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Muxia - Finisterre - Santiago?

Robo

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Frances 15,16,18
VdlP 23, Invierno 23, Fisterra 23
Just a random thought and apologies if this has been discussed / answered elsewhere, but I did look.......

If after my next Camino my legs are still working......which is unlikely on part performance, I thought I might try to add another short Camino

An obvious one is to continue on to Muxia and Finisterre, and I see there is a nice looking certificate to add to the collection.
Finishing on the Ocean would be nice.

But, what about walking it in reverse?
A bus to Muxia then walking to Finisterre and back to Santiago?
It would be nice to enter Santiago from a different direction and have the feeling of 'completion' in finishing there.
But is it practical? Signs etc........
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
I saw many pilgrims walking back to Santiago when on my way to Muxia, so it does not seem difficult to do in 'reverse'. I didn't notice if the signage pointed the way back but just walking in the opposite direction to all the others should see you on the right track!
 
You will certainly not be the first one. I walked to muxia - finisterre and then to Santiago. The trip from muxia to finisterre was just rain rain and rain. I also stepped in a puddle that turned out to be a hole one feet deep - to much amusement to my fellow pilgrims.
 
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I wouldn't count on a stream of walkers heading toward me from Santiago to get me to Santiago; it could be awfully easy to get off track between pilgrims. I would have the Wikiloc app running. You don't need to keep looking at it; it will signal you if you walk too far from the track. Also, you can use a track from A to B to get you from B to A; in a short while the app notices the direction you are traveling is the reverse of the recorded track and adjusts.

In 2015 the track between Finisterre and Muxia was double arrowed but I didn't notice if that was the case on the Santiago - Finisterre way so probably not then but possibly now.

Be careful on a double arrowed path. You may stop for a break and if you hadn't paid attention when you did you could end up resuming your walk headed back the way you came.
 
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An obvious one is to continue on to Muxia and Finisterre, and I see there is a nice looking certificate to add to the collection.
Finishing on the Ocean would be nice.

But, what about walking it in reverse?
A bus to Muxia then walking to Finisterre and back to Santiago?
It would be nice to enter Santiago from a different direction and have the feeling of 'completion' in finishing there.
But is it practical? Signs etc........
Just an opinion but I don't really see the point of doing it in reverse. Doing it the regular way gets you a continuous walk plus two different finishes: walking into Santiago and reaching the coast. Going in reverse gets you the same finish twice (albeit from different directions, but that's no big deal). Walking into Santiago after a short walk from the coast and 4-5 days after you already did it will not really feel like much of an accomplishment, plus splitting up your walk with a bus could take you out of your rhythm and pilgrim mindset.
 
Walking from Santiago to Muxia to Finisterre gets you TWO "compostelas! One on Muxia and one in Finistera. Going backwards gets you one more! Beautiful walk, either way.

And don't forget the beach north of finisterra--kneel in the waves and let 7 waves hit you and your sins are forgiven! Really works!
 
...and ship it to Santiago for storage. You pick it up once in Santiago. Service offered by Casa Ivar (we use DHL for transportation).
Walking from Santiago to Muxia to Finisterre gets you TWO "compostelas! One on Muxia and one in Finistera. Going backwards gets you one more! Beautiful walk, either way.

And don't forget the beach north of finisterra--kneel in the waves and let 7 waves hit you and your sins are forgiven! Really works!
There is another compostela that you can receive in Muxia? I am walking from Santiago to Fisterre to Muxia at the end of my SJPP to Santiago pilgrimage. How do I get more information?
 
There is another compostela that you can receive in Muxia? I am walking from Santiago to Fisterre to Muxia at the end of my SJPP to Santiago pilgrimage. How do I get more information?
I received one in Muxia in 2019. Assume they still have them.
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
There is another compostela that you can receive in Muxia? I am walking from Santiago to Fisterre to Muxia at the end of my SJPP to Santiago pilgrimage. How do I get more information?
Not sure what it requires, going from Fisterre to Muxia, but last year I walked from Santiago to Muxia (hospitalero had the certificate), and then to Fisterre (tourist office had certificate) and then walked to Cee where I got the bus--and had the best chocolate stuffed croissant ever!
 
There is another compostela that you can receive in Muxia? I am walking from Santiago to Fisterre to Muxia at the end of my SJPP to Santiago pilgrimage. How do I get more information?
The Compostela is only given in Santiago de Compostela. In Muxía you can collect a Muxiana, and in Fisterra a Fisterrana.
Information about these certificates is here:
 
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And don't forget the beach north of finisterra--kneel in the waves and let 7 waves hit you and your sins are forgiven! Really works!
Be careful. The coast here is called Costa da Morte for good reason. A pilgrim drowned at this beach shortly before I visited in 2019. The waves can be very dangerous indeed. It's much safer to enter the water the harbour side of town.
 
But, what about walking it in reverse?
Check out “The Walking Veteran” on YouTube. He just finished the Frances, then walked to Finesterre and Muxia and back to Santiago. His videos highlight some of the issues he had heading back, especially at crossroads. I think he used the Camino Ninja app(💗) to keep himself on track. (On a side note, he averaged 40 km a day - I was tired after watching each of his videos 😂)
 
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@Robo, to revert to your original question. Santiago-Fisterra-Muxia-Santiago and the reverse are both well way marked even if a little attention is required from time to time. A basic awareness of time, hemisphere and required direction of travel ( and maybe a mapping app) is all thats really necessary.
I’ve walked both loops and loved them both and found the shifts in perspective interesting. Any one walking M-F-S or the converse will have walked more than 100km to Santiago and can request a Compostela if they so desire.
My recommendation, if your legs have it, is to walk the triangle. A very satisfying route around beautiful Galicia.
 
@Robo, to revert to your original question. Santiago-Fisterra-Muxia-Santiago and the reverse are both well way marked even if a little attention is required from time to time. A basic awareness of time, hemisphere and required direction of travel ( and maybe a mapping app) is all thats really necessary.

Having just walked from Fisterra to Santiago a couple of weeks ago, I beg to differ. It MIGHT be easier if you have just walked in the usual direction (Santiago - Fisterra - Muxia) and still remember the route, but not if you have only reached the coast by bus. The waymarkers, in the form of a handpainted 'SC' and an arrow, are few and far between and often very faded and hardly visible - difficult to spot if you want to start early in the morning in low light conditions. No waymarkers at some intersections. It does help when you see other pilgrims coming towards you, but you can't count on seeing other pilgrims at every intersection. And the pilgrim walking towards you could have just gone off the Camino to answer Nature's call in privacy. In fact, I suspect that was how I got off trail for a bit at one point.

However, if you have downloaded the GPS track onto your phone, you will have no trouble at all. In that case, other skills like awareness of time and sense of direction (which I have none) are not really relevant anyway. I found the walk easy, thanks only to the GPS track.

But leaving aside issues with navigation, I found walking in the reverse direction a very strange experience. I was doing it at a time when the route was very busy (late July in a Holy Year) and saw hordes of other pilgrims on the way every day, but I had never felt so alone. Bumping into hundreds of other people walking towards me meant endless greetings (which got a bit tiresome after a while), but no real interaction with any of them because they were all going in the opposite direction. In the 5 days of walking on this route, I only saw 4 other people walking in the reverse direction like me and only got to talk to one of them (the other 3 obviously didn't want to engage). In other words, I experienced the usual congestion on this route during the busy season without developing any of the usual Camino comaraderie with anyone. Overall I am still glad that I had this unique experience, but walking in the reverse direction is not something I would be keen to do ever again.
 
Having just walked from Fisterra to Santiago a couple of weeks ago, I beg to differ. It MIGHT be easier if you have just walked in the usual direction (Santiago - Fisterra - Muxia) and still remember the route, but not if you have only reached the coast by bus. The waymarkers, in the form of a handpainted 'SC' and an arrow, are few and far between and often very faded and hardly visible - difficult to spot if you want to start early in the morning in low light conditions. No waymarkers at some intersections. It does help when you see other pilgrims coming towards you, but you can't count on seeing other pilgrims at every intersection. And the pilgrim walking towards you could have just gone off the Camino to answer Nature's call in privacy. In fact, I suspect that was how I got off trail for a bit at one point.

However, if you have downloaded the GPS track onto your phone, you will have no trouble at all. In that case, other skills like awareness of time and sense of direction (which I have none) are not really relevant anyway. I found the walk easy, thanks only to the GPS track.

But leaving aside issues with navigation, I found walking in the reverse direction a very strange experience. I was doing it at a time when the route was very busy (late July in a Holy Year) and saw hordes of other pilgrims on the way every day, but I had never felt so alone. Bumping into hundreds of other people walking towards me meant endless greetings (which got a bit tiresome after a while), but no real interaction with any of them because they were all going in the opposite direction. In the 5 days of walking on this route, I only saw 4 other people walking in the reverse direction like me and only got to talk to one of them (the other 3 obviously didn't want to engage). In other words, I experienced the usual congestion on this route during the busy season without developing any of the usual Camino comaraderie with anyone. Overall I am still glad that I had this unique experience, but walking in the reverse direction is not something I would be keen to do ever again.
I walked the triangle (kite with tail) after completing the CF in May this year. It was beautiful, & with amazing downpours of rain. It's true that the signposting is not geared for return pilgrims. I wished I'd taken a bit more notice (or photos) of landmarks at intersections. Often I found myself scouring the surfaces of the possible tracks looking for footprints. It worked most of the time. 🧐😁
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
I have walked to Muxia from Santiago and also to Finisterre from Santiago. I would do the entire loop/triangle: Santiago-Muxia-Finisterrre-Sanitago if I were you, which is about 200km. Going out to Muxia you pass through Negreira and Olveiroa. After Logroso (3-4km) beyond the latter where there is a lovely algergue you trend right at the junction at Hospital (2km on) to go to Dumbria and Muxia. Then down the coast (but inland) to Finisterre. From Finisterre you come back up to the junction at Hospital and back to Olveiroa and Negreira. It would hard to get lost in the first return stage from Finisterre to Hospital and then you are on the trail you came out on and will more than likely remember it even in reverse. And coming back into SdeC there is a wonderful view of the cathedral from the high ground at Sarela de Abaixo. It would be a great week's extension to your Camino! And there are certificates at both Muxia & Finisterre.
 
Thanks all. Lots of great tips.

I think it will all come down to two things:

  1. If my legs are still working, and
  2. How much time 'in country' I have remaining....
 
Be careful. The coast here is called Costa da Morte for good reason. A pilgrim drowned at this beach shortly before I visited in 2019. The waves can be very dangerous indeed. It's much safer to enter the water the harbour side of town.

Not to forget - that it's officially recommended that you do NOT go into the water, much less swim.
 
...and ship it to Santiago for storage. You pick it up once in Santiago. Service offered by Casa Ivar (we use DHL for transportation).
Be careful. The coast here is called Costa da Morte for good reason. A pilgrim drowned at this beach shortly before I visited in 2019. The waves can be very dangerous indeed. It's much safer to enter the water the harbour side of town.
Hard enuff to just kneel in the waves--would never try swimming!
 
Hi,
Maybe to give an supplement of information to the OP and me. for those whom have done the loop in the two direction, which direction giving the more beautiful view of the ocean ? I did the walk to Finisterre and the first view of the ocean was wonderful and also we can distinguish the Cape Finisterre.
 
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The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
The Compostela is only given in Santiago de Compostela. In Muxía you can collect a Muxiana, and in Fisterra a Fisterrana.
Information about these certificates is here:
According to the Santiago de Compostela official Pilgrims website and source of official statistics they regularly issue a Muxia Y Finisterre Compostela. See https://oficinadelperegrino.com/en/statistics/ and a graph of the number issued since 2016 below.
mux16.jpeg
 
Of course, if you will walk from Fisterra - Muxia back to Santiago (and stamps from that way, you can get (regular) Compostella in pilgrims office in Santiago.. (It must be over 100kms, so Muxia-Fisterra-Olveiroa-Negreira-Santiago - or starting in Fisterra to Muxia, etc). I think you will need at least 2 stamps daily.
 
Just a random thought and apologies if this has been discussed / answered elsewhere, but I did look.......

If after my next Camino my legs are still working......which is unlikely on part performance, I thought I might try to add another short Camino

An obvious one is to continue on to Muxia and Finisterre, and I see there is a nice looking certificate to add to the collection.
Finishing on the Ocean would be nice.

But, what about walking it in reverse?
A bus to Muxia then walking to Finisterre and back to Santiago?
It would be nice to enter Santiago from a different direction and have the feeling of 'completion' in finishing there.
But is it practical? Signs etc........
Very easy , saw many pilgrims going anti clockwise
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
Just a random thought and apologies if this has been discussed / answered elsewhere, but I did look.......

If after my next Camino my legs are still working......which is unlikely on part performance, I thought I might try to add another short Camino

An obvious one is to continue on to Muxia and Finisterre, and I see there is a nice looking certificate to add to the collection.
Finishing on the Ocean would be nice.

But, what about walking it in reverse?
A bus to Muxia then walking to Finisterre and back to Santiago?
It would be nice to enter Santiago from a different direction and have the feeling of 'completion' in finishing there.
But is it practical? Signs etc........
No problem. Easily done
 
An obvious one is to continue on to Muxia and Finisterre, and I see there is a nice looking certificate to add to the collection.
Finishing on the Ocean would be nice.

But, what about walking it in reverse?
A bus to Muxia then walking to Finisterre and back to Santiago?
It would be nice to enter Santiago from a different direction and have the feeling of 'completion' in finishing there.
But is it practical? Signs etc........
Of course, if you walk it in reverse, there would be no nice certificate to show you'd done so. 😁
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
Just a random thought and apologies if this has been discussed / answered elsewhere, but I did look.......

If after my next Camino my legs are still working......which is unlikely on part performance, I thought I might try to add another short Camino

An obvious one is to continue on to Muxia and Finisterre, and I see there is a nice looking certificate to add to the collection.
Finishing on the Ocean would be nice.

But, what about walking it in reverse?
A bus to Muxia then walking to Finisterre and back to Santiago?
It would be nice to enter Santiago from a different direction and have the feeling of 'completion' in finishing there.
But is it practical? Signs etc........
I was thinking about the same route. I'm calculating that from the Santiago elevation to the ocean would mean more down hill sections than the reverse.

So far, I have seen limited places to stay along the way.

When I took the bus from Santiago to visit Finisterre, after a Camino to Santiago, it felt like a calm, meditative finality opposed to the urban ending in Santiago after the solitude of the different camino ways. Buen camino.
 
I was thinking about the same route. I'm calculating that from the Santiago elevation to the ocean would mean more down hill sections than the reverse.

So far, I have seen limited places to stay along the way.

When I took the bus from Santiago to visit Finisterre, after a Camino to Santiago, it felt like a calm, meditative finality opposed to the urban ending in Santiago after the solitude of the different camino ways. Buen camino.

Yes, I did the same on my first Camino.
Due to time and complaining legs, I couldn't walk to the Ocean, but took a bus to Muxia for the day.
Sitting there watching the waves was the perfect ending.......

So I've allowed a few extra days on this next Camino to walk out there, if my legs are still working.

I have a plan to 'trick' them and not stop in SdC but just keep going :cool:
And start with a spare blank Credencial........

I presume when I come back to SdC a few days later I can turn up with my VdlP credencial.
So I could get my Compostela before departing SdC.
Or will they ask where I have been for the last 5 days ? :oops:
 
Just a random thought and apologies if this has been discussed / answered elsewhere, but I did look.......

If after my next Camino my legs are still working......which is unlikely on part performance, I thought I might try to add another short Camino

An obvious one is to continue on to Muxia and Finisterre, and I see there is a nice looking certificate to add to the collection.
Finishing on the Ocean would be nice.

But, what about walking it in reverse?
A bus to Muxia then walking to Finisterre and back to Santiago?
It would be nice to enter Santiago from a different direction and have the feeling of 'completion' in finishing there.
But is it practical? Signs etc........
If you are walking back from Muxia to Santiago, whether you walk back through Cee or you walk back through Dumbria, there will be many signs but they will be pointing in the opposite direction, towards Finisterre or Muxia, so a bit awkward but do-able. I'll be walking back to Santiago from Muxia through Dumbria, so I will use a gps track of the route (you should be able to find these online) to help keep me on the Way.
 
Ideal sleeping bag liner whether we want to add a thermal plus to our bag, or if we want to use it alone to sleep in shelters or hostels. Thanks to its mummy shape, it adapts perfectly to our body.

€46,-
If you are walking back from Muxia to Santiago, whether you walk back through Cee or you walk back through Dumbria, there will be many signs but they will be pointing in the opposite direction, towards Finisterre or Muxia, so a bit awkward but do-able. I'll be walking back to Santiago from Muxia through Dumbria, so I will use a gps track of the route (you should be able to find these online) to help keep me on the Way.
Also, if you are walking from Santiago to Finisterre and on to Muxia, there are two certificates available: one when you arrive in Finisterre, at the lighthouse at the very end and one when you arrive in Muxia at the tourist information office. If you complete the entire loop, Santiago to Finisterre to Muxia and back to Santiago, collecting two stamps a day, you should be able to receive a compostela certificate at the pilgrim office in Santiago.
 
Also, if you are walking from Santiago to Finisterre and on to Muxia, there are two certificates available: one when you arrive in Finisterre, at the lighthouse at the very end and one when you arrive in Muxia at the tourist information office. If you complete the entire loop, Santiago to Finisterre to Muxia and back to Santiago, collecting two stamps a day, you should be able to receive a compostela certificate at the pilgrim office in Santiago.
Last Fall, you had to go to the municipal albergue in Fisterra to get the certificate. They happened to be closed the day we were there, so I had to email the tourist office and they mailed on to the US. There was no facility near the lighthouse to register for the Fisterra certificate.
 

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