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The big map o the Caminos de Santiago

My Camino Packing List

#1
I am planning on hiking from Roncesvalles to Santiago, starting about September 21, 2008. I am not new to distance hiking but this will definitely be my longest hike.

Using a digital postal scale, I have weighed most of my smaller items individually . Because it has a capacity limit of 500 grams, I am using the manufacturer weights. The loaded pack was weighed on a larger capacity postal scale this morning and it came in at 12 pounds (revised to 14 pounds after editing the original post) without water and food.

The Big Stuff


Backpack - Asolo Aerator XT - 40 liter capacity. The suspended mesh back has a sprung steel frame to keep the pack off my back. I also have the 30 liter version of this pack and really like it. Other features are hydration sleeve strap, sternum whistle and a rainfly built into the bottom of the pack. Weighs .82 kg (1.84 lbs)

Sleeping bag - Asolo Marco - Ultra compact, lightweight 2 season mummy bag. Temperature rating : +5° Celsius / 41°F. Packed Size: 23 cm / 9" X 13 cm / 5". Really little. Total: 540 grams , complete with a silk sleeping bag liner and a stuff sack with compression straps. Nice find.

Total weight of the big stuff: 1.36 kg


Clothes Worn Daily


Hiking Shoes - Dunham 6630 - seam sealed, waterproof and lightweight leather upper with cushioning in heel and forefoot. Weight: 580 grams

Hiking Shirt - MEC Rapid-T Short-Sleeved T-Shirt - made with a high-performance, 100% recycled polyester. Weight: 120 grams

Liner Socks - Wigwam Ultimax - provides excellent warmth and comfort next to the skin. By allowing some of the friction caused by walking to take place between the liner sock and the main sock, liner socks may also help reduce blistering. Weight: 40g

Hiking Socks - SmartWool - no-itch Merino wool has a natural moisture-wicking ability keeps feet dry and comfortable on the trail no matter what the temperature. Blended with nylon and elastic for improved durability and fit. Weight: 90 grams

Hiking Shorts - MEC Dart - airy, quick-drying shorts. Flat-knit polyester is easy-moving and soft. 100% polyester, in a comfy flat face knit. Wide, comfortable elastic waistband with adjustable drawstring. Has pockets and a quick-drying mesh lining. Weight: 435 grams

Hat - Tilley LT5 – a uniquely Canadian thing - is guaranteed for life and insured against loss. Broad brimmed, it protects against both sun and rain, ties on in the wind, has a security pocket, floats and comes with a four page owner's manual. Weight: 100 grams

Bandanna – cotton – folded diagonally, it’s tied around my neck to provide protection on the back of my neck. Weight: 35 grams

Trekking Poles - Black Diamond Approach – light and packable. Sometimes the locking mechanism fails but I have learned how to fix it. Once you get used to using poles you cannot go back. They reduce the knee jarring of descents, provide balance and are always good to lean on while you’re standing around. Weight: 275 grams

Sunglasses – polarized. Weight: 50 grams

Timepiece – carabineer-style clips to the backpack. Weight: 20 grams

Blistex/ Sunscreen / Insect Repellant – small container of each. Weight: 150 grams

Total weight of clothes worn: 2.095 kg

Extra Clothes

Jacket - MEC Northern Lite Jacket - Shell is lightweight nylon with DWR finish to shed light precipitation. Insulated with 100g PrimaLoft PL1. Packs into one of its pockets. Weight: 400 grams

Rain Jacket - MEC Aquanator - hooded, lightweight and has "pit" zippers for ventilation. Weight: 360 grams

Windshirt - MEC Dervish – lightweight fabric sheds wind and drizzle. Easy to pack and lightweight to carry just in case a nice day starts to look a little bleak. Weight: 250 grams

Fleece pillow bag – filled with some extra clothes.

Travel Shirt – MEC Nylon – lightweight and comfortable. Weight: 435 grams.

Travel Pants – MEC Nylon – lightweight. Weight: 435 grams

Camp Shoes – Crocs – light weight and comfortable. Weight: 330 grams

Extra pair of hiking socks and liner socks

Underwear – silk boxers

Hiking T-Shirt - MEC Rapid-T Long-Sleeved T-Shirt – similar to the short sleeve one.

Warmwear top – Cabela silk long sleeve crew. Weight: 200 grams

Warmwear bottom – MEC cycling tights. Weight: 400 grams

Total weight of extra clothes: 2.7 kg

Miscellaneous

Hydration – a plastic 16 oz. sports drink bottle and a stainless steel 16 oz. hot beverage cup. Each fits into a side pocket of my pack. Weight: 300 grams

Camera – Olympus D520 – nothing fancy. Uses AA batteries. Extra memory card. Weight: 300 grams

Knife – Gerber LST – folding. Weight: 40 grams

Spoon – stainless steel – for eating snacks which require one. Weight: 30 grams

Plastic garbage bags – always have a couple along for the junk.

Cleanup Kit – (kept in a Ziploc bag) – micro fiber towel (18”x36”) and a smaller piece for a washcloth, liquid soap which double as laundry soap and stick deodorant. Weight: 120 grams

Cordage / Clips – 20 feet of 2mm line and security card clips for clothes pegs. Weight: 130 grams

Dental Kit – (kept in a Ziploc bag) – toothbrush, small tube of toothpaste, dental floss. Weight: 80 grams

Sanitation Kit – (kept in a Ziploc bag) - roll of toilet paper with core removed, self-sealing packet
of wet wipes, sanitizing gel. Weight: 170 grams

Repair Kit – (kept in a Ziploc bag) – safety pins, sewing needles, small roll of duct tape with core
removed, spare AA batteries. Weight: 150 grams

Navigation – John Brierley guidebook, Spanish/English phrasebook. Weight: 400 grams

Wallet / Money belt – lightweight nylon. Weight: 150 grams

Journal – spiral bound notebook, pen, Sharpie permanent marker. Weight: 300 grams

Headlamp – Petzel Tikka – LED lights. Weight: 75 grams

First Aid Kit – (kept in a Ziploc bag) - alcohol wipes, assorted band-aids, moleskin, Imodium, Tylenol, Naproxin, nail clipper, folding scissors, tweezers, ear plugs. Weight: 200 grams

Tensor knee braces.

Total weight of miscellaneous items: 3.3 kg

Total pack weight without food and water: About 6.3 kgs (14 lbs)

Total weight "from skin out": 9.7 kgs (21.5 lbs)

There are probably some things I have failed to list but this is basically it. Maybe someone will find it useful as a reference.

Trundle
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#2
And, the total weight is?

A very complete listing and well thought out.

I've not been all that impressed with wigwam products, they give out over long periods of wear. Stick with the SmartWool. Also, with SmartWool, make sure you get the proper fit for the boots you'll wear. Sometimes hikers will attempt to "fill in the gap" between their current socks and their boots by purchasing a larger size sock. That's a major mistake because what happens is that the larger sock actually begins to stretch and move even more inside the boot, creating exactly the movement and rubbing you tried to avoid in the first place. Rather use the right size sock. The only way to be sure is to hike in them"on terrain you expect to find".

My few cents worth. Your FEET are the most important consideration.

Buen Camino

Arn
 

Deirdre

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (2007), Camino Francés (2008), Camino Portugués (2010), Camino Aragonés - from Lourdes (2012)
#3
You can buy iodine along the way (which you will most probably need) but definitely add a needle and thread - for your feet - not for sewing.
Buen Camino,
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#4
Hi Trundle,
Looks like you have catered for all eventualities. You might like to consider making the safety pins the extra large ones. I took 8 nappy/diaper pins. They are useful to hang wet clothes on your backpack whilst walking (nobody cares if your boxers are flapping on your pack!) and can also be used as extra pegs when needed.
I also took two plastic 'butcher hooks' (those S shape hooks) to hang packets on the shower rail or door. There is often nowhere to put dry or wet clothes whilst showering.
One thing I never travel without is a spiral immersion heater and tin cup. It is so useful to make a quick cup of coffee/tea in the morning and also for a cup of soup at night if there is nowhere to eat out or cook. You can buy them at most travel stores or from Amazon for under $5.
You don't seem to have a waterproof rain coat or poncho on the list? "It never rains in (California) Spain - but man don't they warn ya - It pours, man it pours!"
The ALTUS Rain cape is a great product that combines raincoat with poncho in that you can put it on while you have the backpack on (it has a hump at the back) and opens completely in the front; long sleeves fasten at the wrists with velcro. I have just bought 3 for friends who are planning on walking with me next year. They are on special for 16.80 euro at http://www.barrabes.com
September is a lovely time to walk. Although you don't have the spring flowers and most of the large stork have left their nests, it is harvest time and you will be able to enjoy figs, walnuts and chestnuts, apples, pears, grapes etc etc.
Abrazos,
 
#5
Thank you for the comments so far.

The safety pins are the larger ones, meant for baby diapers. I like the idea of the shower hooks.

I did forget to list my rain jacket in the original post. I pack it last so it's easily accesible. It's been edited into my original post.

Also, I edited some weights in my original post. I maintain my packing check lists on Excel spreadsheet. There are separate checklists for each trip I've done or am planning.

I'm still trying to find the best way of ordering my gear into the pack. Because the pack has that sprung metal frame, pack capacity is less than 40 liters. My Golite Team pack is also rated at 40 litres and this list fits into it quite easly. I chose not to use it because of the way it clings to my back.

Trundle
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#6
Hi there Trundle,
You might find that packing your clothes into see through, zip-lock bags is a good way to keep them sorted and protected from rain or any spills from bottles (accidents do happen). I always kept my sleeping bag and raincoat in the top compartment.
When you arrive at an albergue, you roll your sleeping bag/liner onto the bed to show that it has been taken. Most peregrinos then take a shower and wash their clothes so it helps to keep the towel/toiletries and washing stuff close to the top as well.
 

vinotinto

Active Member
#7
I recommend bringing along around 24 plastic clothespins (the plastic ones are lighter than wood). Although some alberuges provide them, they often run out. And some don't have very many, so you can leave those for pilgrims who didn't bring any along. :wink:

They're very useful for hanging your wash, especially on those rickety metal/plastic clothesline stands - much better than draping them over (they tend to fall off easier that way, especially when it's windy). I was certainly grateful for mine many times on the Way...you can get them along the Camino at stores as well, as I did. :arrow:
 

lynnejohn

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2005), VDLP(2007), Madrid(2009), Ingles(2009), Sur (2011), VDLP(2011)-partial, VDLP(2014)
#8
Great packing list! I agree with recommendations for ziplock bags (but for carrying food), big safety pins, either to hang up your clothes at the end of the day, or to hang your clothes off the outside of your pack as you walk - necessary if your clothes didn't dry the day before. The safety pins are more secure than clothespins in very windy conditions.

Buen camino -

lynne
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#9
Vinotinto wrote:I recommend bringing along around 24 plastic clothespins (the plastic ones are lighter than wood). Although some alberuges provide them, they often run out. And some don't have very many, so you can leave those for pilgrims who didn't bring any along.
OK...so let me get this straight. Vinotinto leaves plastic clothespins for his fellow peregrinos and I leave beer!

Now, I ask you, whom would YOU rather walk the Camino with? :mrgreen:

Buen "drying my wet clothes but not wetting my dry whistle" Camino

Arn
 

vinotinto

Active Member
#10
Arn said:
Vinotinto leaves plastic clothespins
Well, I actually used the clothespins I brought so that those who didn't bring any could use the albergue's limited supply...although if someone offered to trade me vino for my clothespins, I would have certainly taken them up on it... :wink:

lynnejohn said:
to hang your clothes off the outside of your pack as you walk
I used my safety pins for this purpose, although I mainly did that with socks that failed to dry the night before. Hauling a bunch of wet clothes around gets heavy fast, as a fellow pilgrim who did so affirmed. But when you have to do it, you have to do it, and safety pins are great for that purpose.

lynnejohn said:
The safety pins are more secure than clothespins in very windy conditions
True, although I rarely had any wind issues with my clothespins. But I can see how it would be safest to use both together to prevent your clothes from sliding down the line or flying away... :arrow:
 
#11
Arn said:
OK...so let me get this straight. Vinotinto leaves plastic clothespins for his fellow peregrinos and I leave beer!

Now, I ask you, whom would YOU rather walk the Camino with? :mrgreen:

Arn
Well Arn I certainly know who my hubby would choose!!!! (I would rather have wine)
 

Deirdre

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (2007), Camino Francés (2008), Camino Portugués (2010), Camino Aragonés - from Lourdes (2012)
#13
Arn,
While you are lounging on the beach in Málaga on your "pre-Camino" holiday :lol: I think you need to invest in and break in "una bota". XXX is generally considered to be quite good if not the best. I bought one for the Camino, but decided that 2 litres was too heavy (that, in addition to litres of water) and so my wine remained in glasses. However, I will admit that on long hot afternoons it was occasionally that thought of the lovely glass at the end of the day that kept one plodding along!!!!
Buen Camino,
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#14
Deirdre mentioned:"una bota"
So, now I've got bottles of beer (or can I get cans), a bota of vino and a Sigg bottle of water. I may as well be a traveling "ABC" store.

Sounds good to me...except my kit just grew by 15 lbs.

Drat, well there goes the extras...soap, clean clothes, plastic clothes pins (Thanks Vinotinto) and wash cloth.

Buen Camino
Arn
 
#15
Arn - you've walked the Appalachian Trial , I think - that is a huge undertaking - what weight did you carry and what was your average length of daily walk if you don't mind me asking?

I wouldn't consider carrying anymore than 7k including rucksack + food and water even in winter.
 
#16
When I walked the AT back in 2003, my loaded pack weight was 32 lbs. The pack I was using was an ArcTeryx Bora 80 which weighed about 7 lbs empty.

Trundle
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#17
Hi Johnnie Walker and Trundle,

I had an external frame pack (I liked the idea of not unloading and loading my stuff) to keep the heat off my back. I started on March 1st from Springer. With winter stuff (jacket/long poly-pro stockings) and sufficient food for 14 days...my total kit weighed in at about 60 lbs/27kgs. Figure that the food alone was nearly half of that total. My sleeping bag was a Coleman 40F and very large and bulky at 5lbs/2.5kg and tent at 3lbs/1.8kgs. By the time I got to Fontana Dam, I'd figured out that I didn't need to carry that much food as I could replenish nearly every 5 days or so and, when I rid myself of the winter stuff, I was down to a walking weight of about 35lbs/16kgs.

The AT has many severe rises in height, especially at the start in Georgia/Tenn and again near the end in VT (where there aren't any trails, but rather they pick a stream coming off the mountain and you go straight up),NH and Me. In most areas I could make between 10 and 15 miles/24km a day and, in the Shenandoah NP of Virginia I was easily making 15to 20 miles/32km a day.

How things have changed. The equipment is better, the weights are down...but the body is 12 years older. My current kit weighs in at about 20 lbs/9.9kgs not counting water and beer/vino. Add 5lbs/2.5kgs. Wow, that in at about 25% of my total weight. Then of course, should I tire early...I'll just have to start drinking earlier!

Salud,
Arn
 

ksam

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese '08, Frances '11, del Norte '14, Invierno '16, Ingles '17, Primitivo October 2018
#18
Trundle...super list, might actually print it out as a starter go by and thank you for the idea of using the excel spread sheet to do running totals...as it's looking like I will be doing the packing for me and the significant other!!! He says he's gonna pack old stuff and just discard as he goes along! This should prove to be a most interesting trip, to say the least. I have only one stipulation, you bring it..you carry it! And if you didn't bring it...or choose not to carry it..(barring near death) ya ain't gettin mine! :wink:

Using large, ie gallon or more ziploc baggies for clothes and other things is a great way to compact things as well as keep em dry. Did this on a 3 day bike tour in Seattle last year and was dry and warm and all snug together...also helps for easy dressing in the morning...esp for those of us who can barely speak until caffiene time!

Karin
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#20
Lillian wrote:beer in the streams that I would wade through
My understanding is that there really aren't any fast moving streams we'll wade through...so beer on the Camino might not be in the offing. I may have to go to the Vino route though and as far as the wet clothes...just wait for a refreshing shower from Heaven.

Buen Dos Cerveza Camino

Arn
 
#21
in 2001 my brother in law and I got lost and ended up fording a fast moving stream, made it to! No beer in or near the stream! We missed a sign that said, "bridge out". When we got into town and mentioned our trek, others looked at us and said, "trouble reading?" oh, well it was an adventure.

Arn, you said your kit is 20 pounds, have you posted your kit in this site?
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#22
Mike wrote:Arn, you said your kit is 20 pounds, have you posted your kit in this site
In bits and pieces but never a complete list. I'm re working and trying for 15 lbs or less. Will post later today.
Buen "gotta cut the fat" Camino

Arn
 
#23
Arn, yesterday I met a man who walked part of the AT and is leaving in 2 weeks to walk the whole thing. He said he found your beer in the stream. Enjoyed it and thank you.
He also said that people left alot of things for others to enjoy.... I thought, "Wow, the spirit of walking is everywhere".
Lillian
 
#24
Impressive collection....comprehensive. Now, have you done any research for what you can get THERE for less money than to ship and may then just leave there? Or, even if you want to take home with you, would still be less than shipping? Seems that a lot of what you are shipping could be had there...or, is this only the list of what you are "planning" to take? If the latter, I say it looks fine...you can adjust to taste as you go....
 

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