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MRI for a hurting Pilgrim in Hontanas.

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LornaD

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015, 2017, 2018
Norte 2019
Camino sister currently in Hontanas, would like an MRI on knee. Was told in Burgos hospital they could not provide MRI only an x-ray. She kept walking and is now concerned she has done more damage as pain is unbearable. She is separated from her Camino family. She lost two from her Camino family recently as husband died in his sleep and wife is returning home with his ashes. My heart is aching for her and I'd appreciate any advice. She speaks no Spanish. UPDATE: Thank you all for the informative input. My dear Camino sister (from 2015- I'm not currently walking) will be returning to her home country for further evaluation. She is a fighter! She will return again.
 
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Vacajoe

Traded in my work boots for hiking ones
Camino(s) past & future
2019 Biarritz-Pamplona-Lourdes
2018 Aragon/Frances/Finis
2018 Operation Sabre
2018 Marin Ramble
She needs to stop walking!

Pain is the body’s way of getting one to stop doing an activity that is damaging it. While an MRI may provide further info on the injury, the result will be the same: STOP WALKING!
 

SabineP

Camino = Empathy + Compassion.
Camino(s) past & future
some and then more. see my signature.
Stop walking immediately.
Trust the advice of the Burgos hospital that no MRI is needed but since she kept walking go to the next available hospital or Centro de Salud for further care.
All the best!
 

NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
She can taxi to Castrojerez and catch a bus there to wherever, but she needs to listen to her body and stop walking until it's better.

Castrojerez seems big enough to have a clinic but there won't be an MRI ....

She can also just stay in Hontanas for a few days, rest, ice, elevation ... and stay off it for a few days.

If she is worried about losing her friends, perhaps she is destined to meet the love of her life who is a few days behind on the trail....
 

SabineP

Camino = Empathy + Compassion.
Camino(s) past & future
some and then more. see my signature.
A gentle sidenote . I know that for some pilgrims the concept of " a Camino family " is very important ( I think differently ) but listening to your body is much more important than keeping up a pace that is not right for you at that moment.
 

LornaD

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015, 2017, 2018
Norte 2019
She can taxi to Castrojerez and catch a bus there to wherever, but she needs to listen to her body and stop walking until it's better.

Castrojerez seems big enough to have a clinic but there won't be an MRI ....

She can also just stay in Hontanas for a few days, rest, ice, elevation ... and stay off it for a few days.

If she is worried about losing her friends, perhaps she is destined to meet the love of her life who is a few days behind on the trail....
I'm forwarding this to her now. She has lost so much recently. I pray this gives her a spark of hope and different perspective.
 

Annet2020

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portugues 2020
I agree with some of the previous post: stop walking if the pain is that bad.
What value would a MRI add at this moment? Either some problem is seen on it and she will have to stop walking. Or nothing will be seen on it and she still would have to stop walking and give her knee rest.
 

amancio

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primit, Salvador, Portug, Arag, Ingles, VdlP, Leban-Vadin, Fisterra, Invierno, LePuy
Painful as it may be, the sensible thing is to go back to the nearest large hospital, and that will be Burgos. I would recommend taxi to Burgos and directly to Urgencias (emergencies in Spanish) and wait for the results, she might not necessarily need an MRI but instead some other type of study!
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
Castrojeriz doesn't have a clinic, the nearest to Castrojeriz is in Fromista and that is a small clinic with one doctor (she is brilliant, if she is still there). I had a rescued pilgrim I was trying to get care for and had to drive to Fromista.

Having an MRI won't help her knee, not walking and RICE - rest, ice, compression, elevation - will help her knee.

Sorry not to be supportive here but I just do not understand why injured pilgrims keep walking until they really damage themselves, sorry.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
She needs to stop walking!

Pain is the body’s way of getting one to stop doing an activity that is damaging it. While an MRI may provide further info on the injury, the result will be the same: STOP WALKING!
I agree completely! No Camino or friend is worth risking her long term health and ability to walk! I know that it's incredibly disappointing to have to stop walking, but the Camino will always be there waiting.
 

LornaD

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015, 2017, 2018
Norte 2019
Thank you all. She has stopped walking. She is resting, icing and elevating. She no longer has her hopes hinged on an MRI. She was supposed to return to the Camino with me last year but had to cancel last minute due to a cancer diagnosis. It has been her dream to return to walking. Her grief is strong and I hope the Camino provides healing for her while she rests. She appreciated knowing others were offering advice and support to her from this forum.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
Sorry not to be supportive here but I just do not understand why injured pilgrims keep walking until they really damage themselves, sorry.
I recently read a Facebook post by someone who completed the Camino on a broken ankle! While others were congratulating him, I just thought what a bloody fool!
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
Thank you all. She has stopped walking. She is resting, icing and elevating. She no longer has her hopes hinged on an MRI. She was supposed to return to the Camino with me last year but had to cancel last minute due to a cancer diagnosis. It has been her dream to return to walking. Her grief is strong and I hope the Camino provides healing for her while she rests. She appreciated knowing others were offering advice and support to her from this forum.
Santiago is not going anywhere. He (his relics) will still be there, waiting, for when she actually arrives. Take the time to heal before proceeding.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011 (2019)
Several points:
  • Depending upon how much further your friend has walked, the closest major hospital with an emergency department is in Burgos. My wife was treated there a few years ago - they found a doctor with excellent English, we were treated sympathetically and given sound advice and treatment that allowed us to continue with some adjustments to our approach. Just make sure you have enough cash to pay on the day. The stories of bills arriving months later that are difficult to pay still pop up here from time to time.
  • There are local bus services, such as those provided by Soto y Alonso. They have morning services going to Burgos, and evening services returning to local towns and villages. The buses arrive in the bus station in the centre of Burgos. There are bus services to the hospital, or one can get a cab.
  • In many countries it is the medical practitioner who determines the most appropriate diagnostic techniques to use, not the patient. Asking for a specific diagnostic test and moving on because it is not available seems unusual to someone who comes from one of those countries. Maybe your friend should let the doctors undertake their work with the tools they have available to them when next she gets to see someone about this.
  • In any case, as someone with recent experience in having a knee injury treated, I suggest that the sort of treatments that are going to be indicated or eliminated by MRI or similar tests are not going to be offered in the first instance to someone temporarily in a country such as a pilgrim is, but will require your friend to return home. That advice .won't need such tests in the first instance. A good doctor should be able to provide that advice without too much additional high level testing.
  • Of course, she may get advice about how she can manage this condition so that she can continue, which would also be a good outcome.
 
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LornaD

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015, 2017, 2018
Norte 2019
Several points:
  • Depending upon how much further your friend has walked, the closest major hospital with an emergency department is in Burgos. My wife was treated there a few years ago - they found a doctor with excellent English, we were treated sympathetically and given sound advice and treatment that allowed us to continue with some adjustments to our approach. Just make sure you have enough cash to pay on the day. The stories of bills arriving months later that are difficult to pay still pop up here from time to time.
  • There is a local bus service provided by Soto y Alonso. They have morning services going to Burgos, and evening services returning to local towns and villages. The buses arrive in the bus station in the centre of Burgos. There are bus services to the hospital, or one can get a cab.
  • In many countries it is the medical practitioner who determines the most appropriate diagnostic techniques to use, not the patient. Asking for a specific diagnostic test and moving on because it is not available seems unusual to someone who comes from one of those countries. Maybe your friend should let the doctors undertake their work with the tools they have available to them when next she gets to see someone about this.
  • In any case, as someone with recent experience in having a knee injury treated, I suggest that the sort of treatments that are going to be indicated or eliminated by MRI or similar tests are not going to be offered in the first instance to someone temporarily in a country such as a pilgrim is, but will require your friend to return home. That advice .won't need such tests in the first instance. A good doctor should be able to provide that advice without too much additional high level testing.
  • Of course, she may get advice about how she can manage this condition so that she can continue, which would also be a good outcome.
Thank you for your reply. It is so compassionately stated that I think your advice will be well received by her. I shall pass it on.
 

Evvie

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
September 2019
Camino sister currently in Hontanas, would like an MRI on knee. Was told in Burgos hospital they could not provide MRI only an x-ray. She kept walking and is now concerned she has done more damage as pain is unbearable. She is separated from her Camino family. She lost two from her Camino family recently as husband died in his sleep and wife is returning home with his ashes. My heart is aching for her and I'd appreciate any advice. She speaks no Spanish.
Go to the hotel -- not the albergue -- in Hontanas. The young woman there speaks a bit of English. I had medical issues when I was there and she helped me greatly. She called the ER in the next town and told them I was coming, then she called a taxi for me. That ER can't do much and certainly can't do an MRI, but they kept telling me that I could only get certain treatment in the hospital. I'm sure the young woman at the hotel can help your friend get to that hospital. Best of luck to her.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF2012,Le Puy/CF 2015 Portugues 2017 Norte 2018, CF 2019
I know so many people love their "Camino Families" and wax poetically about them. I understand the bond that is made between people as they walk. I have seen on more than a few occasions, especially on the CF, people like this woman mentioned above walking themselves into severe pain and serious injury because they didn't want to leave their "family". They are friends and over the course of a few days have developed into really good friends. But they are NOT your family. As I have stated here and on the Camino more than a few times when people tell me they have to continue to keep up with their "family". I look at infected blisters, swollen joints or high fevers and always ask the same question. You say they are your family right? If your mother, father or sister saw your injury or illness would they say, suck it up or we will have to leave you behind? The "family" all have their own Caminos and schedules and, and they can't or won't wait. Your MOTHER or FATHER would wait. In fact your real family would tie you to the bed before they would let you walk. I always tell pilgrims in this situation one other thing. You know what, there is probably a pilgrim you have never met that is coming up behind you that you will meet that will be just as nice, funny, sympathetic or wise as anyone in your family. You will not be losing your family just adding to it. This whole concept is pretty destructive to me sometimes. This story is very familiar. The struggles of this woman are sad and deserve compassion and love, but the walking is just flat out dumb and needs to be called out. That is what a real family would do.
 

Glenshiro

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy - León, Camino Frances (2012 - 2019)
Go to the hotel -- not the albergue -- in Hontanas. The young woman there speaks a bit of English.
The woman who runs the Hostal Restaurante Fuentestrella in Hontanas is from N Ireland, and knows Burgos well - I agree that's the nearest place with a big hospital. Hope your friend feels better after resting. As t2andreo says, Santiago isn't going anywhere.
 

Faye Walker

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2014, CF 2018, CP 2019 from Coimbra
.... You say they are your family right? If your mother, father or sister saw your injury or illness would they say, suck it up or we will have to leave you behind? The "family" all have their own Caminos and schedules and, and they can't or won't wait. Your MOTHER or FATHER would wait. In fact your real family would tie you to the bed before they would let you walk. I always tell pilgrims in this situation one other thing. You know what, there is probably a pilgrim you have never met that is coming up behind you that you will meet that will be just as nice, funny, sympathetic or wise as anyone in your family. You will not be losing your family just adding to it. This whole concept is pretty destructive to me sometimes. This story is very familiar. The struggles of this woman are sad and deserve compassion and love, but the walking is just flat out dumb and needs to be called out. That is what a real family would do.
Exactly! On my first camino, there was a man in a group that I had already allowed myself to lag behind (my short legs to their long ones...), and my knees were suffering with tendonitis even after I'd taken 2 rest days. Their own needs to rest someplace meant that we ran into each other again and he urged me to just suck it up "surgery could fix any real damage later." As a mother, I was stunned. I would *never* give that kind fo advice to my own child. And so why would I take that advice myself? I thanked him for helping me to find a place to stay (I had rolled in as the last person of the day to Carrion) and bid him Buen Camino. I did not see him again until SdC.

He was not a "bad guy" but perhaps a foolish one. And definitely not family. It56ny has it nailed down.
 

Nanc

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (Sept 2016)
SDC/ Finesterre/ Muxia (2016)
Stop walking immediately.
Trust the advice of the Burgos hospital that no MRI is needed but since she kept walking go to the next available hospital or Centro de Salud for further care.
All the best!
i think OP said Burgos could ONLY do an xray not that an MRI wasn't indicated
 

Mark Lampe

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Maybe next year
Hi All,
My wife and I walked slow and had a new wonderful Camino family most days. We also met a number of broken Camino friends that tried to keep up with faster walkers, but we all walk our own Camino.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF2012,Le Puy/CF 2015 Portugues 2017 Norte 2018, CF 2019
Exactly! On my first camino, there was a man in a group that I had already allowed myself to lag behind (my short legs to their long ones...), and my knees were suffering with tendonitis even after I'd taken 2 rest days. Their own needs to rest someplace meant that we ran into each other again and he urged me to just suck it up "surgery could fix any real damage later." As a mother, I was stunned. I would *never* give that kind fo advice to my own child. And so why would I take that advice myself? I thanked him for helping me to find a place to stay (I had rolled in as the last person of the day to Carrion) and bid him Buen Camino. I did not see him again until SdC.

He was not a "bad guy" but perhaps a foolish one. And definitely not family. It56ny has it nailed down.
You know I thought about your story today and said to myself Faye would be a good person to walk with. No matter how many caminos I walk I will never get that spiritual to walk The Bronx out of me. If that guy said to me what he said to you, I would have said so, so naturally like water flowing after you flush the toilet, can't be stopped, Your a Moron, get away from me!!! But Faye you may have almost stopped me from saying it. You can see the good and the glass half full lots better than I ever will. Buen Camino!!! Maybe see you out there in 3 weeks.
 

Faye Walker

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2014, CF 2018, CP 2019 from Coimbra
You know I thought about your story today and said to myself Faye would be a good person to walk with. No matter how many caminos I walk I will never get that spiritual to walk The Bronx out of me. If that guy said to me what he said to you, I would have said so, so naturally like water flowing after you flush the toilet, can't be stopped, Your a Moron, get away from me!!! But Faye you may have almost stopped me from saying it. You can see the good and the glass half full lots better than I ever will. Buen Camino!!! Maybe see you out there in 3 weeks.
HAHA! Thank you!

First time in my life I've been described as a "glass half full" person! I tend to the cranky because I'd rather be an incorrect pessimist than an incorrect optimist!

I'm working on seeing the collective population of humans as flawed, but at being more patient with individuals...

I'll be walking out of Coimbra on the 6th! I can hardly wait...
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF2012,Le Puy/CF 2015 Portugues 2017 Norte 2018, CF 2019
HAHA! Thank you!

First time in my life I've been described as a "glass half full" person! I tend to the cranky because I'd rather be an incorrect pessimist than an incorrect optimist!

I'm working on seeing the collective population of humans as flawed, but at being more patient with individuals...

I'll be walking out of Coimbra on the 6th! I can hardly wait...
Did the Portuguese 2 years ago from Lisbon. Don't walk out of Coimbra too quickly. It is a great city. I am sure you know the oldest university in Portugal is there. I had a chance to check out the campus in the evening. You will see students all over the city walking in groups. The upperclassmen/women have long black robes and kind of look like judges. I had a great conversation with a group of them. Check out the Monastery de Santa Cruz in the Centro Historico. Right next door there is a magnificent old cafe that you need to get a coffee or tea at. One final note. No matter how crazy the world is getting and no matter how nice and helpful you found the Spainish people, or people just about anywhere you have met in the world. You are in for a treat because in my mind, without a doubt, the Portuguese people are the kindest, friendliest, most generous people I have ever met in my life. There was not a day that went by that I didn't receive an act of generosity or kindness that was so naturally given to me as when I walked in Portugal. Buen Camino.
 

Faye Walker

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2014, CF 2018, CP 2019 from Coimbra
Did the Portuguese 2 years ago from Lisbon. Don't walk out of Coimbra too quickly. It is a great city. I am sure you know the oldest university in Portugal is there. I had a chance to check out the campus in the evening. You will see students all over the city walking in groups. The upperclassmen/women have long black robes and kind of look like judges. I had a great conversation with a group of them. Check out the Monastery de Santa Cruz in the Centro Historico. Right next door there is a magnificent old cafe that you need to get a coffee or tea at. One final note. No matter how crazy the world is getting and no matter how nice and helpful you found the Spainish people, or people just about anywhere you have met in the world. You are in for a treat because in my mind, without a doubt, the Portuguese people are the kindest, friendliest, most generous people I have ever met in my life. There was not a day that went by that I didn't receive an act of generosity or kindness that was so naturally given to me as when I walked in Portugal. Buen Camino.
Thank you! Yes... not an accident that I am starting from Coimbra! Thank you for the tip about the cafe and the Monastery.... and I shall look for the students in their robes. Perhaps I should take my regalia with me?? It only weighs about 12 pounds! :p

I'm figuring on 3 weeks to have a gentle walk to SdC... fly back to North America on the 29th of Nov. early morning so need to be back to Lisbon on the 28th.
 

Texas Walker

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte (2017 summer)
Portugues (2015)
Frances (2014)
Several points:
  • Depending upon how much further your friend has walked, the closest major hospital with an emergency department is in Burgos. My wife was treated there a few years ago - they found a doctor with excellent English, we were treated sympathetically and given sound advice and treatment that allowed us to continue with some adjustments to our approach. Just make sure you have enough cash to pay on the day. The stories of bills arriving months later that are difficult to pay still pop up here from time to time.
snipped remainder of good thoughts. I wanted to mention that, in Bilbao, also a good-sized city, when DH was injured and we went to the Centro de Salud, we offered to pay and explained that our insurance was a reimbursement deal. The answer was that the Centro de Salud was not set up to collect payments, expect a bill later. It came in email 2 months or so later and was extremely reasonable--2 doctor visits, X-ray at the Urgencia in the hospital (after a taxi ride) and casting--the factura was 56 euro. And your bank can help you wire the payment, in ours the wire info was included in the email factura. (Bank fees and exchange fees were at or slightly more than the amount of the factura.) We finished that Camino the following year.

This was, you all will note, an outpatient visit. Overnight in the hospital might be another kettle of fish monetarily. (Cue the long discussions about travel insurance.)

I will also whisper the thought that perhaps a garment is worsening the lady's knee? I wore bike style capris that I thought fit me when we did CP and the hem constricted just below one knee. It made the knee very uncomfortable, and I forwent climbing the bell tower at the cathedral in ...Pontevedra?... anyway. It's not only feet that can be affected by clothing fit!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) Portugues(2013)
San Salvador (2017) Ingles (2019)
Thank you! Yes... not an accident that I am starting from Coimbra! Thank you for the tip about the cafe and the Monastery.... and I shall look for the students in their robes. Perhaps I should take my regalia with me?? It only weighs about 12 pounds! :p

I'm figuring on 3 weeks to have a gentle walk to SdC... fly back to North America on the 29th of Nov. early morning so need to be back to Lisbon on the 28th.
Coimbra is very uppy downy, but yes, a lovely place to be in. I was lucky to have some days there last year and we toured around, taking in some Roman remains. Most enjoyable. Sounds like you know what is awaiting, so enjoy, buen camino.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
snipped remainder of good thoughts. I wanted to mention that, in Bilbao, also a good-sized city, when DH was injured and we went to the Centro de Salud, we offered to pay and explained that our insurance was a reimbursement deal. The answer was that the Centro de Salud was not set up to collect payments, expect a bill later. It came in email 2 months or so later and was extremely reasonable--2 doctor visits, X-ray at the Urgencia in the hospital (after a taxi ride) and casting--the factura was 56 euro. And your bank can help you wire the payment, in ours the wire info was included in the email factura. (Bank fees and exchange fees were at or slightly more than the amount of the factura.) We finished that Camino the following year.

This was, you all will note, an outpatient visit. Overnight in the hospital might be another kettle of fish monetarily. (Cue the long discussions about travel insurance.)

I will also whisper the thought that perhaps a garment is worsening the lady's knee? I wore bike style capris that I thought fit me when we did CP and the hem constricted just below one knee. It made the knee very uncomfortable, and I forwent climbing the bell tower at the cathedral in ...Pontevedra?... anyway. It's not only feet that can be affected by clothing fit!
I think that the Centros de Salud are much less expensive than the hospitals.
Last year my bill at the hospital in Santiago was 362€ for a simple examination and two paracetamol! No x-rays or anything other than the doctor moving my foot around and asking "does this hurt?"
 

Mycroft

Member
Generally in the US we start with an X-ray if there is no known specific traumatic injury precipitating the pain. A good orthopedic examination of the joint is needed. Then maybe an MRI would be another step, but definitely the R in RICE (Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation) is primary.
A good history is required--previous problems with this joint? boots causing problem? previous hip problem? etc, etc.
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
The MRI is a very sophisticated and expensive diagnostic tool. Shouldn't it be used in a setting where the medical specialist is able to work with other specialists and the patient to develop the optimal treatment plan, based on a careful diagnostic process?

Before an MRI is the next logical step, I would think that the person would have first stopped the voluntary punishing activities!
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
It was mentioned in this thread before, but is worth a re-statement. An MRI for orthopedic issues is most often used only to fine-tune a diagnosis in preparation for tertiary treatments, like surgeries. An X-ray is usually sufficient for ruling out the type of damage that requires immediate emergency care for the likes of broken bones or dislocated joints.

For torn ligaments, muscles, and cartilage, a competent orthopedic exam along with an X-ray is sufficient to rule out most injuries that will require further interventions like surgical repairs or revisions. That does NOT mean that such diagnosis will allow a pilgrim to continue to walk on Camino, it only means that surgical intervention is not likely needed for treatment of the healing injury.

The decision on whether an injured pilgrim can continue walking on Camino or not should be based on the provider's advice, not on personal convenience, desire, or despair.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011 (2019)
This thread started days ago and I find it strange that the OP has not chime in. I, for one, am not a happy camper about those people who only want information and then never provide any feedback
I agree that providing information without a response can be disheartening, but to be fair, she did provide both feedback and an update two days ago, the day the thread started and when there had been over a dozen replies.
 

LornaD

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015, 2017, 2018
Norte 2019
My apologies in not giving another update. I realize that asking for help, and receiving such good and thoughtful advice I should indeed offer an equally detailed response. As I mentioned earlier, the Pilgrim has stopped walking for now. She was transported to a monastery and is receiving good care while she practices the RICE that many mentioned. She is also receiving Physio. Her last comment to me was that she does not want her Camino to end. There is so much more to her story but it is not mine to tell. She recognizes that a Camino is so much more than just the act of walking. The kindness she has been receiving is a salve to her hurting heart. Thank you all who contributed your wisdom, time and words of encouragement.
 
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dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011 (2019)
Before an MRI is the next logical step, I would think that the person would have first stopped the voluntary punishing activities!
Wrong, wrong, wrong :) :) :)
There is nothing logical about the thinking here. I have seen it, and I do it myself. It goes to the overwhelming drive not to give up, especially on a pilgrimage. In 2016, my hip was replaced just four months after my wife and I had finished the CF. I dosed myself up with analgesics each day, and made it. This year I was doing long walks up to just over a month before I had a total knee replacement and OTC painkillers weren't enough and I had to slow down. The osteoarthritis in the remaining hip and knee won't get any better. Even if I do things like hydro-therapy and get my weight down, that might delay, but not put off forever the day when it all gets too difficult to continue without another joint replacement. And in the meantime? Well, I will keep walking.
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
@dougfitz I also have osteoarthritis in both knees though not advanced enough to require replacements quite yet and I also intend to keep walking as long as practical. But I think there is a significant difference between our situation and that of the person whose problem is being discussed. In our case we both know fairly clearly what the issue is and also know that though some moderate continued use might be painful it will probably not lead to any substantial additional damage. We have little to lose. To press on with an undiagnosed condition which might be exacerbated is a far more risky business.
 

Wokabaut_Meri

somewhere along the Way
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés 2015
Pilgrims Way 2018
Via Francigena #1 Canterbury-Dover 2018
It was only an MRI that finally gave a definite diagnosis of the navicular stress fracture in my foot. My xrays showed nothing as there is often a lag before an injury shows. CT scan lit up all over but wasn’t specific.

Sometimes MRIs are necessary but also required is a knowledgeable medico who can interpret them.

Fortunately I didn’t need surgery but recovery was a long and hard Healing Camino.

I wish for a speedy diagnosis and steady full recovery for our injured pilgrim. All the best on your healing journey.
 

NavyBlue

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy and Camino Frances. Via Francigena. Tro-Breiz in progress.
Hi,
It was only an MRI that finally gave a definite diagnosis of the navicular stress fracture in my foot.
Good point, Wokabaut_Meri.

On the Le Puy, I felt a rather sudden and unbearable pain in the knee area. Going on was not an option and rest didn't change anything.

Conventional X-ray and echography brought no evidence of a damage. I eventually got an MRI (waiting list is abt. 1 month here) which showed a stress fracture of the tibial plateau. Recovery is a matter of months, not weeks or days.
 

Susu60

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, La via plata, Aragon,
Camino sister currently in Hontanas, would like an MRI on knee. Was told in Burgos hospital they could not provide MRI only an x-ray. She kept walking and is now concerned she has done more damage as pain is unbearable. She is separated from her Camino family. She lost two from her Camino family recently as husband died in his sleep and wife is returning home with his ashes. My heart is aching for her and I'd appreciate any advice. She speaks no Spanish.
Perhaps the
Camino sister currently in Hontanas, would like an MRI on knee. Was told in Burgos hospital they could not provide MRI only an x-ray. She kept walking and is now concerned she has done more damage as pain is unbearable. She is separated from her Camino family. She lost two from her Camino family recently as husband died in his sleep and wife is returning home with his ashes. My heart is aching for her and I'd appreciate any advice. She speaks no Spanish.
there is a restaurant, the green tree, in Hornillos, not far from Hontonas, and the owner speaks English! She is lovely!
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
MRIs are not done lightly in Spain, at least not in the public health system. I cannot speak for Burgos, but next door in Palencia, the regional hospital is home to the only two MRI machines in the entire province. They are booked solid for weeks in advance. If you get an MRI, you are either an inpatient or you´re in dire straits.
On the other hand, if you have private insurance and are using a private clinic or hospital, you may be able to get one when you feel it´s needful. Most pilgrims depend on the public system, as the private places serve big cities only.
 

JudyWanaWander

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
PlanFuture(2020)
As with all injuries regardless of the cause the advice is RICE. Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation. So one needs to know more about what caused the pain. I am a retired neuromuscular therapist. I ask, when did the pain start, what do you think caused the pain, what makes it worse, what makes it better, was it cause by an acute injury or do you believe it is from repetitive use, how long have you been in pain, is this an old injury that has been exacerbated or is this new. If she thinks she needs an MRI, she is looking for surgery because if they find something bad enough for surgery she will get it OR they will say we don't see anything rest wouldn't help. If it was me, I would RICE and see how it goes. If it doesn't improve, I would go home to my trusted medical support and delve further ONLY if I am willing to get surgery. Sometime acceptance is the hardest thing when it come to pain. Sorry for your friend!!!!
 

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