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My Camino Del Norte back in 2018

Ivan Motlokhov

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Did: Camino Portugues, Camino Del Norte
Going to do: Camino Frances, Camino Primitivo
This is going to be a story. Even though I finished my Del Norte in September 2018, my report is not ready yet. So I'm going to be creating it in real time, dropping a couple of messages (which equals to a one day of my Journey) a week, tops.

Preface

Well... here we go.. It's been a little over 4 years since I first found out about Camino de Santiago from the movie called "The Way", starring Martin Sheen. You probably heard of it.

Anyway, my life has drastically changed since I came back from Del Norte. Now I got a job that I like, a girl I love and a couple of hobbies/dreams I keep pursuing. And it's all thanks to one of the biggest hobby in my life - English, which, after 4 years, I can now speak fluent (I would say so...). But l'm still learning, so please bear with my clumsy steps towards perfection.

This journey starts not with a purchasing tickets, but with a termination of my employment contract. That was a job I really hated. Well, bygones be bygones, and by the end of 2017 I eventually got tired of the endless attempts to reconcile work and my two hobbies, vocals and English, which were so crucial for me. Even taking into account that I was single in those days and had my spare time only for myself. But it wasn't enough to be happy. I had a feeling that I was loosing a touch with my purpose. And I didn't want to loose a sight of the things that matter the most. So I quit.

"If you don't act on life, life has a habit of acting on you. The days slip into weeks, the weeks slip into months and the months slip into years. Pretty soon it's all over and you're left with nothing more than a heart filled with regret over a life half lived. © Robin Sharma

What's next?

Four months of sitting on my butt, learning English, with rare weekends. TV series, books, writing down a thousands of phrases, pacing back and forth in apartment I rented specifically for this occasion. I swear I learn at least 2-3 thousand of a new words for that period... And the goal was pretty straightforward: to speak as freely as possible to get a new job in the same field but the company should have been international or it could have been a Russian company but with the foreign clients. Got to say that I hadn't even thought about doing Camino these days.. The final goal of what I'd been doing was kinda of a EuroTrip for a two or three months, communicating with people as much as possible, developing confidence and fluency, getting myself ready for a hypothetical interview.

Money

Money is always a question. I'd earned some before I quit. But also was planning to busk (playing on my guitar and singing on streets) while I'm there to support my wallet. I know what you might think... Why not just taking English classes? Well, I got an answer to that question. Those lessons, as I think, are not really worth the money spent. The progress is so slow you may start getting nervous at some point. So I nip the idea of lessons in the bud. I needed an intensive course and there's nothing better than sit yourself on a butt and work hard for, say, 8-10 hours a day.

At that time I was also taking vocal lessons to improve my vocal skills to look and sound better while busking... But unfortunately, after 4 months of practicing I did not feel like I was able to sing with the mike. I had to change my plan...
 

Disey

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (May 2017)
This is going to be a story. Even though I finished my Del Norte in September 2018, my report is not ready yet. So I'm going to be creating it in real time, dropping a couple of messages (which equals to a one day of my Journey) a week, tops.

Preface

Well... here we go.. It's been a little over 4 years since I first found out about Camino de Santiago from the movie called "The Way", starring Martin Sheen. You probably heard of it.

Anyway, my life has drastically changed since I came back from Del Norte. Now I got a job that I like, a girl I love and a couple of hobbies/dreams I keep pursuing. And it's all thanks to one of the biggest hobby in my life - English, which, after 4 years, I can now speak fluent (I would say so...). But l'm still learning, so please bear with my clumsy steps towards perfection.

This journey starts not with a purchasing tickets, but with a termination of my employment contract. That was a job I really hated. Well, bygones be bygones, and by the end of 2017 I eventually got tired of the endless attempts to reconcile work and my two hobbies, vocals and English, which were so crucial for me. Even taking into account that I was single in those days and had my spare time only for myself. But it wasn't enough to be happy. I had a feeling that I was loosing a touch with my purpose. And I didn't want to loose a sight of the things that matter the most. So I quit.

"If you don't act on life, life has a habit of acting on you. The days slip into weeks, the weeks slip into months and the months slip into years. Pretty soon it's all over and you're left with nothing more than a heart filled with regret over a life half lived. © Robin Sharma

What's next?

Four months of sitting on my butt, learning English, with rare weekends. TV series, books, writing down a thousands of phrases, pacing back and forth in apartment I rented specifically for this occasion. I swear I learn at least 2-3 thousand of a new words for that period... And the goal was pretty straightforward: to speak as freely as possible to get a new job in the same field but the company should have been international or it could have been a Russian company but with the foreign clients. Got to say that I hadn't even thought about doing Camino these days.. The final goal of what I'd been doing was kinda of a EuroTrip for a two or three months, communicating with people as much as possible, developing confidence and fluency, getting myself ready for a hypothetical interview.

Money

Money is always a question. I'd earned some before I quit. But also was planning to busk (playing on my guitar and singing on streets) while I'm there to support my wallet. I know what you might think... Why not just taking English classes? Well, I got an answer to that question. Those lessons, as I think, are not really worth the money spent. The progress is so slow you may start getting nervous at some point. So I nip the idea of lessons in the bud. I needed an intensive course and there's nothing better than sit yourself on a butt and work hard for, say, 8-10 hours a day.

At that time I was also taking vocal lessons to improve my vocal skills to look and sound better while busking... But unfortunately, after 4 months of practicing I did not feel like I was able to sing with the mike. I had to change my plan...
Your English is very good! I’m looking forward to the next instalment. I wish I was as dedicated in improving my Spanish as you were in your English.
 

Ivan Motlokhov

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Did: Camino Portugues, Camino Del Norte
Going to do: Camino Frances, Camino Primitivo
Well thank for your warm responses t56ny and Disey! This is definitely gonna keep me motivated!

Let's continue where we left off last time...

Matter of choice

2018, June, and here I was, wondering, what to do next? But life made a decision for me. While I was thoroughly immersed in my English learning stuff Russia was in the middle of the FIFA World Cup and I figured why not to let things slide, why shouldn’t I party a little watching games with my pals, drinking beer, chanting Russian National Anthem on the streets. When all the drinking was over (that took me around a month) I was back to square one. I still felt unsure of my vocal skills but at the same time I was determined to quench my wanderlust.

I love Europe, everything about it... Tiny streets, cozy cafes where you can order a cup of coffee and a sandwich for 2 or 3 euros (depends on a country of course), the sea is almost in every country, and a lot of nice people. I don't wanna be offensive towards people from Russia, but I would not say our people travel a lot. Well, not quite right actually, we travel a lot but it's not like we're surrounded by a lot of other countries and the only way to communicate properly is a knowledge of English. Besides, the size of Europe is far less than Russia so I think people were just forced to communicate by circumstances and they know how to be nice and they are nice, that's my point.

Anyways, while I was thinking about where and when to start I accidentally came across the old photos from my first Camino, Portugal one. The solution turned out to be so simple... Why didn't I thinks about Camino in the first place? It's so easy, I could travel, I could enjoy the nature, I could speak English as much as I'd like to for a long period of time! It's more than a month we're talking, damn it! That could work and give me a lot of experience and joy. But what Camino should I have taken? Frances or Del Norte? I started to explore the issue and chose Del Norte cause a lot of folks from different web forums were recommending it due to their experience, they were saying it's usually less crowded in August and September than the French one. It was decided - I was gonna do Camino Del Norte! Wow! Exciting!!!
 

Disey

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (May 2017)
Thanks for the second instaIment Ivan! My next Camino is going to be the del Norte (did the Camino Frances in 2017) and looking forward to more of your story. Di
 

Ivan Motlokhov

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Did: Camino Portugues, Camino Del Norte
Going to do: Camino Frances, Camino Primitivo
Tickets, planing and shopping

This is not going to be the most interesting part of this story. To save some money I decided to buy cheap RyanAir tickets and fly from Riga, Latvia, instead of getting a direct fight from Saint Petersburg as it was about twice the price. There was no way to get to the beginning point of Del Norte (which was Irun, small Spanish frontier town) straight from the place where I flew off, so my plane took off from Riga and landed in Girona, beautiful old city not so far from Barcelona. My plan was to cross the border with France as I'd never been there and take a couple of buses or BlaBlaCars to get to the place where I could start with the Credencial in my jacket. I'd also been hoping to visit Andorra because you know, chances are pretty slim one would find oneself around these Europe's small countries like Andorra, Luxembourg, Monaco or Liechtenstein so I figured, why not?

I spent one amazing day in Girona, all those tiny streets, majestic Castle and beautiful bridges. On a plane from Riga I met a nice Russian girl and we even met later in Girona, but I was all about my Camino that day and wasn't in the mood for hitting on anyone, so we had a nice walk and that's it.

Shame I had to move on to Perpignan, where I though I could buy a small travel guitar for my trip. I have to mention that I definitely knew more than 100 songs in English by that moment and hoped to meet some cool folks and to sing with them as much as my throat allowed.

So it was Friday when I embarked for France on the BlaBlaCar I booked back in Russia. My plan was to get the guitar, take a look around and take a bus or a car to Biarritz or, if there weren't any, to Toulouse and then to Biarritz. But who knew that unfortunately online shop where I'd ordered at would screw up. And hey, okay, that was my bad I didn't find out about delivery days... Turned out they don't deliver on the weekends. I waited till 6 PM, made another call and they said the delivery guys couldn't make it to a Hotel I specified in my order and the next delivery was only on Monday. What the heck? All right, I couldn’t afford myself three nights in Perpignan as it could cost around 80 Euros with drinks and food. I tried to find another music store in the area but the best offers they had were 300 Euros for definitely not small and travel guitars.. The one I ordered before was for 65 Euros, there's indeed a difference... The hell with that, I'm gonna go as I am. Oh, and Andorra - yeah, unfortunately the driver I made a deal with canceled... I let it go and booked a seat on BlaBlaCar to Toulouse hoping to walk around the city as it's supposed to be very nice... and it was!

I was half asleep in the back seat almost all the way to Toulouse with a nice French couple in the front. Guys were really nice, I remember some soft music playing and one of the songs by Dua Lipa - One Kiss, which became an earworm for the rest of my Camino. I didn't mind, I liked Dua Lipa, the acoustic version of Scared to be lonely was one of my favorite songs in spring 2018. In two and a half hours they got me to the destination point and there I was, in the airport of Toulouse, wondering if I should get a room or stay at the airport for free... Well, I chose the second. Don't ask me why, I'm just a crazy traveller. I had a sleeping bag and a rug so what else did I need? Besides, it's around 25 Euros extra and that was around two days of my Camino. In the end of my journey I thanked myself for every time I decided to save some money, even taking into account that I had to stay in Madrid's airport for two nights because all my cash was gone and I didn't want to start using my credit card, but we'll get to that in a bit more than 40 days.

Early morning I got my ass off the airport bench and went on a tram ride to the city centre. It turned out to be quite nice and again, I wish I had more time, but all the trip was already planned and I had the ticket back from Santiago... Next time, I though to myself, I'm gonna have one way ticket... Anyway, I had to get to the bus station. The bus station was just next to the Railway Station, Gare de Toulouse-Matabiau. Built more than a hundred years ago, so beautiful I couldn’t resist and had to stay there for a while just staring at it... But my bus was there, so I got on it and went to Biarritz. Pretty cozy ride, the only annoying thing was a bunch of students screaming and trying to make fun of my last name for like 5 min after I gave it to a bus driver to be checked in. But the whole vibe was great, they had a lot of surfboards and there was something about it... just riding with ones who were gonna surf sunny beaches of one of the nicest resorts in France. I even got some sleep.
 
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Ivan Motlokhov

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Did: Camino Portugues, Camino Del Norte
Going to do: Camino Frances, Camino Primitivo
Zero day

Alright folks, enough foreplay. Camino Del Norte, let's get down to it!

Moving ahead, let's just say the first day was kinda not the way I'd dreamed it would be. And who's fault was that? Of course mine... I really didn't think this through and didn't bother to throw some Paracetamol into my bag when I was packing back in Russia... But okay, where was I...

Biarritz, I got off the bus and decided to wander around the town for some time. Oh, guys, it's so beautiful over there... Small cozy streets with fallen leaves. It hard to explain how nice it was, just walking there, just staring at those posh houses and villas without a single thought in your head... You probably know what I'm talking about, don't ya?

I was craving the coolness of Bay of Biscay so I reached the beach and went swimming immediately. The beach and the reefs sticking out of water were one hundred percent worth it. I spend an hour or two there and started thinking where to sleep. I knew it was too late to try crossing Spanish border, Irun was around 30km away from where I was and I got no chance to book anything in Biarritz as the cheapest place could cost me approx. 80 Euros per night, which was totally crazy. So... that was my Biarritz, shame I didn't get a good look around...

I decided to move my ass as close as possible to Irun and camp when it gets dark. I had a small tent I bought in Saint Petersburg, I wasn't going to use it often, just for emergency cases like that. So there I was, somewhere on a border between Francia and Espana, moving forward until the sun goes down so I could camp without attracting too much attention to myself and my small green tent.

Suddenly I started getting cold.. what the hell? Then I remembered that every time I get to a place with a climate my body not used to, I have some kind of fever. Some sort of acclimatization... Damn... not now, when I got no place to sleep aaand... oh no, I forgot to pack an antipyretic!

Without any ideas I decided to camp behind some bushes. Folks, It's really kinda hard to pop the tent when you're shivering, but of course I hadn't any other options so I manage to do that and the only cure for my condition I had was 100ml of Cognac. I actually had two small bottles, 100ml each, so I took a deep sip from the one and got myself into a sleeping bag. And there I was, all by myself. But did I feel lonely? Hell no! Even shivering with cold, I felt nothing but freedom, the most incredible feeling a human being capable of.

Somehow I managed to get some sleep that night... But in the morning I didn't feel much better and knew that I couldn’t walk like this. There was around 20km left to Irun. I knew there was a train station in 5-7 km so I had to get up, pack and go... Of course I tried to hit a couple of bars asking for a paracetamol but come on, it's France... nobody gives a damn about speaking English in those areas... And no drug store around... Famous and cozy resort you say? All right, let's get going...

When you're sick, you don't do usual 5-6 km per hour... and in an hour of walking I had to stop and take a sit on a bus stop, I was really cold and even blacked out a couple of times for 5 minutes... In about 40 minutes I pulled it together and continued. After a while I took another little pit stop on a bench and one thing I remember precisely, me, experiencing another fever attack, sitting there and sweating, and monk, approaching with two dogs… I mean it seemed crazy even for me, he was wearing a red robe. Just for fun I imagined I was dead and a monk came to me :D However he did come up to me and asked something not really important to me at that moment, and off he went. I took a picture of him leaving with his dogs to remember.

In about an hour I finally reached that damn train station and got myself a ticket to Irun, which was 10 km away. The ticket cost me 3.30. I still have a photo of that one, cause you know, really unforgettable 24 hours of my life! When I crossed a border it took me not so much time to get to my first Albergue. Well, not quite true actually, the first place I hit was closed but with an announcement glued to the door that Albergue was moved to a place around the corner. Or closed, honestly I don't remember guys. But when I got to the second place it was closed as well. But not permanently closed, the open hours were from 4 PM, so I had to wait with other pilgrims without any intention to befriend someone... No mood at all. I only asked a Korean guy to give me some pills, which were extremely helpful. Funny story about that Korean guy, but later..

When they finally checked us in, I decided to get some booze and fix myself a dinner. Pasta, some meat and a bottle of Champagne made my evening. Hospitalero was a really friendly guy, I offered my Champagne, he introduced Txakolina, local Basque Country wine, to me and other peregrinos. Nice thing I must say, highly recommended! And finally, my Camino started! Based on everything I'd been through that day I figured, every day, even the most rainy, muddy and coldy, should be better than this Zero Fever Day.
 
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Ivan Motlokhov

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Did: Camino Portugues, Camino Del Norte
Going to do: Camino Frances, Camino Primitivo
Day 1 (Part 1)

So, the first day! What kind of day will it be? All I could think of at that time was to start making Camino friends. I distinctly recall my first day on Portugal Camino, I was walking on a wooden walkway along the ocean enjoying my solitude, peering into the distance, small and cozy houses at the right side, and the ocean, great and unexplored, at the left... But this time I wanted to start practicing English, hell I've been learning a lot! Besides, chatting creates the illusion of time going fast. So I picked a pilgrim, a guy, about my age and guess what... he turned out to be from Spain, from Basque Country to be precise and yes, he didn't speak English well... Not my day! But despite the language barrier we got along, he was extremely friendly, offered me a water a couple of times and something to eat. What can I say, it's Camino! All good people from around the globe gather here, it's like a one big ball of positive energy.

He had a small wireless speaker and happened to like Iron Maiden and a lot of other 1980s-90s bands so we were walking country lanes, mountain trails, climbing steep hills and singing along to the rock. Nice start I should say! And then, guess what, we found a dog. My Spanish friend put the dog on a USB cable, he didn't want to just let the good boy go, he said we'd better give it to a local police, they knew what to do with the stray dogs.

Oh, I didn't mention we're going to San Sebastian, one of the most beautiful cities in Basque Country. But to get there we needed to cross a little bay, it's supposed to be very pretty. On the way we met some other pilgrims, also from Spain, and they tried to teach me some Spanish. Don't remember a single word now.. And then it got even better. We started singing my favorite Ed Sheeran's songs together and with all that music reached that nice bay. Folks, I'm finally attaching pictures to this diary, everything is better with pictures.

IMG_0003.JPG

Looks nice, doesn't it? This cute little ferry can move your ass to the other side for just 80 Cents. Wave Hi to my Spanish pal 🖐

And here I am, posing for a picture:

IMG_0004.JPG

Look at these small coastal houses, aren't they nice? I wish I owned one of these...

So we crossed the bay and in about two hours we were entering San Sebastian enjoying the view of the city from the top of the hill:

IMG_0005.JPG

Gorgeous, isn’t it? Wait until you see the next photos, there're a shedload of naked chicks out there. "Don’t distract me with your sexy girls Spain, I'm not falling for that! And not renting a place for a couple of days!" But let's get going.. It was less than a kilometer to our destination point. Albergue was located in the school premises beyond school hours. A school hundred meters from the ocean? With naked girls on a beach even closer? You have got to be kidding me... I was born in the wrong place...

So here we were, standing in a line in front of the second Albergue on our way. Remember I said I had a couple of small bottles of Cognac? The line was pretty long and I remembered I hadn't killed the second one. But it was too hot to drink hard alcohol... So hot I think one could manage to fry an egg on a shovel or you know, pass out... I needed something refreshing, like coke. Why not mix a coke with some Cognac? Sounds refreshing to me! Let's hit a local grocery, which was 50 meters from Albergue's front door.

It was still two hours left until they would let us in, so I killed my little 40% Vol. friend and noticed a girl... with a guitar! Thank God, It was bound to happened sometime! I gave her my name, she gave me hers and we started chatting about music. She turned out to be from Great Britain, lovely accent of course. After a while we were singing together. Then other folks started singing along. That's how parties start! We sang about 20 songs and started getting to know each other. I still got a video of me singing Passenger - Let her go... Not my best gig by the way.... but not my worst either. The key thing is that the real Camino started the way it should. Singing, drinking, smoking, laughing, smiling, all those little things...

Song by song time flew by and the doors opened. Well, and another hour in line, waiting for Hospitalero to check you in. Then of course simple pleasures of life, hot shower, a little nap and unsuccessful attempts to get some Wi-Fi. What's next? In that line where we met, four pilgrims arranged to meet at 8 PM outside the front door, to hit some cafes, get some drinks and something to eat. Zitta, a nice and pretty lady from Hungary, Alessandra, pretty girl from Spain around my age, Andrea, a tall and skinny guy from Rome, also around my age, and Silvia, also pretty and also from Italy.

What about my plans to wander around the city all by myself? Well, I called them off. I had a sense I'd get along with the guys, and I was right... but we'll get to that.
 
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Ivan Motlokhov

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Did: Camino Portugues, Camino Del Norte
Going to do: Camino Frances, Camino Primitivo
Day 1 (Part 2)

So at 8 PM we gathered outside the front door of the Albergue. The plan was to go on a pub crawl, get a dozen of Pinchos, to try as many of them as possible, and get something to drink. Food was delicious, honestly guys, I highly recommend to visit Basque Country and hit these small Pincho Bars. A good half-dozen of those delicacies turned out to be really awesome, not to mention drinks.

Funny thing, one of the guys we met told me about his incredible journey across the whole Russia, from Saint Petersburg to Vladivostok, more than 7000 km on a train with a damn lot of stops. I myself have never been to Vladivostok and I can't think of a single reason why I should visit that city. Well, they have a sea, big deal... I was born in Siberia and I find it more interesting than Far East. But I strayed off topic. Check out us together drinking:

IMG-20180807-WA0010.jpg

Surely, this wasn't the first time I tried Vermouth, but Vermouth in Spain is different from what you can get in Italy, or you know, any other country where you can buy a martini. The most widespread type of Vermouth in Spain is Rosso. Though you'll find dry and bianco-style vermouths, sweet red vermouth is what locals drink, and I was no exception. From that day on Me and this magic potion became companions, I would say best friends, till the end of Camino.

But back to my newly minted Camino friends. Beside the drinking and eating we also had a chance to see some sights, listen to some folks busking (singing in Spanish of course) and take some pictures. I particularly like this one:

IMG-20180807-WA0012.jpg

It was getting dark and we had to get back to Albergue as almost every public Albergue closes at 10 PM, with a few exceptions. And oh, I forgot to mention that this school Albergue was one hundred percent Donativo. Each Peregrino donates as many as he sees fit.

It's a pity I didn't visit old town and Santa Clara Island. But I had a sense if I stayed there for another day, I'd miss something really awesome with the guys I met... Maybe some other time..
 

Ivan Motlokhov

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Did: Camino Portugues, Camino Del Norte
Going to do: Camino Frances, Camino Primitivo
Day 2 (Part 1)

San Sebastian -> Zarautz


Before going to sleep, we arranged to wake up at 5 (oh my... Why do some folks really hate sleep?) and set off to the next place which was supposed to be Zarautz, a small town with a beautiful bay. It's actually funny to call a particular bay on Del Norte "beautiful", they all kinda are... So off we went, walking by the sea, singing, watching cows eating grass behind the fences, chatting and getting to know each other. Andrea turned out to be a great guy who knew a lot of songs.

Bit by bit we were approaching Zarautz. When we started in San Sebastian, there were around dozen of Pilgrims walking side by side on Playa de la Concha, but at some point, when we reached a place called Orio, there were only three of us left, Zitta, Andrea and myself. And here we are, having a nice lunch 15 meters from the small river called Oria:

IMG_20180807_114253.jpg

My memories of yesterday's vermouth had not faded completely, so I ordered one. Ahh, that feeling guys... Sitting with nice folks, drinking sweet Spanish vermouth in the middle of nowhere... but in that moment I hadn't even realize it would have been a lot better with a roll-your-own.

By the way, how often do you see cops drinking at 10 AM? Well, it is not a big deal in Spain, at least Basque Country! That time in Orio I saw the first one.

It was around 5 km left to Zarautz. A sign at one of the crossroads was saying 787 km to Santiago. That's a lot of walking! But when we got to Zarautz, Albergue turned out to be full up... Yeah, I had a tent, but there're three of us, so we decided to go further on seacoast towards the next village. I didn't know the next place was so famous, but we'll get to that..

As you probably know, there's a great web resource Gronze. They have an info on the majority of Albergues on the different Camino. I used it each time an Albergue was fully booked or I got lost. Highly recommended!

Thank God, by the way, they didn't have free beds in that Albergue. Cause later we met two awesomely awesome guys from Italy...

Check out the Promenade!

IMG_0007.jpg

Do you see the black ship?

IMG_0006.jpg
 
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