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Luggage Transfer Correos

My all-season packing list

C clearly

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
There have been several questions from new pilgrims about what things to take. So, I'm starting a new thread to address them, and have decided to post my packing list (even though it feels a bit like putting my laundry out on display). I am not seeking feedback on the list - rather it is for information of anyone who wants to see what I have settled on after 6 Caminos. (My first camino was not much different, because I followed the good advice from this forum.)

This list is suitable for virtually all weather conditions. I would make some minor adjustments for walking in January or July, but not much. I tend to walk in March-April or Oct-Nov, when it is necessary to be prepared for any weather conditions. I know some items that I could save weight on, if necessary, but I am happy with this collection. I am quite comfortable carrying this weight (between 5 and 6 kg before water and snacks) and it provides me with everything I am likely to need. I do not want to be searching for a pharmacy when I am not feeling well, or looking for rain gear when it is raining!)

My approach to clothing is to have a walking outfit that consists of several light layers that can be put on or taken off to suit any conditions. Rain jacket and pants provide the ultimate protection against wind, rain or cold. Then I have an evening outfit, including down vest, that I wear to bed as well. The day outfit can stay a bit dirty and the evening outfit stays pretty clean, so my daily laundry is just socks and underwear.

I take a very lightweight sleeping bag, and have wool or down clothes I can also wear at night. I find that my body gets chilled easily when it is tired from walking all day, and I prefer not to risk being cold at night.

The attached list adds up to 5.3 kg (just under 12 pounds). In practice, a few odds and ends always creep into my back before departure, but those would be very small items like snacks, notes or extra toiletries that can/will be discarded. My pack is always under 6 kg, without water. I typically carry two 500 mL bottles of water and another 500 mL emergency drink in the bottom of my pack.
 

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alaskadiver

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017-Camino Primitivo
April 2019-Camino de Invierno
You don’t actually wear all those shirts while walking, though, do you? Those are your options right?
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
You don’t actually wear all those shirts while walking, though, do you? Those are your options right?
Typically on a cool dry day, I will start with the tank top, long sleeve merino base, button up shirt, and buff. On a clear day that warms up, the buff comes off in 30 minutes, and the merino shirt after an hour or two. If it is cold or damp, the rain jacket goes on. I almost always wear the button-up shirt while walking. My other merino shirt, sweater and vest are all for the evenings, although very occasionally I might need to add the sweater during the day. The t-shirt is a spare for hot evenings.
 

alaskadiver

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017-Camino Primitivo
April 2019-Camino de Invierno
Typically on a cool dry day, I will start with the tank top, long sleeve merino base, button up shirt, and buff. On a clear day that warms up, the buff comes off in 30 minutes, and the merino shirt after an hour or two. If it is cold or damp, the rain jacket goes on. I almost always wear the button-up shirt while walking. My other merino shirt, sweater and vest are all for the evenings, although very occasionally I might need to add the sweater during the day. The t-shirt is a spare for hot evenings.
This a great example of cold tolerance. I walk with a T-shirt and a skirt in temps down to 40s F. I don’t like being hot when I hike :) I only tolerate a long sleeve shirt in Alaska where the mosquitoes eat me alive otherwise.
This is why it’s hard to give advice to new hikers who have no experience with their own tolerance or fitness level. Best for them to be prepared for everything and figure it out as they go along.
Your packing list is good for that I think. Covers all the bases.
 
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PhxRiles

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (Leon to Santiago) 2019
As a first-timer, I've been seeking feedback from those who have "been there, done that." I've attempted to compile my own packing list from what others have suggested. What I have here needs tweaking, but when I weighed a couple days ago, it was about 13.6 lbs. I'll try to get it down to about 11 lbs. before I leave in May. Any suggestions are appreciated!
 

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C clearly

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
Any suggestions are appreciated!
The list shows you have 2 long-sleeved shirts and a fleece as your shirts. Would you need UV sleeves if your shirts are all long-sleeved? I assume the list includes the things you are wearing, so does the weight (13.6 lbs) include it all? If so, that weight is very good.
 

alaskadiver

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017-Camino Primitivo
April 2019-Camino de Invierno
As a first-timer, I've been seeking feedback from those who have "been there, done that." I've attempted to compile my own packing list from what others have suggested. What I have here needs tweaking, but when I weighed a couple days ago, it was about 13.6 lbs. I'll try to get it down to about 11 lbs. before I leave in May. Any suggestions are appreciated!
You have a poncho and a rain jacket. I would only take 1. Also consider swapping out the heavy fleece jacket for a light weight synthetic jacket. May into June is hot in Spain (Anomalous years aside). Consider 1 short sleeve shirt instead of 2 long sleeve ones.
And I agree that if you have long sleeves with uv protection (or wear sunscreen), the sun sleeves are not needed.
You don’t say which Camino you are walking or for how long.
 

PhxRiles

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (Leon to Santiago) 2019
You have a poncho and a rain jacket. I would only take 1. Also consider swapping out the heavy fleece jacket for a light weight synthetic jacket. May into June is hot in Spain (Anomalous years aside). Consider 1 short sleeve shirt instead of 2 long sleeve ones.
And I agree that if you have long sleeves with uv protection (or wear sunscreen), the sun sleeves are not needed.
You don’t say which Camino you are walking or for how long.
alaskadiver, Thanks for the suggestions! The fleece jacket I've got is lightweight...it's from Columbia. Rain jacket is also thin and lightweight, almost more of a cover than a jacket.
I figure the long sleeves plus sunscreen would eliminate the need for sun sleeves.
I'll be walking the Camino Frances between Leon and Santiago. I start on May 18 and return home on June 11. From what I've read, I'm allowing plenty of time...about 3 weeks.
 

Stroller123

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning Italy to Finisterre and back (20xx)
I love reading lists and make them!

If I may add my two cents:

Weight: at the moment (age, level of fitness) I'm comfortable to carry 10Kg (with food and water), when I was younger and fitter I could carry more. So, even if I want to bring with me a lead ball, the total weight of my pack won't exceed that limit. To do so I have to choose not only what I want to pack, but also the quality (weight) of the gear, usually the lighter the more expensive it gets.

Pack: I hate having things hanging outside the pack, so everything must stay inside, which also includes my walking boots for the days in which I want to walk with sandals and, of course, food or extras I buy along the way. Therefore, I always take into account the extra space I may need when choosing the right pack. I love backpacks, I have 15 of them form 10l to 100l!

Comfort: everyone is different, for example I need to drink a cup of tea as soon as I wake up, or else I'll be grumpy all day. Therefore, I always have with me a cup, tea bags and sugar and a small alcohol stove, regardless if I'm camping or if I stay in hotel. Sunny weather on me is harder than cold weather, so I bring a hat and a cap, to switch them when they are too sweaty. I wear prescription glasses, so I take with me 2 pairs usually 1 pair with clear lenses and 1 pair with dark/photochromic ones. My skin gets easily sunburned and chapped, so lip balm and cream (I use PREP) are a necessity.

The "just in case": when I decide if I may or may not need something I consider what the consequence of not having that item ready would be vs. the weight. Would I want to go and look of a pharmacy when I have a strong migraine or diarrhea or do I rather have with me few pills? Would I really want to walk for an X amount of time without water rather than carry an extra 1/2 liter? Do I want to walk with a broken shoelace for X Km to save the weight of a piece of string? And so on.

To sum it up, for me walking must be a pleasure not a torture; once I tested the weight I'm comfortable carry, I strictly stick to it and pack accordingly not just for necessities, but also for comfort.
 

tomishy

Member
Camino(s) past & future
April/May 2019
can I ask about the dri sack that you put your pack into at night? also what do you sleep in? my daughter and I start out April 29th from sjpp :)
 

J F Gregory

Portugal Central - October 2019
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (March-April,2016) finished, (October 2019) Portuguese Central Route.
I like your pack list. mine weighs about the same 4.5 kg with water. I carry 1 long sleeve smart wool and 1 short sleeve smart wool 't' shirts and 1 long sleeve Columbia button up. I like wearing button up for hiking. Where my extra weight comes in is my prescription meds for 2x a day for how many days I am traveling. My next walk is next October the Caminho Central. This last year I traded by Osprey Kestral 48 for a Osprey Exos 38 ( dropped about 7 Kg). With this new pack I made about a 120 km walk in Poland and Czech Republic and hiked in Iraq last January. It is very comfortable.
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
can I ask about the dri sack that you put your pack into at night? also what do you sleep in?
If you google "pack liner" you will find various ones. I have one that is almost twice the size of my pack, so I can toss things in at night without having to pack it up carefully. I sleep in my "evening outfit" - merino sweatpants and long sleeved shirt, with the down vest if I am cold, or the t-shirt if it is warm. Remember I think in terms of 1 evening outfit and then a many-layered walking outfit. Two items (sweater and down vest) can cross over.

I like your pack list. mine weighs about the same 4.5 kg with water... Where my extra weight comes in...
Mine weighs about 5.5 kg without water. How do you keep yours down to 4.5 kg especially if you have extra weight from medicines?
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I first spray my Osprey 36L pack with Permathrin, then line it with a sturdy trash compactor bag. At night I put everything back inside it to deter bedbugs.
I use a lightweight, inexpensive sleeping bag for mid April thru May caminos. Since we sleep indoors, I don't think there is a need to spend too much on a sleeping bag or liner.
Clothing: 2 bras, 3 undies, 3 pr socks, 1 pr lightweight synthetic hiking pants, 1 pr synthetic shorts, 2 wicking t-shirts, 1 longsleeve thin 1/4 zip fleece, a lightweight poly filled puff jacket, buff, Frogg Togg rain jacket/pants, fleece beanie/gloves.
I prefer the two t-shirts as they become my washable alternating undergarments under my fleece, then I rarely wash it. I never take a tank top as I don't want my underarms touching my fleece. I also have never taken any additional long sleeve shirt, nor wished I had.
The above combination of clothing has always worked perfectly for me on my spring caminos. I dislike both being cold and being hot.
 

J F Gregory

Portugal Central - October 2019
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (March-April,2016) finished, (October 2019) Portuguese Central Route.
If you google "pack liner" you will find various ones. I have one that is almost twice the size of my pack, so I can toss things in at night without having to pack it up carefully. I sleep in my "evening outfit" - merino sweatpants and long sleeved shirt, with the down vest if I am cold, or the t-shirt if it is warm. Remember I think in terms of 1 evening outfit and then a many-layered walking outfit. Two items (sweater and down vest) can cross over.


Mine weighs about 5.5 kg without water. How do you keep yours down to 4.5 kg especially if you have extra weight from medicines?
I use light quick drying pants, I packed and 1 to wear. The same with socks Darn Tough socks, light fleece and rain jacket. Same with shirts, exception: 1 Columbia hiking shirt and Laundry daily. All clothing items in stuff sack and grooming kit (zip lock bag) and sleep sack. I use a flex garbage sack as a pack liner. Grooming kit: 1 bar multi-use soap ( will last about 45 days) comb and tooth brush, 1 travel razor. All of the travel clothes I use are expensive except pants. I buy cheap quick dry pants Bass Pro Shop, their brand on sale for $29 per pair and they will last if given the proper care. All of this weighs about 4 kg. Then water and daily snacks. If something breaks I replace it at their stores. I do use walking sticks. When we walked a winter Camino I carried the ashes of my brother to spread along the way, That added an extra 1.1 kg. We did this because he wanted to walk a Camino and never had the opportunity.
 
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dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2012, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011
The attached list adds up to 5.3 kg (just under 12 pounds).
This is an interesting list, as much because of the weights as anything else, and what that might mean for larger people. I am somewhere between an L and XL in clothes sizes, and nothing that I own is as light as the gear the @C clearly has listed. The largest percentage difference will be my Tilley hat, at just over 150 gm - over 300% heavier than the 50 gm hat on this list. Other clothing items appear to be around 25-30% heavier, and presumably bulkier.

Other items that I use that are not clothing size related are also somewhat heavier, such as my Opinel, at 47 gm, some 30% heavier than the 37 gm knife listed.

My sleeping system, which always includes a silk liner and now includes a 100 gm inflatable pillow, is just under 900 gm when packed in a compression sack to reduce its volume to a more manageable size. Given that on my last camino, I carried a travel CPAP, the 100 gm for a pillow that keeps my windpipe relatively straight is a very reasonable alternative. It makes it easier to keep my windpipe open when I am sleeping, and it is both a comfort for me, and possibly to my fellow pilgrims if I snore less.

Denture care and other specialist dental items also add considerably to my wet bag weight, even if some of those items are consumables, and might, technically, be excluded from a base weight calculation.

This combination of size issues, the need to carry additional health and dental care items, and comfort choices all add to the packing list. This year (walking the S:t Olavsleden in Sweden and Norway) this resulted in a pack base weight of just over 10 kg, about 15% of my ideal walking weight (or 12% of my actual weight). It doesn't take long for these weight differences to add up.

@C clearly doesn't reveal what her packing list is as a percentage of her walking weight, but for spring and autumn pilgrimages, I generally manage to keep my bare pack weight to under 15% of my ideal walking weight, although it went slightly over when I carried a CPAP.

I think larger pilgrims in particular should be looking at the general structure of @C clearly's list rather than the individual weights, which many will find cannot be achieved at reasonable cost in their sizes. In doing that, keeping overall weight down is always going to be key to walking further and faster.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I agree that in general, man's basic kit will usually be heavier than a woman's even before the variations each person chooses to bring.
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
@C clearly doesn't reveal what her packing list is as a percentage of her walking weight
OK, OK, you are forcing me to reveal my weight! I am about 5'4" (162 cm) and my official walking weight is 60 kg. (My actual weight is a couple more :mad:, especially now at Christmas.) Either way, my pack is just under 10% without including water. That was my original target for my first Camino, and I have found that it coincides with the things I really want to have, and I can carry it comfortably. I am tempted to add an umbrella, but have been lucky with the weather, so I haven't yet.

I think larger pilgrims in particular should be looking at the general structure of @C clearly's list rather than the individual weights,
I agree.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2012, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011
I agree that in general, man's basic kit will usually be heavier than a woman's even before the variations each person chooses to bring.
... and I think boys bring more toys, or at least I do. This year I carried three items that were entirely optional. My smartphone could have replaced all three, albeit with some limitations.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
... and I think boys bring more toys, or at least I do. This year I carried three items that were entirely optional. My smartphone could have replaced all three, albeit with some limitations.
So true..."boys and their toys". My husband probably purchases 5x's more techy do-dads than he ever needs. Plus, technology is ever changing, so in a couple of short years, it all "needs" to be upgraded.
 

Samarkand

Member
Camino(s) past & future
January 2019, French Camino
This is my winter packing list (below). It weights about 5.5kg without the clothes on my back (included in the picture), food and water. It fit into a 30L backpack.

For warmer seasons, just remove the warmer items and switch to very light jacket.

Gear(1).jpg
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
This is my winter packing list (below). It weights about 5.5kg without the clothes on my back (included in the picture), food and water. It fit into a 30L backpack.

For warmer seasons, just remove the warmer items and switch to very light jacket.

View attachment 50181
I am fascinated with your tech organisation more than your contents list! How did you get the numbers to sit neatly on the items??? What’s more, if you forgot something, you would just have to lay everything out in the same order as your photo to identify the missing item...
 

Samarkand

Member
Camino(s) past & future
January 2019, French Camino
I just used Photoshop for the numbers. It took me 10 minutes to make the list, but I wanted to make one forever. I already forgot the sandals, but it's OK.
 

nidarosa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Inglés 2009+2017, Francés 2012+2018, Astorga-Santiago repeatedly
Thank you, @C clearly and @Samarkand , this is good info for newbies! My own packing list has changed a little over the years as I change the way I do things and what things I need (like walking in a skirt, taking an evening specific change of clothes, and different shoes because of plantar fasciitis) but I have always aimed to make myself as comfortable as possible for minimum weight. Interestingly when I tried to pack the same stuff for my husband (not the skirt) for a CF from Estella, it only partially worked. I love a poncho, he hates it. I feel cold in the morning, he wants to start in shorts. I want breathable shoes, he wants goretex mids. After a few walks and tweaks we were both happy with our kit.
My top tip for new pilgrims would be to start with one of these lists, see what they already have before they start spending lots of money, and then go for a long walk at least two days on the run wearing only what they intend to bring, carrying the full pack, doing some laundry with the soapy stuff of their choice, and then wear the second change of clothes to relax after. The only thing that is going to show up problems and solutions is to wear and wash and pack your actual gear repeatedly over time! If your trousers chafe or dry slowly, consider getting some new ones. If the tech shirt feels cold and clammy, consider merino. If your feet overheat, try different socks before you invest in new shoes. If you get blisters, learn to treat them so you can carry on, and how to avoid them. Just make sure you know your kit properly to make yourself as comfortable as possible for minimum weight.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
Thank you, @C clearly and @Samarkand
My top tip for new pilgrims would be to start with one of these lists, see what they already have before they start spending lots of money, and then go for a long walk at least two days on the run wearing only what they intend to bring, carrying the full pack, doing some laundry with the soapy stuff of their choice, and then wear the second change of clothes to relax after. The only thing that is going to show up problems and solutions is to wear and wash and pack your actual gear repeatedly over time! If your trousers chafe or dry slowly, consider getting some new ones. If the tech shirt feels cold and clammy, consider merino. If your feet overheat, try different socks before you invest in new shoes. If you get blisters, learn to treat them so you can carry on, and how to avoid them. Just make sure you know your kit properly to make yourself as comfortable as possible for minimum weight.
Great advise. I remember testing and wearing my choice of rain gear in the shower at home before I left on my first camino. I had to try a couple of different options before finding one that totally kept me dry. I also dried myself off after showering with a few towel options until finding a favorite.
 

linkster

Nunca dejes de creer!
Camino(s) past & future
Francés 05/17 brazo roto Portomarín
Francés 09/17, 09/18 SJPdP - Fisterra
Portuguese ~05/19
I like the published lists, but the description, rationale, philosophy is just as enlightening. Everyone will tailor their kit to their own specific needs, and preferences. Here is my list for the Portuguese in the spring.

I like to be warm, dry, change of clothes for at night, and don't want to have to be in search for Imodium etc. in a hamlet without a farmacia. I usually end up giving away ~1/2 of my med kit by the time I finish.
 

nidarosa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Inglés 2009+2017, Francés 2012+2018, Astorga-Santiago repeatedly
@Camino Chris Good idea to try out the rain gear in the shower, but I'd still recommend getting out in the rain with it on and go for a walk - some rain gear breathes and some doesn't, and some is tricky to get on and off if rain comes and goes. I like a poncho with closed sides because it is easy to pop over myself and the pack, and is roomy so better ventilated. Or at the very least a rain coat with pit zips!
 

ISABEL linares

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
camino frances,camino del norte,camino frances
There have been several questions from new pilgrims about what things to take. So, I'm starting a new thread to address them, and have decided to post my packing list (even though it feels a bit like putting my laundry out on display). I am not seeking feedback on the list - rather it is for information of anyone who wants to see what I have settled on after 6 Caminos. (My first camino was not much different, because I followed the good advice from this forum.)

This list is suitable for virtually all weather conditions. I would make some minor adjustments for walking in January or July, but not much. I tend to walk in March-April or Oct-Nov, when it is necessary to be prepared for any weather conditions. I know some items that I could save weight on, if necessary, but I am happy with this collection. I am quite comfortable carrying this weight (between 5 and 6 kg before water and snacks) and it provides me with everything I am likely to need. I do not want to be searching for a pharmacy when I am not feeling well, or looking for rain gear when it is raining!)

My approach to clothing is to have a walking outfit that consists of several light layers that can be put on or taken off to suit any conditions. Rain jacket and pants provide the ultimate protection against wind, rain or cold. Then I have an evening outfit, including down vest, that I wear to bed as well. The day outfit can stay a bit dirty and the evening outfit stays pretty clean, so my daily laundry is just socks and underwear.

I take a very lightweight sleeping bag, and have wool or down clothes I can also wear at night. I find that my body gets chilled easily when it is tired from walking all day, and I prefer not to risk being cold at night.

The attached list adds up to 5.3 kg (just under 12 pounds). In practice, a few odds and ends always creep into my back before departure, but those would be very small items like snacks, notes or extra toiletries that can/will be discarded. My pack is always under 6 kg, without water. I typically carry two 500 mL bottles of water and another 500 mL emergency drink in the bottom of my pack.

You are very well organize peregrino.
 

Mito

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2011, 2013) Roncesvalles to Belorado
CLeP (2013) - Le Puy to ?
CF (2018) Belorado to Astorga
Great list! (The initial list -- the photo looks like way too much for me) My rule of thumb for clothes is to "carry" the most I will ever wear at one time (which will depend on the weather) as well as a soft cotton t-shirt and light socks for sleeping, Croc clogs for non-hiking, an extra pair of socks, and my down throw and silk liner. If you use wool (socks and base layers) you won't need to wash much :) Wash days I wore my rain pants and one of my cleaner top layers. If your clothes are made up of thin (very thin) layers, you will always have a "just right" ensemble no matter what the weather. My pack came in at 11 lbs as well and that was only when I was naked!! BTW, I hike only in the shoulder seasons as I am not fond of hot weather.
 
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Mito

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2011, 2013) Roncesvalles to Belorado
CLeP (2013) - Le Puy to ?
CF (2018) Belorado to Astorga
@Camino Chris Good idea to try out the rain gear in the shower, but I'd still recommend getting out in the rain with it on and go for a walk - some rain gear breathes and some doesn't, and some is tricky to get on and off if rain comes and goes. I like a poncho with closed sides because it is easy to pop over myself and the pack, and is roomy so better ventilated. Or at the very least a rain coat with pit zips!

My personal preference for rain is Marmot precip pants which are so light and comfy, I often wore them with my long-johns if there was even a hint of rain. And a Marmot jacket -- with my pack (Osprey 33L) in its cover. I did buy a poncho now for crazy wet weather, but used it just once. I'm not fond of the way they whip around in the wind.
 

Samarkand

Member
Camino(s) past & future
January 2019, French Camino
Great list! (The initial list -- the photo looks like way too much for me) My rule of thumb for clothes is to "carry" the most I will ever wear at one time (which will depend on the weather) as well as a soft cotton t-shirt and light socks for sleeping, Croc clogs for non-hiking, an extra pair of socks, and my down throw and silk liner. If you use wool (socks and base layers) you won't need to wash much :) Wash days I wore my rain pants and one of my cleaner top layers. If your clothes are made up of thin (very thin) layers, you will always have a "just right" ensemble no matter what the weather. My pack came in at 11 lbs as well and that was only when I was naked!! BTW, I hike only in the shoulder seasons as I am not fond of hot weather.
Ehh, I don't know. All the "extra" clothing weights a total of 2-3lbs. I guess it's the price to pay to travel clean, comfortable and be ready even for a blizzard.
 

Mito

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2011, 2013) Roncesvalles to Belorado
CLeP (2013) - Le Puy to ?
CF (2018) Belorado to Astorga
I
Ehh, I don't know. All the "extra" clothing weights a total of 2-3lbs. I guess it's the price to pay to travel clean, comfortable and be ready even for a blizzard.
Well.....hiking in March, I had rain, sleet, snow, driving wind with rain and sleet, blizzard.....you name it! For me (smallish and in my 60s) the 2-3 lbs extra were not worth it. And I am a wimp. I hate being cold and wet and dirty when I get to my destination. Never had a issue with what I had :) Maybe I should also mention that last year I thought I had pared things down enough (13 lbs?) and then purged and sent every single extra piece of clothing/paper/you name it on to my hostel in Madrid. And it was heaven with only 10 lbs max on my back!! I didn't miss a thing. AND the weather was COLD and very wet.
 

Samarkand

Member
Camino(s) past & future
January 2019, French Camino
I


Well.....hiking in March, I had rain, sleet, snow, driving wind with rain and sleet, blizzard.....you name it! For me (smallish and in my 60s) the 2-3 lbs extra were not worth it. And I am a wimp. I hate being cold and wet and dirty when I get to my destination. Never had a issue with what I had :) Maybe I should also mention that last year I thought I had pared things down enough (13 lbs?) and then purged and sent every single extra piece of clothing/paper/you name it on to my hostel in Madrid. And it was heaven with only 10 lbs max on my back!! I didn't miss a thing. AND the weather was COLD and very wet.
Ah, got it. This js my 4-seasons list. I assume if I walk in March I'll leave the sweater, one long-sleeve shirt, the 2nd pair of gloves, and a few other smaller things.
 

loumura

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugues March 2019
There have been several questions from new pilgrims about what things to take. So, I'm starting a new thread to address them, and have decided to post my packing list (even though it feels a bit like putting my laundry out on display). I am not seeking feedback on the list - rather it is for information of anyone who wants to see what I have settled on after 6 Caminos. (My first camino was not much different, because I followed the good advice from this forum.)

This list is suitable for virtually all weather conditions. I would make some minor adjustments for walking in January or July, but not much. I tend to walk in March-April or Oct-Nov, when it is necessary to be prepared for any weather conditions. I know some items that I could save weight on, if necessary, but I am happy with this collection. I am quite comfortable carrying this weight (between 5 and 6 kg before water and snacks) and it provides me with everything I am likely to need. I do not want to be searching for a pharmacy when I am not feeling well, or looking for rain gear when it is raining!)

My approach to clothing is to have a walking outfit that consists of several light layers that can be put on or taken off to suit any conditions. Rain jacket and pants provide the ultimate protection against wind, rain or cold. Then I have an evening outfit, including down vest, that I wear to bed as well. The day outfit can stay a bit dirty and the evening outfit stays pretty clean, so my daily laundry is just socks and underwear.

I take a very lightweight sleeping bag, and have wool or down clothes I can also wear at night. I find that my body gets chilled easily when it is tired from walking all day, and I prefer not to risk being cold at night.

The attached list adds up to 5.3 kg (just under 12 pounds). In practice, a few odds and ends always creep into my back before departure, but those would be very small items like snacks, notes or extra toiletries that can/will be discarded. My pack is always under 6 kg, without water. I typically carry two 500 mL bottles of water and another 500 mL emergency drink in the bottom of my pack.
Thanks so much for sharing your list! Very helpful to us as we plan our March camino. Concise and uncomplicated...best I've found on site and true to keeping the weight to a minimum.
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
Great list! (The initial list -- the photo looks like way too much for me)
If you examine the two lists, item by item, you will find they are almost the same. @Samarkand has just 1 more quick dry shirt than I do, but I have a down vest. The way a "list" is presented can affect the first impression.
This js my 4-seasons list. I assume if I walk in March I'll leave the sweater, one long-sleeve shirt,
I would take the same items in March. Be aware that things might not dry overnight.
 
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min200

Member
Thank you folks for this thread, it has been as entertaining as it is informative! Wifey and I are starting our first Camino in April and are just now looking at our packing lists so this is really helpful!
 

Paul J W

Paul J
Camino(s) past & future
Miscellaneous camino routes since 2000.
Interesting and informative thread. Thank you.
For me survival (whenever walking) is a prime consideration. To that end I always carry a survival bag, good torch, whistle and compass; pain killers too. Not being melodramatic here but know all too well in upland areas, in particular in winter months, inadvertent deviation from the waymarked route does happen!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Lourdes to Burgos, Oct 2018
Burgos to Santiago, May 2019, D.V.
As a first-timer, I've been seeking feedback from those who have "been there, done that." I've attempted to compile my own packing list from what others have suggested. What I have here needs tweaking, but when I weighed a couple days ago, it was about 13.6 lbs. I'll try to get it down to about 11 lbs. before I leave in May. Any suggestions are appreciated!
UV sleeves. Didn't think of that. For most of October I would often start out on a cool morning with a long-sleeved merino top, and then have to find someplace to change over to my t-shirt by 11AM, didn't like my arms getting hot. Sounds like a good solution for that issue.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Lourdes to Burgos, Oct 2018
Burgos to Santiago, May 2019, D.V.
I love reading lists and make them!

If I may add my two cents:

Weight: at the moment (age, level of fitness) I'm comfortable to carry 10Kg (with food and water), when I was younger and fitter I could carry more. So, even if I want to bring with me a lead ball, the total weight of my pack won't exceed that limit. To do so I have to choose not only what I want to pack, but also the quality (weight) of the gear, usually the lighter the more expensive it gets.

Pack: I hate having things hanging outside the pack, so everything must stay inside, which also includes my walking boots for the days in which I want to walk with sandals and, of course, food or extras I buy along the way. Therefore, I always take into account the extra space I may need when choosing the right pack. I love backpacks, I have 15 of them form 10l to 100l!

Comfort: everyone is different, for example I need to drink a cup of tea as soon as I wake up, or else I'll be grumpy all day. Therefore, I always have with me a cup, tea bags and sugar and a small alcohol stove, regardless if I'm camping or if I stay in hotel. Sunny weather on me is harder than cold weather, so I bring a hat and a cap, to switch them when they are too sweaty. I wear prescription glasses, so I take with me 2 pairs usually 1 pair with clear lenses and 1 pair with dark/photochromic ones. My skin gets easily sunburned and chapped, so lip balm and cream (I use PREP) are a necessity.

The "just in case": when I decide if I may or may not need something I consider what the consequence of not having that item ready would be vs. the weight. Would I want to go and look of a pharmacy when I have a strong migraine or diarrhea or do I rather have with me few pills? Would I really want to walk for an X amount of time without water rather than carry an extra 1/2 liter? Do I want to walk with a broken shoelace for X Km to save the weight of a piece of string? And so on.

To sum it up, for me walking must be a pleasure not a torture; once I tested the weight I'm comfortable carry, I strictly stick to it and pack accordingly not just for necessities, but also for comfort.
Small stove with fuel tablets and titanium pot for next time. Thought about it before I left but decided it would be overkill. Boy was I wrong. Next time I'll be prepared.
 
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Paul J W

Paul J
Camino(s) past & future
Miscellaneous camino routes since 2000.
. . . one other point, from not inconsiderable personal experience: additional items of clothing, toiletries and such can (nearly) always purchased en route (street markets for bargains!) as you will seldom be that distant from “civilisation” . . .
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
Small stove with fuel tablets and titanium pot for next time. Thought about it but decided it would be overkill. Boy was I wrong, especially as I refuse to drink anything from those coffee machines.
What? You don't love "cafe con leche"? :eek:
I actually look to make sure they have one of those machines before I order coffee in Spain! :)
 

Oravasaari

Helsinki, Finland
Camino(s) past & future
2015 SJpdP to Fistera, 2016 Leon to Fistera, 2017 CF-Salvadore-Primitivo, 2018 CF run/walk
Great post! Starting with 5-6kg as a basis, then even the few "extras" people often want to take it won't result in a pack that only a mule could handle for 850km.
I went to the extreme last June when I took only a 6l Osprey Rev 6 running pack with a packout weight of under 3kg inc 1 litre of water in bladder. I was running some sections though! It proved to me ( at least) that approx 2 kg of dry contents is possible in summer with only a minimalist sleeping bag and one change of clothes. I'd take the small pack again as it leaves the lower back exposed and is therefore less sweaty. A mini pack also makes you take less!
Such minimalism may only be possible after multiple caminos and becoming comfortable with leaving all the just-in-case and nice-to-have items at home. I understand it may not be for everyone though, especially those used to hiking/camping who happily yomp 30km with a 20kg pack. But for me, carrying an extra kilo for the best part of 1000km is the equivalent of carrying 1 tonne for 1 km energy-wise.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Lourdes to Burgos, Oct 2018
Burgos to Santiago, May 2019, D.V.
What? You don't love "cafe con leche"? :eek:
I actually look to make sure they have one of those machines before I order coffee in Spain! :)
I'm talking about those coffee vending machines. I don't even want to see what they look like inside. That was all that was available in the albergue in San Juan d'Ortega, and the next bar was 4k away.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I'm talking about those coffee vending machines. I don't even want to see what they look like inside. That was all that was available in the albergue in San Juan d'Ortega, and the next bar was 4k away.
Oh, I see, and agree completely!
I refuse to have coffee at all when I see one of those. o_O
 

Just_Me

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portugues (April 2019)
. . . one other point, from not inconsiderable personal experience: additional items of clothing, toiletries and such can (nearly) always purchased en route (street markets for bargains!) as you will seldom be that distant from “civilisation” . . .
this is good to remember for us Australians - we are not used to the luxury of having towns so close together
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
There have been several questions from new pilgrims about what things to take. So, I'm starting a new thread to address them, and have decided to post my packing list (even though it feels a bit like putting my laundry out on display). I am not seeking feedback on the list - rather it is for information of anyone who wants to see what I have settled on after 6 Caminos. (My first camino was not much different, because I followed the good advice from this forum.)

This list is suitable for virtually all weather conditions. I would make some minor adjustments for walking in January or July, but not much. I tend to walk in March-April or Oct-Nov, when it is necessary to be prepared for any weather conditions. I know some items that I could save weight on, if necessary, but I am happy with this collection. I am quite comfortable carrying this weight (between 5 and 6 kg before water and snacks) and it provides me with everything I am likely to need. I do not want to be searching for a pharmacy when I am not feeling well, or looking for rain gear when it is raining!)

My approach to clothing is to have a walking outfit that consists of several light layers that can be put on or taken off to suit any conditions. Rain jacket and pants provide the ultimate protection against wind, rain or cold. Then I have an evening outfit, including down vest, that I wear to bed as well. The day outfit can stay a bit dirty and the evening outfit stays pretty clean, so my daily laundry is just socks and underwear.

I take a very lightweight sleeping bag, and have wool or down clothes I can also wear at night. I find that my body gets chilled easily when it is tired from walking all day, and I prefer not to risk being cold at night.

The attached list adds up to 5.3 kg (just under 12 pounds). In practice, a few odds and ends always creep into my back before departure, but those would be very small items like snacks, notes or extra toiletries that can/will be discarded. My pack is always under 6 kg, without water. I typically carry two 500 mL bottles of water and another 500 mL emergency drink in the bottom of my pack.
There is one important thing missing, IMO, though not for the Camino Francés. Just to alert you that @C clearly has politely declined our invitation to join the Electric Coil Club. In fact, she was so sorry she had brought one along last year that she gave it to me. Believe it or not, my own coil had fizzled out just the day before, how is that for synchronicity?

In seriousness, I would say that for any camino with long distances between stops and lots of towns where the bars don’t open in response to the few pilgrims dribbling by, the coil is a high-value item for caffeine-addicted peregrinos. https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/the-electric-coil-changed-my-life-on-the-camino.19167/#post-142134
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
I would say that for any camino with long distances between stops and lots of towns where the bars don’t open in response to the few pilgrims dribbling by, the coil is a high-value item
I wouldn't mind having it with me but so far I've found that I didn't use it much and besides, I found that the coffee I made with it was not a worthwhile substitute for the real thing.

So, I decide to live dangerously and face the possibility that I actually might not get coffee one morning! :eek:
 
Camino(s) past & future
June 2013, June 2014, Oct 2014, May 2015
There have been several questions from new pilgrims about what things to take. So, I'm starting a new thread to address them, and have decided to post my packing list (even though it feels a bit like putting my laundry out on display). I am not seeking feedback on the list - rather it is for information of anyone who wants to see what I have settled on after 6 Caminos. (My first camino was not much different, because I followed the good advice from this forum.)

This list is suitable for virtually all weather conditions. I would make some minor adjustments for walking in January or July, but not much. I tend to walk in March-April or Oct-Nov, when it is necessary to be prepared for any weather conditions. I know some items that I could save weight on, if necessary, but I am happy with this collection. I am quite comfortable carrying this weight (between 5 and 6 kg before water and snacks) and it provides me with everything I am likely to need. I do not want to be searching for a pharmacy when I am not feeling well, or looking for rain gear when it is raining!)

My approach to clothing is to have a walking outfit that consists of several light layers that can be put on or taken off to suit any conditions. Rain jacket and pants provide the ultimate protection against wind, rain or cold. Then I have an evening outfit, including down vest, that I wear to bed as well. The day outfit can stay a bit dirty and the evening outfit stays pretty clean, so my daily laundry is just socks and underwear.

I take a very lightweight sleeping bag, and have wool or down clothes I can also wear at night. I find that my body gets chilled easily when it is tired from walking all day, and I prefer not to risk being cold at night.

The attached list adds up to 5.3 kg (just under 12 pounds). In practice, a few odds and ends always creep into my back before departure, but those would be very small items like snacks, notes or extra toiletries that can/will be discarded. My pack is always under 6 kg, without water. I typically carry two 500 mL bottles of water and another 500 mL emergency drink in the bottom of my pack.
Appreciate your well compiled list. Nice to learn and compare. Thank you.
 

grantaellis

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese (March 2019)
This is my winter packing list (below). It weights about 5.5kg without the clothes on my back (included in the picture), food and water. It fit into a 30L backpack.

For warmer seasons, just remove the warmer items and switch to very light jacket.

View attachment 50181
Thanks for this visual - lists are great BUT to see the gear is tangible :)
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(x4), Fisterra/Muxía(x2), VdlP, Jerusalem, VF, Walsingham,
C inglés. Next: Gd St Bernard to Rome
In seriousness, I would say that for any camino with long distances between stops and lots of towns where the bars don’t open in response to the few pilgrims dribbling by, the coil is a high-value item for caffeine-addicted peregrinos. https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/the-electric-coil-changed-my-life-on-the-camino.19167/#post-142134
I love the electric coil, even had one since my student days in Madrid ;) Have never taken one on any Camino though : you’re in the middle of nowhere, no cafe open, no .... nothing so.....where do you plug the thing??? Have I missed something? :D
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(x4), Fisterra/Muxía(x2), VdlP, Jerusalem, VF, Walsingham,
C inglés. Next: Gd St Bernard to Rome
There have been several questions from new pilgrims about what things to take. So, I'm starting a new thread to address them, and have decided to post my packing list (even though it feels a bit like putting my laundry out on display). I am not seeking feedback on the list - rather it is for information of anyone who wants to see what I have settled on after 6 Caminos. (My first camino was not much different, because I followed the good advice from this forum.)

This list is suitable for virtually all weather conditions. I would make some minor adjustments for walking in January or July, but not much. I tend to walk in March-April or Oct-Nov, when it is necessary to be prepared for any weather conditions. I know some items that I could save weight on, if necessary, but I am happy with this collection. I am quite comfortable carrying this weight (between 5 and 6 kg before water and snacks) and it provides me with everything I am likely to need. I do not want to be searching for a pharmacy when I am not feeling well, or looking for rain gear when it is raining!)

My approach to clothing is to have a walking outfit that consists of several light layers that can be put on or taken off to suit any conditions. Rain jacket and pants provide the ultimate protection against wind, rain or cold. Then I have an evening outfit, including down vest, that I wear to bed as well. The day outfit can stay a bit dirty and the evening outfit stays pretty clean, so my daily laundry is just socks and underwear.

I take a very lightweight sleeping bag, and have wool or down clothes I can also wear at night. I find that my body gets chilled easily when it is tired from walking all day, and I prefer not to risk being cold at night.

The attached list adds up to 5.3 kg (just under 12 pounds). In practice, a few odds and ends always creep into my back before departure, but those would be very small items like snacks, notes or extra toiletries that can/will be discarded. My pack is always under 6 kg, without water. I typically carry two 500 mL bottles of water and another 500 mL emergency drink in the bottom of my pack.
Love your list @C clearly. I would say that as mine is practically the same! 😀
 
Camino(s) past & future
Lourdes to Burgos, Oct 2018
Burgos to Santiago, May 2019, D.V.
There is one important thing missing, IMO, though not for the Camino Francés. Just to alert you that @C clearly has politely declined our invitation to join the Electric Coil Club. In fact, she was so sorry she had brought one along last year that she gave it to me. Believe it or not, my own coil had fizzled out just the day before, how is that for synchronicity?

In seriousness, I would say that for any camino with long distances between stops and lots of towns where the bars don’t open in response to the few pilgrims dribbling by, the coil is a high-value item for caffeine-addicted peregrinos. https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/the-electric-coil-changed-my-life-on-the-camino.19167/#post-142134
Yup. The first thing I ordered (from Ebay, they're difficult to track down these days) when I got back. I think I read in S. Yates' book that you don't want to drink anything from those coffee machines.
I took my own coffee & filters with me along with a mug, but many albergues (and all the hotels, for that matter), did not have facilities for boiling water. We Americans tend to take a coffee maker in our hotel rooms for granted, and hotels and B&Bs in the UK almost always provide tea & coffee making facilities. Not so in Spain, so best to be prepared.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Lourdes to Burgos, Oct 2018
Burgos to Santiago, May 2019, D.V.
I love the electric coil, even had one since my student days in Madrid ;) Have never taken one on any Camino though : you’re in the middle of nowhere, no cafe open, no .... nothing so.....where do you plug the thing??? Have I missed something? :D
Plug in the same outlet that you use to charge your phone. Every albergue has a few of those.
 

Bobcat77

CF starts 23 March SJPdP
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances in 22 March (2019)
NOW, after years of hearing it, I understand Kris Kristopherson's reference to his 'cleanest dirty shirt'.
He must have done something like a Camino (with 0.8673 kilos on his back excluding water, FSO.)
While this thread is very informative, it's not a competition folks. All the technical doo-dah is exhausting. It's a pilgrimage, remember? Well, for me it is anyway.
Relevant tonight, as tomorrow is Ash Wednesday, the start of Lent, 40 days of preparation for Easter. 😇
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(x4), Fisterra/Muxía(x2), VdlP, Jerusalem, VF, Walsingham,
C inglés. Next: Gd St Bernard to Rome
While this thread is very informative, it's not a competition folks. All the technical doo-dah is exhausting. It's a pilgrimage, remember?
@bobcat, when I first discovered this forum, prior to my first Camino, I recoiled in horror on seeing the many threads on equipment :eek: I stopped reading any of it: It didn’t concern me, i was not a walker, I was only going on a pilgrimage and it was to be a one-off.
It is only now, after many thousands of kms walked, that I am interested in, say, finding out what people’s views are on merino tops or hiking umbrellas or the merits of a poncho versus a rain jacket!
This thread is very helpful for people who don’t know (and worry about) what to take with them. (And there are many). It is also interesting to serial camino-ers who can maybe find something new....
Those who - like me back then - don’t feel it concerns them I am sure will have stopped reading by now.;):D
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
A chance find, for a friend, was a ladies’ wine coloured Crane merino short zip, long sleeved top for €10.00 the other day. Too big for her. Size 16. Actually, the style is unisex in my opinion.
Anyone in Ireland who wants it can have it. I will drop it in to the Camino Society office this coming Friday. I will ask the volunteer on duty to give it to the first person who asks, or raffle it at the next event, whichever happens first.
Donation can be made to a favourite charity in lieu of payment.
What goes around... Although, a saying from my childhood: only cast your bread upon the waters when the tide is coming in, is really just a Scottish way of laughing at ourselves, and the music-hall caricature of us. Like the beggar who climbed three flights of stairs in an Aberdeen tenement, knocked on a door and asked the lady if she could spare tuppence for a bed. Her reply: I’d have to see it first.
Gone! It found a new owner in the Camino office in town. It was serendipity, a person needed something to cheer her up, and the top brought a great big smile!
 
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Bobcat77

CF starts 23 March SJPdP
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances in 22 March (2019)
Thanks @ domigee. I too have learned a lot here and there's lots in my pack specifically because I read about it on the forum, even a members badge! I start in 2 weeks. Getting slightly nervous, or is that excitement I feel.
I have to compliment and express my love & gratitude to my wife and all the non-walking husbands and wives who support our efforts on Camino. We haven't been apart for 6 weeks since .... over 40 years!!!
Robert
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
Thanks @ domigee. I too have learned a lot here and there's lots in my pack specifically because I read about it on the forum, even a members badge! I start in 2 weeks. Getting slightly nervous, or is that excitement I feel.
I have to compliment and express my love & gratitude to my wife and all the non-walking husbands and wives who support our efforts on Camino. We haven't been apart for 6 weeks since .... over 40 years!!!
Robert
Wishing you the best camino experience. I can imagine the apprehensiveness at your separation, but you know, with the option to whatsup (as a friend of mine from Poland insists on calling it! ) you will be as near as you can be, under the circumstances!
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(x4), Fisterra/Muxía(x2), VdlP, Jerusalem, VF, Walsingham,
C inglés. Next: Gd St Bernard to Rome
Thanks @ domigee. I too have learned a lot here and there's lots in my pack specifically because I read about it on the forum, even a members badge! I start in 2 weeks. Getting slightly nervous, or is that excitement I feel.
I have to compliment and express my love & gratitude to my wife and all the non-walking husbands and wives who support our efforts on Camino. We haven't been apart for 6 weeks since .... over 40 years!!!
Robert
Very exciting! Buen camino @Bobcat77 ! 4 weeks to go for me...
 

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