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most scenic section appox 50-75km

rosh3000

New Member
Time of past OR future Camino
2022 - Porto to Santiago de Compostela
I want to do a part of the camino with my gf next year. Which would be the most scenic section to do with plenty of hostels in between. I dont mind if it doesn't end in Santiago de Compostela and would be looking to do max 15 km a day.

(I've previously done a Porto to Santiago de Compostela and many on route recommended the France route but its obviously way too long)
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
If you're not bothered about ending in Santiago, why not start in Santiago and walk to Finisterre - really pretty, and you get to arrive at an historical 'endpoint'. Think it's around the 70km mark . .
 
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I want to do a part of the camino with my gf next year. Which would be the most scenic section to do with plenty of hostels in between. I dont mind if it doesn't end in Santiago de Compostela and would be looking to do max 15 km a day.

(I've previously done a Porto to Santiago de Compostela and many on route recommended the France route but its obviously way too long)
St Jean Pied de Port to Pamplona is a very nice section.
 
I want to do a part of the camino with my gf next year. Which would be the most scenic section to do with plenty of hostels in between.
St Jean Pied de Port to Pamplona is a very nice section.
Sorry T, I love your posts but I can't agree with this one. It is very scenic, yes, (not that it looked like Vermont but it did remind me of it) but I think that the GF might be too anxious about lodging to make this the best recommendation. I suggest some stretch between Pamplona and Castrojeriz. There's good transportation out of Logrono and I keep hearing so many good things about Logrono's tapas bars that leaving to go home on the day after arriving there would be a good idea.
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
The Camino is a pilgrimage. If you don't intend to walk to Santiago, please stay at hostels and hotels, and leave the dedicated pilgrim-only accommodations for the pilgrims.
At the risk of challenging your assumptions about the OP’s intentions, which you do not know, ALL pilgrims are free to walk in their own way and this is the beauty of pilgrimage—a spiritual journey. Pilgrimages may be long or short, and as most pilgrims heading toward Santiago are not doing it for “religious” reasons, rather spiritual, an arrival at an end destination is not necessary. All we know from the OP is the interest in a scenic section and nothing about the reasons for why they walk. It strikes me that the Spirit of the Camino has an open enough heart to even welcome them into albergues as they too are pilgrims.
 
Sorry T, I love your posts but I can't agree with this one. It is very scenic, yes, (not that it looked like Vermont but it did remind me of it) but I think that the GF might be too anxious about lodging to make this the best recommendation.
There's plenty of accommodation. The OP didn't say that they were adverse to advance bookings.
 
Could we go back to basic questions for the OP?

What is the OPs definition of scenic, and does that line up with the stated desire for plenty of hostels ( why?) and about 15km/ day? And what does the gf want?

Small mountains and lots of up and downs and overlooks? That's the early Primitivo or the Salvador, but neither meets the other two desires ( especially between Borres and Berducedo) .

Coastal overlooks and or sandy beaches? That's the early Norte or the Portuguese.

Bucolic villages and farmland? Sarria to Santiago will do just fine, especially since neither OP or the gf have apparently taken that route.

Oh, and OP...why take your gf on Camino, but deprive her of the emotional experience that she might have arriving at Santiago?

Buen Camino...but go on Camino.
 
Train for your next Camino (or keep the Camino spirit alive) on Santa Catalina Island
ALL pilgrims are free to walk in their own way
Just for clarification, and I think that it is actually relevant for the OP's question: There are "dedicated pilgrim-only accommodations for the pilgrims" on several Caminos and those who own them or manage them have made it clear in recent years that they do not wish to accommodate certain categories of Camino walkers who don't correspond to the profile of what they see as their target group. The criteria are not always clearly defined. Those who are fairly new to Camino walking ought to be made aware that among the "hostels" ("albergues") with dormitory beds there are those who are "pilgrims only" and there are those who are "not pilgrims only but oriented towards pilgrims".

In general, what is noticeable is a shift to very short Camino walks, and the question of this thread is an example for this fairly new development - it is different from the short "etapas" of those who walk over several years with the aim of reaching Santiago eventually. So, yes, there is room for a bit of awareness raising, I think.

As to the most scenic 50 km? Oh dear, what a question ... just look at the first sections of the Camino Francés: there is the magnesium plant near Zubiri and there is nothing much to see when it is raining or foggy on the Pyrenees passes. Elsewhere and pretty much everywhere, busy roads are frequently in view and if you can't see them you hear the car noise (I have good hearing, I heard them on the Meseta ...). For me, there were scenic parts everywhere but I did not measure them in kilometres. Buen Camino to the OP in any case!
 
I think the only argument that people will win is the fact that the spirit of Albergue accommodation is for those who have an intention to make their way ultimately to Santiago at some point (in the case of the CF).

In terms of the OP I think the suggestion of the Norte and the early stages is a good idea.
 
I think the only argument that people will win
It should not be turned into an argument. The aim is awareness raising. There are these places for accommodation on the Caminos, especially on the Camino Francés. Be aware of them. Then make your own personal decision whether you think that you fit their profile or not.

The Camino Francés has plenty of accommodation of all categories. Day walks of 15 km maximum ought to be possible pretty much everywhere along the 800 km. Plus there is barely a point that cannot be reached by a taxi that can pick you up or deposit you in case of need or convenience.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
Scenery ... I have always enjoyed the part after Pamplona but the caveat for any recomendation is where is easiest to get to and from for you and the gf.

If I was taking any of my Gf's from the past, I might not take them over the Pyrenees or indeed the final stretch from Sarria ... 1st being harder and last being busier

Of course the scenery is also very subjective. GL with whatever you chose, and please disregard the noise :)
 
Walking the pilgrimage along the Camino de Santiago, in stages, is an accepted way to accomplish arriving at Santiago - eventually. So, while I wholeheartedly agree with Rebekah about saving pilgrim specific accommodations for pilgrims, I can also see the argument for looking for a nice, scenic segment to walk, as part of a longer commitment to eventually end at the Cathedral.

OTOH, if the person seeking the information (above) is simply planning a walking vacation, and wants to experience a disjointed segment of the Camino just to have the experience, then I have to agree more steadfastly with Rebekah about not consuming precious pilgrim accommodations in the albergue system.

I would feel differently in the off-season, but from now until the end of September, albergue beds are at a premium. Those walkers who are not doing the pilgrimage, don't have a credencial, and do not have the intention of ending at the Cathedral in Santiago, ought to steer clear of this pilgrim-focused system of accommodation.

Hope this helps.

Tom
 
At the risk of challenging your assumptions about the OP’s intentions, which you do not know, ALL pilgrims are free to walk in their own way and this is the beauty of pilgrimage—a spiritual journey. Pilgrimages may be long or short, and as most pilgrims heading toward Santiago are not doing it for “religious” reasons, rather spiritual, an arrival at an end destination is not necessary. All we know from the OP is the interest in a scenic section and nothing about the reasons for why they walk. It strikes me that the Spirit of the Camino has an open enough heart to even welcome them into albergues as they too are pilgrims.
I could not disagree with you more. I think it is quite obvious the intention of the op. He wants to take a hike for a few days and there is nothing wrong with that. I believe the definition of "pilgrimage" and "pilgrims" on this forum has reached a point of total absurdity. People have made up their own little and neat definitions of what the Camino de Santiago is. I think it is often a way for people to say, "oh look at me, see how inclusive, open, non judgemental and welcoming I am!" I always have to laugh when people accuse me or others of being judgemental for expressing an opinion that differs from their own. Then the judgements come flying from all those who are so inclusive, welcoming and warm. I do have to say when this happens I get great joy in agitating the situation even more because it is so ridiculous to begin with. I don't know whether to laugh or get sick when I hear people say , we all walk our own camino. The camino is not ours to walk. It is the camino that allows us to step foot on its many paths. The whole question of why one walks in relationship to the camino being a religious path has become mute. A spiritual reason is a "godly" reason. The verbiage may be different but the path to peace or to some form of enlightenment is parallel. The "Spirit of the Camino"? I am not sure what that is. Historically the spirit and experiences and treatment of pilgrims for hundreds of years (through my historical study) is far different than this term which has evolved over just a moment in time of the totality of the history of Camino de Santiago. It is another pleasant and saccharine term that makes us all feel good. It is like Little League in the United States where everyone gets a trophy.
I walk long caminos every year. I am 70 years old and will do another 1000k this fall. I enjoy solitary routes now. I have come to learn that walking in peace and mindlessly one can look over an endless field of monotonous olive trees in Southern Spain and see just as much beauty as walking on the cliffs overlooking the ocean on the Norte. I have walked in days of rain, cold, heat, and snow and am thankful the camino allows me to feel it's energy. There is no "Spirit of the Camino" It is a fabrication that has been made up by some today to feel good about how kind and generous they say they are.
I will end here. I have so many other thoughts on subjects related to this but I will not bore you. No I don't think about this alot as it just smacks you in the face the moment you experience it. It doesn't take alot of wisdom to see, express or understand what I said.
Finally in the "Spirit of the Camino" this is what I think and I am still waiting to hear an interpretation that would change my mind.
P.S. What Ms. Scott said is 1000% true:
The Camino is a pilgrimage. If you don't intend to walk to Santiago, please stay at hostels and hotels, and leave the dedicated pilgrim-only accommodations for the pilgrims.
(dictated to myself but not read so there are probably lots of typos etc ;)
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
I believe the CF and all of its Albergues and Pensions are open to all pilgrims, no matter how long or short you choose to walk at any given time and for whatever reason you are walking it. I have met many wonderful people/pilgrims these past 2 years while walking Le Chemin de St Jacques and the Camino Frances who are taking their journey slowly and more power to them. All the best to you. ❤️
 
I want to do a part of the camino with my gf next year. Which would be the most scenic section to do with plenty of hostels in between. I dont mind if it doesn't end in Santiago de Compostela and would be looking to do max 15 km a day.

(I've previously done a Porto to Santiago de Compostela and many on route recommended the France route but its obviously way too long)
If you're still there … If the Portugues is too long it sounds like you have limited time. Depending upon how many days you want to walk just about any section of the Frances beginning in Pamplona would work for your criteria. From there to Logrono is one option. You can also start at Leon (but take the alternate route at Trabajo del Camino as the rest of that day on the main route is abysmal), Astorga, or Ponferrada and end at Sarria. Any of these will provide options for getting in and out relatively easily by bus or train.
 
I want to do a part of the camino with my gf next year. Which would be the most scenic section to do with plenty of hostels in between. I dont mind if it doesn't end in Santiago de Compostela and would be looking to do max 15 km a day.

(I've previously done a Porto to Santiago de Compostela and many on route recommended the France route but its obviously way too long)
Saint Jean to Burgos or Astorga to SdC. I’ve walked both of those segments several times and never tire of the experience.

And as for the rest of the conversation two thoughts. First, what starts as a walking vacation or adventure can become something very different, but only if you take the first steps (regardless of your initial motive). Second, my wife, with whom I gave walked many kms, says of the Camino — “It is an opportunity to experience how God would have us treat one another”, to which I would add it can be that, but it might take more than a week or two to find it.
 
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...and ship it to Santiago for storage. You pick it up once in Santiago. Service offered by Casa Ivar (we use DHL for transportation).
I want to do a part of the camino with my gf next year. Which would be the most scenic section to do with plenty of hostels in between. I dont mind if it doesn't end in Santiago de Compostela and would be looking to do max 15 km a day.

(I've previously done a Porto to Santiago de Compostela and many on route recommended the France route but its obviously way too long)
Does it have to be in Spain?

If France is an option, the Via Podiensis has many amazingly beautiful sections (you can find it on Gronze as well), and if I remember correctly, you should mostly be able to do 15 km stretches (but please double check).

For example, you could start in Navarrenx and do about 65 km to St. Jean Pied de Port. I loved hiking towards the Pyrenees.

Head up, in France, it is common to book the gîtes in advance (if only a day) and most offer a dinner and breakfast (demi-pension).

(The French also do not care whether you’re a „real“ pilgrim or not. There are plenty of section hikers there and no one minds either way.)
 
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Does it have to be in Spain?

If France is an option, the Via Podiensis has many amazingly beautiful sections (you can find it on Gronze as well), and if I remember correctly, you should mostly be able to do 15 km stretches (but please double check).

For example, you could start in Navarrenx and do about 65 km to St. Jean Pied de Port. I loved hiking towards the Pyrenees.

Head up, France, it is common to book the gîtes in advance (if only a day) and most offer a dinner and breakfast (demi-pension).

(The French also do not care whether you’re a „real“ pilgrim or not. There are plenty of section hikers there and no one minds either way.)
Is the route you suggest dog friendly?
 
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At the risk of challenging your assumptions about the OP’s intentions, which you do not know, ALL pilgrims are free to walk in their own way and this is the beauty of pilgrimage—a spiritual journey. Pilgrimages may be long or short, and as most pilgrims heading toward Santiago are not doing it for “religious” reasons, rather spiritual, an arrival at an end destination is not necessary. All we know from the OP is the interest in a scenic section and nothing about the reasons for why they walk. It strikes me that the Spirit of the Camino has an open enough heart to even welcome them into albergues as they too are pilgrims.
All pilgrims can walk how they like. But people who are doing short scenic tours with no intention of going to the saint's tomb are not, by definition, on the pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela. The dedicated pilgrim albergue network is provided for pilgrims, not sight-seeing tourists -- no matter what name they call themselves. The pilgrimage is a thing. It is not whatever anyone wants it to be. People on scenic tours should stay in private hostels or hotels. Nada mas.
 
All pilgrims can walk how they like. But people who are doing short scenic tours with no intention of going to the saint's tomb are not, by definition, on the pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela. The dedicated pilgrim albergue network is provided for pilgrims, not sight-seeing tourists -- no matter what name they call themselves. The pilgrimage is a thing. It is not whatever anyone wants it to be. People on scenic tours should stay in private hostels or hotels. Nada mas.
Fortunately, the OP didn't mention staying in dedicated pilgrim albergues.

I want to do a part of the camino with my gf next year. Which would be the most scenic section to do with plenty of hostels in between
 
Fortunately, the OP didn't mention staying in dedicated pilgrim albergues.
Ah, the flexibility of language: hostel; hostal; hotel; Albergue; Casa acogida; Donativo….

It is a constant source of astonishment for
me how many people are incapable of distinguishing one from t’other.

The OP is just after a nice walk in the countryside and, obviously, the Camino Frances is “too long” even though they could just start in Sarria from whence it’s much shorter. It really doesn’t matter what their motivation or intention are. They just want a nice walk with readily available accommodation and presumably minimal interrogations. @MickMac ’s suggestion at #2 had it covered. Life should contain surprises 😉
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
Ah, the flexibility of language: hostel; hostal; hotel; Albergue; Casa acogida; Donativo….

It is a constant source of astonishment for
me how many people are incapable of distinguishing one from t’other.

The OP is just after a nice walk in the countryside and, obviously, the Camino Frances is “too long” even though they could just start in Sarria from whence it’s much shorter. It really doesn’t matter what their motivation or intention are. They just want a nice walk with readily available accommodation and presumably minimal interrogations. @MickMac ’s suggestion at #2 had it covered. Life should contain surprises 😉
You have nailed it Tinca some contributors did not read the original post all the person was asking for was a scenic nice walk with his gf 15 kms a day not a big ask simple.
I would like to apoligise to Rosch it's not always like this on the forum, best of luck which ever way you take "May the road rise to meet you and the Sun be always at your back" safe camino "Pilgrim"
 
don't mean to be inhospitable, but we in the non-profit network are dealing with great waves of short-trip scenery or wine-tasting tourists this year, who think calling themselves "pilgrim" means everything is free and no rules apply to them. It is taxing.
That is absolutely understandable and I know that people like this exist. I have met them. I also get that the sheer mass of people who come to Spain nowadays puts a strain on the infrastructure and that with huge numbers, the number of non-behaving folks increases.

I find it a bit difficult though to accuse everyone on only a short journey of behaving like that. It feels off-putting to those who want to start with a short trip to see if this kind of journey fits them at all, only have limited time off or physically can't do more that a few days. In this case, the OP has done the journey to Santiago already and now want to bring their girlfriend to share a bit of the experience with her. I don't see anything wrong with that or why that would make them less of a pilgrim.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
Finding the most scenic short section of the CF is like looking for the proverbial needle in the haystack. It's in there somewhere but you have to work to find it. If you're looking for a lovely, short and beautiful walk, I'd recommend looking at a different walk. European is dripping with gorgeous and beautiful walks. The Camino Frances is not one of them.
 
a pilgrimage goes somewhere specific. A pilgrimage on the Camino de Santiago goes to Santiago de Compostela, maybe over time, but with that in mind. If you're showing someone around for a few days, it is harmless and nice, you may be on the pilgrim Way, but you're not a pilgrim yet.
I know it's all semantics at this point, but it's like the words "pilgrim" and "pilgrimage" are losing their meaning in the big wave of relativism and tourism.
Pilgrimage is a thing. It is not "anything." It is not "everything."
And it ain't nothing, either. It is something special and precious.
 
...and ship it to Santiago for storage. You pick it up once in Santiago. Service offered by Casa Ivar (we use DHL for transportation).
If you're looking for a lovely, short and beautiful walk, I'd recommend looking at a different walk. European is dripping with gorgeous and beautiful walks. The Camino Frances is not one of them.
Somewhat agreed. My wife and I just came back from TMB - regrettably had to cut it short of completing the full circle - and what we saw is unparalleled to anything on CF.
But then a hike in the woods it is not and (ahem!) no "albergues" 😉
 
don't mean to be inhospitable, but we in the non-profit network are dealing with great waves of short-trip scenery or wine-tasting tourists this year, who think calling themselves "pilgrim" means everything is free and no rules apply to them. It is taxing.
Rebekah don't quite get that by "calling themselves pilgrims" means everthing is free and no rules apply to them, did I miss something?
 
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It means that some people feel entitled in their lives and therefore reason out that if they call themselves "pilgrims" than they should be handled everything on a silver platter and allowed to stay in albergues while bringing 3 hard-shell suitcases with them (via luggage transfer of course) and stay on Calle Laurel til 3:00 am and have hospitalera open the door when they finally decide to come back...
....just to give few examples...

...you know - I say I AM therfore I AM...

Does anyone remember a reasonably recent post someone made? It went something like this:
We passed this place. It had no restaurant or any other general facility but the owner was not tuned in that we PILGRIMS are hungry and thirsty and offered us no food or water and shooed us away and sicked his dogs on us....

Yeah THAT!!!!! 😡
 
CW calm down please, it was a question to Rebakah never met anybody like the people you talk about, once again please go back and read the original post, it was just someone asking about a short scenic route for themselves and gf for a few days it seems to have opened up peoples feelings on Camino tourism live and let live..
 
Im absolutely calm. I know that question was asked of Rebekah but I gave you (at least my) version of what her comment meant. of all people she has one-helluva understanding of what she posted and she did say that the situation is very taxing! And perhaps me and you can agree to disagree but I fully get what she is saying!
and the situation is TAXING! :rolleyes: (and I have witnessed the examples of the behaviour myself, sadly as it may be and thankfully a small percentage overall)

P.S. I know that typing in caps is equal to shouting. That said when i post something using my mobile I cannot do bold or italic fonts to punctuate a point, so i use caps. So don't take it personally - I was not yelling at you ☮️🕊️ 🫶
 
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. I know that typing in caps is equal to shouting. That said when i post something using my mobile I cannot do bold or italic fonts to punctuate a point, so i use caps. So don't take it personally - I was not yelling at you
That's strange, I have no problem using bold or italics when posting from my phone, which is what I just did.
 
@trecile - I looked all over my keyboard and I cannot find those options. I can change the size of the text that's about it. At the same - I can (and I do use) type some symbols (the euro and GBP symbols come to mind for example) on my phone and I can't find them if I am on my laptop
Perhaps its only me :-(
 
Somewhat agreed. My wife and I just came back from TMB - regrettably had to cut it short of completing the full circle - and what we saw is unparalleled to anything on CF.
But then a hike in the woods it is not and (ahem!) no "albergues" 😉
OK I now know gf is girlfriend (and know what a wife is as I HAD one 30 years ago) but please where is this joyous TMB place and are you shouting? But I guess this post will also be deleted!
 
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@trecile - I looked all over my keyboard and I cannot find those options. I can change the size of the text that's about it. At the same - I can (and I do use) type some symbols (the euro and GBP symbols come to mind for example) on my phone and I can't find them if I am on my laptop
Perhaps its only me :-(
It's not in your keyboard, it's part of the forum software. Just highlight what you want to make bold or italics, then tap on the B or I.

1000031398.jpg


Now I'm wondering how you do it on your computer, since I use the same process on my phone or laptop. 🤔
 
ON my laptop I have the option appear on the top of the box:

1721087904439.png

I do not have that on my mobile. But I will try your suggestion next time i am on my mobile
 
OK I now know gf is girlfriend (and know what a wife is as I HAD one 30 years ago) but please where is this joyous TMB place and are you shouting? But I guess this post will also be deleted!
Tour de Mont Blanc - a famous trail in the Alps that circumference the Mont Blanc Massif and traverses through France, Italy and Switzerland.
If you have access to FindPenguins app - look me up (CWBuff) and you can check out this adventure in my trips.

As to my "shouting" please see above - I'm not really shouting 😁

I see no reason why your post would be deleted and why 'also' lest you already had one deleted.

In any case there you have the TMB
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.

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