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Madrid Airport Taxi Rip Off

Camino(s) past & future
Santiago to Finisterre to Muxia 2013
Camino Frances May 2015
Camino Frances July 2017
#1
Just a quick warning and tip for pilgrims travelling by taxi from Madrid Airport.

Yesterday I was staying at a hostal a short distance (3kms) from the airport. Coming to the taxi queue outside arrivals I got into an official cab on the taxi rank and said where I wanted go. As I was putting on my seatbelt the guy said it would be €30. I immediately said "No" and opened the door, if I had not opened the door I'm sure he would have pulled off and held me to this extortionate fare. For a little while after that no cab would take me as I was clearly a trouble maker, then one quoted €20. I went to airport information to try and see what the deal was, apparently €30 is a standard charge for anyone going to the city centre and then anything else should be metered but because they queue so long for passengers the cabs try to charge everyone the flat fee which is pretty outrageous.

So, while I couldn't get any cab at arrivals to take me on a metered journey I discovered that the guys upstairs dropping off at departures (at least in the case of terminal 1) were happy to do metered trips so I would suggest everyone picks up their cab at departures rather than arrivals.

Hope this helps someone.

Rob.
 
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Marbe2

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 SJPD to Burgos
2017 Leon to Santiago
Pamplona to Santiago Mar. 2018
Burgos - SCDC (Oct 18)
#3
Just a quick warning and tip for pilgrims travelling by taxi from Madrid Airport.

Yesterday I was staying at a hostal a short distance (3kms) from the airport. Coming to the taxi queue outside arrivals I got into an official cab on the taxi rank and said where I wanted go. As I was putting on my seatbelt the guy said it would be €30. I immediately said "No" and opened the door, if I had not opened the door I'm sure he would have pulled off and held me to this extortionate fare. For a little while after that no cab would take me as I was clearly a trouble maker, then one quoted €20. I went to airport information to try and see what the deal was, apparently €30 is a standard charge for anyone going to the city centre and then anything else should be metered but because they queue so long for passengers the cabs try to charge everyone the flat fee which is pretty outrageous.

So, while I couldn't get any cab at arrivals to take me on a metered journey I discovered that the guys upstairs dropping off at departures (at least in the case of terminal 1) were happy to do metered trips so I would suggest everyone picks up their cab at departures rather than arrivals.

Hope this helps someone.

Rob.

I had a similar experience a few years ago. The shuttle to our hotel near the airport was a no-show so after an hour waiting for it....we got a cab....he started riding around the world...with the meter on!! We were less than two miles from the hotel. 15minutes later, I finally told him...I was not paying another euro..he was annoyed but within two minutes we were at our hotel. If it happens again, I will try departures! Thanks for the post.
 
#4
Just a quick warning and tip for pilgrims travelling by taxi from Madrid Airport.

Yesterday I was staying at a hostal a short distance (3kms) from the airport. Coming to the taxi queue outside arrivals I got into an official cab on the taxi rank and said where I wanted go. As I was putting on my seatbelt the guy said it would be €30. I immediately said "No" and opened the door, if I had not opened the door I'm sure he would have pulled off and held me to this extortionate fare. For a little while after that no cab would take me as I was clearly a trouble maker, then one quoted €20. I went to airport information to try and see what the deal was, apparently €30 is a standard charge for anyone going to the city centre and then anything else should be metered but because they queue so long for passengers the cabs try to charge everyone the flat fee which is pretty outrageous.

So, while I couldn't get any cab at arrivals to take me on a metered journey I discovered that the guys upstairs dropping off at departures (at least in the case of terminal 1) were happy to do metered trips so I would suggest everyone picks up their cab at departures rather than arrivals.

Hope this helps someone.

Rob.
I used to do that at the Lisbon airport all the time, for the same reason — the hotel I stay in is about 5 km from the airport and a very low fare for the driver. There is no way to do that in Lisbon now, because the authorities have prohibited cabs at departures from picking people up. That’s unfortunate, because it means that every time I go I run the risk of making a cab driver very unhappy. I try to do my small part for honesty by giving a huge tip to the drivers who are honest and not mean. I let the dishonest ones have it in my bad Portuguese and pay the fare I know it costs with no tip (knowing I can get backup from the doorman at the hotel ;)). I’d say it’s about a 50-50 split.

In their defense (and I am not saying it is justified), I know that the taxi drivers at these big airports wait for hours for a fare. In Lisbon and Madrid, I know that three or four hours is not uncommon. So I understand their total frustration. I have long thought that there should be a different passenger line for short fares so the driver could choose whether to take the long wait or not, but that seems like it would be a nightmare to administer. Going to the departure area is likely to make the driver there very happy, so long as it remains a legal option, because that guy was not expecting anyone, so it is win win.

On balance, though, I think the single fare idea is a huge benefit to tourists in particular. We now don’t have to worry about unscrupulous drivers taking us on a long winding detour, except if we want to go to a destination that is really really close.
 

Marbe2

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 SJPD to Burgos
2017 Leon to Santiago
Pamplona to Santiago Mar. 2018
Burgos - SCDC (Oct 18)
#6
I used to do that at the Lisbon airport all the time, for the same reason — the hotel I stay in is about 5 km from the airport and a very low fare for the driver. There is no way to do that in Lisbon now, because the authorities have prohibited cabs at departures from picking people up. That’s unfortunate, because it means that every time I go I run the risk of making a cab driver very unhappy. I try to do my small part for honesty by giving a huge tip to the drivers who are honest and not mean. I let the dishonest ones have it in my bad Portuguese and pay the fare I know it costs with no tip (knowing I can get backup from the doorman at the hotel ;)). I’d say it’s about a 50-50 split.

In their defense (and I am not saying it is justified), I know that the taxi drivers at these big airports wait for hours for a fare. In Lisbon and Madrid, I know that three or four hours is not uncommon. So I understand their total frustration. I have long thought that there should be a different passenger line for short fares so the driver could choose whether to take the long wait or not, but that seems like it would be a nightmare to administer. Going to the departure area is likely to make the driver there very happy, so long as it remains a legal option, because that guy was not expecting anyone, so it is win win.

On balance, though, I think the single fare idea is a huge benefit to tourists in particular. We now don’t have to worry about unscrupulous drivers taking us on a long winding detour, except if we want to go to a destination that is really really close.
Upon reflection, this problem is not unique to Just Spain and Portugal. At EWR Airport (Newark) NY...there are free Shuttles to airport hotels...but if you take a cab, they charge over 20 dollars for a maximum of two miles to the hotel!

On the other hand, at Dublin Airport, when I take a cab from the Airport to an airport hotel, my experience has been that they charge the meter rate.

Like Laurie, I am aware that many drivers wait a long time and if I see a long line of cabs when I am getting mine, I do try to increase the tip!!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago to Finisterre to Muxia 2013
Camino Frances May 2015
Camino Frances July 2017
#7
In their defense (and I am not saying it is justified), I know that the taxi drivers at these big airports wait for hours for a fare. In Lisbon and Madrid, I know that three or four hours is not uncommon. So I understand their total frustration. I have long thought that there should be a different passenger line for short fares so the driver could choose whether to take the long wait or not, but that seems like it would be a nightmare to administer. Going to the departure area is likely to make the driver there very happy, so long as it remains a legal option, because that guy was not expecting anyone, so it is win win.

On balance, though, I think the single fare idea is a huge benefit to tourists in particular. We now don’t have to worry about unscrupulous drivers taking us on a long winding detour, except if we want to go to a destination that is really really close.
I fear you are a better soul than I @peregrina2000 . I agree that people should have a right to make a living but I can't help thinking that if it weren't for the opportunity to fleece unsuspecting tourists the queues of taxis would be shorter and they wouldn't have to wait so long. If there are too many taxis in general that is a matter for the city council.

I just think it's a terrible advert for a city if pretty much your first experience after picking up your bags is to be literally and figurativley taken for a ride by a taxi driver.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
#8
As I know Barajas - Madrid Centro is 30€ fixed rate (max.) set by City Council to prevent tourists being ripped off. Of course you might get lucky and get lower price. But if you go to any other destination you first have to check with the taxi driver. In my experience from this year they can give pretty accurate final price for rides within the city.

Use the public transport (which runs very smoothly in Madrid) and your problem is solved ;)
 
#9
I fear you are a better soul than I @peregrina2000 . I agree that people should have a right to make a living but I can't help thinking that if it weren't for the opportunity to fleece unsuspecting tourists the queues of taxis would be shorter and they wouldn't have to wait so long. If there are too many taxis in general that is a matter for the city council.

I just think it's a terrible advert for a city if pretty much your first experience after picking up your bags is to be literally and figurativley taken for a ride by a taxi driver.
I am certainly not a better soul, and I have done my share of yelling at unscrupulous taxi drivers. I just know from experience (my stepson has a cab in the US) that this is a hard business, and UBER-Lyft, etc. have made it much more so. I agree with Kinky that the purpose, and for most parts the effect, of the single fare has been to protect tourists. Since most go to downtown Madrid, and since many were victims of creative weavings in and out and around the city, this fare removes all incentive to do that .... EXCEPT for the unintended victims like you, the ones who are only going a few kms away and don’t have to pay that flat rate. I don’t know what the solution to that problem is, and it is not limited to Madrid.
 
Camino(s) past & future
future
#10
I took a Cabify from the airport to Cuatro Caminos 3 weeks ago and it was 23€. Haven't ever take a cab so did not know about the flat rate. If I had only had my backpack, I would have taken the metro, bus or train. An option to taking a cab at the flat rate might be to take the metro to the Barajas exit, then taking a cab from there to the hotel. There are certainly cabs in Barajas. Or book your overnight stay in Barajas. It's quite close to the airport. I haven't done this but I don't know why you could not. I suspect it would not cost 30€.
 
#11
I took a Cabify from the airport to Cuatro Caminos 3 weeks ago and it was 23€. Haven't ever take a cab so did not know about the flat rate. If I had only had my backpack, I would have taken the metro, bus or train. An option to taking a cab at the flat rate might be to take the metro to the Barajas exit, then taking a cab from there to the hotel. There are certainly cabs in Barajas. Or book your overnight stay in Barajas. It's quite close to the airport. I haven't done this but I don't know why you could not. I suspect it would not cost 30€.
Well, now I am curious. I am not sure why a cabbie who had the right to charge you 30 would charge you 23, but hey! I just thought I would check, and yes indeed, the flat rate is 30 euros from airport to places inside the M-30, which is all of central Madrid.

But the other interesting thing is that there is also a flat rate, from the Airport to anywhere outside the M-30, if the total distance is less than 10 km (which would include all airport hotels). And that rate is 20 €. So, @Dorpie, that cabbie who offered to take you o the Barajas hotel for 20, was actually being honest!

https://www.aeropuertomadrid-barajas.com/transportes/taxis-barajas.htm
That does seem like a steep fare, but I guess it reflects those long waits that the cabbies have to endure.
 

tominrm

Hiking to Celebrate the End of Working Life.
Camino(s) past & future
CF(2014)
del Norte ( 2015)
Portuguese ( 2016)
Primitivo ( 2017)
VdlP (2018)
#12
I had to stay in a hotel near MAD, and they had free shuttle. I thought all hotels there would provide free shuttle service.
 
Camino(s) past & future
future
#13
Well, now I am curious. I am not sure why a cabbie who had the right to charge you 30 would charge you 23, but hey! I just thought I would check, and yes indeed, the flat rate is 30 euros from airport to places inside the M-30, which is all of central Madrid.

But the other interesting thing is that there is also a flat rate, from the Airport to anywhere outside the M-30, if the total distance is less than 10 km (which would include all airport hotels). And that rate is 20 €. So, @Dorpie, that cabbie who offered to take you o the Barajas hotel for 20, was actually being honest!

https://www.aeropuertomadrid-barajas.com/transportes/taxis-barajas.htm
That does seem like a steep fare, but I guess it reflects those long waits that the cabbies have to endure.
Cabify is a private cab company different than the cabs in the queue at the airport. I think it's only in Spain, Portugal and some countries in South America. I don't know why the fare was 23E. That's what I paid, though. The nice thing about Cabify (like other such companies - ie Lyft) is the fare is paid on a card and no money exchanges hands between the passenger and the driver. I don't like haggling so when I have to use a taxi, I use Cabify. I particularly like Cabify because the cars are always clean, they always treat me well (offer water, offer a phone charger, ask if I want the AC or heat on, do I want to listen to the radio - if so, what kind of station...). Plus the drivers are not supposed to talk to you unless you initiate a conversation which I always do because my Spanish needs the practice - lol. Anyway, I hope that clarifies your confusion and curiosity.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Future (2019) Portuguese.
#14
So I understand their total frustration. I have long thought that there should be a different passenger line for short fares so the driver could choose whether to take the long wait or not, but that seems like it would be a nightmare to administer.
As a one time hack in NYC 35+ years ago at JFK they had a "short haul" ticket the dispatcher gave the driver so they could return to a much, much shorter waiting line for next fare. As for using the departure level, although clever, in many places it is not legal to accept a new passenger upstairs. Of course no one is likely policing this and it is in fact a win-win for both driver (no long wait or empty return to city) and passenger.

Might I add that even at home or any destination if family or friend is picking you up always go back upstairs to departures to meet. There is tons less traffic. Of course some places only have one level. Typically arrivals is a nightmare.
 
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KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
#15
As a one time hack in NYC 35+ years ago at JFK they had a "short haul" ticket the dispatcher gave the driver so they could return to a much, much shorter waiting line for next fare. As for using the departure level, although clever, in many places it is not legal to accept a new passenger upstairs. Of course no one is likely policing this and it is in fact a win-win for both driver (no long wait or empty return to city) and passenger.

Might I add that even at home or any destination if family or friend is picking you up always go back upstairs to departures to meet. There is tons less traffic. Of course some places only have one level. Typically arrivals is a nightmare.
This shorter line ticket is a clever idea.

But the policy about not accepting passengers on departure decks isn't at all about taxi (drivers). Taxi drivers can easily make a loop from departure to arrival decks. The airports just wants to swallow the people on departure decks and get rid of them on arrival decks as soon as possible. If you are commuting between arrival and departure decks in wrong direction just to grab a cab you are causing a mess. Well, one person not but one quarter of them and there you go... ;)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
#17
I have flown to and from Madrid airport on two caminos and from it on a third and have never taken a taxi, either in Madrid or anywhere else in Spain (or France). I had a problem after my first camino getting to Madrid airport, due to my Alsa bus not going to the airport although I had bought a ticket to there. I got there on a Cercanias train from the Alsa bus depot.
After my second camino, the night before I flew home I stayed at Hotel Don Luis in Barajas. I walked the few blocks there from the Barajas metro station. For my evening meal, I walked the couple of blocks to the central plaza. At that time, I found the bus stop for the airport bus, which started its run at about 6 am and went to all the terminals. That bus is how I got to the airport in the morning.
For my third camino, last fall, I again flew to and from Madrid. On arriving, I bought a train ticket at the airport for Burgos, where I was volunteering before my camino, and took the Cercanias train to the inter-city train station nearby, and on to Burgos. To return home after this camino, I had an early morning flight out of Madrid. So I stayed at Hostal Vicky in Barajas , getting to the airport using a free transfer ticket, which I got by standing in line at the train station, then called Hostal Vicky for a free ride to the hostal. The next morning, a free shuttle from Hostal Vicky drove me to the airport. I am not a particularly competent traveller and relied on many members of this forum, as well as the kind people at Pilgrim House, to help me plan how to get around on public transport. I don't think that travelling cheaper is particularly difficult or slow. It is more efficient, as most of my transit trips were on tracks and I never had to wait in traffic for my taxi to get moving. You can try it too.
 

lissie45

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning to walk Frances 2019
#18
This sort of crap is why I’ll happily use Uber particularly from an airport so you don’t get hit by the scams
 

lissie45

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning to walk Frances 2019
#21
But it's not a scam. They have a flat rate that is determined by the government.
It’s a scam if you’re being charged 20 euro for a short trip - I’d be curious to know what Uber quotes for the same trip
 

SabineP

Camino is about empathy. Not about entitlement.
Camino(s) past & future
some and then more. see my signature.
#22
This sort of crap is why I’ll happily use Uber particularly from an airport so you don’t get hit by the scams
But it's not a scam. They have a flat rate that is determined by the government.

Indeed I do not see the need to talk about " crap or scam ".
To my knowledge a lot of airport taxi companies work with fixed rates.

I am someone who will never use Uber ( or ArBnB for that matter ) because I believe in people getting paid honestly.
Scammers can be found everywhere btw.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago to Finisterre to Muxia 2013
Camino Frances May 2015
Camino Frances July 2017
#24
Indeed I do not see the need to talk about " crap or scam ".
To my knowledge a lot of airport taxi companies work with fixed rates.

I am someone who will never use Uber ( or ArBnB for that matter ) because I believe in people getting paid honestly.
Scammers can be found everywhere btw.
You think charging €30 for a 2.9km journey is being paid honestly?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago to Finisterre to Muxia 2013
Camino Frances May 2015
Camino Frances July 2017
#27
Instead complaining you can start walking from the airport , problem solved .
That works great in many cases and I would obviously do that in most cases but that's not always an option. I didn't mention it, because I didn't want to be seen as playing the sympathy card, but I had my 80 year old dad in a wheelchair with me.

And even if you're not physically limited, arriving at an airport in a country where you might not know the infrastructure or the language and may be jetlagged to hell puts you in an unusually vulnerable position.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago to Finisterre to Muxia 2013
Camino Frances May 2015
Camino Frances July 2017
#28
I get that, though incidentally there's nothing to indicate the tarrifs at the taxi rank, I'm asking if you think €30 or even €20 to go 2.9km, which took literally 5 minutes is an honest price? Maybe I'm just a scrooge, but for much of my working life I barely made that in an hour.

And the justification that to avoid them ripping people off in one way, by driving customers on overly long routes to their destination in order to bump up the fare, we should instead accept being charged an inflated flat fee hurts my head.

As I implied before, the mere fact that dozens of cabs are queued up, even at a fairly peak time (this was 6pm) waiting for fares suggests to me that this is a distinctly flawed system.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
St Olav/Francés ('16)
Baztanés/Francés ('17)
Ingles ('18)
#29
That works great in many cases and I would obviously do that in most cases but that's not always an option.
I took it to mean that Peter was suggesting (with a bit of lightness) that we all begin to walk to Santiago from the airport, forgetting cabs and hotels altogether.;)
 
Camino(s) past & future
2035 km of the way to Saint James in Galicia done.
#32
I get that, though incidentally there's nothing to indicate the tarrifs at the taxi rank, I'm asking if you think €30 or even €20 to go 2.9km, which took literally 5 minutes is an honest price? Maybe I'm just a scrooge, but for much of my working life I barely made that in an hour.
I sympathize with you. And I'm grateful that you shared your experience. You started one of the more useful threads, at least for me :cool:. I didn't know about the 30 € / 20 € fixed price system for Madrid Barajas, really good to know.

I find it actually not such a bad system. It's a ripoff that you were asked 30 € instead of 20 €. But the 20 € is ok, even if it was only 5 minutes and 3 km. It's possibly a fair price for the time the driver needed to get another ride. You pay for his time overall, not by distance. Try to look at it like that. ;)

A lot of certainly well meant advice. We once had a layover of several hours at Madrid and thought of walking out. We didn't see our way out, we couldn't figure it out. Yes, it's possible, I know it now, after studying Google Earth for a long time after our return.

And no, airport hotels in particular are not always easy to reach by train, bus (other than airport bus if running) or metro.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#33
As I implied before, the mere fact that dozens of cabs are queued up, even at a fairly peak time (this was 6pm) waiting for fares suggests to me that this is a distinctly flawed system.
Similar rules and limitations (and a few dishonest drivers) exist at many airports around the world. The judgement of "flawed" depends on your criteria. If supply-demand rules, you'd find almost no taxis at certain times, possibly leaving those few customers stranded. At many big airports you can see long lines of waiting passengers at some times and long lines of waiting taxis at other times. One big plane lands and the lines move quickly.

The €20 rate balances out the need for taxi availability (which goes hand in hand with driver waiting time). The €30 rate protects customers from being taken for a long ride unnecessarily (harder to recognize on the longer trips in a city you don't know).

It can't be an easy management task, and I prefer to pay a bit extra for security and convenience. Of course, as I am playing by the rules, I want the taxi drivers to do the same.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago to Finisterre to Muxia 2013
Camino Frances May 2015
Camino Frances July 2017
#34
Similar rules and limitations (and a few dishonest drivers) exist at many airports around the world. The judgement of "flawed" depends on your criteria. If supply-demand rules, you'd find almost no taxis at certain times, possibly leaving those few customers stranded. At many big airports you can see long lines of waiting passengers at some times and long lines of waiting taxis at other times. One big plane lands and the lines move quickly.

The €20 rate balances out the need for taxi availability (which goes hand in hand with driver waiting time). The €30 rate protects customers from being taken for a long ride unnecessarily (harder to recognize on the longer trips in a city you don't know).

It can't be an easy management task, and I prefer to pay a bit extra for security and convenience. Of course, as I am playing by the rules, I want the taxi drivers to do the same.
If only in this tech savvy era there was some kind of app that balanced supply and demand for taxis and altered the rates accordingly.

I'm being facetious of course. I hate Uber as a company what with their disregard for either passenger, driver or staff welfare and reluctance to pay taxes but as an actual model to balance supply and demand it's a brilliant concept.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
#35
I checked on-line for Uber and their price for Barajas - Madrid Centro would vary between 15-30€ depending on the type of a car.
 
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#36
As a one time hack in NYC 35+ years ago at JFK they had a "short haul" ticket the dispatcher gave the driver so they could return to a much, much shorter waiting line for next fare. As for using the departure level, although clever, in many places it is not legal to accept a new passenger upstairs. Of course no one is likely policing this and it is in fact a win-win for both driver (no long wait or empty return to city) and passenger.

Might I add that even at home or any destination if family or friend is picking you up always go back upstairs to departures to meet. There is tons less traffic. Of course some places only have one level. Typically arrivals is a nightmare.
What a brilliant idea — give the driver who takes a short haul a different line to wait in on the return. That would require more on the ground personnel than Barajas currently has, but seems like a very fair idea to me.

And I think that what you say about it being illegal to get a taxi at departures is technically true in these places as well. In Lisbon, I think it was just that no one was paying attention for a while, and then someone figured it out. Because there is staff policing the taxi line at the Lisbon arrivals area. Let’s see how long the trick continues to work at Barajas!
 
#37
If only in this tech savvy era there was some kind of app that balanced supply and demand for taxis and altered the rates accordingly.

I'm being facetious of course. I hate Uber as a company what with their disregard for either passenger, driver or staff welfare and reluctance to pay taxes but as an actual model to balance supply and demand it's a brilliant concept.
Ok, I know I am straying a bit (or more) off topic, but IMO Uber and Lyft have a lot of other negative impacts in adition to their employment model. They have brought havoc to the streets of many cities — in Seattle, for instance, they estimate that having those companies on the road has increased driven miles by 94,000,000 miles! https://www.seattletimes.com/seattl...illion-miles-in-seattle-last-year-study-says/

These companies are not primarily providing an alternative to private car ownership, they are pulling people off public transit, off bikes, and off their feet. Seems like supply and demand and market forces are taking us down an unsustainable path. I remember a huge taxi strike in Lisbon protesting Uber, but I think they have set up shop and are not being regulated much, but I am not sure about Spain.
 
#38
I took a Cabify from the airport to Cuatro Caminos 3 weeks ago and it was 23€. Haven't ever take a cab so did not know about the flat rate. If I had only had my backpack, I would have taken the metro, bus or train. An option to taking a cab at the flat rate might be to take the metro to the Barajas exit, then taking a cab from there to the hotel. There are certainly cabs in Barajas. Or book your overnight stay in Barajas. It's quite close to the airport. I haven't done this but I don't know why you could not. I suspect it would not cost 30€.
Aha, that explains it! I had never heard of Cabify, but it sounds like Uber or Lyft, TNCs they call them in the US (transportation network companies).
 

RecCarey

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2019
#39
Just a quick warning and tip for pilgrims travelling by taxi from Madrid Airport.

Yesterday I was staying at a hostal a short distance (3kms) from the airport. Coming to the taxi queue outside arrivals I got into an official cab on the taxi rank and said where I wanted go. As I was putting on my seatbelt the guy said it would be €30. I immediately said "No" and opened the door, if I had not opened the door I'm sure he would have pulled off and held me to this extortionate fare. For a little while after that no cab would take me as I was clearly a trouble maker, then one quoted €20. I went to airport information to try and see what the deal was, apparently €30 is a standard charge for anyone going to the city centre and then anything else should be metered but because they queue so long for passengers the cabs try to charge everyone the flat fee which is pretty outrageous.

So, while I couldn't get any cab at arrivals to take me on a metered journey I discovered that the guys upstairs dropping off at departures (at least in the case of terminal 1) were happy to do metered trips so I would suggest everyone picks up their cab at departures rather than arrivals.

Hope this helps someone.

Rob.
I use the Metro situated right in the Airport. Don't recall the cost but believe it was about $5 and took about 25 minute to get to my destination near the south train station.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF April 2016 April - Jun
Del Norte, Finesterre 2018 May - Jun
#42
Just a quick warning and tip for pilgrims travelling by taxi from Madrid Airport.

Yesterday I was staying at a hostal a short distance (3kms) from the airport. Coming to the taxi queue outside arrivals I got into an official cab on the taxi rank and said where I wanted go. As I was putting on my seatbelt the guy said it would be €30. I immediately said "No" and opened the door, if I had not opened the door I'm sure he would have pulled off and held me to this extortionate fare. For a little while after that no cab would take me as I was clearly a trouble maker, then one quoted €20. I went to airport information to try and see what the deal was, apparently €30 is a standard charge for anyone going to the city centre and then anything else should be metered but because they queue so long for passengers the cabs try to charge everyone the
Just a quick warning and tip for pilgrims travelling by taxi from Madrid Airport.

Yesterday I was staying at a hostal a short distance (3kms) from the airport. Coming to the taxi queue outside arrivals I got into an official cab on the taxi rank and said where I wanted go. As I was putting on my seatbelt the guy said it would be €30. I immediately said "No" and opened the door, if I had not opened the door I'm sure he would have pulled off and held me to this extortionate fare. For a little while after that no cab would take me as I was clearly a trouble maker, then one quoted €20. I went to airport information to try and see what the deal was, apparently €30 is a standard charge for anyone going to the city centre and then anything else should be metered but because they queue so long for passengers the cabs try to charge everyone the flat fee which is pretty outrageous.

So, while I couldn't get any cab at arrivals to take me on a metered journey I discovered that the guys upstairs dropping off at departures (at least in the case of terminal 1) were happy to do metered trips so I would suggest everyone picks up their cab at departures rather
flat fee which is pretty outrageous.

So, while I couldn't get any cab at arrivals to take me on a metered journey I discovered that the guys upstairs dropping off at departures (at least in the case of terminal 1) were happy to do metered trips so I would suggest everyone picks up their cab at departures rather than arrivals.

Hope this helps someone.

Rob




Rob.
Hi Rob, We do research before leaving home to avoid catching taxis, (recently in Madrid), we found a hotel near the main train line and caught the train (about 2 Euro) into Chamartin station, walked about 200 metres to the hotel then in the morning, back to Charmartin to catch the train to Irun. Have done the same in Ireland and Japan. The first time in Copenhagen, I caught a taxi to the hotel ($60) and realised it was right on the line from the airport, so next time onto the train at the airport and the fare was a few dollars!!!! Great achievement
 

annakappa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Part frances jun 07/rest frances may- jun 2008/Frances sept-oct 2009/ Sanabres Oct 2010/Frances sept-oct 2011/Aragones Sept-Oct 2012. Hospitalero Sept 2010, Amiga in Pilgrim's Office Oct 2013. Part Primitivo Oct 2013. Portugues from Porto June 2015.
#43
We have never taken a taxi in Madrid. We learned that it was more convenient and interesting to stay in Barajas town and not at one of the "airport hotels". As far as I know all the "airport hotels" offer free transport to and from the airport ( but, of course the cost for staying at one of these hotels is more expensive). You can take the metro and then walk about 500 metres to the centre, or take the local bus which drops you off right at the side of the plaza. Just a short walk to your chosen place to stay. Barajas offers porticos on 3 sides of the plaza with a selection of restaurants. Plenty of people watching to do, if you are trying to kill time! Hostel Vicky, one of the hostels in Barajas, offers a free shuttle service. To go to Madrid centre, you can take the metro, or even the bus from the airport.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago to Finisterre to Muxia 2013
Camino Frances May 2015
Camino Frances July 2017
#44
We have never taken a taxi in Madrid. We learned that it was more convenient and interesting to stay in Barajas town and not at one of the "airport hotels". As far as I know all the "airport hotels" offer free transport to and from the airport ( but, of course the cost for staying at one of these hotels is more expensive). You can take the metro and then walk about 500 metres to the centre, or take the local bus which drops you off right at the side of the plaza. Just a short walk to your chosen place to stay. Barajas offers porticos on 3 sides of the plaza with a selection of restaurants. Plenty of people watching to do, if you are trying to kill time! Hostel Vicky, one of the hostels in Barajas, offers a free shuttle service. To go to Madrid centre, you can take the metro, or even the bus from the airport.
Funnily enough we stayed at Hostal Viky. It just never occurred to me that a taxi would have been so expensive. A lesson learned.
 

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