take it because it looks delicious and it fits into one's romantic notion that this fruit has serendipitously appeared for one's random consumption. Thanks for listening - it has been a very stressful week at the farm.
It depends of country and crop of course. I live in Kent in the south east UK - the one time Garden of England. We don't have as many apple orchards as we used to but there are still a lot.
Walk through one after harvest time and you'll see hundreds and hundreds of apples rotting on the ground.
Supermarkets demand perfection and nature isn't perfect so anything that doesn't come up to scratch is left to rot.
A dear old friend, sadly no longer with us, was a farmer's daughter. As children they were set to to collect "windfalls" that would be mashed and turned into cider and she was saddened in later life that it was neither the current practice nor economical for the farmer to do.
There are a lot of strawberry farms here, nearly all the crops being grown on tables (for easy picking) under polytunnels (for extended season) and it's so annoying to see people wander along the countryside footpaths and help themselves to "just a handful" (or more). On a walk last year our walk leader specifically told the group not to touch the strawberries . . . guess what happened?
 
As I was writing up my description of my Camino da Geira, it occured to me that I do have one more thing to say about this topic!

In late September, I was walking past an apple orchard with a group of women picking apples off the ground. I stopped, and they were very happy to take a break and talk to me. Turns out that they were picking apples for sidra, which are only “ready” when they fall on the ground.

IMG_5774.jpeg

So we know that under Spanish law the fruit belongs to the owner of the trees. I bet there will still be some who think that “just taking one” is a harmless act, but that’s up to you. It’s pretty clear what the legalities are.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
Orchard country here and on the popular cycling routes some farmers fence off their orchards so people do not pick the fruit. Do not want to generalise but it is mostly a tourist ( someone who is not acquainted with the fact that this fruit is actually the income for a farmer ) who fills his panier with fruit.
Luckily here around the block it is not needed seeing only locals use these roads.
Raspberries and pears in progress 🙂.

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There was a man ahead of us who picked a bunch of kiwis (filled his pockets). He began walking and ate one, realized they were not ripe, and through them all away! What a waste. You are a guest in the country. The fruit is not yours. Be respectful.
I observed pilgrims gathering olives that had fallen outside the wall that enclosed the trees. I didn’t bother to tell them how much processing was needed to make them edible. :cool:
 
I observed pilgrims gathering olives that had fallen outside the wall that enclosed the trees. I didn’t bother to tell them how much processing was needed to make them edible.
Best of luck to anyone anticipating a treat from the fruit of the olive trees!

(From a newbie olive-grove owner):)
 
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The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
A few pictures of the proper protocol for picking fruit along the Camino, in my books anyway, and ingrained in us growing up.
Photo 1: Ask! Near Montredon on the Via Podiensis, where we came across a family picking cherries right on the Chemin. We asked.
Photo 2: The result of asking.
Photo 3: Pay! Just after Lauzerte on the Via Podiensis, we came across a table of picked cherries and sign asking for a donation. We paid, and we probably paid far more than the handful of cherries was worth, but we appreciated the effort of someone preparing the table, and recognizing that pilgrims will be passing by.
Photo 4: Read! Between Maslacq and Navarrenx on the Via Podiensis are several fruit trees planted expressly for pilgrims.
Photo 5: There were several different fruit varieties planted along the Chemin. But, you have to be there at the right time ... we weren't! :(

Moral of the story ... do not assume.

cherries.jpg cherries1.jpg cherries2.jpg fruit.jpg fruit 2.jpg
 

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