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Most scenic 5-7 days on any Camino?

JustJack

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
May 2023
Haven't yet walked my first camino and here I am planning my second...

I'll be walking the CF this spring/summer, but I'm looking ahead to summer 2024, when my wife and teenage daughter will join me. We are starting to consider routes.

With the following criteria, which section would you recommend?

Assumptions:
- travel is in July or August
- reaching Santiago isn't a must
- walking for 5-7 days maximum (as part of a 2-3 week trip to Spain)
- looking for a relatively easy walk - not too much up and down. Some is ok - welcome even - but not looking for a gruelling hike.
- not fussy about which camino we walk (ie doesn't have to be the CF, but it could be)

We're really just looking for the most beautiful/scenic/interesting section of a camino to walk. My wife and daughter will be treating this very much like a walking holiday, not a pilgrimage.

Not having walked anywhere myself yet I have no opinion to offer my wife, so I'm reaching out to you guys for some suggestions. She will then spend some time researching some of the suggestions and hopefully pick a route. I suspect this research will help keep her occupied while I'm off enjoying myself walking the CF.

Thanks for sharing your thoughts!
 
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Tincatinker

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
2012
Wait till you’ve walked. You’ll have experienced the scenic and the not so. You’ll have experienced Camino, sacred and profane. You’ll be able to reframe your question.

If your family want a walking holiday why not take them on one. There are fantastic, well provisioned, routes in Andalusia, in the Basque region, around Barcelona- try walking to Figueres and the Museo Dali.
I’m not suggesting, before someone suggests I am, that the pilgrimage routes should be left to pilgrims. Far from it. What I’m suggesting is that your family’s desires might be more easily met other than on one of the thousand roads to Santiago. If they change any parts of their inclinations when they hear your tales then plan to walk the Camino Ingles
 

JustJack

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
May 2023
Wait till you’ve walked. You’ll have experienced the scenic and the not so. You’ll have experienced Camino, sacred and profane. You’ll be able to reframe your question.

If your family want a walking holiday why not take them on one. There are fantastic, well provisioned, routes in Andalusia, in the Basque region, around Barcelona- try walking to Figueres and the Museo Dali.
I’m not suggesting, before someone suggests I am, that the pilgrimage routes should be left to pilgrims. Far from it. What I’m suggesting is that your family’s desires might be more easily met other than on one of the thousand roads to Santiago. If they change any parts of their inclinations when they hear your tales then plan to walk the Camino Ingles
Some good thoughts, thank you. And I get your point - if it's not the pilgrimage experience they are after we don't need to restrict ourselves to camino routes.

And as you've noted, my perspectives will likely evolve once I've walked. I guess part of my thinking is that the various camino routes have a lot of infrastructure built in - albergues, restaurants, etc., which are great when walking with your family. But thank for the suggestion of checking our non-pilgrim walking routes.

Also thanks for the suggestion of Camino Ingles.
 

JustJack

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
May 2023
If you can ignore all the noise, the last 100km from Sarria to SDC is really very beautiful. And for the young ones it's a hoot. A moving fiesta.
Yeah I'm thinking that the crowds and festive atmosphere of the last 100kms - which is often a perceived negative in the minds of pilgrims that have walked from further away - might be appealing to my wife and daughter (who will be 15 then).
 
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dick bird

Moderator
Staff member
Time of past OR future Camino
Plata, Ingles, Madrid, Norte, Primitivo, Invierno, Aragones, Olvidado, Chemin D'Arles
I agree with Tincatinker, why follow camino at all? Another point is that July and August are very very hot in most parts of Spain. The Picos de Europa would therefore be worth looking at. The scenery is stunning, there are hotels, there are GR walking routes and even a little known camino (Lebaniego/Vadinense) which passes through the main town - Pótes.
 

Bob Howard

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
CF 2016 2018 2022
With respect to the Camino Frances, it is in Northern Spain. Just as a matter of reference, the average temperature in July/August in Burgos is 77-81. Even in heat waves where the temps can get 90+, the high temp of the day does not occur until about 4:00, which is totally avoidable by leaving early and finishing by noon. I know because I just did a July Camino finishing in early August. I never had to walk in temps exceeding 80, and even that was rare--mornings were in the 50's and 60's. While there are probably assorted reasons not to do the Camino Frances in July or August--too hot and too crowded are not among them.
 
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SabsP

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
some and then more. see my signature.
Haven't yet walked my first camino and here I am planning my second...

I'll be walking the CF this spring/summer, but I'm looking ahead to summer 2024, when my wife and teenage daughter will join me. We are starting to consider routes.

With the following criteria, which section would you recommend?

I certainly do not want discourage you but did you consider the possibility that when on your first Camino you might not enjoy it?
Most likely this will not happen to you but lots of pilgrims take the decision to stop en route.
This does not necessarily mean because of a physical injury, many other reasons might occur.
 
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jungleboy

Spirit of the Camino (Nick)
Time of past OR future Camino
Some in the past; more in the future!
Not trying to be discouraging here, but I would be a bit hesitant about this idea. Combining pilgrimage and travel sounds great in theory but it can be a bit difficult in practice, firstly on a practical level (clothes, luggage etc) but mostly on an emotional/mental level. The two things require different mindsets and different energy and it can be difficult to transition from one to the other. If you are set on this plan, I would do the pilgrimage part at the end, because going from pilgrimage to tourism is harder than it sounds.
 
Time of past OR future Camino
1340
I would agree with @Tincatinker and second his suggestion to walk the Ingles, if your family wants to spend their vacation walking on a Camino. This route has infrastructure and beautiful scenery, and it fits your timeframe nicely.
Since the time you’re planning to go is usually one of the busiest times for pilgrimage, I’d suggest that you do not take away the beds of several pilgrims so your family can sleep conveniently and inexpensively while they are on vacation.
The Ingles has several pensions and inexpensive hotels all along the way that can provide lodging without using the infrastructure of albergues or other pilgrim lodging. Most can be pre-booked using a lodging site, or by emailing the establishment.
This will take more planning than arriving and walking, which has its own undeniable charm, but on your first Camino you will likely see lots of others who rely on albergues for community and a night’s sleep before they resume their walk to Santiago.

All the best,
Paul
 

darealdeal77

Member Since 2018
Time of past OR future Camino
2014 Camino Frances
That’s a hard question to answer! Because Camino is such a wonderful walk even at it’s hardest parts, but since you want something easy, I agree with the rest the walk from Saria to Santiago is not hard, and you will see several and different scenery! Hope this helps, BUEN CAMINO
 

lisagb

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
2021
Haven't yet walked my first camino and here I am planning my second...

I'll be walking the CF this spring/summer, but I'm looking ahead to summer 2024, when my wife and teenage daughter will join me. We are starting to consider routes.

With the following criteria, which section would you recommend?

Assumptions:
- travel is in July or August
- reaching Santiago isn't a must
- walking for 5-7 days maximum (as part of a 2-3 week trip to Spain)
- looking for a relatively easy walk - not too much up and down. Some is ok - welcome even - but not looking for a gruelling hike.
- not fussy about which camino we walk (ie doesn't have to be the CF, but it could be)

We're really just looking for the most beautiful/scenic/interesting section of a camino to walk. My wife and daughter will be treating this very much like a walking holiday, not a pilgrimage.

Not having walked anywhere myself yet I have no opinion to offer my wife, so I'm reaching out to you guys for some suggestions. She will then spend some time researching some of the suggestions and hopefully pick a route. I suspect this research will help keep her occupied while I'm off enjoying myself walking the CF.

Thanks for sharing your thoughts!
Le Puy to Conques or Rocamadour
 
Time of past OR future Camino
Frances: Spring 2022, Ingless or Norte: Fall 2022
Last year I walked 5 days on ruta do mar, on the north west cost of Spain. Stunning scenery. Barely a camino as far as infrastructure goes but plenty of places to stay day to day. It’s also possible to use the train to get from town to town, which, btw, is true for parts of the camino Norte, which also has some amazing scenery. Another option is the camino Portuguese from Porto. I took my daughter on short camino, also last year. It was pleasant, not too difficult, mostly along the coast. We spent a couple of days in Bayonne at the Parador and she went home from there. Have fun!
 
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Turga

Camino tortuga
Time of past OR future Camino
Pondering 2023
I agree about the Inglés, it’s a quite scenic walk, although there will be the occasional walk through suburbs and industrial areas and quite a lot of tarmac walking.

looking for a relatively easy walk - not too much up and down.

There will be quite some ups and downs on the Inglés, whether they are difficult is a personal matter, but you will notice them :)
 

ThomasFromColorado

New Member
Time of past OR future Camino
2019
Haven't yet walked my first camino and here I am planning my second...

I'll be walking the CF this spring/summer, but I'm looking ahead to summer 2024, when my wife and teenage daughter will join me. We are starting to consider routes.

With the following criteria, which section would you recommend?

Assumptions:
- travel is in July or August
- reaching Santiago isn't a must
- walking for 5-7 days maximum (as part of a 2-3 week trip to Spain)
- looking for a relatively easy walk - not too much up and down. Some is ok - welcome even - but not looking for a gruelling hike.
- not fussy about which camino we walk (ie doesn't have to be the CF, but it could be)

We're really just looking for the most beautiful/scenic/interesting section of a camino to walk. My wife and daughter will be treating this very much like a walking holiday, not a pilgrimage.

Not having walked anywhere myself yet I have no opinion to offer my wife, so I'm reaching out to you guys for some suggestions. She will then spend some time researching some of the suggestions and hopefully pick a route. I suspect this research will help keep her occupied while I'm off enjoying myself walking the CF.

Thanks for sharing your thoughts!
I’m a big fan of the experience of walking an early part of a Camino. The connection that forms with others is magical like I’ve never experienced anywhere else. Starting in St. Jean requires a hard first day. An easier start is from Pamplona.

We can call it whatever one likes, a pilgrimage, walking vacation, a trek. The reality is that it is yours. Consider Pamplona to Logroño. Enjoy tapas on Laurel street when you get there!
 

Christine Leneghan

New Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2018) and Portuguese Coastal Camino (2019)
Haven't yet walked my first camino and here I am planning my second...

I'll be walking the CF this spring/summer, but I'm looking ahead to summer 2024, when my wife and teenage daughter will join me. We are starting to consider routes.

With the following criteria, which section would you recommend?

Assumptions:
- travel is in July or August
- reaching Santiago isn't a must
- walking for 5-7 days maximum (as part of a 2-3 week trip to Spain)
- looking for a relatively easy walk - not too much up and down. Some is ok - welcome even - but not looking for a gruelling hike.
- not fussy about which camino we walk (ie doesn't have to be the CF, but it could be)

We're really just looking for the most beautiful/scenic/interesting section of a camino to walk. My wife and daughter will be treating this very much like a walking holiday, not a pilgrimage.

Not having walked anywhere myself yet I have no opinion to offer my wife, so I'm reaching out to you guys for some suggestions. She will then spend some time researching some of the suggestions and hopefully pick a route. I suspect this research will help keep her occupied while I'm off enjoying myself walking the CF.

Thanks for sharing your thoughts!
Because you only have a week, Portuguese coastal till it turns into Spain is perfect!
 
Time of past OR future Camino
Ingles 2018
1) Fly into Porto and enjoy 2 or 3 days sightseeing and leave a good percentage of your luggage in the hotel storage to lighten the load whilst walking.
2) Walk say 3 days along the Portuguese Coastal Camino.
3) Take transit to Barcelos and walk 2-3 days experiencing Portuguese Interior Camino.
4) Return to Porto and spend the remainder of your holiday either visiting cities like Lisbon or Santiago, chill out on a beach or relax in the vineyards of the Douro Valley.
5) When you are home update the forum and tell us that you are now kind of addicted to this vibe.

Sorry, not really answering your question regarding the most scenic route because I have only walked the Ingles and lack experience to give feedback specifically hence looking at your entire 2-3 week trip potential.
 

JustJack

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
May 2023
I certainly do not want discourage you but did you consider the possibility that when on your first Camino you might not enjoy it?
Most likely this will not happen to you but lots of pilgrims take the decision to stop en route.
This does not necessarily mean because of a physical injury, many other reasons might occur.
I have considered that possibility, and promptly banished it from my mind. I'm quite certain I will love it, but even if I hate it for some reason I will finish my camino, no question about it.
 
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JustJack

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
May 2023
Not trying to be discouraging here, but I would be a bit hesitant about this idea. Combining pilgrimage and travel sounds great in theory but it can be a bit difficult in practice, firstly on a practical level (clothes, luggage etc) but mostly on an emotional/mental level. The two things require different mindsets and different energy and it can be difficult to transition from one to the other. If you are set on this plan, I would do the pilgrimage part at the end, because going from pilgrimage to tourism is harder than it sounds.
Excellent points!
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Next Camino: Madrid/San Salvador/Primitivo
Haven't yet walked my first camino and here I am planning my second...

I'll be walking the CF this spring/summer, but I'm looking ahead to summer 2024, when my wife and teenage daughter will join me. We are starting to consider routes.

With the following criteria, which section would you recommend?

Assumptions:
- travel is in July or August
- reaching Santiago isn't a must
- walking for 5-7 days maximum (as part of a 2-3 week trip to Spain)
- looking for a relatively easy walk - not too much up and down. Some is ok - welcome even - but not looking for a gruelling hike.
- not fussy about which camino we walk (ie doesn't have to be the CF, but it could be)

We're really just looking for the most beautiful/scenic/interesting section of a camino to walk. My wife and daughter will be treating this very much like a walking holiday, not a pilgrimage.

Not having walked anywhere myself yet I have no opinion to offer my wife, so I'm reaching out to you guys for some suggestions. She will then spend some time researching some of the suggestions and hopefully pick a route. I suspect this research will help keep her occupied while I'm off enjoying myself walking the CF.

Thanks for sharing your thoughts!
It would be helpful if you gave us some indication of where your interests lie (to determine what you might find interesting) or what kind of scenery you find beautiful. Unfortunately, for many, the Caminos that are considered the most scenic are also the ones that are more challenging with more ups and downs.
 

JustJack

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
May 2023
It would be helpful if you gave us some indication of where your interests lie (to determine what you might find interesting) or what kind of scenery you find beautiful. Unfortunately, for many, the Caminos that are considered the most scenic are also the ones that are more challenging with more ups and downs.
Thanks David. In retrospect I'm jumping the gun here, and I should hold off on picking a route until I've had a chance to walk the CF, as that no doubt will inform and influence my decision. Coming from the west coast of Canada we are used to hiking in the mountains, so what's novel and exciting to us would be the beautiful medieval villages and cathedrals. Things we don't see in Canada. I have a feeling we will end up opting to walk a part of the CF, as that seems to have everything we are looking for. I'll know for sure this May!
 

Aguapura

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Sarria to Santiago 2010
Roncesvalles to Logrono 2015
Hospitalera 2016
Consider the Via Podiensis, from Le Puy en Velay (France). There are lots of beautiful medieval villages, and there is, or used to be, a bus that stopped at each stage for the first 12 stages or so. We left from the Cathedral in Le Puy, along with all the other pilgrims, and walked the first day, then used the bus to skip a few sections because we had planned our trip to include the most number of beautiful villages. The trail is pretty, green, not difficult, and mostly routed away from roads. Eventually the trail leads to St Jean Pied a Port, where it joins the Camino Frances. The food was excellent, the people friendly, and it wasn't very expensive
 

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