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2019 Camino Guides

My Camino Experience (Ask me anything)

nailuj

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Norte (starting in mid-August 2018)
#1
Hello there. I wanted to share a few thoughts and things with you guys.
I started my Camino Mid-August (22nd) in Irun and arrived in Santiago on the 23rd of September. During those weeks I met so many amazing people, I've seen lots of beautiful places and it really was an experience someone should have at least once in their lives.

First of all, if you're new or you want to start soon you have propably read this post https://www.caminodesantiago.me/com...ould-not-walk-the-camino-del-norte-pdf.22248/. I have to say that I disagree with almost all of the statements made there.
Language: It's true that english speaking spanish people are rare but english is spoken a lot among other pilgrims. But I started the camino with no spanish knowledge at all, communicating just with hands and feet and ended up being able to communicate with them in spanish. *g*
Hills and Profile: You don't have to have a lot of walking experience before doing the camino. I've read about people here, training for the camino by doing 30k walks each day or walking with packed backpacks. You get more than enough training on the camino itself, so if you are not completely unfit/unhealthy I think you can do it. The first 1 - 1.5 weeks will be tough but I've even met an 89 year old doing all these hills and being very fast at it. ;)
Albergues: There's at least one private and/or municipal albergue every 10 to 15km on this camino (Edit: after checking, sometimes you have to walk 20 to 25km to get to the next albergue) and I never had trouble finding a bed in albergues during my walk. If 10 or 15km is already too much for you you should propably really consider doing a different camino. If you don't rely on albergues you will find even more places to sleep.
Cafes/Bars etc: Are you going to walk the camino and do you plan to stop at 10 bars every day? Then you should propably do the Frances. Seriously, if there is no bar in your stage ahead, just plan ahead and get your food ahead from a supermarket.
Road walking: Yes, there is some road walking and even some days of just walking on asphalt but all in all it didn't really bother me. But this is my personal opinion.
Rain: Lots of people say the north coast is really rainy, however I had only 4 days of rain during my 35 days long journey. But maybe I just had luck.


In Villaviciosa I switched to the Camino Primitivo and I don't regret the switch at all. If you started in Irun and you are still alive arriving in Villaviciosa you should really consider doing the Primitivo since you will have already built up lots of stamina by then. :) The landscape was so amazing on the Primitivo and really different from the del Norte.


I loved the Camino del Norte and the Primitivo. If you are open to meeting new people you will find lots of interesting people.
If you have any questions regarding the Camino del Norte (de la Costa), the Camino Primitivo or anything else feel free to ask. :)

~ Julian
 
Last edited:

Rick M

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
April ('16,'18, '19)
#2
Cafes/Bars etc: Are you going to walk the camino and do you plan to stop at 10 bars every day? Then you should propably do the Frances. Seriously, if there is no bar in your stage ahead, just plan ahead and get your food ahead from a supermarket.
For my wife, at least, this one is a huge issue. No, we don't need five hot coffees followed by five cold beers (or does this follow the 80/20 rule?) every day. What she does need is access to a bathroom at least once in the middle of the walking day. How many days, in your opinion, will this be an issue? I have traced some of the route with google maps, and determined that there are going to be some facility-inspired variations in the route required. I already figured that we would need to take the road from Deba to Markina for that reason alone. What google maps can't tell me is how many of those bathrooms that it thinks are bars, will be open.
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2, El Norte incompleto
#3
Albergues: There's at least one private and/or municipal albergue every 10 to 15km on this camino
I did not find this to be the case on the Norte.
What she does need is access to a bathroom at least once in the middle of the walking day. How many days, in your opinion, will this be an issue?
I was always able to find a bathroom when I needed one on the Norte. I never had to resort to going in the woods.
 

nailuj

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Norte (starting in mid-August 2018)
#4
I did not find this to be the case on the Norte.
I just checked on my Guidebook and yeah, you're right. There are some stages that require you to walk 25km to get to the next albergue. However I was only able to speak for the albergues before Villaviciosa since I left the Norte for the Primitivo there.

I will list those over 20km below:
Villaviciosa - Deva 22.4km
Soto de Luina - Cadavedo 20km
Gontan - Vilalba 21km
Miraz - Sobrado dos Monxes 25.2km
 
Camino(s) past & future
Norte, Primitivo, Plata, Salvador Torres
#7
For my wife, at least, this one is a huge issue. No, we don't need five hot coffees followed by five cold beers (or does this follow the 80/20 rule?) every day. What she does need is access to a bathroom at least once in the middle of the walking day. How many days, in your opinion, will this be an issue? I have traced some of the route with google maps, and determined that there are going to be some facility-inspired variations in the route required. I already figured that we would need to take the road from Deba to Markina for that reason alone. What google maps can't tell me is how many of those bathrooms that it thinks are bars, will be open.
No bars between Deba and Markina, but then there is nothing wrong with woods as bathrooms, is there?
 

Iriebabel

Iriebabel aka Cyborg Turtle
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances April (2018)
Camino Del Norte for April (2019) possible Primitivo
#10
I just checked on my Guidebook and yeah, you're right. There are some stages that require you to walk 25km to get to the next albergue. However I was only able to speak for the albergues before Villaviciosa since I left the Norte for the Primitivo there.

I will list those over 20km below:
Villaviciosa - Deva 22.4km
Soto de Luina - Cadavedo 20km
Gontan - Vilalba 21km
Miraz - Sobrado dos Monxes 25.2km
Can you give a full list of your stages and places you stayed? I am preparing for April 2019. I have bad knees I may have to split some stages in the beginning and for me I have to plan and prepare my knee for the days to come lol
 
Last edited:

Rick M

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
April ('16,'18, '19)
#11
No bars between Deba and Markina, but then there is nothing wrong with woods as bathrooms, is there?
Well, that works for me. According to Connie though, I would need an apparatus of ropes and pulleys for this to be an option for her. I'm trying to keep my pack weight down under 40 kilos.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Norte, Primitivo, Plata, Salvador Torres
#12
Only if you leave your toilet tissue behind.
Is this an aspect qualifying the woods as bathroom? I trust your bathroom does not look like this! (- do not know how to add a funny emoij or whatever these things are called).

Glad to know that there is a bar now between Deba and Markina - had not looked it up again since I walked there 8 years ago. If ever I go there again I can see that I have to update myself carefully....
 

nailuj

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Norte (starting in mid-August 2018)
#13
Can you give a full list of your stages and places you stayed? I am preparing for April 2019. I have bad knees I may have to split some stages in the beginning and for me I have to plan and prepare my knee for the days to come lol
Of course, but I'm not sure whether they are open in April already.
 

Iriebabel

Iriebabel aka Cyborg Turtle
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances April (2018)
Camino Del Norte for April (2019) possible Primitivo
#14
Of course, but I'm not sure whether they are open in April already.
Thank you. I can check on gronze.com if they will be open or check with the individual location .
I appreciate your help
 
Camino(s) past & future
looking into summer 2017
#15
Can you give a full list of your stages and places you stayed? I am preparing for April 2019. I have bad knees I may have to split some stages in the beginning and for me I have to plan and prepare my knee for the days to come lol
I also did this exact Irun-Villaviciosa, then switched to the Primitivo trip. Happy to post my list of locations and distances. I will try to post this tomorrow!
 

Iriebabel

Iriebabel aka Cyborg Turtle
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances April (2018)
Camino Del Norte for April (2019) possible Primitivo
#16
I also did this exact Irun-Villaviciosa, then switched to the Primitivo trip. Happy to post my list of locations and distances. I will try to post this tomorrow!
Yes please I am greatful for any help. This will definately aid in my planning efforts as I am also thinking of switching over to primitive
Thank you
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances April 2018... planning El Salvador & Primitivo
#18
Hello there. I wanted to share a few thoughts and things with you guys.
I started my Camino Mid-August (22nd) in Irun and arrived in Santiago on the 23rd of September. During those weeks I met so many amazing people, I've seen lots of beautiful places and it really was an experience someone should have at least once in their lives.

First of all, if you're new or you want to start soon you have propably read this post https://www.caminodesantiago.me/com...ould-not-walk-the-camino-del-norte-pdf.22248/. I have to say that I disagree with almost all of the statements made there.
Language: It's true that english speaking spanish people are rare but english is spoken a lot among other pilgrims. But I started the camino with no spanish knowledge at all, communicating just with hands and feet and ended up being able to communicate with them in spanish. *g*
Hills and Profile: You don't have to have a lot of walking experience before doing the camino. I've read about people here, training for the camino by doing 30k walks each day or walking with packed backpacks. You get more than enough training on the camino itself, so if you are not completely unfit/unhealthy I think you can do it. The first 1 - 1.5 weeks will be tough but I've even met an 89 year old doing all these hills and being very fast at it. ;)
Albergues: There's at least one private and/or municipal albergue every 10 to 15km on this camino (Edit: after checking, sometimes you have to walk 20 to 25km to get to the next albergue) and I never had trouble finding a bed in albergues during my walk. If 10 or 15km is already too much for you you should propably really consider doing a different camino. If you don't rely on albergues you will find even more places to sleep.
Cafes/Bars etc: Are you going to walk the camino and do you plan to stop at 10 bars every day? Then you should propably do the Frances. Seriously, if there is no bar in your stage ahead, just plan ahead and get your food ahead from a supermarket.
Road walking: Yes, there is some road walking and even some days of just walking on asphalt but all in all it didn't really bother me. But this is my personal opinion.
Rain: Lots of people say the north coast is really rainy, however I had only 4 days of rain during my 35 days long journey. But maybe I just had luck.


In Villaviciosa I switched to the Camino Primitivo and I don't regret the switch at all. If you started in Irun and you are still alive arriving in Villaviciosa you should really consider doing the Primitivo since you will have already built up lots of stamina by then. :) The landscape was so amazing on the Primitivo and really different from the del Norte.


I loved the Camino del Norte and the Primitivo. If you are open to meeting new people you will find lots of interesting people.
If you have any questions regarding the Camino del Norte (de la Costa), the Camino Primitivo or anything else feel free to ask. :)

~ Julian
Hello there. I wanted to share a few thoughts and things with you guys.
I started my Camino Mid-August (22nd) in Irun and arrived in Santiago on the 23rd of September. During those weeks I met so many amazing people, I've seen lots of beautiful places and it really was an experience someone should have at least once in their lives.

First of all, if you're new or you want to start soon you have propably read this post https://www.caminodesantiago.me/com...ould-not-walk-the-camino-del-norte-pdf.22248/. I have to say that I disagree with almost all of the statements made there.
Language: It's true that english speaking spanish people are rare but english is spoken a lot among other pilgrims. But I started the camino with no spanish knowledge at all, communicating just with hands and feet and ended up being able to communicate with them in spanish. *g*
Hills and Profile: You don't have to have a lot of walking experience before doing the camino. I've read about people here, training for the camino by doing 30k walks each day or walking with packed backpacks. You get more than enough training on the camino itself, so if you are not completely unfit/unhealthy I think you can do it. The first 1 - 1.5 weeks will be tough but I've even met an 89 year old doing all these hills and being very fast at it. ;)
Albergues: There's at least one private and/or municipal albergue every 10 to 15km on this camino (Edit: after checking, sometimes you have to walk 20 to 25km to get to the next albergue) and I never had trouble finding a bed in albergues during my walk. If 10 or 15km is already too much for you you should propably really consider doing a different camino. If you don't rely on albergues you will find even more places to sleep.
Cafes/Bars etc: Are you going to walk the camino and do you plan to stop at 10 bars every day? Then you should propably do the Frances. Seriously, if there is no bar in your stage ahead, just plan ahead and get your food ahead from a supermarket.
Road walking: Yes, there is some road walking and even some days of just walking on asphalt but all in all it didn't really bother me. But this is my personal opinion.
Rain: Lots of people say the north coast is really rainy, however I had only 4 days of rain during my 35 days long journey. But maybe I just had luck.


In Villaviciosa I switched to the Camino Primitivo and I don't regret the switch at all. If you started in Irun and you are still alive arriving in Villaviciosa you should really consider doing the Primitivo since you will have already built up lots of stamina by then. :) The landscape was so amazing on the Primitivo and really different from the del Norte.


I loved the Camino del Norte and the Primitivo. If you are open to meeting new people you will find lots of interesting people.
If you have any questions regarding the Camino del Norte (de la Costa), the Camino Primitivo or anything else feel free to ask. :)

~ Julian
Hello there. I wanted to share a few thoughts and things with you guys.
I started my Camino Mid-August (22nd) in Irun and arrived in Santiago on the 23rd of September. During those weeks I met so many amazing people, I've seen lots of beautiful places and it really was an experience someone should have at least once in their lives.

First of all, if you're new or you want to start soon you have propably read this post https://www.caminodesantiago.me/com...ould-not-walk-the-camino-del-norte-pdf.22248/. I have to say that I disagree with almost all of the statements made there.
Language: It's true that english speaking spanish people are rare but english is spoken a lot among other pilgrims. But I started the camino with no spanish knowledge at all, communicating just with hands and feet and ended up being able to communicate with them in spanish. *g*
Hills and Profile: You don't have to have a lot of walking experience before doing the camino. I've read about people here, training for the camino by doing 30k walks each day or walking with packed backpacks. You get more than enough training on the camino itself, so if you are not completely unfit/unhealthy I think you can do it. The first 1 - 1.5 weeks will be tough but I've even met an 89 year old doing all these hills and being very fast at it. ;)
Albergues: There's at least one private and/or municipal albergue every 10 to 15km on this camino (Edit: after checking, sometimes you have to walk 20 to 25km to get to the next albergue) and I never had trouble finding a bed in albergues during my walk. If 10 or 15km is already too much for you you should propably really consider doing a different camino. If you don't rely on albergues you will find even more places to sleep.
Cafes/Bars etc: Are you going to walk the camino and do you plan to stop at 10 bars every day? Then you should propably do the Frances. Seriously, if there is no bar in your stage ahead, just plan ahead and get your food ahead from a supermarket.
Road walking: Yes, there is some road walking and even some days of just walking on asphalt but all in all it didn't really bother me. But this is my personal opinion.
Rain: Lots of people say the north coast is really rainy, however I had only 4 days of rain during my 35 days long journey. But maybe I just had luck.


In Villaviciosa I switched to the Camino Primitivo and I don't regret the switch at all. If you started in Irun and you are still alive arriving in Villaviciosa you should really consider doing the Primitivo since you will have already built up lots of stamina by then. :) The landscape was so amazing on the Primitivo and really different from the del Norte.


I loved the Camino del Norte and the Primitivo. If you are open to meeting new people you will find lots of interesting people.
If you have any questions regarding the Camino del Norte (de la Costa), the Camino Primitivo or anything else feel free to ask. :)

~ Julian
Hi Julian, I enjoyed reading your travels and I’m interested in your thoughts about my trip next year.... I’m planning to walk the exact same route but in Mid April then into May. Do you think that time of year would be ok for Albergues and hostels? I’m not bothered about the weather and I’m sure the Primitivo will be a challenge but I’m definitely interested in it after doing the Frances this April. (Which I totally loved)
Anyway any feedback would be greatly appreciated.
Regs
Nicky
 

nailuj

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Norte (starting in mid-August 2018)
#19
My way on the Camino de la Costa
--- Basque Country

  1. Hendaye - Ulia: 24 km
    I stayed in a nice community which is called "Twelve tribes" or "Doce Tribus". It was just before the youth hostel on the hill before San Sebastian.
  2. Ulia - Zarautz: 25,7 km
    I stayed at the municipal albergue in Zarautz which wasn't in a great condition but I think it was still okay. It is only opened in July and August according to my guidebook though.
  3. Zarautz - Deba: 22 km
    This was a really nice albergue. Its location was in an old renovated train station.
  4. Deba - Markina: 23,9 km
    The municipal albergue was located inside an old monastery. Open from end of March to the beginning of October. There are also other (private) albergues in Markina.
  5. Markina - Gernika/Lumo: 24,9 km
    There was no other place to stay here than a youth hostel. 18 € :/
  6. Gernika - Bilbao: 33,2 km
    This stage was tough, because there is quite a big hill before Bilbao. But arriving in Bilbao felt really good. I stayed at the first albergue when you arrive in Bilbao. I didn't want to keep on walking further. :D
  7. Bilbao - Pobena: 21,8 km
    Stayed at the municipal albergue which was nice and friendly. Open from March to September.
    --- Cantabria
  8. Pobena - El Pontarron: 26,9 km
    Not so nice Albergue, but okay for staying the night. There's nothing but a bar and a supermercado in 1.5 km distance. I liked it but others may not.
  9. El Pontarron - Laredo: 20,7 km
    Stayed at a very nice monastery "Casa de la Trinidad". Very nice, friendly albergue runned by the local Franciscans. Really worth a stay. :)
  10. Laredo - Guemes: 30,4 km
    The famous donativo in Guemes. It has around 90 places and is called "Albergue del Abuelo Peuto". Nice albergue with a nice history.
  11. Guemes - Santander: 15 km
    The 'albergue situation' in Santander is really bad. A look at booking.com is really worth it (you might get a deal for 12 to 15€ if you're lucky). I stayed at the "official" one though (50 places) and it was okay, but really not worth the price of 12€.
  12. Santander - Santilla del Mar: 34,4 km
    The walk to Santilla wasn't that beautiful but it was totally worth it. Santilla del Mar is a really beautiful city. It really has a GoT vibe since the tourism and everything is kept in this "medieval" style. There are a few albergues there and I stayed at one called "El Convento", nice, clean and I can't complain about this one.
  13. Santilla del Mar - Comillas: 22,1 km
    The albergue in Comillas tends to be full very quickly. Open from April to October. The albergue is in an old jail, very cool.
    --- Asturia
  14. Comillas - Colombres: 31,8 km
    The albergue is open from March to October. 123 beds but apparently in July/August reservations are recommended(?).
  15. Colombres - Llanes: 24,9 km
    The view on the way to Llanes was amazing. In Llanes I stayed in the touristic Albergue "La Estacion" which was also inside an old trainstation. It is open from March to November.
  16. Llanes - Pria: 23,8 km
    I stayed at a very nice albergue which was located up on a hill next to a church. It had an amazing view and the building really felt old (in a nice way); I think the hospitalero said it is from the 16th century. Open from May to September.
  17. Pria - Priesca: 39 km
    I went a little crazy on this day and tried to push my limits. I didn't really touch them but in Priesca I passed the albergue "La Rectoral" which was really nice so I stayed there. *g*
  18. Priesca - Amandi (Villaviciosa): 10,5 km
    I had to catch up with some caminofriends so I walked a little shorter this day. We stayed at the Albergue in Amandi. Definitely worth a stay, super friendly hospitaleros and a very nice place. You should make a reservation before though. Open from March to October.
I didn't ever plan more than 2 days ahead and those distances are just the ones I walked. Others may walk more, others less. Those albergues aren't the only ones. :)

Edit: The albergues where I didn't say any opening time are either open all year long or I didn't find any information about it.

I'm gonna post my list about the camino primitivo later.
 

nailuj

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Norte (starting in mid-August 2018)
#20
Do you think that time of year would be ok for Albergues and hostels?
Hello nicky. April to May is good for walking the camino del norte even though it might be a little bit more rainy and not all albergues might be open during this season.

Very good resources for weather are:
https://www.ventusky.com/
https://www.windy.com/

And very good resources on the way itself and on accomondations are:
https://www.gronze.com/ (use google translate to translate it to your desired language)
http://www.wisepilgrim.com/ (great resource, sadly discovered it after I finished my camino and not during it :D)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances April 2018... planning El Salvador & Primitivo
#21
Hello nicky. April to May is good for walking the camino del norte even though it might be a little bit more rainy and not all albergues might be open during this season.

Very good resources for weather are:
https://www.ventusky.com/
https://www.windy.com/

And very good resources on the way itself and on accomondations are:
https://www.gronze.com/ (use google translate to translate it to your desired language)
http://www.wisepilgrim.com/ (great resource, sadly discovered it after I finished my camino and not during it :D)

Thanks for replying, I’ll check the links that you attached :0)
 

Iriebabel

Iriebabel aka Cyborg Turtle
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances April (2018)
Camino Del Norte for April (2019) possible Primitivo
#22
My way on the Camino de la Costa
--- Basque Country

  1. Hendaye - Ulia: 24 km
    I stayed in a nice community which is called "Twelve tribes" or "Doce Tribus". It was just before the youth hostel on the hill before San Sebastian.
  2. Ulia - Zarautz: 25,7 km
    I stayed at the municipal albergue in Zarautz which wasn't in a great condition but I think it was still okay. It is only opened in July and August according to my guidebook though.
  3. Zarautz - Deba: 22 km
    This was a really nice albergue. Its location was in an old renovated train station.
  4. Deba - Markina: 23,9 km
    The municipal albergue was located inside an old monastery. Open from end of March to the beginning of October. There are also other (private) albergues in Markina.
  5. Markina - Gernika/Lumo: 24,9 km
    There was no other place to stay here than a youth hostel. 18 € :/
  6. Gernika - Bilbao: 33,2 km
    This stage was tough, because there is quite a big hill before Bilbao. But arriving in Bilbao felt really good. I stayed at the first albergue when you arrive in Bilbao. I didn't want to keep on walking further. :D
  7. Bilbao - Pobena: 21,8 km
    Stayed at the municipal albergue which was nice and friendly. Open from March to September.
    --- Cantabria
  8. Pobena - El Pontarron: 26,9 km
    Not so nice Albergue, but okay for staying the night. There's nothing but a bar and a supermercado in 1.5 km distance. I liked it but others may not.
  9. El Pontarron - Laredo: 20,7 km
    Stayed at a very nice monastery "Casa de la Trinidad". Very nice, friendly albergue runned by the local Franciscans. Really worth a stay. :)
  10. Laredo - Guemes: 30,4 km
    The famous donativo in Guemes. It has around 90 places and is called "Albergue del Abuelo Peuto". Nice albergue with a nice history.
  11. Guemes - Santander: 15 km
    The 'albergue situation' in Santander is really bad. A look at booking.com is really worth it (you might get a deal for 12 to 15€ if you're lucky). I stayed at the "official" one though (50 places) and it was okay, but really not worth the price of 12€.
  12. Santander - Santilla del Mar: 34,4 km
    The walk to Santilla wasn't that beautiful but it was totally worth it. Santilla del Mar is a really beautiful city. It really has a GoT vibe since the tourism and everything is kept in this "medieval" style. There are a few albergues there and I stayed at one called "El Convento", nice, clean and I can't complain about this one.
  13. Santilla del Mar - Comillas: 22,1 km
    The albergue in Comillas tends to be full very quickly. Open from April to October. The albergue is in an old jail, very cool.
    --- Asturia
  14. Comillas - Colombres: 31,8 km
    The albergue is open from March to October. 123 beds but apparently in July/August reservations are recommended(?).
  15. Colombres - Llanes: 24,9 km
    The view on the way to Llanes was amazing. In Llanes I stayed in the touristic Albergue "La Estacion" which was also inside an old trainstation. It is open from March to November.
  16. Llanes - Pria: 23,8 km
    I stayed at a very nice albergue which was located up on a hill next to a church. It had an amazing view and the building really felt old (in a nice way); I think the hospitalero said it is from the 16th century. Open from May to September.
  17. Pria - Priesca: 39 km
    I went a little crazy on this day and tried to push my limits. I didn't really touch them but in Priesca I passed the albergue "La Rectoral" which was really nice so I stayed there. *g*
  18. Priesca - Amandi (Villaviciosa): 10,5 km
    I had to catch up with some caminofriends so I walked a little shorter this day. We stayed at the Albergue in Amandi. Definitely worth a stay, super friendly hospitaleros and a very nice place. You should make a reservation before though. Open from March to October.
I didn't ever plan more than 2 days ahead and those distances are just the ones I walked. Others may walk more, others less. Those albergues aren't the only ones. :)

Edit: The albergues where I didn't say any opening time are either open all year long or I didn't find any information about it.

I'm gonna post my list about the camino primitivo later.
Thank you so much :)
 

Kippax

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
First time -
#23
Hello there. I wanted to share a few thoughts and things with you guys.
I started my Camino Mid-August (22nd) in Irun and arrived in Santiago on the 23rd of September. During those weeks I met so many amazing people, I've seen lots of beautiful places and it really was an experience someone should have at least once in their lives.

First of all, if you're new or you want to start soon you have propably read this post https://www.caminodesantiago.me/com...ould-not-walk-the-camino-del-norte-pdf.22248/. I have to say that I disagree with almost all of the statements made there.
Language: It's true that english speaking spanish people are rare but english is spoken a lot among other pilgrims. But I started the camino with no spanish knowledge at all, communicating just with hands and feet and ended up being able to communicate with them in spanish. *g*
Hills and Profile: You don't have to have a lot of walking experience before doing the camino. I've read about people here, training for the camino by doing 30k walks each day or walking with packed backpacks. You get more than enough training on the camino itself, so if you are not completely unfit/unhealthy I think you can do it. The first 1 - 1.5 weeks will be tough but I've even met an 89 year old doing all these hills and being very fast at it. ;)
Albergues: There's at least one private and/or municipal albergue every 10 to 15km on this camino (Edit: after checking, sometimes you have to walk 20 to 25km to get to the next albergue) and I never had trouble finding a bed in albergues during my walk. If 10 or 15km is already too much for you you should propably really consider doing a different camino. If you don't rely on albergues you will find even more places to sleep.
Cafes/Bars etc: Are you going to walk the camino and do you plan to stop at 10 bars every day? Then you should propably do the Frances. Seriously, if there is no bar in your stage ahead, just plan ahead and get your food ahead from a supermarket.
Road walking: Yes, there is some road walking and even some days of just walking on asphalt but all in all it didn't really bother me. But this is my personal opinion.
Rain: Lots of people say the north coast is really rainy, however I had only 4 days of rain during my 35 days long journey. But maybe I just had luck.


In Villaviciosa I switched to the Camino Primitivo and I don't regret the switch at all. If you started in Irun and you are still alive arriving in Villaviciosa you should really consider doing the Primitivo since you will have already built up lots of stamina by then. :) The landscape was so amazing on the Primitivo and really different from the del Norte.


I loved the Camino del Norte and the Primitivo. If you are open to meeting new people you will find lots of interesting people.
If you have any questions regarding the Camino del Norte (de la Costa), the Camino Primitivo or anything else feel free to ask. :)

~ Julian
Thanks for sharing. Were there many opportunities along the way where you could have dropped your pack and gone for a swim ? The Norte really appeals to me as I love the beach and scenic coastlines. Christian
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015); Camino Norte/Primitivo (2016); Camino Frances (2017); Le Puy (June 2018)
#24
No bars between Deba and Markina, but then there is nothing wrong with woods as bathrooms, is there?
No, certainly no problem with that! Now if there are no woods or bushes, now THAT would be a problem! :oops: (Just remember to carry your tp out or wear a minipad).
 
Camino(s) past & future
Via Gebennensis (2018)
Via Podiensis (2018)
Voie Nive Bidassoa (2018)
Camino Del Norte (2018)
#27
Thanks for sharing. Were there many opportunities along the way where you could have dropped your pack and gone for a swim ? The Norte really appeals to me as I love the beach and scenic coastlines. Christian
We are nearing the end of our Norte, and we had many opportunities to walk on beaches. So although we didn't drop our pack and go for a swim, you would definitely have the opportunity!
Buen Camino
Andrew
 
Camino(s) past & future
Via Gebennensis (2018)
Via Podiensis (2018)
Voie Nive Bidassoa (2018)
Camino Del Norte (2018)
#28
My way on the Camino de la Costa
Santander- Santilla del Mar: 34,4 km
Thewalk to Santilla wasn't that beautiful but it was totally worth it. Santilla del Mar is a really beautiful city. It really has a GoT vibe since the tourism and everything is kept in this "medieval" style. There are a few albergues there and I stayed at one called "El Convento", nice, clean and I can't complain about this one.
@Iriebabel , if you can, break this into two stages. Look for posts on coastal alternatives on this forum.
Check these links:
https://www.wikiloc.com/wikiloc/view.do?id=6940275
https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/following-the-coast-from-santander-to-boo.42660/
There are further options which will allow you to enjoy the coast

Buen Camino
Andrew
 

jenniferf

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
April 19
#29
Julian,

Thank you for your thoughts! How crowded was the camino at this time of year?


Hello there. I wanted to share a few thoughts and things with you guys.
I started my Camino Mid-August (22nd) in Irun and arrived in Santiago on the 23rd of September. During those weeks I met so many amazing people, I've seen lots of beautiful places and it really was an experience someone should have at least once in their lives.

First of all, if you're new or you want to start soon you have propably read this post https://www.caminodesantiago.me/com...ould-not-walk-the-camino-del-norte-pdf.22248/. I have to say that I disagree with almost all of the statements made there.
Language: It's true that english speaking spanish people are rare but english is spoken a lot among other pilgrims. But I started the camino with no spanish knowledge at all, communicating just with hands and feet and ended up being able to communicate with them in spanish. *g*
Hills and Profile: You don't have to have a lot of walking experience before doing the camino. I've read about people here, training for the camino by doing 30k walks each day or walking with packed backpacks. You get more than enough training on the camino itself, so if you are not completely unfit/unhealthy I think you can do it. The first 1 - 1.5 weeks will be tough but I've even met an 89 year old doing all these hills and being very fast at it. ;)
Albergues: There's at least one private and/or municipal albergue every 10 to 15km on this camino (Edit: after checking, sometimes you have to walk 20 to 25km to get to the next albergue) and I never had trouble finding a bed in albergues during my walk. If 10 or 15km is already too much for you you should propably really consider doing a different camino. If you don't rely on albergues you will find even more places to sleep.
Cafes/Bars etc: Are you going to walk the camino and do you plan to stop at 10 bars every day? Then you should propably do the Frances. Seriously, if there is no bar in your stage ahead, just plan ahead and get your food ahead from a supermarket.
Road walking: Yes, there is some road walking and even some days of just walking on asphalt but all in all it didn't really bother me. But this is my personal opinion.
Rain: Lots of people say the north coast is really rainy, however I had only 4 days of rain during my 35 days long journey. But maybe I just had luck.


In Villaviciosa I switched to the Camino Primitivo and I don't regret the switch at all. If you started in Irun and you are still alive arriving in Villaviciosa you should really consider doing the Primitivo since you will have already built up lots of stamina by then. :) The landscape was so amazing on the Primitivo and really different from the del Norte.


I loved the Camino del Norte and the Primitivo. If you are open to meeting new people you will find lots of interesting people.
If you have any questions regarding the Camino del Norte (de la Costa), the Camino Primitivo or anything else feel free to ask. :)

~ Julian
 

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