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Mass and Communion on the Camino

sillydoll

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#1
A couple of years ago I asked a catholic priest whether protestants could go to Holy Communion in the Catholic churches along the camino.
I also wrote to the Anglican Communion Office in England. These were their replies.

QUESTION:
“I am not a Catholic. Can I go to Holy Communion when I attend a Pilgrims’ Mass along the Camino or when I arrive in Santiago?”

ANSWER - Catholic Priest:
This is a question that is often asked by pilgrims to Santiago de Compostela. There is a desire to go to Communion and to be part of the liturgical celebration while at the same time wanting to respect the practice of the host church. What is the position?
The general rule in the Catholic Church regarding sacramental sharing is that it is only permissible for those with whom we share full ecclesial communion. There are two exceptions to this rule, namely, in danger of death or for “some other grave or pressing need”. In the case of grave or pressing need, the following conditions are to be met: “(a) the person must seek it of his or her own initiative, (b) must be unable to receive the sacrament from a minister of his or her own Church, (c) must manifest Catholic faith in the sacrament, (d) must have proper disposition for the fruitful reception of it”.
How these norms are interpreted varies from place to place and I think that one can normally assume a broad interpretation. For example, here in Cape Town, the policy has this to say regarding the criterion that the person should “manifest Catholic faith in the sacrament”: the person concerned should “acknowledge that the sacrament is the Body and Blood of Christ given under the form of bread and wine. This faith is manifest by responding ‘Amen’ to the minister who presents the sacred bread and saving cup.”
The short answer? By all means go to communion if you are a regular communicant in your own church and can say ‘yes’ to this being the Body and Blood of Christ. After all, when you are walking the Camino, you are probably a long way off from receiving the sacrament from your own church! And surely everyone on pilgrimage has the proper disposition!
One last thing. You will notice that most Catholic churches give Communion to the congregation under the form of bread only. This is really a matter of convenience. We believe that Christ is entirely present under either of the species. For symbolic value, of course, receiving Communion under both kinds is more complete.
And one more last thing. When Communion is administered to someone on their death-bed it is referred to as ‘viaticum’ which means ‘food for the journey’. But in a real way, every time we receive communion, it is viaticum, food for the pilgrimage of life!
Fr Frank de Gouveia is the Spiritual Advisor at the St Francis Xavier Seminary in Cape Town. He has walked both the Camino Frances and Portuguese Caminho

The Anglican reply:

The Anglican Churches recognise Roman Catholic Eucharists as valid celebrations of the Eucharist, and would be delighted to be invited to Communion. Unfortunately, the Roman Catholic Church does not permit it, except in very unusual circumstances.
With best wishes
The Department of Ecumenical Affairs and Studies
Anglican Communion Office
London

PS: The difference seems to be that Catholics must believe that the bread and wine actually are the body and blood of Christ - not symbols of as is the case in most Protestant churces.
 

TerryB

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#2
Thanks for this Sil. As an Anglican I would hope to share in the Eucharist with whoever was on the camino in a church of whatever denomination. You probably know the old joke about worship in heaven? When St. Peter was asked what was happening on the other side of a high wall he replied 'shush those are the ........(insert denomination) . They think that they are the only ones here!
Tio Tel
 

sillydoll

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#3
You won't find many Protestant churches in Spain. In 2007 the Federation of Evangelical Religious Entities (FEREDE) estimated that there are only 1.2 million evangelical Christians and other Protestants in Spain (800,000 of whom are immigrants or live in the country at least six months of the year). 79.1% of Spaniards consider themselves Roman Catholic although 54.7% state that they almost never attend Mass.
I attended mass in many of the churches on the camino. They were attended mainly by old women and a few pilgrims.
 

oursonpolaire

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#4
In three Caminoes I have only twice seen non-RC churches in Spain, a small evangelical storefront church in Monzon (on the Cami San Jaume) and the Anglican church in Madrid (there is now an Anglican chaplaincy to students in Salamanca for those doing the VdP). Sillydoll's attendance observations are close to mine, although I have seen a few exceptions (such as the Hermitage of San Amaro in Burgos, just west of the park albergue) in my time.

From my observation of the priest helping the communicant to receive properly, the clergy are pretty well aware that many peregrinos are not RC. I have not spoken with any cleric about this, but I suppose that they take the position that pilgrims to the tomb of the apostle are clearly unable to receive the Sacrament from their own clergy (there being none around in northern Spain), are manifesting faith in the Sacrament (are they not coming up to the altar respectfully?) and are showing proper disposition (are they not walking hundreds of kilometres?). In any case, for the RCs, this is a profound expression of hospitality and a sign of their respect for the effort and dedication involved in walking the Camino.
 
A

Anonymous

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#5
sillydoll said:
The Anglican Churches recognise Roman Catholic Eucharists as valid celebrations of the Eucharist, and would be delighted to be invited to Communion. Unfortunately, the Roman Catholic Church does not permit it, except in very unusual circumstances.
And the Anglican church sometimes gets it wrong in 'unusual circumstances'! I was in Taize a few years ago with the Archbishop of Canterbury (George Carey) and a thousand young Anglicans at an ecumenical gathering. The Archbishop announced that only Anglicans could receive at the Eucharist he was going to celebrate. Those of us who knew this was a nonsense went running over to his chaplain to explain this was not the Anglican position. An embarrassed George Carey amended his invitation and announced all were welcome!

So, this example shows that it's always a sensitive issue, but sometimes those at the top don't know what they are doing either! Before I converted to the Catholic church I made a point of not receiving communion at Catholic Mass, as I wanted to wait until I was in communion with the church before receiving communion. That seemed to me only natural. I would advise to do what your conscience tells you, and not ask permission. If you ask, the official answer will usually be no. Your conscience might happen to agree with that.

Gareth
 
#6
I would advise to do what your conscience tells you, and not ask permission.
Although not wishing to be controversial I agree with this and perhaps we should simply ask ourselves, " what would the Master say...?"

I've also been impressed that Church attendance all over Spain seems to be alive and well in comparison to other places. Of course in small rural villages it seems to be only a few older women who are attending - exactly the same as in the UK! However on the Via de la Plata and subsequently the Camino Ingles I regulary found evening Mass often with singing. And whilst my first hand knowledge of the Camino Frances is as yet restricted I found:

About 60 people in the parish church of San Esteban in Zubiri

At least 100 people singing heartily ar Mass in Puente la Reina

A full church of San Nicolas in Pamplona on All Saints day

30 people or so gathering for mass at the Monstaerio of Irache when I passed and similarly at the Church of St Andrew in Villamayor

Then there is the Pilgrims Mass and blessing in many languages from an extremely friendly priest in the Church of Holy Mary in Los Arcos

In Santo Domingo de la Calzada there were enough people for the responses to be heard above the sound of the cockerel!

And this was at a time when generally I was the only other pilgrim there since there were so few around.
 
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#7
Because this question came up again a day or two ago, I thought it wise to revive this thread. I live on the camino, I am Anglican/Episcopalian, I am a believer who wanted to fully participate in the life of my Roman Catholic parish. I did not want to violate church rules or my own conscience, so I asked every church authority I could find what was the right thing to do. I was roundly informed by Anglican and Catholic authorities and even my local Catholic bishop: If there´s no Anglican priest to provide the Eucharistic service, I am free to receive at the Catholic service -- long as my beliefs about the bread and wine are in line with the Catholic teaching.
They are, and so I do.
If you are Episcopalian, Anglican, or even Lutheran, you can freely receive Communion along the Camino, if that is what you wish to do.
 

rector

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#8
Hi Rebekah I am of exactly the same denomination as yourself and as a clergyman/priest in N Ireland we often run into this problem. We have an open table which welcomes all so Roman Catholics here will often partake with us but the RC church frowns upon it. The real problem for the pilgrim is that of deception would you ofend a priest by taking it under what he could see as false pretentions. On a personal level, as someone who believes in one church with different understandings and who spends as much time as possible in Spain, I will not partake for sake of offending I therefore sit at the back during the service and so worship. on a positive note my wife and I leave st John 14th May on our second camino, so if anyone desired communion on The Way and they seen the badge I would be delighted to oblige.
thanks for all the questions you answer Rebekah
Because this question came up again a day or two ago, I thought it wise to revive this thread. I live on the camino, I am Anglican/Episcopalian, I am a believer who wanted to fully participate in the life of my Roman Catholic parish. I did not want to violate church rules or my own conscience, so I asked every church authority I could find what was the right thing to do. I was roundly informed by Anglican and Catholic authorities and even my local Catholic bishop: If there´s no Anglican priest to provide the Eucharistic service, I am free to receive at the Catholic service -- long as my beliefs about the bread and wine are in line with the Catholic teaching.
They are, and so I do.
If you are Episcopalian, Anglican, or even Lutheran, you can freely receive Communion along the Camino, if that is what you wish to do.
 
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#9
Rector, even if the Irish RCs haven´t cottoned onto the concept, the RC priests along the camino would not be offended at your receiving communion. You are welcome at the table -- the diocesan bishops along the Way have agreed, even.
Still, if you stop here in Moratinos during your journey, I would be overjoyed to host an Anglican Eucharist!
 
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#10
Question: If a Pastor of a non-Roman Catholic brand was walking the Camino, would it offend sensibilities for them to offer a service of evening prayer with communion to anyone who happened to want to attend?
 

rector

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#12
As I often find myself in Spain when on leave I often worship in RC Churches who permit Anglicans or other denominations to use their churches before or after their own service
 

indyinmaine

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#13
Because this question came up again a day or two ago, I thought it wise to revive this thread. I live on the camino, I am Anglican/Episcopalian, I am a believer who wanted to fully participate in the life of my Roman Catholic parish. I did not want to violate church rules or my own conscience, so I asked every church authority I could find what was the right thing to do. I was roundly informed by Anglican and Catholic authorities and even my local Catholic bishop: If there´s no Anglican priest to provide the Eucharistic service, I am free to receive at the Catholic service -- long as my beliefs about the bread and wine are in line with the Catholic teaching.
They are, and so I do.
If you are Episcopalian, Anglican, or even Lutheran, you can freely receive Communion along the Camino, if that is what you wish to do.
AMEN! Even though I converted just 8 years go I asked my parish priest the same question last night. The essential elements are: belief in transubstantiation, your "home church is not available to you, you say "Amen" as affirmation of the above.
 
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freescot

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#14
Two weeks ago I finished a Camino and wrote about inter-faith communion. I expressed a profound desire, arising from walking caminos, that we use communion to express the reality of our unity and our love. "Love is the most powerful source of energy and the greatest symbol Christians have for Love, for our God, is in the breaking of the bread, in our shared communion. So while walking it has kept coming back to me how important it is to let nothing come in the way of the last command and great desire of Jesus just before his execution that we “do this in memory of me.” more: http://driftwood.the-raft-of-corks.com/deaf-blind-numb-christianity/.
 

rector

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#15
Hi freescot
I am not sure from your post if you have experienced inter faith communion, I have and found it to be wonderful. I ask the question, if someone wants to commune with Christ, who has the right to say no.
 

freescot

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#16
Yes, Rector, often. What convinced me, though, was a visit to Iona in 2010 after my first Camino. There nobody asked what denomination we were. Having been brought up a Catholic in Glasgow it was the first detail you needed to know about anyone and here, in Iona, was a flourishing ecumenical, prayer and action centred, inclusive project of a dispersed Christian Community with its heart on this little island. By the end of a week together I learned that a group of Austians with us had come with their Parish Priest (Catholic) in the guise of Christians and we had all shared in the Eucharist, celebrated by an ordained woman without qualms. I now return every year and see the communion service as a powerful statement of our unity not of our differences. From this perspective, united in God's Love, I wrote last Christmas "In my naïvety I don’t see any need for more commissions, dialogue or debate before we share the Eucharist. We need to share the Eucharist first and around the table learn from each other the wonderful richness of our differences which in reality do not divide but complement. Let us be one in all innocence." (http://driftwood.the-raft-of-corks.com/naivety-nativity/)
 
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#17
I am a retired Lutheran Pastor. I will be on the Camino Frances April and May. I always carry Holden Evening Prayer with me on long hikes. I would be happy to sing Holden Evening Prayer and/or share communion with anyone who wishes it in any albergue at which I stop along the way.
 
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#18
When I have attended a Mass in NZ as a non-Catholic but committed Christian, I was told to cross my arms across my chest like an X and the priest or deacon would pray a blessing instead. On these few occasions, I've been officially blessed and avoided offending the clergy. Is this practice also common in Spain?
 

colinPeter

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#19
Hello Freescot,
....I learned that a group of Austians with us had come with their Parish Priest (Catholic) in the guise of Christians ...."
Not completely sure of your meaning here, regarding the phrase "in the guise of Christians".
...We need to share the Eucharist first and around the table learn from each other the wonderful richness of our differences which in reality...
Then again, learning from "our differences", might mean that we discover that one is actually right & one is wrong.
In "reality", that might just be a possibility, however much we'd prefer it otherwise.
Colin
 

Tia Valeria

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#20
It often seems to me that countries that had a hard time during what we call the 'Reformation' period have a problem with being ecumenical. Other places are much freer with their acceptance or welcome, and others are learning. To me Spain has always been in the welcoming group and we can choose to join together accordingly. Individuals may prefer to abastain and that is fine as that is their personal choice.
Reb has made the official position clear, so perhaps now is the time to let the matter rest again.
 

falcon269

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#21
countries that had a hard time during what we call the 'Reformation' period
Most of the seven billion humans on Earth may not find anything in the concept of a reformation; they are xenophopic for myriad other reasons.;)
 

oursonpolaire

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#22
When I have attended a Mass in NZ as a non-Catholic but committed Christian, I was told to cross my arms across my chest like an X and the priest or deacon would pray a blessing instead. On these few occasions, I've been officially blessed and avoided offending the clergy. Is this practice also common in Spain?
This practice, common in English-speaking countries, was almost unknown in Spain until quite recently. It is now understood by clergy at the cathedral in Santiago, and is becoming better-known elsewhere. You will still find priests who are unclear as to what you are up to.
 

indyinmaine

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#23
This practice, common in English-speaking countries, was almost unknown in Spain until quite recently. It is now understood by clergy at the cathedral in Santiago, and is becoming better-known elsewhere. You will still find priests who are unclear as to what you are up to.
Wow, this thread is taking off! The reason the crossed arms is probably not known in Spain is that most people there are Catholic. What I find encouraging is that inter faith communion CAN occur in whatever form it take as long as both denominations agree. What's usually referred to as the "fine print" in a contract keeps you from doing something. In this case it appears to allow it!
 

freescot

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#24
Hello Freescot,

Not completely sure of your meaning here, regarding the phrase "in the guise of Christians".

Then again, learning from "our differences", might mean that we discover that one is actually right & one is wrong.
In "reality", that might just be a possibility, however much we'd prefer it otherwise.
Colin
Hi Colin, "in the guise of Christians" is to say that this group of Catholics did not come with T-shirts proclaimimg their affiliation with the Vatican - they simply cam as part of the island community for that week - as Christians with other Christians.

Yes, you're right, "differences" is not the best term here. I really meant a celebration of diversity and let's just put aside who is right and wrong for a while and see what difference it makes..
 

rector

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#25
Hi freescott
i am glad that you appreciate the handywork of one of our better N Irish exports St Columba and his work amongst you Scotts on Iona but as a Cunningham perhaps I should say nothing about that. It was a better export than the Titanic anyway the English sunk that one on us.
Back to theology surely in the act of communion we meet with our Lord, Him in us, we in Him, in so doing we meet with what has been and what will be we in effect meet with all creation and all eternity.
With all our legalistic man made rules and regulations we inhibit this marvel - filled event and perhaps, if I can quote properly the words of a Sufi divine "Beyond our ideas of right and wrong there is a field, I will meet you there" In that way the simple act of sharing a meal in an albergue or hostel in which people in a caring and sharing way with all their ideas, ideals and traditions set aside may be closer to that which Christ reflected in His teaching and life
 

colinPeter

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#28
Freescot,
...."in the guise of Christians" is to say that this group of Catholics did not come with T-shirts proclaimimg their affiliation with the Vatican - they simply cam as part of the island community for that week - as Christians with other Christians...
Ah, that's a different thing now, I thought the original post might be construed to mean they weren't "real" Christians. (With or without the T-shirts - lol) :)

Yes, you're right, "differences" is not the best term here. I really meant a celebration of diversity and let's just put aside who is right and wrong for a while and see what difference it makes..
Yes, diversity is a wonderful thing, which should be celebrated, but I would venture to say that the acceptance of diversities, must not require the abandonment of understood truth, just for the sake of warm congeniality.

Colin

ps Falcon, now waiting for the T-shirt (lol) :)
 

freescot

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#29
Hi freescott
i am glad that you appreciate the handywork of one of our better N Irish exports St Columba and his work amongst you Scotts on Iona but as a Cunningham perhaps I should say nothing about that. It was a better export than the Titanic anyway the English sunk that one on us.
Back to theology surely in the act of communion we meet with our Lord, Him in us, we in Him, in so doing we meet with what has been and what will be we in effect meet with all creation and all eternity.
With all our legalistic man made rules and regulations we inhibit this marvel - filled event and perhaps, if I can quote properly the words of a Sufi divine "Beyond our ideas of right and wrong there is a field, I will meet you there" In that way the simple act of sharing a meal in an albergue or hostel in which people in a caring and sharing way with all their ideas, ideals and traditions set aside may be closer to that which Christ reflected in His teaching and life
Yes, indeed and really one of the great experiences on the Camino is doing just this in a huge variety of ways which don't just belong to our own tradition. I shared an English afternoon tea in the Albergue in Miraz on the feast of St James, offered by the English Hospitaleros, with a Japanese Buddhist - among many such encounters. And, yes, the Camino is a great teacher above all in the practice of hospitality where so often, as in the Benedictine rule, the door is opened to the stranger as if he were Christ himself.
 

rector

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#30
Jesus died for all of us not just a chosen few It is our response to his sacrifice through desire or need which makes us acceptable
And not a codification of laws and rules, but rather His grace and our acceptance of it
Is this getting a bit too heavy?
 
#32
I have described my "live on the camino experience" with mass and communion in several posts in another thread. If you are interested, look for "A fork in my camino".
 
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#33
There is no need to harp on the theologies of communion here as if one is right and one is wrong. We come from different backgrounds and have different understandings and beliefs. And we are unlikely to change another's mind in such exchanges. Roman Catholicism leans more heavily on the church fathers. Other brands including mine lean more heavily on the scriptures. (And our scriptures too are a bit different.) Some delve deeply into context of written scriptures or patristics. Transsubstantiation comes primarily from St Thomas Aquinas and he leaned heavily on a somewhat arcane version of Greek philosophy. (And, from the 11 the century was not a very early church father.) Others lean heavily on the Greek and not the Latin of the scriptures. And still yet others simply go to their current translation of the Bible and deal with words chosen by those translators.

Snipits on a forum or email are inadequate (though interesting) to deal with such issues. Lutheran Catholic Dialogues have some rather hefty books related to the dialogue.

What I ran across many years ago in seminary that was the simplist version of something that made some sense was the quote (I forget from where but it was given to me by a Roman Catholic Priest in a course on worship) for the definition of symbol taken from the study of religion and anthropology: "A Symbol is an action which discloses a relationship." To get at the meaning of symbol anthropologically please think of it as action, not just a sign like a cross. That definition applied to communion gives a nice framework for discussion of our various understandings.

I believe this thread was supposed to be about the possibilities of sharing communion along the camino, principally in local Roman Catholic Churches. If those who are not Roman Catholic are welcome, that is wonderful. (By the way, I have received communion in Roman Catholic churches in USA and even preached in one. How broadly a church deals with this issue depends upon the priest (pre or post Vatican II understanding) and their Bishop and whether the Majesterium has resently said anything about it.) If there are those who are not RC, or don't feel welcome in a Roman Catholic setting or for any other reason wish to have communion, I am happy to provide that service anywhere I am for anyone who wishes. (Hey, the music is beautiful.) My theological basis is essentially that Jesus shared the Last Supper with a lot of very obtuse, dumb disciples. If we understand Mark to be the first Gospel, that writer shows again and again how the disciples missed almost any point Jesus made and they surely had no clue about the resurrection of what the church would become after Jesus' death and resurrection or what this passing around of bread and wine meant until afterwards. I can faithfully say it is his body and blood but I do not need St Thomas' rather lengthy and convoluted reasoning to say so.

There a great multitude of meanings of communion. I am a 72 year old pastor and happily can say I learn more of the depth and breadth of meanings all the time. One of the most powerful for me is that it is the gathering of the family of God (us of any and all backgrounds) sharing the meal of bread and wine and the presence of God through Jesus Christ. Lutherans like the terms "in, with and under." That is only one of MANY meanings of this marvelous meal. But it is one.

That is quite enough. And this is quite enough theological ranting from me on this thread. If anyone wants to continue such theological discussion it might be best off the general thread which, I think, was not intended for airing our differences or getting anyone hot and bothered but for information about the availability of communion along the way, in particular from Roman Catholic churches in our host country.
 

rector

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#34
That's it then folks back to the trenches we will come out to play another day
 

freescot

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#35
Theology is heavy and as Mary E Davison says above "Jesus shared the Last Supper with a lot of very obtuse, dumb disciples." I'm happy to be dumb on this issue. The Camino de Santiago has helped me grow up, have wider horizons, recognise many of my prejudices and not to be afraid of failure or pain, all of which have helped to liberate me from a very formal Catholic upbringing. Thank God. I am still a Catholic in spite of feeling free of the heaviness of the theology.
That said I find most of the posts here reflect wonderfully the true communion we can share on the Camino, the many ways in which this happens and the love with which we meet each other - not just in warm collegiality - but truly as one body brought together by an ancient sacred tradition.
 
#36
As a moderator I see no problem with this thread and it is probably wise to discuss the topic at least once each year as many new pilgrims will have the subject of communion/mass on their mind.

As long as the discussion is not personal or derogatory about other religions it will not be locked.
 
#37
Because this question came up again a day or two ago, I thought it wise to revive this thread. I live on the camino, I am Anglican/Episcopalian, I am a believer who wanted to fully participate in the life of my Roman Catholic parish. I did not want to violate church rules or my own conscience, so I asked every church authority I could find what was the right thing to do. I was roundly informed by Anglican and Catholic authorities and even my local Catholic bishop: If there´s no Anglican priest to provide the Eucharistic service, I am free to receive at the Catholic service -- long as my beliefs about the bread and wine are in line with the Catholic teaching.
They are, and so I do.
If you are Episcopalian, Anglican, or even Lutheran, you can freely receive Communion along the Camino, if that is what you wish to do.
It may be helpful at this point to remember the simple and informative point which Rebekah made.

If you are not a Roman Catholic and there is no minister of your own denomination available it is permissible to receive communion at a Catholic Mass if you believe in what the Catholic Church teaches about communion.

Decide yourself whether this applies to you. If it does and you go to a Catholic Mass you don't need to ask for permission - just go to communion. Simple.

Buen camino!

John
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#38
Whether one can take communion is not particularly complex. There is very little range on what the Catholic Church says. There is a bit more range on what actually happens. Then the discussion turns to what "should" be. That is where it becomes contentious. Instead of everyone simply doing what he wants to do, some try to convert others to their attitude.
 
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christer1

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
none (yet)
#39
Religion is divisive along with many other institutions in our society. We are all humans and live on this planet alongside each other. We have the same basic needs and the sooner we put this first and repair the damage to human consciousness the better. This is not a criticism of religion or nationalism or any other such outdated concepts, rather it is an attempt to make people think about the world in a different way.

I wish you all a free and synergetic existence whatever you choose to do with your time!

Much love, Christer
 

Tincatinker

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
#41
I offer no offence and intend no trespass but as one of the forums resident "pagans" the breaking of bread and the sharing of wine are key elements of inter - communal engagement in most societies and across many cultural and religious boundaries. While I would never presume to enter into a religious act wherein my presence might offend others I will commune with any that will commune with me.

Reb and others have I hope given comfort and assurance to all that if you seek communion, in its full Christian significance, it is readily available to you on Camino.

My more arcane but as heartfelt communion is also available to all. Break bread with your fellow pilgrims, share wine, do it in awareness of the divine in all of us. Be joyous of our lives and the miracle that is living.
 

rector

ONE HALF
Camino(s) past & future
MAY (2011)
MAY (2014)
Camino Porto-Santiago Aug 2015
#42
I feel that I have to come out of my trench, I hope it's all clear and nobody will take a pot shot at me, but am I mistaken. or picked this up wrong perhaps I am paranoid but I feel there is a negative tone starting to creep in to this thread. I have checked back and all I can see are people who are not exclusive, but rather inclusive and there is an air of positivity abroad. Perhaps some times it has become to deep but otherwise all I can see are people who love God and the fellow man
 

johns

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF "2010" Ingles and Finisterre "2011" CP - L-P-S "2012" F /M "2013" c norte may 2014 CP 2015
#45
titanic iceberg want did the english sink
 

indyinmaine

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances - SJPdP to Santiago - Sept/Oct 2013
#46
It may be helpful at this point to remember the simple and informative point which Rebekah made.

If you are not a Roman Catholic and there is no minister of your own denomination available it is permissible to receive communion at a Catholic Mass if you believe in what the Catholic Church teaches about communion.

Decide yourself whether this applies to you. If it does and you go to a Catholic Mass you don't need to ask for permission - just go to communion. Simple.

Buen camino!

John
AMEN!
 
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
#47
I hope that one day in the future, priests/clergymen from all religions will come together and talk, unite, and communicate a common faith to us peasants. Maybe we'll then get peace on Earth after 2000 years? (said with tongue in cheek after reading through this thread)
 

pilgrim b

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Caminos Frances 2013
Ingles 2014
Frances 2015
St Cuthbert's Way 2017
Via Francegena 2018
#49
Please note that I have moved a few posts about the topic A sense of the Holy to this thread: Have you had a sense of the Holy on your camino

Thank you,
Susanna/Mod.
A sense of the Holy on Camino: Many times did I see, the beauty and uniqueness on my fellow pilgrim's faces, the miracle of their determination to continue in spite of their suffering. The Camino angels who supported them including the Priests and the many locals who blessed and served us all with no thought of our diversity. We were pilgrims on a sacred path all with our own reasons for our journey. Yet I often thought as I journeyed how beautiful the world is and how little I really know, and "this must be what the Kingdom of Heaven is like! Maybe this is why the Camino calls us back again and again.
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
#50
One of the things that helps at present, with not being able to walk the Camino this year, is the remembrance of the sense of the Holy, and reading too of others experience of that. Uplifting, thank you.
 

wayfarer

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-Santiago-Finistera-Muxia. April/May 2012
Sarria-Santiago Sept. 2013
SJPP - Almost Orrison April 2014
#51
A sense of the Holy on Camino: Many times did I see, the beauty and uniqueness on my fellow pilgrim's faces, the miracle of their determination to continue in spite of their suffering. The Camino angels who supported them including the Priests and the many locals who blessed and served us all with no thought of our diversity. We were pilgrims on a sacred path all with our own reasons for our journey. Yet I often thought as I journeyed how beautiful the world is and how little I really know, and "this must be what the Kingdom of Heaven is like! Maybe this is why the Camino calls us back again and again.
I completely agree pilgrim b, the beauty and spiritual sense I got from the Camino was in the people I met along the way, those being kind and helpful to each other, true Christianity, even some of these were of other faiths. As you said Camino Angels.
Mind you I met a few devils too...... ;):D
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#52
I completely agree pilgrim b, the beauty and spiritual sense I got from the Camino was in the people I met along the way
It is hard not to feel a great deal of gratitude on the Camino. Following on the heels of that emotion is the sense of accomplishment. For many pilgrims it has been a while since they challenged themselves physically, and it is satisfying to know that it is still possible to rise to challenges. Introspection can add to these two dominant feelings, and maybe that is a sense of the holy. I see it as mostly an internal process, but I can see how others think it is being bestowed on them. Many times we do not give credit to ourselves when credit is due, as though that goal was the result of something other than the team's effort. Chacun a son gout.
 
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indyinmaine

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances - SJPdP to Santiago - Sept/Oct 2013
#53
I hope that one day in the future, priests/clergymen from all religions will come together and talk, unite, and communicate a common faith to us peasants. Maybe we'll then get peace on Earth after 2000 years? (said with tongue in cheek after reading through this thread)
Alex,
Actually what needs to happen is that the people from all religions come together and talk, unite, and communicate a common faith!
 

pilgrim b

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Caminos Frances 2013
Ingles 2014
Frances 2015
St Cuthbert's Way 2017
Via Francegena 2018
#54
I see it as mostly an internal process, but I can see how others think it is being bestowed on them. Many times we do not give credit to ourselves when credit is due, as though that goal was the result of something other than the team's effort. Chacun a son gout.
I like your comments Falcon your introspection to see in these feelings that: “ maybe, that is a sense of the holy”. To also see it as mostly an internal process,”I agree, I think it is an internal process in our hearts or souls or certainly some deep down awareness in our innerselves. Not bestowed upon us, but there all the time waiting to be discovered with those infinite pupils in our finite eyes so to speak!

Alex,
Actually what needs to happen is that the people from all religions come together and talk, unite, and communicate a common faith!

That the people from all religions come together and talk, unite, and communicate a common faith much like on this forum indyinmaine without judging or considering anyone could possibly have a monopoly on all the truth but loving each other in spite of difference. I agree.
 
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rector

ONE HALF
Camino(s) past & future
MAY (2011)
MAY (2014)
Camino Porto-Santiago Aug 2015
#55
Hi Pilgim B & Alex
A Chinese Buddhist friend of mine, upon reading a Christinan meditation on my desk, said do you know John there is a great truth in that. Perhaps the thing which bring a unified response by human souls/ hearts/ minds, is the truth and perhaps in the uncompicated and simple reality of the Camino the truth is more easily recognised and experienced and Alex I can assure that your 2000 year wish does happen I spent my weekend three weeks ago doing just that.
 

colinPeter

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-SDC (2009) Somport-Jaca, Burgos-SDC, Cee-Muxia (2012) Le Puy - Aumont-Aubrac (2014) SJPP-SDC (Oct 2015)
#56
"Faith seeking understanding” (fides quaerens intellectum).
 

pilgrim b

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Caminos Frances 2013
Ingles 2014
Frances 2015
St Cuthbert's Way 2017
Via Francegena 2018
#60
Am I missing an answer to this question?
Question: Non Roman Catholics receiving Mass on the Camino
Anonymous relpy: I would advise to do what your conscience tells you, and not ask permission.
Johnnie: Although not wishing to be controversial I agree with this and perhaps we should simply ask ourselves, " what would the Master say…? JC

Hope this helps fraluchi
 

gidivet

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés - SJPP to Santiago de Compostela - 24 April to 1 June 2014.
Camino Francés - Short section Sept 2014
Camino Francés - Short section May 2015
Camino Francés and Camino Le Puy short sections - April/May 2016
#61
I am heartened by this thread and attitudes expressed on all sides. I start walking in a little over a month and look forward to communion in whatever form it may be offered along the way.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Did 200km in 2012. Did some more kms in 2014! and also volunteered as a hospitalero at an albergue for 2 weeks!
#62
Not sure if already mentioned on these threads, but there is an albergue in Villamayor de Montjardin run by a Dutch evangelical group (Protestant organisation). I stayed there last time and it turned out to be a personal highlight of my Camino. They didn't offer communion (and I didn't ask), but the dinner was a wonderfully uplifting "communion" experience.
 
N

NoQ

Guest
#63

That's a super resource falcon. Wonder if some of the times are a little wrong though, compared to last summer? Or maybe times have changed since then. Anyway it gives people a great idea.

There are plenty more churches and masses along the way too. For instance the churches at Zabaldika and Villamayor de Monjardin are amazing and both offered mass in the evening when I passed through. El Burgo Ranero had a lovely little church too, that held mass in the morning. The only sad thing is the sparse number of pilgrims attending mass sometimes, as in Castrojeriz on an evening last July, there was a mass and a pilgrim blessing attended by only two pilgrims of the many stopping in the various albergues that night.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (April-May, 2014
#65
I am a retired Lutheran Pastor. I will be on the Camino Frances April and May. I always carry Holden Evening Prayer with me on long hikes. I would be happy to sing Holden Evening Prayer and/or share communion with anyone who wishes it in any albergue at which I stop along the way.
I missed this post earlier. I am a Catholic Lay Ecclesial minister (it's complicated), and if I catch up with you I would be delighted to say evening prayer with you.
 

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