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My first Camino in April'19- Recommendations

Sakamoto

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese (Valença-Santiago) April'19
#1
Hello.

I´m planing to make my first Camino in next April, from the 14th to the 19th.

I´m going with two friends and we are really looking forward to what to hope to be a wonderful time. The Camino was always something that caused fascination in me and I always dreamed of making it.

I´m the most enthusiastic of the 3 because I had to make my preparation in a very tough and resilient way. On the day I decided to make the Camino I weight about 95 kgs and my physical condition was very very poor. I had some health issues that came from this weight (I´m 165 cms tall so it´s a lot) and I decided to do something risky, and stabilish an objective for myself, to help me get better in my life. And that decision was to make the Camino. I´ve lost about 15 kgs since April and I´m making 2-3 walkings per week to make my preparation for the road. So, in a matter of speak, I can say that even before I made it, the Camino is already helping me to be a better person :D

So, I´m planning to do from the 14th to the 19th of April. I´m a bit concerned that is the Holy Week and might be a bit crowded. My concern is not to see a lot of people because that could be very cool, to know people all around the world and share experiences. My concern is regarding the accomodations. I´m thinking in making some reservations in some albergues to be sure I have a bed at the end of the day. Do you think it´s a good idea or not?

Other recommendation that I would like to discuss with you are the checkpoints. I´m thinking in making the following checkpoints:

- Valença - Porriño
- Porriño - Redondela
- Redondela - Pontevedra
- Pontevedra - Caldas de Reis
- Caldas de Reis - Padron
-Padron - Santiago

For a 6 day Camino it´s seems to me to be a fair mix between time and distance. Journeys in the house of 20 kms more or less. To the ones who made this Camino recommend this checkpoints or should I change any of the stops?

Last but not the least, the equipment. I bought a pair of Bestard boots that some specialized house recommend me and I hope to receive them in the next week so I can give them some "hard time" in this last 3 months before the Camino. I already bought some pair of good socks as well, and what a difference they make. My question is regarding the backpack. I didnt mind to spend some money on the boots because on of my major concerns was the good condition of my feet. That´s why I searched for something good but with the backpack should I have the same concern or should I just bought something cheap where can I fit all my equipment?

Thanks to all of you that took your time to read all this giant text and, if you have the time, thanks for all the help. I might remember some more things to ask in the meantime :D
 

Anamya

Keeping it simple
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015)
Portugues (2017)
Lebaniego (2019)
#2
Hi Sakamoto!

I did exactly the same stages in April 2017, so I can totally say your choices are pretty good :)
At that time, I pre-booked my first city and not the others, because I wanted to check how the walk would go. My French Camino a few years earlier went completely different from my plans, so I left the Portuguese a bit open.

That said, the biuld up for Easter is probably going to be huge. So maybe, can you pre-book places that have free cancelation? Booking.com does that a lot, and you can just change plans if things change along the route. there are MANY accomodation options, so you should not have too much of a problem.

Shoes: I am a fan of sneakers and would not go on CP with boots, but that is a personal preference. If you got something that is good for your feet, great! Make sure they fit well and you are comfortable walking with them. i usually go on my caminos with whatever I've been using on my walks at home. CP from Valenca does not have mountains, so comfort is the main thing.

Backpack is also very important, as it will become almost part of your body along the way. You don't have to spend a fortune because there are very good affordable options out there. Mine costed $55 at decathlon and feels awesome on the back.

From you what you described, you are well on the tracjk to do this camino, and will have a great time over there. Wishing you a Buen camino!
 

Sakamoto

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese (Valença-Santiago) April'19
#3
Hi Sakamoto!

I did exactly the same stages in April 2017, so I can totally say your choices are pretty good :)
At that time, I pre-booked my first city and not the others, because I wanted to check how the walk would go. My French Camino a few years earlier went completely different from my plans, so I left the Portuguese a bit open.

That said, the biuld up for Easter is probably going to be huge. So maybe, can you pre-book places that have free cancelation? Booking.com does that a lot, and you can just change plans if things change along the route. there are MANY accomodation options, so you should not have too much of a problem.

Shoes: I am a fan of sneakers and would not go on CP with boots, but that is a personal preference. If you got something that is good for your feet, great! Make sure they fit well and you are comfortable walking with them. i usually go on my caminos with whatever I've been using on my walks at home. CP from Valenca does not have mountains, so comfort is the main thing.

Backpack is also very important, as it will become almost part of your body along the way. You don't have to spend a fortune because there are very good affordable options out there. Mine costed $55 at decathlon and feels awesome on the back.

From you what you described, you are well on the tracjk to do this camino, and will have a great time over there. Wishing you a Buen camino!
First of all, thanks for taking your time to answer me.

I´m following your advice and I will check on booking acommodations with free cancelation, it´s a very good ideia. With that I´m able to see how the things go during the Camino and be prepared for any setbacks.

I´m a little prone to sprains so that´s why I´m choosing boots. I feel more confident with them and I´ve recommended a pair of Bestard boots, with Goretex. I try them, I liked and I hope that they ´ll be a nice companion for my Camino.

I also saw some backpacks at Decathlon. How many litres,and model, is yours? Might check that in the weekend!
 

Anamya

Keeping it simple
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015)
Portugues (2017)
Lebaniego (2019)
#4
I´m a little prone to sprains so that´s why I´m choosing boots. I feel more confident with them and I´ve recommended a pair of Bestard boots, with Goretex. I try them, I liked and I hope that they ´ll be a nice companion for my Camino.
As I said - if they work for you, great! Give them plenty of use before you go so your feet get used to it and you should be fine :) April tends to be a rainy month in Portugal, so the Goretex may come handy.

I also saw some backpacks at Decathlon. How many litres,and model, is yours? Might check that in the weekend!
Something between 30L-50L should be enough. I usually walk with my husband, so we can share some items and reduce our backpacks. We both have 30L packs at the moment.

I'm using the MH100 30L. https://www.decathlon.com.au/p/8493730_mh100-30l-hiking-backpack-black.html#/7844-132-30l
Pros: Cheap and light with good capacity.
Cons: I wish it had more compartments, but for a short Camino (my next will be only 4 days) it works well. Also I have not found a way to "lock it" yet.

My husband wears the Forclaz 30L Air+, which I think is slightly better than their current MH500 because it has a water bottle pocket and more zipers. https://my.carousell.com/p/forclaz-30-air-quechua-128398915/?hl=en
Pros: Super light, very breathable back, great support.
Cons: not lockable, and the back support may not fit shorter people (the female version does not work for my back at all).

(To solve the locking issue, if needed, we are putting the bags inside our ultralight foldable duffle bag and locking that one)

Give decathlon a visit, wear the options available and see what you think,. They usually have weights you can put into the pack to walk around the store and have a feel.

@davebugg is the equipment specialist in this forum, he may be able to help you more with that :)
 

Sakamoto

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese (Valença-Santiago) April'19
#5
As I said - if they work for you, great! Give them plenty of use before you go so your feet get used to it and you should be fine :) April tends to be a rainy month in Portugal, so the Goretex may come handy.



Something between 30L-50L should be enough. I usually walk with my husband, so we can share some items and reduce our backpacks. We both have 30L packs at the moment.

I'm using the MH100 30L. https://www.decathlon.com.au/p/8493730_mh100-30l-hiking-backpack-black.html#/7844-132-30l
Pros: Cheap and light with good capacity.
Cons: I wish it had more compartments, but for a short Camino (my next will be only 4 days) it works well. Also I have not found a way to "lock it" yet.

My husband wears the Forclaz 30L Air+, which I think is slightly better than their current MH500 because it has a water bottle pocket and more zipers. https://my.carousell.com/p/forclaz-30-air-quechua-128398915/?hl=en
Pros: Super light, very breathable back, great support.
Cons: not lockable, and the back support may not fit shorter people (the female version does not work for my back at all).

(To solve the locking issue, if needed, we are putting the bags inside our ultralight foldable duffle bag and locking that one)

Give decathlon a visit, wear the options available and see what you think,. They usually have weights you can put into the pack to walk around the store and have a feel.

@davebugg is the equipment specialist in this forum, he may be able to help you more with that :)
Going to check those two models, thanks. Let´s see if @davebugg can give me any further information!
 

Unie

Irish in QLD Australia
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, May 2019
#6
Good on you for getting so motivated on your health, I hope everything goes great for you.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF (4/2017)
CP (5/2019)
#7
I did CF in 4/2017 and will do CP 5/2019. My footwear of choice are 1) waterproof, breathable trail running shoes and 2) a walking sandals for showers and city walking.

My socks will still be double-layer anti-blister socks with a "Camino Shell" embroidery on them. (Also massaging and moisturizing the feet often.)
 

John Ho

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese Camino 2018
#8
If carrying a backpack for 20-26km up and downhill is a concern, I strongly recommend the Tuitrans to move your luggage. It cost me 25 euros per bag for 6 days from Tui to SdC. It allowed me to focus on walking and enjoying the environment. But I've also seen many younger and fitter walkers having no problems.

Enjoy your preparation and the Camino.
 

stevov

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
walked the portuguese way (senda littoral). from porto, vila do conde via viana and redondela Jun 17
#9
After Pontevedra, taking the 'spiritual variant' instead of the route to Caldas comes highly recommended, but you would need to check whether you have the time to take it. I took walking/trekking shoes (Saloman) - and they were good given some of the rougher inland terrain - but I did get blisters after a while. Feet getting warm and expanding in the shoe I think was main cause...which is why i think you see many references to breathable shoes...double socking towards the end helped. But if you haven't got any signs of blisters from your boots so far then that's good. The back pack I took wasn't fancy ...the main issue I had was the waterproof cover supplied was ineffective and I ended up with soggy stuff on one occasion (fortunately it rained only one day) but it was still a pain. I did it in June so don't know about April, but I think you will find you will have company, and especially after Pontevedra (where northern routes converge) I found it got busier.
 

Sakamoto

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese (Valença-Santiago) April'19
#10
Thanks to all for your kind answers.

My concern is not carrying the backpack, is knowing which type will be suitable to make the Camino.

Another doubt, by double socking you mean two pair of socks or a specific model of socks? I bought a pair of Lurbel B-Max that have done great in hikings in the range between 13-20 Kms.
 

Leon Ivan

Senior member
Camino(s) past & future
August 2018: Portuguese (Porto/Santiago), Santiago -Finisterre / Muxia
#11
I think for a backpack you can look at 35 liter size
 

stevov

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
walked the portuguese way (senda littoral). from porto, vila do conde via viana and redondela Jun 17
#12
Thanks to all for your kind answers.

My concern is not carrying the backpack, is knowing which type will be suitable to make the Camino.

Another doubt, by double socking you mean two pair of socks or a specific model of socks? I bought a pair of Lurbel B-Max that have done great in hikings in the range between 13-20 Kms.
Apart from the salomon shoes, a modern walking pole and a proper hat I didn't get too technical about stuff and managed with a cheap rucksack....but I can with hindsight see the value of well balanced rucksacks. I had taken some lightweight ankle socks...I found later on that if I put on two pairs it worked against the rubbing that was causing my blisters and it definately helped.
 

Walli Walker

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances '2009', Camino Portuguese from Porto '2015', Camino Ingles from Ferrol '2015', Finisterre and Muxia '2015'. Tentatively planning Camino from Granada '2017'.
#14
Sakamoto, just make sure that your backpack is fitted correctly. It needs to sit nicely on your hips without weight on your shoulders. Try them all on until you find one that suits you. This is as important as correctly fitting footwear. Buen Camino to you and your group.
 

jefferyonthecamino

http://www.barrerabooks.com/ - Guidebooks
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (1994)
Camino Francés (2013 - 2018)
Camino Portugués (2015 - 2018)
#15
Hello.

Thanks to all of you that took your time to read all this giant text and, if you have the time, thanks for all the help. I might remember some more things to ask in the meantime :D
Stages look good and yes, you may want to book in advance as it is Easter. You may even want to indulge at one of the Paradores, if that is your thing. Buen Camino!
 

Prentiss Riddle

Aprendiz de todo, maestro de nada
Camino(s) past & future
Poco a poco: we're nibbling away at the Francés. (2015, 2016 & 2017)
#16
(Also massaging and moisturizing the feet often.)
Everyone is different, but in my case moisturizing my feet was the wrong thing to do. On one camino I was applying a cream-based antifungal in the morning which actually contributed to my blisters by softening my skin. I try to start each day with completely dry feet.
 

Sakamoto

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese (Valença-Santiago) April'19
#17
Thank you all for the feedback.

Sakamoto, just make sure that your backpack is fitted correctly. It needs to sit nicely on your hips without weight on your shoulders. Try them all on until you find one that suits you. This is as important as correctly fitting footwear. Buen Camino to you and your group.
One of the backpacks I saw and liked is the Lowa Alpine Airzone 35:45. Nice and comfortable, main part of the weight is all in the hips. Any of you already try one of these?


Stages look good and yes, you may want to book in advance as it is Easter. You may even want to indulge at one of the Paradores, if that is your thing. Buen Camino!
I took your advice, and the previous ones, and already booked all the accommodations. Mainly private albergues in the range of 10€-20€ per night. I guess it's a relief to walk knowing that you have a guaranteed bed at the end of the walk.
 

Albertinho

ninguém disse que era fácil
Camino(s) past & future
2013 Lisboa - Sant.
2014 Ferrol -Sant.
2015 Porto -Sant.
2018 Porto -Valença
2019 Valença -Sant.
#18
Nobodody talked about pre reserving albergues. That is not possible. albergues do not accept reservations.
The track Valença (better say Tui) to Santiago is very popular by Spanish people. It is an advantage on your CV if you have walked the caminho in Spain.
So lots of Spanish choose for the shortest trail where you can obtain a Compostela certificate That means you have to walk at least the last 100 kms and important, collect 2 stamps per day on your credential ! So lots of Spaniards start on the Tui or Saria to Santiago caminos.
So especial in the Semana Santa week ( before Easter) it can be crowded.
Furthermore in the same time lots of Portuguese take their mountainbikes and bike to Santiago from Porto in 4 days. Except from busy times at the albergues you have to take care for groups of bikers on the road . Take care for accidents and collisions with them . The most hassle about this matters I experienced on the coastal routes where it is fairly flat and most bikers drive on the boardwalks where also the walkers are .

Passa bem e bom caminho
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese (Valença-Santiago) April'19
#19
Nobodody talked about pre reserving albergues. That is not possible. albergues do not accept reservations.
The track Valença (better say Tui) to Santiago is very popular by Spanish people. It is an advantage on your CV if you have walked the caminho in Spain.
So lots of Spanish choose for the shortest trail where you can obtain a Compostela certificate That means you have to walk at least the last 100 kms and important, collect 2 stamps per day on your credential ! So lots of Spaniards start on the Tui or Saria to Santiago caminos.
So especial in the Semana Santa week ( before Easter) it can be crowded.
Furthermore in the same time lots of Portuguese take their mountainbikes and bike to Santiago from Porto in 4 days. Except from busy times at the albergues you have to take care for groups of bikers on the road . Take care for accidents and collisions with them . The most hassle about this matters I experienced on the coastal routes where it is fairly flat and most bikers drive on the boardwalks where also the walkers are .

Passa bem e bom caminho
Hum, that's true, the traditional Albergues interesse accept rreservation.

I call them Albergues because they call themselves that. For example, in Porrino I will stay in a place called "Albergue Camiño Português". Other one, in Caldas de Reis, is called "Albergue Agarimo". They are very similar to the traditional Albergues but is possible to reserve beds in advance.
 

Albertinho

ninguém disse que era fácil
Camino(s) past & future
2013 Lisboa - Sant.
2014 Ferrol -Sant.
2015 Porto -Sant.
2018 Porto -Valença
2019 Valença -Sant.
#20
Hum, that's true, the traditional Albergues interesse accept rreservation.

I call them Albergues because they call themselves that. For example, in Porrino I will stay in a place called "Albergue Camiño Português". Other one, in Caldas de Reis, is called "Albergue Agarimo". They are very similar to the traditional Albergues but is possible to reserve beds in advance.
Okay. That's new to me . But we never are too old to learn 😊😎

Passa bem e bom caminho
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
#21
Nobodody talked about pre reserving albergues. That is not possible. albergues do not accept reservations.
What? Parochial, municipal or association albergues may not accept reservations (some do, on some routes, like the one at Roncesvalles). Most private albergues do accept reservations. I think you know one on the Camino Portugues very well for which reservations are practically a necessity!
 

Albertinho

ninguém disse que era fácil
Camino(s) past & future
2013 Lisboa - Sant.
2014 Ferrol -Sant.
2015 Porto -Sant.
2018 Porto -Valença
2019 Valença -Sant.
#22
That's right , especially in Spain . But @Sakamoto starts in Valença do Minho -which is a good choice because as said before the Espanhois all travel to Tui to start so the busier part starts over the Minho bridge . In Valença is an albergue where I expect is place enough by that time he starts. Otherwise there are lots of cheap hotels and another advantage is that you are still in Portugal- cheaper meals, drinks and delicious pasteís de nata with your coffee.

By the way there is a great "albergue " on your way to Santiago at the Galicean side, o refúxio de la Jérezana in Cessantes. Just passed Redondela Far better than the smelly busy municipal albergue in Redondela. Only 3 kms further. Well waymarked from Redondela.

Pega bem e bom caminho
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese (Valença-Santiago) April'19
#23
That's right , especially in Spain . But @Sakamoto starts in Valença do Minho -which is a good choice because as said before the Espanholes all travel to Tui to start so the busier part starts over the Minho bridge . In Valença is an albergue where I expect is place enough by that time he starts. Otherwise there are lots of cheap hotels and another advantage is that you are still in Portugal- cheaper meals, drinks and delicious pasteís de nata with your coffee.

By the way there is a great "albergue " on your way to Santiago at the Galicean side, o refúxio de la Jérezana in Cessantes. Just passed Redondela Far better than the smelly busy municipal albergue in Redondela. Only 3 kms further. Well waymarked from Redondela.

Pega bem e bom caminho
I will start in Valença because of the feeling of beginning in Portugal, just a simbolic thing. But I will not sleep in Valença, my first stop will be in Porriño.

In Redondela we choose an albergue named Conserveira: https://www.booking.com/hotel/es/a-...7682718f4d360247;type=total;ucfs=1&#hotelTmpl

Seems very nice, a high score in booking 9,2 out of 10.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese (Valença-Santiago) April'19
#24
Today I started using my nem boots, that I received in the past Monday, a Bestard Trotter II. A 12 kms hike in road and forest tracks.

Even using hiking socks, by Lurbel, I had 2 not blisters, but beginning of blisters. That medium pain that you know if you walk 2 or 3 more kms will become a blister.

Do you think this happened because the boots are new and they need to be softened or should I be worried about this?
 

Albertinho

ninguém disse que era fácil
Camino(s) past & future
2013 Lisboa - Sant.
2014 Ferrol -Sant.
2015 Porto -Sant.
2018 Porto -Valença
2019 Valença -Sant.
#25
Today I started using my nem boots, that I received in the past Monday, a Bestard Trotter II. A 12 kms hike in road and forest tracks.

Even using hiking socks, by Lurbel, I had 2 not blisters, but beginning of blisters. That medium pain that you know if you walk 2 or 3 more kms will become a blister.

Do you think this happened because the boots are new and they need to be softened or should I be worried about this?
Did you order your boots one size bigger than as usual you buy shoes ?
I bought new walkingshoes-one size bigger than I usually buy- the other day and are busy breaking them in by now.
No any trace of blisters or painpoints ! I walk between 4 to 6 kms a day now increasing the more I reach the time to go to Portugal.
Also in Portugal I will have a slow start. Twice 8 kms a day and then slowly walk more.
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese (Valença-Santiago) April'19
#26
Did you order your boots one size bigger than as usual you buy shoes ?
I bought new walkingshoes-one size bigger than I usually buy- the other day and are busy breaking them in by now.
No any trace of blisters or painpoints ! I walk between 4 to 6 kms a day now increasing the more I reach the time to go to Portugal.
Also in Portugal I will have a slow start. Twice 8 kms a day and then slowly walk more.
Yes, I did. I wear the 39½ and I order the 7UK that is a 40¾.
 

Albertinho

ninguém disse que era fácil
Camino(s) past & future
2013 Lisboa - Sant.
2014 Ferrol -Sant.
2015 Porto -Sant.
2018 Porto -Valença
2019 Valença -Sant.
#28
What? Parochial, municipal or association albergues may not accept reservations (some do, on some routes, like the one at Roncesvalles). Most private albergues do accept reservations. I think you know one on the Camino Portugues very well for which reservations are practically a necessity!
Did you order the book from Carlos Basto in Barcelos ?
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
#29
Today I started using my nem boots, that I received in the past Monday, a Bestard Trotter II. A 12 kms hike in road and forest tracks.

Even using hiking socks, by Lurbel, I had 2 not blisters, but beginning of blisters. That medium pain that you know if you walk 2 or 3 more kms will become a blister.

Do you think this happened because the boots are new and they need to be softened or should I be worried about this?
Hi, sakamoto..

I have posted this before, and it may be of help to you.

----------------------------------------
Blisters are a product of friction.... often referred to as shear force friction. The skin of your foot, and the sock that is in contact with that area of skin, are sliding and rubbing together.

Strategies for the prevention of shear force friction and blisters have changed and matured over recent years.
  1. A properly fitting shoe. In brief, it needs to be long enough and wide enough to accommodate any insoles, orthotics, metatarsal pads, etc, PLUS the socks that you will be wearing, PLUS the increased pressure on the feet from wearing a loaded pack.
  2. Light padded Merino wool sock designed for walking or backpacking, or the same type of sock in a good synthetic blend. A heavy pad on a sock allows potentially more movement against the skin, takes longer to air out, and takes longer to dry when washed.
  3. A sock fit that is snug and form fitting to the foot, but not gangrene-inducing tight. You want the shear force to be between the sock and the interior of the shoe, not the sock and the skin. A snug fitting sock will help to make that happen.
  4. Allow the shoe to move over the sock a bit. By keeping the shoes a bit looser on the feet, the sock will take the brunt of the shear force. If a shoe is tied snug, then that forces the foot to move more in the sock, which means the sock and skin are absorbing the shear force. An exception occurs on long downhill grades; the shoes need to be tied tight enough to keep your toes from hitting the front of the shoe which can cause injury and trauma to the nail bed and toe joints.
  5. While there are foot lubricants, from Body Glide and Hiker's Goo to plain old vaseline, they have a fairly short viable working span as the material rubs off of the skin and is absorbed by the socks. For prophylactic protection from shear force friction to blister prone areas on the feet, a long lasting barrier is the better option. The placement of tapes, like Leukotape P, or moleskin-type products, if adhered correctly, will last the whole day.
  6. To apply tapes and moleskin type products,
    1. Clean off the area of application with a bit of alcohol to remove grease, dirt, and body oils. A bit of regular hand sanitizer works for this, in addition to hand cleansing.
    2. Cut a piece of your chosen barrier material to fit the area you want protected; be sure to cut rounded corners rather than square in order to help the material from rolling up away from the skin.
    3. Apply a thin smear of Tincture of Benzoin to the skin area where the adhesive will stick. This will increase the holding power of the tape or moleskin.
      1. If the tape or moleskin, etc. is going on top of a blistered area, avoid getting the Benzoin on the roof area of the blister, and add a thin coating of ointment/vaseline onto the blister roof, avoiding the surrounding skin area. This will allow removal of the product without hurting the blister wound.
    4. Place the barrier on the area, taking care to not handle the adhesive; spend a bit of time rubbing the material to create friction so that the adhesive will heat up and adhere more firmly.
    5. At the end of the day, remove the barrier and use some alcohol to wipe the area that was covered.
      1. Since fungus (athletes foot) and pathogens splash around in showers, shower shoes are not necessarily preventative to one's feet being exposed or infected. It is helpful to use an alcohol or astringent product applied to the feet after showering.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
#30
..... Do you think this happened because the boots are new and they need to be softened or should I be worried about this?
The type of footwear can definitely contribute to blistering. Do you have a link to a website showing the boots that you are using? I am not familiar with 'nem boots'.
 

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  • January

    Votes: 11 1.3%
  • February

    Votes: 5 0.6%
  • March

    Votes: 35 4.3%
  • April

    Votes: 126 15.4%
  • May

    Votes: 199 24.3%
  • June

    Votes: 58 7.1%
  • July

    Votes: 17 2.1%
  • August

    Votes: 13 1.6%
  • September

    Votes: 241 29.4%
  • October

    Votes: 98 12.0%
  • November

    Votes: 11 1.3%
  • December

    Votes: 5 0.6%
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