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Maintaining Blood Sugar...food on the trail

Barobins

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés fall/winter 2019
Hi all,

I am having some issues during training with getting hungry often while walking. I’m using a lot of bars, and fruit, but I’m thinking I might need to add something to my water. Sometimes it’s just hard to keep eating bars too!

There are a million electrolyte drinks here in the US...what is available in Spain?

What do any of you use to keep up your blood sugar?

I’m 5’2’ (157 cm) and 59 kilos. I don’t really have any body weight agenda...I just don’t want to “bonk”!

Any info would be great!

I’m doing the CF from Pamplona 21 Oct.

Thanks!
Barbara
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
Pretty much anything you can buy in the USA, you can buy (perhaps generically) in Spain. Lots of things to carry in your pack, including nuts, cheese, fruit, bocadillos, sausages, packaged things like puddings, drinks, you name it. And I've seen plenty of electrolyte powders. If you are starting in Pamplona, give yourself 2-3 days there to see the city and stock up for your first day, though there are places to eat along the way.
Buen Camino. Here's a blog with photos of some of the things you might find: http://caminosantiago2.blogspot.com/2018/02/el-almuerzo-lunch-on-camino-santiago.html
 

Malachiuri

CaminoTranquilo
Camino(s) past & future
St Jean to Burgos '17
St Jean to Fisterra '18
St Jean to Astorga '20
COVID CAMINO!
Norte '21
Hi there!

What you are probably experiencing is glycogen depletion while working out. Glycogen is the glucose structure that is stored in your muscles, organs and fat cells that are the fuel for your muscles to work.

After 90 mins of mild or difficult cardio workout, the glycogen in your muscles is depleted and you start burning other sources of energy, in particular your muscle/fat structures, and thats why you feel so icky.

Try eating a fast and natural source of sugar about every 90 minutes. Something like half an apple or an orange can be enough to keep ya going without the "bonk". If 90 minutes doesn't work, try 60.

Electrolyte drinks, energy bars and the like take extra processing for your system to grab hold of the sugars of as opposed to natural sources like fruit.

When I was training for half marathons and longer trail runs I had the exact same issues. I met with a PhD candidate nutritionist as part of my weight loss and training program and he told me to try the fruit thing. It worked superbly for me and I still use it to this day. Fruit is easy to find on the Camino, easy to carry and easy to digest.

YMMV but give it a try and avoid the "sport drink and bars" trap.

Cheers!

M
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
On a practical level, you might want to look at the pattern of your food intake during the day to see whether your main meals is giving you the best foundation, and snacks and supplements are complementing these rather than replacing them.

I suggest this will be more difficult in Spain, where breakfasts provided by albergues and in many cafes are based around toast and jam, and not anything more substantial. I know that I would always be like a Hobbit, and ready for a second breakfast after an hour or so of walking.

Aquarius is marketed as an electrolyte supplement throughout Spain, but is far from sugar free. My own preference for electrolyte additives is to use one that is sugar free, and I normally only use it at the end of the day. The exceptions are if I do start to feel my muscles starting to cramp up, or when the water taste needs to be masked.
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
Hi Barobins - no, definitely don't bonk on the Camino, well, not during the day when you are walking with a pack ;) .

Beware those "bars" as they tend to be mostly sugar .... when you eat one of those "trail" bars you get an almost instant shot of sugar into your bloodstream - makes you feel good doesn't it - but twenty minutes later your sugar level is way below where it was before you ate the bar, so you eat another bar (they are designed like this so that you keep eating them - lots of profit!) - and you end up living a life of highs and lows, peaks and troughs.
And here is the thing, your body doesn't like that. It isn't designed for that, nor the poor offering of fruit to the craving body. Fruit is almost totally fructose, which is sugar - so the effect is the same. As with chocolate - steer well clear of chocolate.
I think you would do much better carrying lots of water, salt, and strips of cooked fatty meat and full fat cheeses ... or cheese sandwiches, ham sandwiches, etc.

This fruit and trekking bars way of living - I don't think it is natural to our bodies, it doesn't give our bodies what they actually need .... - so - for a moment discard all modern product promoted dietary advice and just think what your ancestors of, say, only 100 years ago ate .. they laboured as long as the sun was up, but never felt this modern energy loss thing - why? Because they ate lots of real food, heavy food, the staple foods, our historic human foods - or traditional vegetarian versions of that .. so, I say, do that. ;)

If you carry full fat cheese and full fat meat, say, in a European style sausage for portability, and coarse 100% wholemeal bread (without added sugar - they do that now!) you will never feel faint, never be hungry, never have blood sugar level problems, and your body will just keep on going, as did your ancestors.
 
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RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
Whenever I could, I kept a bag of peanuts in my pack and maybe a banana. For the most part not difficult to get everyday on the Frances. That really helped curb any hunger in the morning before I located a proper breakfast. Not that toast and jam junk food which is generally served then.
I also made it a point to drink at least 1/2 a litre of water first thing in the morning.
 

Anamya

Keeping it simple
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015)
Portugues (2017)
Lebaniego (2019)
Barobins: I was a professional athlete for 11 years, and would highly recommend you to check your diet and what you have been eating before and after exercizing. Maybe even discuss that with your GP or nutritionist, if you have one. If you feel such a need of extras, it is because your body is not getting enough, and just adding bars+suplements+electrolites may be a bandaid solution to something with deeper roots.

Maybe you are missing someting more foundational, as others have suggested. Do not fall into the 'trekking bar' trap - if you are eating well, fruits, orange juice, nuts, cheese and other thigs readily available in spain would cover any needs.

I particularly indulge in Spanish food and rarely need more than water and orange juice while walking. My husband adds some bananas as well.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Depending on how much I carry and my pace while carrying it, I will take in about 100 calories every 25 to 30 minutes. That will begin to provide needed fuel with about 20 minutes after eating it. As an example, that is a about 1/4 of a Snicker bar, or a small handful of Peanut M&Ms along with bite or two of cheese or sausage, and I'm good to go.

I then make sure I eat balanced meals (as much as possible :) )
 
Camino(s) past & future
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
Time magazine has an article on a hydration that you may find interesting. Here is one thing they say:

Ingesting water along with amino acids, fats and minerals seems to help the body take up and retain more H2O—and therefore maintain better levels of hydration—which is especially important following exercise and periods of heavy perspiration.
 

NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
Be aware that many of the bars that you stop at during the day for coffee and snack are often quite willing and able to rustle up some eggs and bacon. More than once I arrived at a spot to hear pilgrims lamenting the poverty of edibles and then look google-eyed when my second (or third) breakfast arrived. Just ask nicely.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2022)
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2022)
Hi all,

I am having some issues during training with getting hungry often while walking. I’m using a lot of bars, and fruit, but I’m thinking I might need to add something to my water. Sometimes it’s just hard to keep eating bars too!

There are a million electrolyte drinks here in the US...what is available in Spain?

What do any of you use to keep up your blood sugar?

I’m 5’2’ (157 cm) and 59 kilos. I don’t really have any body weight agenda...I just don’t want to “bonk”!

Any info would be great!

I’m doing the CF from Pamplona 21 Oct.

Thanks!
Barbara
I am not one to give dietary advice.
I am overweight and tend to put on weight on the Camino if I'm not careful! :oops:

Lots of great advice above. Which Camino are you walking? If the CF, there is food around every corner!

From a personal maintaining energy perspective..........as I tended to go downhill a bit after the 20 kms mark ....

I would try to eat a proper breakfast. Many bars service toast, bacon, eggs etc.
Then I would eat a Pilgrim menu at the end of my walk for that day.
So this generally meant stopping by about 2 pm.
If I have a longer walking day, I would snack or maybe find a simpler lunch, and have a Pilgrim menu for dinner.

The key for me was some good fuel to get me going in the morning (proper breakfast)
I sometimes boiled eggs the night before to eat with a bread roll.

As I was walking I would generally have some trail mix to nibble. (Dried fruit and nuts)
Easy to buy in Spain.

Then I discovered Aquarius!
I would often have one in the afternoon if still walking and it gave me a real energy boost.
Though I think they have a lot of sugar. But if that last hour or two was a real struggle, Aquarius would get me there.

If possible, I now buy those rehydration satchets (For tummy upsets)
I tip one of those into a small 400 ml 'spare' water bottle and sip it through the day.
Healthier than Aquarius.
Available in Farmarcias.

Oh. Bananas! I always carry one or two...... Another great booster.
Easy to find in Village stores (if walking the Frances)
 
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Henry B

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016
Aquarius isn't all bad and the flat type you can buy in most supermercado in the hydration bladder works well. Oranges chocolate and peanuts are good sources and stoned dates stuffed with peanut butter too
 

Via2010

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
06/07 & 12 Camino Francés, 08-10 Via de la Plata, 13/14 & 17 Camino Portugués, 18 Camino Primitivo
I think it is a question of training and what kind of food you are normally used to.

I am a diabetic and from my training I learnt that human body can not develop a dangerously low blood-sugar, unless you depend on artificial insuline. The body will regulate itself, telling you that he is hungry if blood-sugar falls under a certain limit. However, your nutrition can influence your blood-sugar.

Juices, lemonades with sugar and "Energy Drinks" make your blood-sugar rise quickly but also too fall down within a short period. If blood-sugar is falling quickly, you may feel hungry, weak or "bonk". Better eat food which does not contain simple sugars but makes your blood-sugar rise (and accordingly fall) slowly such as wholegrain bread. Your body can even gain necessary carbohydrates from fat, eggs or meat. This kind of food, if you are used to it, supplies you with lots of energy for a long time.

Snacking around with your blood-sugar going up and down and up and down will harm your body in the long term. Try to get along with 3 meals a day, with a break of minimum 5 hours between the meals. Once you have got used to it, you will start to feel stronger and more vital.

On my past Caminos I became used to walking the first 8-12 km without breakfast, then have a good break with coffee and a bocadillo, enjoying another coffee or a cerveza (or cerveza clara) later the day and having an evening meal. I managed very well with that and felt very strong.

BC
Alexandra
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(2012) Le Puy/CF (2015) Portugues (2017) Norte (2018) CF (2019) VDLP?
Hi there!

What you are probably experiencing is glycogen depletion while working out. Glycogen is the glucose structure that is stored in your muscles, organs and fat cells that are the fuel for your muscles to work.

After 90 mins of mild or difficult cardio workout, the glycogen in your muscles is depleted and you start burning other sources of energy, in particular your muscle/fat structures, and thats why you feel so icky.

Try eating a fast and natural source of sugar about every 90 minutes. Something like half an apple or an orange can be enough to keep ya going without the "bonk". If 90 minutes doesn't work, try 60.

Electrolyte drinks, energy bars and the like take extra processing for your system to grab hold of the sugars of as opposed to natural sources like fruit.

When I was training for half marathons and longer trail runs I had the exact same issues. I met with a PhD candidate nutritionist as part of my weight loss and training program and he told me to try the fruit thing. It worked superbly for me and I still use it to this day. Fruit is easy to find on the Camino, easy to carry and easy to digest.

YMMV but give it a try and avoid the "sport drink and bars" trap.

Cheers!

M
As a former drug representative who had a product for diabetes your advice is 100% correct. There is nothing better than natural sources of energy. Fruits that have high sugar and fiber content are great sources of energy. When you eat natural sugars that have fiber, not only is the fiber good for you, but it slows the absorption of the sugars and it allows the body to break down the sugar and store it properly within the body. Fructose or other sugar is absorbed quickly forcing the pancreas to pump out more insulin. This sugar often ends up as brown fat that surrounds your organs and is definitely not good for anything or anyone.
 

Beeks

Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2019) only 2 weeks available! St. Jean PDP - Pamplona, then Sarria - SDC with the family,
Bonk!

Screenshot_20190926-152828_Bing.jpg
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
In case you missed it, bonking by Beeks below:
Sure, but its much more fun thinking the OP might, just might, have been referring to one or other of the more commonly accepted definitions of this word, even noting that they didn't want to engage in it. That, I thought, showed marvelous restraint!
 

WalkingJane

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
May and October 2015
(2015 October)
June 2018 Portuguese
Barobins: I was a professional athlete for 11 years, and would highly recommend you to check your diet and what you have been eating before and after exercizing. Maybe even discuss that with your GP or nutritionist, if you have one. If you feel such a need of extras, it is because your body is not getting enough, and just adding bars+suplements+electrolites may be a bandaid solution to something with deeper roots.

Maybe you are missing someting more foundational, as others have suggested. Do not fall into the 'trekking bar' trap - if you are eating well, fruits, orange juice, nuts, cheese and other thigs readily available in spain would cover any needs.

I particularly indulge in Spanish food and rarely need more than water and orange juice while walking. My husband adds some bananas as well.
Hard boiled eggs are another good thing that can be carried along.
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP2Santiago completed (Sept.15, 2018).
Hi all,

I am having some issues during training with getting hungry often while walking. I’m using a lot of bars, and fruit, but I’m thinking I might need to add something to my water. Sometimes it’s just hard to keep eating bars too!

There are a million electrolyte drinks here in the US...what is available in Spain?

What do any of you use to keep up your blood sugar?

I’m 5’2’ (157 cm) and 59 kilos. I don’t really have any body weight agenda...I just don’t want to “bonk”!

Any info would be great!

I’m doing the CF from Pamplona 21 Oct.

Thanks!
Barbara

I mixed raisons/walnuts/cheese - tasty nibbles and sustained good energy. I also bought a jar of peanut butter and would start off (early am 5:30ish) w/ a spoonful of peanut butter. Also used NUUN electrolyte tabs (in bottle of h20). Buen Camino.
 

Barobins

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés fall/winter 2019
Barobins: I was a professional athlete for 11 years, and would highly recommend you to check your diet and what you have been eating before and after exercizing. Maybe even discuss that with your GP or nutritionist, if you have one. If you feel such a need of extras, it is because your body is not getting enough, and just adding bars+suplements+electrolites may be a bandaid solution to something with deeper roots.

Maybe you are missing someting more foundational, as others have suggested. Do not fall into the 'trekking bar' trap - if you are eating well, fruits, orange juice, nuts, cheese and other thigs readily available in spain would cover any needs.

I particularly indulge in Spanish food and rarely need more than water and orange juice while walking. My husband adds some bananas as well.
I think you are spot on. I was high level cyclist for over a decade and I never had food issues while training. I was very ill about a year ago and dropped 30 pounds in two months, I could have a deficiency in something. I’m also getting digestive unrest as I ramp up hiking time.

Now to get this taken care of ASAP in the US medical field will be a challenge!
Thanks for the reply
Barbara
 

Anamya

Keeping it simple
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015)
Portugues (2017)
Lebaniego (2019)
I was high level cyclist for over a decade and I never had food issues while training.
Then you just need some minor adjustments and you will be more than ready for the camino! High level cycling is tough, lady! 😍
 
Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
There's an old song I'll paraphrase for decency:

I'm a rambler, a peregrino, I'm a long way from home
And if you don't like me, well, leave me alone
I'll eat when I'm hungry, I'll drink when I'm dry
And if the dodgy, sugar laden, overpriced "sports" drinks and Palm Fat rich oat bars don't kill me, I'll live til I die

Unless you have a specific health condition that requires close monitoring and maintenance of blood-sugar levels then a normal healthy diet is all that you need to follow while walking a camino. A stroll along the camino Frances will offer endless opportunities for re-fuelling. Some of the less travelled Caminos may require a bit more care and planning. If you are struggling during training walks at home try a bigger and better breakfast.
 

JJinWI

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
May-June (2018) Camino Frances
There are a lot of theories on this...

I actually found that eating more fat & protein (and fewer carbs) worked for me. Do a little research on keto/ketosis. A state where your body converts fats into ketones and your body uses ketones rather than glycogen for energy.

NOTE: I was eating "keto" for ~6 months before my Camino.

Cheers,

-jj
 

Kevin Malinak

-kevin-
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, St Jean PdP, March 18 (2018)
When you first start exercising/walking, your body is mostly burning glycogen... after the first half hour or so of walking, your body switches over to burning mostly fats.

Therefore a snack such as nuts, cheese, etc will give you the absolutely best energy for each day. I almost always had some Chorizo and/or a few boiled eggs in my pack too.

The most convenient "road food" was a home made snack mix consisting of 2 or 3 parts Peanuts, 1 part raisins. Most grocery stores in Spain had them. Once in a while we made the mix with different things.
(the 2/3:1 ratio can vary a huge amount and still be just fine)
Buen Camino!!!
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
When you first start exercising/walking, your body is mostly burning glycogen... after the first half hour or so of walking, your body switches over to burning mostly fats.

Therefore a snack such as nuts, cheese, etc will give you the absolutely best energy for each day. I almost always had some Chorizo and/or a few boiled eggs in my pack too.

The most convenient "road food" was a home made snack mix consisting of 2 or 3 parts Peanuts, 1 part raisins. Most grocery stores in Spain had them. Once in a while we made the mix with different things.
(the 2/3:1 ratio can vary a huge amount and still be just fine)
Buen Camino!!!
@Kevin Malinak, half an hour seems to be a remarkably short time to move the body from using predominantly carbohydrates to predominantly using fats. I have seen figures of many hours for this transition. Do you have sources that indicate walking reduces glycogen sources in the body that rapidly?
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
For me, while walking those last few kilometres of the day, a beautiful piece of fruit is the nectar of the gods. Spanish fruit is very good. In spring a glorious orange, in high summer cherries or figs, in autumn an apple.
 

Lizhk

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis (2017) StJPdP to Burgos (2018) Porto interior (2018), Porto Coastal (May 2019)
I have the same problem and find my low sugar time is late afternoon so I always made sure had an apple or orange (2 preferably) plus nuts mixed with chocolate and I carry glucose pills for emergencies.
Twice I needed my fruit and could continue on 15-30 minutes later. After that I just made sure I ate a piece of fruit mid afternoon and I was fine.
I came across a man who was cold and sweaty and looked like he needed glucose so I have him a pill and 25 minutes later he was fine and could walk the last few kilometers.
 

Kevin Malinak

-kevin-
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, St Jean PdP, March 18 (2018)
@Kevin Malinak, half an hour seems to be a remarkably short time to move the body from using predominantly carbohydrates to predominantly using fats. I have seen figures of many hours for this transition. Do you have sources that indicate walking reduces glycogen sources in the body that rapidly?
Yea I think you're absolutely correct... I was going off of some old(and obviously poor) memories when I used to do a lot of training/running... I just tried to google search that amount of time but failed. The true answer appears to be quite a variable. It depends on how much glycogen you have stored up at the time. (average 2000 calories) It depends on how strenuous you are exercising at the time. (fasting at home vs walking vs jogging vs fast race-pace running, etc)
It also depends on your general eating habits. It appears that, by low carb eating habits, you can sort-of train your body to rely less on burning primarily glycogen to fat. Thank you for pointing this out!!!
 

timr

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Several and counting...
Unless you have a specific health condition that requires close monitoring and maintenance of blood-sugar levels then a normal healthy diet is all that you need to follow while walking a camino. A stroll along the camino Frances will offer endless opportunities for re-fuelling. Some of the less travelled Caminos may require a bit more care and planning. If you are struggling during training walks at home try a bigger and better breakfast.
Thanks for that @Tincatinker. I am a (retired) physician with much experience in nutrition, malnutrition and the care of critically ill patients requiring intravenous (and therefore very closely monitored and controlled), feeding. I have walked various Caminos eleven times, and over the past eighteen months from Canterbury to Thessaloniki. I have run 5 marathons and many shorter and more recreational races.
I should be good (in theory) at 'helping' my body.
But I never ever do.
I have never taken a supplement of any kind, nor any vitamins. I just eat normal food with very little meat, but by no means vegetarian, and drink fluids (the disproportionate majority of which are in the form of coffee). Some days I have a snack while I walk, other days I do not. Frequently in southern Italy and more so in Albania, North Macedonia, and Greece I just had breakfast and an evening meal, as there was no other convenient option. If people along the way gave me fruit, I ate it. I do carry plain water from any tap with me.
Otherwise I rely on my kidneys, my liver and my pancreas to keep things sorted out. And up to now they seem quite good at it. And I don't interfere nor try to second guess them.
In the interests of full disclosure I should admit I have never won a race, 😔 but nor have I ever dropped out.😄
If people wish to use any of the many products on the market, and choose to spend the money, that is fine by me. I have no argument and nor will I enter into discussion. And I never give medical advice to people not sitting in the same room as myself. And clearly the situation is different for people with specific metabolic disorders, like Diabetes type 1 or 2. I am just saying what I do.
 
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Old Kiwi

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2016
Camino Frances 2019
SdC to Muxia and Fisterra 2019
Camino Portuguese "2021"
My body must have different needs to most of you. When walking the Camino, I leave the albergue at 6;00am and walk until around 9;00am and find a bar where I have coffee and tortilla. I then walk to wherever I am staying for the night and buy an orange, a banana, a peach and sometimes a necterene. I eat these before doing the shower/laundry thing. It around 7;00pm I have whatever pilgrim menu is available. That is all I eat and I never carry any food. I do not get hungry and do not run out of energy. I might be better off having the fruit at 9;00am and tortilla on arrival at the albergue but it is easier to find a bar than a fruit shop.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
It would be very hard to hit the wall on the Camino Frances - there are places to drink and eat every 5 to 10 K or so. On more remote caminos, I rely on fruit and nuts and stay very far away from highly processed snack bars and artificial rehydration drinks. My drink of choice used to be Kas limon, but I've come to prefer a small glass of zumo de naranja mixed with agua con gaz. Divine!

Otherwise I rely on my kidneys, my liver and my pancreas to keep things sorted out. And up to now they seem quite good at it. And I don't interfere nor try to second guess them.
Very wise advice. Thanks, Tim!
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
I appear to have the opposite problem to many of you. I am walking the Madrid right now. I know I need food and water, but I don't really want enough of either. The days are very hot and dry. I force down warm water, in insufficient quantities, and sometimes I can hardly eat at all. Today was a better day, the morning cool and damp, as I walked south from Segovia. I can drink the tap water in the evenings and may have to stop at every bar along the Way and ask for water (and occasionally food). It can be hard to adjust to a very different lifestyle for a month or two. I am still working at it. We must all learn to take care of our needs to be healthy and enjoy our caminos. And Buen Camino to all.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
Albertagirl, buen camino! One trick that works in the heat is to freeze a bottle of water and then the next day to sip the meltwater. It's so much more appealing and satisfying. So if any albergues have a freezer consider trying that. (Ahem...and I make a note to myself...don't forget it. 😳)
 

Barobins

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés fall/winter 2019
I think my protein/fat intake needs to go way up. That’s been working better. Thanks for all the help and responses!
 
D

Deleted member 29041

Guest
Personally, I usually only get "depleted" when I have missed out on my usual breakfast of .. well, essentially a sandwich or two with tomato and ham/sausage and/or cheese, plus pimientos to taste. I usually buy a fresh "bocadillo" each day and eat half for breakfast. Go for the "Integrale" version (full wheat). I always keep my trusty tomato knife handy for butchering the bread and tomatoes.

An alternative is having a tortilla in a bar.

I usually supplement with some fruit or vegetables along the road.

I really prefer if I can hit a restaurant somewhere in the siesta for a "menu del dia" and then have the rest of the bocadillo for dinner. If not, then the bocadillo or hard boiled eggs for lunch and preferably something self cooked for dinner. A pilgrims menu only if everything else fails.

Pack the bread so it doesn't dry out, or you'll break your teeth. Packets of cheese and meats will keep for two days. Hard boiled eggs for a little longer. All depending on temperature. Take care that the food does not leak into the rest of your pack.

I've learned to have a package of olives in reserve, for when I'm caught out by closed shops and/or eateries.

Candy bars are at best a stop-gap "solution".
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
One of the significant side effects, fo me, of going on camino, is the success with which my body consumes its surplus fat during a long walk. I would hate to lose this useful function, but I am noticing that lower leg cramps get in the way of my walking late in the day. So perhaps I should consider changing my diet somewhat.
 

Donna Sch

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
VdLP-Sanabres-Fisterra (Summer 2015); Levante-Invierno (Feb/Mar 2019);
England Camino routes ?2024
If you want some reading on female exercise physiology I suggest Stacy Sums' ROAR for fine-tuning your nutrition. Go easy on the muesli bars. I find protein is the key for me.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Ingles 2016 Camino Portuguese 2017 Considering Invierno late (2020) In lieu of VdlP (2020)
My American colleague from Florida used to introduce himself to people in the UK with "Hi I am Randy!" He then wondered why people were choking or backing away from him. Randy is generally a state before Bonking occurrs:-} My colleague later changed to using his middle name of Vinnie when visiting the UK.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Ingles 2016 Camino Portuguese 2017 Considering Invierno late (2020) In lieu of VdlP (2020)
Hi all,

There are a million electrolyte drinks here in the US...what is available in Spain?

What do any of you use to keep up your blood sugar?

Thanks!
Barbara
Barbara, Short term sugary drinks or glucose drinks can help when your blood sugar drops. However sustained use of electrolyte solutions stop working since the pancreas starts to ramp up insulin production and the excess sugars are either not digested or converted to fat. You can even get an Insulin spike that reduces the available blood sugar causing one to feel faint and nauseous.
You need to balance the sugary stuff with some slow release energy products such as Peanut butter and oatmeal. Regularly snacking on small portions of trail mix plus water of fruit juice to stop dehydration are a good way to avoid this problem.
 

WalkingJane

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
May and October 2015
(2015 October)
June 2018 Portuguese
My American colleague from Florida used to introduce himself to people in the UK with "Hi I am Randy!" He then wondered why people were choking or backing away from him. Randy is generally a state before Bonking occurrs:-} My colleague later changed to using his middle name of Vinnie when visiting the UK.
I was stunned when, in the UK, a taxi my husband and I had arranged for the following morning, said he would "knock you up" at whatever hour it was we had agreed on. Quick lesson on taking care with any deviation from purely standard usage, even of one's own language.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
I was stunned when, in the UK, a taxi my husband and I had arranged for the following morning, said he would "knock you up" at whatever hour it was we had agreed on. Quick lesson on taking care with any deviation from purely standard usage, even of one's own language.
Doesn't sound like a deviation to me, but perhaps I am used to detecting the differences between standard English usage of the language, and 'standard' American usage. See https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=knock you up.
 

WalkingJane

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
May and October 2015
(2015 October)
June 2018 Portuguese
Doesn't sound like a deviation to me, but perhaps I am used to detecting the differences between standard English usage of the language, and 'standard' American usage. See https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=knock you up.
By now, I, too, am used to deviations. That was from a time before I had traveled much outside the US. My now-former husband and I had sailed across the Atlantic, etcetcetc.; were learning a lot! Caminos came later, after I'd also had a number of trips with Habitat for Humanity; to Brazil, Portugal, Kyrgyzstan, Romania, UK, Hungary, and more.
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016), VDLP (2017), Mozarabe (2018), Vasco/Bayona (2019)
Doesn't sound like a deviation to me, but perhaps I am used to detecting the differences between standard English usage of the language, and 'standard' American usage.
I wouldn't call that standard American usage. It is a slightly crude idiomatic expression in North American usage. I doubt that I have ever used it. At least the British usage bears some relation to the literal meeting of knocking on the door.

I understand and speak standard Spanish fairly well - and have no trouble in Spain versus Latin America. If an expression such as "knock" is used in the context of notifying me at my house, I will figure it out. However, its use in a completely illogical/idiomatic way will give me trouble.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Ingles 2016 Camino Portuguese 2017 Considering Invierno late (2020) In lieu of VdlP (2020)
I was stunned when, in the UK, a taxi my husband and I had arranged for the following morning, said he would "knock you up" at whatever hour it was we had agreed on. Quick lesson on taking care with any deviation from purely standard usage, even of one's own language.
There used to be professional "knocker uppers" who would use a long pole to tap on your bedroom window so a person could get up for the early AM shift at the local colliery/factory. This was of course before alarm clocks were cheap enough to be affordable by people.

My first visit to the USA I was working in Alabama when I shocked the office admin clerk by apparently requesting a condom from the stationery cupboard! After a while the lady told me the correct term in the US is an "eraser"
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP2Santiago completed (Sept.15, 2018).
Pretty much anything you can buy in the USA, you can buy (perhaps generically) in Spain. Lots of things to carry in your pack, including nuts, cheese, fruit, bocadillos, sausages, packaged things like puddings, drinks, you name it. And I've seen plenty of electrolyte powders. If you are starting in Pamplona, give yourself 2-3 days there to see the city and stock up for your first day, though there are places to eat along the way.
Buen Camino. Here's a blog with photos of some of the things you might find: http://caminosantiago2.blogspot.com/2018/02/el-almuerzo-lunch-on-camino-santiago.html
great info Annie/nice presentation. thanks for the info/great suggestions!
 

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