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my packinglist - any thoughts?

#1
Hi all,

I'm planning on walking the camino in April/May next year (starting around April 15th). At the moment I'm trying to compile a packlist, and I've weighed a bunch of things and gotten close to 7kg in weight (incl water). It's a little too heavy, as 10% of my bodyweight would be closer to 5,5kg. So, if you have any thoughts on what I should bring that I haven't, what I won't need...etc. Please let me know.
Weight is in (grams).

Backpack (1050)
Raincover (100)
Sleepingbag (400)
1 T-shirt (180)
1 pair of zip-offs (314)
Underwear (90)
2 pairs of thick socks (80)
2 pairs of thin socks (40)
1 very light rainset (500)
1 fleece (400)
1 pair of sandals + flipflops for the shower (450)
1 quick-drying towel (100)
1 litre water (1000)
some food, snacks (300)
toothbrush, toothpaste (40)
schampoo bar (60)
basic medical kit (120) incl. plaster, compeed, sportstape, bandage and various pills I take, like multivitamins, Fortodol (which is an anti-inflamatory made from turmeric), aspirin, travel sickness pills (for train/bus rides to and from the camino)
muscle rub (40)
sun block (75)
safety pins (-)
small flashlight (80)
charger for mobile (160)
bellypouch (300)
purse, passport, tickets (180)
swiss army knife (50)
camera (140)
charger for camera (125)
mobile (80)
notebook+pen (240)
pilgrim guidebook (152)

In addition to this, i'll be wearing an extra set of clothes, hiking boots and a hat.

In backpack, I'll be carrying 5,7 kg
and in the bellypouch 1,2 kg
So, all in all that's 6,9 kg...
The clothes I wear come up to 1,6 kg



Hilda
 

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#2
How many pairs of underwear are you taking? I did okay with 2 (one in the pack & one on me) for 3 weeks. (undies & sportsbras) Same for socks--2 pr each heavy socks & liner socks (one pr each in pack & one pr on me) Yes, it´s a pain to do laundry every day, but that´s part of the fun. :lol:

I´d ditch the nightshirt. Either replace it with a shirt you can wear during the day or take it out of the pack. Many pilgrims sleep in the clothes they wear the next day.

I´d toss the muscle rub too, since you can always pick that up along the way if needed. You didn´t itemize your first aid kit, so I can´t tell if I would ditch anything you´ve got in there. How big is that shampoo bottle? You can easily get by with hotel or sample size bottles, especially if you cut your hair short. :D

Buen Camino!
Kelly
 
#3
I'd replace sleeping bag with silk sleeping bag liner (140g) - nearly all albergues have some blankets -and ditch the fleece (though poss bring HH thermals and silk balaclava and light gloves)

Little need to carry so much food - liquid plus 100g of chocolate will do most of the time

Sandals on heavy side - Muji do some very light travelling sandals, if not much outdoor walking in evening)

Without sleeping bag and fleece should go for smaller pack (be brave and look at 30L) - maybe explore ultra-light as well

Belly pouch is kinda good idea except weighs 400g to carry 1300g - but belly pouches using light material are very hard to find

And finally I'd ditch the walking poles
 

KiwiNomad06

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy-Santiago(2008) Cluny-Conques+prt CF(2012)
#4
Hi Hilda! ( A family name from Jersey in the Channel Islands, and my mother's second name!)
I am also planning to walk April/May but I am starting in Le Puy, so we won't meet up!

Looking at your packing list, I was just wondering what you will wear if the whole change you are wearing gets wet? I ask this from the experience of getting all my clothes wet in France at that time of year! I am not sure from your list whether you have sufficient warm clothing to change into at the end of a very wet day.

All the best with your prep!
Margaret
 
#5
WolverineDG said:
How many pairs of underwear are you taking? I did okay with 2 (one in the pack & one on me) for 3 weeks. (undies & sportsbras) Same for socks--2 pr each heavy socks & liner socks (one pr each in pack & one pr on me) Yes, it´s a pain to do laundry every day, but that´s part of the fun. :lol:

I´d ditch the nightshirt. Either replace it with a shirt you can wear during the day or take it out of the pack. Many pilgrims sleep in the clothes they wear the next day.

I´d toss the muscle rub too, since you can always pick that up along the way if needed. You didn´t itemize your first aid kit, so I can´t tell if I would ditch anything you´ve got in there. How big is that shampoo bottle? You can easily get by with hotel or sample size bottles, especially if you cut your hair short. :D
Just two pairs of underwear. Figured it'd be enough.
I was going to go for a nightshirt that I can wear during the day too. And I've been thinking about getting zip-off pants; shorts and pants in one would seem like a good idea I think.

First aid kit would be, lots and lots of compeed, some pain-killers, tea tree oil (for bug bites). Don't know if I'd need to bring antihistamines (which some people have recommended) as I'm not really allergic to anything. Some multivitamin pills, maybe magnesium/calcium too. Possibly also some bandage, in case I twist my ankle or something.

The shampoo bottle's not that big. I've been thinking of changing it for a bar of soap instead, as someone on here said it worked well for both hair and body and doing your laundry with.

spursfan said:
I'd replace sleeping bag with silk sleeping bag liner (140g) - nearly all albergues have some blankets -and ditch the fleece (though poss bring HH thermals and silk balaclava and light gloves)
Little need to carry so much food - liquid plus 100g of chocolate will do most of the time
Sandals on heavy side - Muji do some very light travelling sandals, if not much outdoor walking in evening)
Without sleeping bag and fleece should go for smaller pack (be brave and look at 30L) - maybe explore ultra-light as well
Belly pouch is kinda good idea except weighs 400g to carry 1300g - but belly pouches using light material are very hard to find
And finally I'd ditch the walking poles
Not sure I want to ditch the sleeping bag though, as I'm afraid I might be cold otherwise. Same goes for the fleece. I don't really carry any other warmer pieces of clothing with me, and it might be rather cold in the morning when you first start, and up in the mountains.
Yes, I'm going to look for lighter sandals I think. And it is really very hard to find a good belly pouch that is light weight.
I'd rather bring the walking poles, and If I find I don't need them, I'll send them home, or to Santiago.

KiwiNomad06 said:
Looking at your packing list, I was just wondering what you will wear if the whole change you are wearing gets wet? I ask this from the experience of getting all my clothes wet in France at that time of year! I am not sure from your list whether you have sufficient warm clothing to change into at the end of a very wet day.
Well, I am wearing one change of clothes and having a spare in my backpack. And I also have the fleece. And am thinking of taking two pairs of zip-off pants, to have both shorts and long pants in one. The rain factor is also the reason I chose a rain set, with pants instead of just a poncho.

Thank you all for your wonderful tips.
Hilda
 

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KiwiNomad06

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy-Santiago(2008) Cluny-Conques+prt CF(2012)
#6
atlanticheart said:
Well, I am wearing one change of clothes and having a spare in my backpack. And I also have the fleece. And am thinking of taking two pairs of zip-off pants, to have both shorts and long pants in one. The rain factor is also the reason I chose a rain set, with pants instead of just a poncho.

Thank you all for your wonderful tips.
Hilda
Hilda,
At present on your packing list I only see the t-shirt and shorts as extra clothing, (assuming you might need to wear your fleece in cold, wet weather under your rain set). If it is cold and wet , as it may well be in April and May, to me this doesn't look quite enough to change into at the end of a day's walking when you need to warm up again.
Margaret
 
#7
i say ditch the nightshirt, but keep the fleece. I didn't bring a fleece and very much regretted it.

don't bring lots of compeed, as you can buy it absolutely everywhere

bringing pants that zip off are great, Ioved mine.

The only addition I would make is to bring 3 pairs of socks. I found that sometimes it takes 2 days for socks to dry if you get in late, get rained on, or if it is rainy/humid out, and you want to make sure that you always have clean, dry socks to wear.

Keep the walking poles!!!!! They will really really save your joints. They also help with walking in the mud, and it WILL be muddy that time of year. I walked in April/may of this past year and I found it very useful.

I also brought a silk sleeping bag liner instead of a sleeping bad and it was perfectly fine.

your list seems pretty good, though.
 
#8
KiwiNomad06 said:
At present on your packing list I only see the t-shirt and shorts as extra clothing, (assuming you might need to wear your fleece in cold, wet weather under your rain set). If it is cold and wet , as it may well be in April and May, to me this doesn't look quite enough to change into at the end of a day's walking when you need to warm up again.
I'm actually thinking of taking 2 pairs of zipoff pants, instead of the shorts. And might also consider long-sleeved shirts (both for cold and to protect against sun), instead of the t-shirts.

fiddletree said:
i say ditch the nightshirt, but keep the fleece. I didn't bring a fleece and very much regretted it.
don't bring lots of compeed, as you can buy it absolutely everywhere
bringing pants that zip off are great, Ioved mine.
The only addition I would make is to bring 3 pairs of socks. I found that sometimes it takes 2 days for socks to dry if you get in late, get rained on, or if it is rainy/humid out, and you want to make sure that you always have clean, dry socks to wear.
Keep the walking poles!!!!! They will really really save your joints. They also help with walking in the mud, and it WILL be muddy that time of year. I walked in April/may of this past year and I found it very useful.
I also brought a silk sleeping bag liner instead of a sleeping bad and it was perfectly fine.
your list seems pretty good, though.
Yes, I think a fleece will be invaluable, since I don't have any other warmer clothes and it might get cold.
I'm definitely thinking of the zip off pants, they seem like a smart idea. And I'll take your advice and bring 3 pairs of socks, as it'll be absolutely essential for me to wear dry socks.

Yes, I'm definitely keeping the walking poles. It feels as if they'd be good to have when on small paths where it's muddy, or just generally when going up or down-hill.

Thanks for the advice.
Hilda
 
#9
atlanticheart said:
Hi all,

I'm planning on walking the camino in April/May next year (starting around April 15th). At the moment I'm trying to compile a packlist, and I've weighed a bunch of things and gotten close to 7kg in weight (incl water). It's a little too heavy, as 10% of my bodyweight would be closer to 5,5kg. So, if you have any thoughts on what I should bring that I haven't, what I won't need...etc. Please let me know.
Weight is in (grams).

In addition to this, i'll be wearing an extra set of clothes, hiking boots.

In backpack, I'll be carrying 6kg
and in the bellypouch 1,28kg
So, all in all that's 7,3 kg...


Hilda
I believe the guideline for the optimum upper boundary of one's weight threshold is not at a 10% limit but rather at a 20% one, and, it is only a guide as well. Were it only at 10% nobody would be able to do longer, unsupported hikes where one needed to carry multiple days of food, pot to cook it, stove, tent, extra water, etc., items that are not needed at all upon the Camino.

As far as your list, I think it is a great one and I doubt i would change much at all-if any. The muscle rub may (or may not) be needed and so I might not carry it. A female would be more inclined to carry a nightshirt, perhaps, when a longer Tee shirt would suffice, as well as serve double duty for wearing during the day. But those are only two arbitrary suggestions. I think you did a great job. Your pack is small and light and your gear is small and light! Buen Camino!
 
#10
John Hussey said:
I believe the guideline for the optimum upper boundary of one's weight threshold is not at a 10% limit but rather at a 20% one, and, it is only a guide as well. Were it only at 10% nobody would be able to do longer, unsupported hikes where one needed to carry multiple days of food, pot to cook it, stove, tent, extra water, etc., items that are not needed at all upon the Camino.

As far as your list, I think it is a great one and I doubt i would change much at all-if any. The muscle rub may (or may not) be needed and so I might not carry it. A female would be more inclined to carry a nightshirt, perhaps, when a longer Tee shirt would suffice, as well as serve double duty for wearing during the day. But those are only two arbitrary suggestions. I think you did a great job. Your pack is small and light and your gear is small and light! Buen Camino!
Well, I think it'll put a lot less strain on your knees, back, feet, if you only carry 10%. And since everyone else in my family has knee-problems, I'd rather be a little careful.

Thanks for the input. =)
Hilda
 
#11
A load of just 10% of your body weight is quite admirable. I googled it and found that most backpacking sources do recommended a maximum not to exceed of 20% of one's body weight and even one at 25%, so your 10% is enviable. Of course that is everything on you, from your naked skin out, including the poles in your hands, and not just the loaded backpack alone.
 
#12
John Hussey said:
A load of just 10% of your body weight is quite admirable. I googled it and found that most backpacking sources do recommended a maximum not to exceed of 20% of one's body weight and even one at 25%, so your 10% is enviable. Of course that is everything on you, from your naked skin out, including the poles in your hands, and not just the loaded backpack alone.
In that case I think I'll be okay. My total load, everything included, comes to 8-8,5 kg. And 20% of my bodyweight would be 11kg.


Hilda
 
#13
Keep the fleece. Keep the walking sticks (this is a matter of personal choice, but I found them invaluable). As for Compeed, take some with you, then stop at pharmacies & buy replacements as needed. Best bet on that though, is to look at the various ways to prevent getting blisters in the first place, so look into that. Keep the sleeping bag too, since some places don't provide blankets & a sleep sack would not be warm enough.

Buen Camino!
Kelly
 
#14
WolverineDG said:
Keep the fleece. Keep the walking sticks (this is a matter of personal choice, but I found them invaluable). As for Compeed, take some with you, then stop at pharmacies & buy replacements as needed. Best bet on that though, is to look at the various ways to prevent getting blisters in the first place, so look into that. Keep the sleeping bag too, since some places don't provide blankets & a sleep sack would not be warm enough.
Thanks for the advice Kelly. I will keep the walking sticks. If I find them unnecessary, as some seem to do, I can just post them to myself and pick them up in Santiago. Although, I think I will find them useful.

I am doing just that. Trying to find every possible way of preventing blisters, particularly as I'm very prone to getting them in the first place. I'm quite happy though, cause I think I found a pair of good boots. Just hope they won't give me any troubles. =)

Buen camino.
Hilda
 
#15
Personally i think your list looks fine!! I'd agree you dotn need lots of compeed to start - tbh i'd say the needle and thread option is better but make sure you have antiseptic spray as well. Compeed is a great preventative but once you have a large blister it's a waste of time.

The "you can buy it as you go along" approach is good for some things but you still have to carry it and sometimes - especially with first aid supplies - you may not have the option of buying it when you need it as some places are quite remote (or you arrive when they're shut!)

Your opack list is absolutely fine...dont panic about it - thats a small weight to carry even for you - Buen camino :)
 
#16
Martin0642 said:
The "you can buy it as you go along" approach is good for some things but you still have to carry it and sometimes - especially with first aid supplies - you may not have the option of buying it when you need it as some places are quite remote (or you arrive when they're shut!)
You know, I just thought about this the other day. Everyone advises you to buy as you go along, but if you think you're going to need it, why not just buy it at home and bring it from the start. You dont have to bring enormous quantities of it, but, you might as well bring it, instead of having to go look for it when you really need it.

Martin0642 said:
Your opack list is absolutely fine...dont panic about it - thats a small weight to carry even for you - Buen camino :)
Thanks. I probably will panic anyway, lol. But, for me, I guess that's part of the camino experience. =)

Hilda
 
#17
I would advise just a little caution on the "if you think you're going to need it" thing but yes - I took a lot of stuff from the off that perhaps we didnt "need" for quite a while. For instance a very well stocked first aid kit - a big pile of instant white coffee sachets .....the first aid kit got restocked twice on the trip and the coffee sachets were invaluable for us and new found friends on several occasions. I also had about 1kg of mixed dried fruit and nuts - took us most of the trip to go through them but they were a lifesaver when we needed them. And of course...consumables get consumed so your pack gets lighter.

If it all gets too much you can always give stuff away/send it on - do try and cut your list down to the essentials but I think in your case you have. Dont worry about the details anymore......they will take care of themselves now if you've been this well organised...just...walk. ;o)
 
#18
I did the walk this past May/June and it was very wet. One thing I wished over and over that I had brought was a cover for my Pack. A bar owner in Roncesvalles was kind enough to help me with a 10 gallon trash bag that I carried with me for the month but it stretched out and got holes in it. The covers are very light weight and take up very little space....definitely worth it. On a completely different note I would recommend hitting the sample section of your drugstore or an out door store. I had single size laundry soaps that were invaluable and very popular on the Camino. As for soaps, shampoos, etc... bring your own. Everyone said you can get stuff in Spain to me as well and they were correct except the problem I ran into is they have nothing in small sizes over there. I ran out of contact solution and ended up buying a such a huge bottle of it that I had to dump half out. If you can bring a gel soap/shampoo combo that would be ideal and just re-fill it. Often people will leave behind larger bottles of stuff or share with you if you all need to re-stock at the same time. And my last input based on your list... BRING THE POLES. I had no idea how valuable mine would be in the rain and mud or up hills.

Buen Camino
Renee
 
#19
Renee,
Thanks for the advice. I'll definitely bring a cover for my pack.
Never heard of laundry soaps before, but I'll have to look into it. At the moment I've been thinking of bringing a shampoo bar, from Lush, and use as shampoo, soap and to wash my clothes in.

Thanks,
Hilda
 
#20
Hi again,

I'm looking at backpacks at the moment, but can't really decide what size to buy. I've been looking at the Osprey Talon 33l, and the Osprey Aura 35l. At the moment I'm leaning more towards the Talon, as it is a little lighter. I'm just concerned I may not be able to fit everything into it. We don't have any good outdoor stores near here, so I can't go and get one fitted. I need to buy it online.

So, if anyone could help me with this I'd be very grateful.

Hilda
 
#21
atlanticheart said:
. We don't have any good outdoor stores near here, so I can't go and get one fitted. I need to buy it online.
This may not be helpful but I really would not recommend buying your backpack online. You may be lucky but you may have 30+ days of unnecessary pain. You really should get to somewhere with a selection of packs and find someone who knows about them there to advise you.

Buen Camino
William
 
#22
Thanks William.
I tried a sports shop here, but they weren't very helpful. Didn't know much about it, and basically just patted the backpack and said "This is a good backpack". The nearest outdoor store is 2hours away. I'll go to another sports shop and see if they are more helpful...


Hilda
 
#23
Hi Hilda, I had used the Osprey Aura 50 which was great! No regrets. The only thing is that while they are adjustable they come in different sizes for your height, length of torso, etc. I had started with one size and had to try on a couple before we got the right fit. Even with the right fit we had to throw a 10 pound bean bag in there and adjust the straps just to make sure. That's what a good outdoor store will do for you. I used REI. Not sure you have them over there. If you have no choice but to order on line then I would do so now so you have time to return it and get a different size.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
#24
7kgs including the pack?
Excellent ... though it will feel twice as heavy of course by the third day, refuges are littered with items discarded.

Assume your camera has a specialist fitted battery? Otherwise you could leave the charger and just buy alkalines on the way. And hope there's a corkscrew on that pocket knife.

Charger for mobile? Depends on use. If you take the phone as a tool, you can tell people only to text you and only switch it on for 5 minutes in the evening - and don't phone anyone. This way you will be in contact and have one for emergencies but it won't take over your life and you won't need to charge it up, so you won't need a charger. It is so rare to be alone and silent now - when those conditions arise people tend to reach for diversions (such as phones and recorded music) and then never find out what happens if they stay alone and silent for a while ....

I must admit, Personally I stay away from the chocolate option because of the severe blood-sugar drop twenty minutes afterwards, though I know loads swear by it. I always carry bread, sausage and cheese.

I would add a napkin - very handy.

The heavier cold weather stuff can be left until closer to. Last year I was down that way in April (in a camper!) and from Logrono east it was all heavy snow and blizzards and a man got lost and died on the Napoleon Pass. Two years before I was pilgriming in March (from Moissac) and it was mainly a delight - well, ok, I nearly got it wrong with the windchill up on the Napoleon in March, snow still up there in places and some parts of the track blocked. Left it too long to put on extra clothing and when I stopped in a windbreak to do it couldn't get my hands to move to open my pack .. bit worrying for a bit.

and I wouldn't do without the poles (at least one anyway). Twist your ankle and you can't move without a pole ... and dogs can attack ... verr handy.

You have your fab light backpack - but agree with the 'try before you buy' comment. - try first, and don't be embarrassed. Take a pack of laundry with you to the shop and load up the pack so you can see what its like with weight in it. Take your time and, again, don't be embarrassed - it's a shop. Once you get down to two or three packs ask the assistant to leave you alone and just really take your time.
Mind you, does mean you may make your choice and then buy it from Ebay.
 
#25
David,

The 7kg, which are now down to 6,5kg thanks to chosing a lighter backpack are including a waistbag, where I'll carry money, passport, tickets, camera etc. Just some small stuff (but the weight adds up).
I've bought a pack now, a blue Osprey Talon 44lit, and it weighs just over 1kg. I was also considering a Haglöfs 40lit, but I think the deciding factor was the weight and the Haglöfs weighed .65kg more than the Osprey. I'm glad the pack fit well as I bought it online (the osprey one that is, the Haglöfs I bought in a store in town).

Yes, it does have one of those lithium batteries, but I got an extra one as a package deal, so I won't have to charge it as often. Unfortunately, no. No corkscrew on it. I'll have to rely on other people for opening wine bottles.

Well, my parents want to be able to contact me, so I think I will have to bring a charger. Plus, it's an old phone so the batteries wont last as long. I won't have it on all day though, just in the afternoons.

I certainly hope I'll be spared the snow. We don't even have snow up here in April, so I hope it'll have gone in Spain once I get there. I do not like snow. I'm thrilled we've barely got any snow so far this winter. Lots and lots of rain though.

I think I am going to bring the poles. Have a feeling I'll be glad I did when I walk up and down mountains.

Hilda
 
#27
Hehe, well not yet. =)

It's not that I don't like the look of it, but I don't like walking in it. And I don't like the slush and definitely don't like the cold.


Hilda
 

vinotinto

Active Member
#28
atlanticheart said:
I'll have to rely on other people for opening wine bottles.
Well, you can always get one at a shop somewhere - I bought a little kit (corkscrew, wine cork) for about .75 cents. The bigger cities seem to be full of thrift-type stores with all sorts of knick-knacks.

atlanticheart said:
I think I am going to bring the poles.
Hope so, because my two Lekkis were a godsend. They were helpful going up (allowed my upper body to help) and coming down, especially when things were wet. I've heard it said that they can take up to 25% of the strain off of your feet. I know they helped my aching dogs.

Speaking of the canine variety, I wouldn't get too worried about them. During my trek in the summer of 07, they all seemed pretty bored with pilgrims. But it never hurts to be prepared.

By the way, by the time you hit Logrono you should have a better idea of what you need and don't need. You can stop by the Planeta Agua outdoor store there and get what you need. They were quite helpful to me during my break day there (I stayed in a hotel near the cathedral for two nights), and even showed me two streets in town where the best restaurants are. I had one of my Camino's tastiest meals at a restaurant there - complete with great atmosphere, enthusiastic service, a really nice rioja, and a complementary half-bottle of orujo (no, I couldn't finish it).

Br. David said:
but agree with the 'try before you buy' comment.
Absolutely. I had mine sized and adjusted by a clerk at REI, and then wore it around the store for two hours with weighted sacks. However, as I discovered later, it was a bit too big for the Camino. But it fit great, and it was the best wrong pack I could've bought... :wink:

atlanticheart said:
Thanks for the advice. I'll definitely bring a cover for my pack.
If you have a poncho that also covers your pack, and a liner inside the pack to protect everything, then I think a pack cover will simply be redundant, and merely add extra weight. I had brought one as well, but ended up mailing it off to Santiago from Najera (an option for your extra gear, the post office at Santiago will hold your box for approx. 30 days or so). But if you're going the "rainsuit" route, then you'll need a cover.

atlanticheart said:
I'm definitely thinking of the zip off pants
I used two pairs of North Face zip-off pants. At first I left the legs on, but soon I took them off due to the heat. I didn't even wear the legs when it rained - bare legs are easier to dry. But since you are going during a colder season, the flexibility of pantlegs/no pantlegs should serve you well.

atlanticheart said:
And I'll take your advice and bring 3 pairs of socks
That should be fine - a woman who wrote a memoir about the Way recommended this rotation: one pair on your feet, one drying on the outside of your pack, and one pair in the pack. Of course, you could probably get away with two pairs if you had to, but your pack seems pretty light at this point anyway. I wore two pairs at a time: a liner sock and a heavier outer sock. So I ended up carrying a total of 6 pairs (had more, but got rid of them).

Well, it looks like you'll be starting out pretty well-prepared. Getting ready is a fun part of the Camino. I know I had a blast preparing and researching for the Way! :) :arrow:
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
#29
Agree with just about everything said there - and the planning is really exciting - then about seven days before you go you get the 'Gulp!'. "Oh my God! I've told everyone so I won't be able to back out now but I don't know if I will be able to do it, and I won't know anyone, and I can't speak Spanish, and I don't know why I thought I wanted to do it anyway anymore" ...all normal, it will be fine, life is good.

About the dogs - apologies, from my post it looks like you wade through avenues of dogs - not like that at all, just that in early season (March) I met a dog that really did want to attack, which was rather scary - though it could have happened anywhere. Having a pole was great because I felt pretty secure with it .. so I outfaced it (and left it for the next pilgrims, alas). If a dog does get a little anti-social take your hat off. I don't know why, maybe auras or something, but it seems to work.

The sock thing - they also make good gloves if you get caught in a cold spell ... I wore those anti-blister socks, like two socks in one, an inner and an outer - same, though not as flexible, as wearing the two pairs, one slim, one thick ... oh, take the right socks with you when buying boots - and ideally go shopping for hours and then go to the boot shop in the afternoon as your feet swell during the day, and after walking around for a few hours will be more like the size they will be on the Camino. If you want painful feet buy boots in the morning.

By the way, I know there is no ankle support but I'm thinking of doing my next one in my Merrell sandals - anyone have any experience of this?
 
#30
"Oh my God! I've told everyone so I won't be able to back out now but I don't know if I will be able to do it, and I won't know anyone, and I can't speak Spanish, and I don't know why I thought I wanted to do it anyway anymore"

Bro David,
Oh no! I've done the same thing ! told everyone, :oops: help!.....

I walked 71 minutes today and felt pretty good 8) ....wow! big deal... ha ha!... Could I have done 5 more of these?! after the first 71? No way! How did you all do it :?: :!: :shock:

Clarisa
 
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Anonymous

Guest
#31
Hi Clarisa - you are going to get a lot of responses to that I think, I hope so ... you know, it isn't the same, walking round your neighbourhood .. there is something about the camino, other pilgrims, what you are doing ... something about the whole thing .. and, then you start to think how many millions have done this ... and what little equipment did they have then .... you will be fine. And if you remember to stop and have a break regularly - and look back to see where you've been and how far you have come....

Only my opinion but I think the hardest thing to do with walking daily distances is if the pilgrim has booked an exact amount of time to do it, with an aircraft waiting on the runway at Santiago, as it were, .. it can lend an air of desperation ... I feel tired today but I MUST get to that particular refuge tonight or I'll be late and never catch up ... I would like to visit the town and start off late tomorrow, just go a few km - but I can't or I'll miss my flight! - my shin hurts and I need a day off, but I can't, I have to keep moving - to me it seems best to have a few days in hand so that there is no rushing to the end but only an endless present. An endless present. And if you do get to Santiago with those days in hand - relax and enjoy, or go on to Finisterre ...

But the nerves and so on, Clarisa, is really quite normal. And the walking, well, that is all you have to do. It isn't a route march and you haven't been shopping, done the laundry, finished off a project, visited parents and mowed their lawn, and then squeezed in a couple of hours to 'do a walk', you have all day, every day. 12 daylight hours? even with 3 hours on and a whole 1 hour off every three hours? 9 hours walking ... even at the slowest pace you will do 18+ miles (30km) easily ...and there are lots of tips.
A good one I took up was, when entering a large town, especially at the end of the day ..stop and have a refresher break before you go in. Use your flannel to freshen your face, boots off and let the air in for a few minutes .. then start in to the town fresh and relaxed. It makes a huge difference when you get back in to that petrol smelly loud and dangerous environment.

Tell you though, and I am not one of those fit ones who seem to romp over mountains every summer, I'm oldish and too heavy and carrying the results of 10 or 11 bone breaks over the years (I was rather active in my younger days, got into harms way a few times - so fairly knocked about under the skin), but ... normal walking round the shops or the park, you walk in a certain way and you don't realise it but it is rather tiring ... but, there is another way to walk. I can't really describe it very well but it is more like consciously relaxing the muscles and sort of loping along with a much longer stride. The strides are slower than 'city' walking paces but cover more ground ...and you don't get tired, you sort of sweep along - so try relaxing the muscles and lengthening the stride - - - anyone know how to explain that better?

Also, my observation experience is that generally female legs seem to have knees turned inwards a bit when they cycle or walk, so you need to turn them out a bit (can almost feel the responses to that coming in :? ) so that they are straight. Something to do with different hips?

I'll leave now ...
 
#32
cbarua said:
I walked 71 minutes today and felt pretty good 8) ....wow! big deal... ha ha!... Could I have done 5 more of these?! after the first 71? No way! How did you all do it :?: :!: :shock:

Clarisa
When I found myself in a tough spot (often at the beginning, less so the more I walked), I would always tell myself "you got yourself into this mess, you can get yourself out." :lol: Soldier on! You're burnin' daylight, as my father would tell me. Stiff upper lip, etc. Anything to get my feet moving again.

How do we all do it? I don't know. Somehow, we just do. :arrow:

Kelly
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#33
Clarisa,

Br. David, WolverineDG and so many more, I’m sure…have the right of it…training hikes are just that “training”. And to be a bit crass “training sucks!”. How often do we consider the hours and hours of training necessary to field that college football team, the auto racing crew or the hiker/walker about to take on a long distance adventure? We probably don’t! All we see is the two hours, or more, of action!
Clarisa, the commitment you’ve made to walk the Milky Way is a fabulous opportunity to see more, sense more…experience more, than any other event you’ve ever watched before…because, now it’s personal! You are the center of the action…you are in control…you set the pace. As Br. David so aptly states, “…I think the hardest thing to do with walking daily distances is if the pilgrim has booked an exact amount of time to do it)”, that’s so true!. Retain control of Your Camino, rather than surrender it to plane schedules, or some such.
Long distance runners speak of the “runner’s high”, that magical point where your body and your surroundings become one. Instead of thinking about the miles to go to finish…you almost become “surprised” that you are finished. I’m sure you’ll find this to be true as you journey along the Camino. At one point you’ll look ahead to the next hill or mountain and, rather than thinking “oh, that’s so far to go”, you’ll think…”I wonder what’s on the other side?” And, before you know it…you’ll be there.
Come Clarisa, join with us on this most wonderful adventure…an adventure for a life time!
Buen Camino!
Arn
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#35
Br David,
I walked about 50kms in Crocs sandals and a further 650kms of the camino frances in hiking sandals - not very good ones at that.
Now, I didn't plan on walking in sandals but the heavy rain and mud we walked through for the first few days at the end of August resulted in large blisters on both heels.
Yes, I had on Bridgedale sock liners, over vaselined feet, with gortex, Seal Skins socks and my trusty boots that took me over the snow at the Alps last year - but we walked through rivers of mud, torrent courses and pelting rain. Poor socks and boots didn't stand a chance!!
I put Compeed on both heels and after two days, the plasters disintergrated and stuck to my socks. I only realised this when I had already pulled the sock off the right foot, and it took the Compeed and skin off with it. When I tried to take the left sock off it started pulling the skin away from the heel so I had to cut the sock off. Very nasty!!
I had to put dressings on my weeping heels, cover them with sports tape, place a wash-up sponge on top of that (scourer side out) and then put on a sock and sandal. I saw a 'medico' at Lorca and then bought hiking sandals at Logrono.
The sandals were great - especially on the flat sections and across the meseta but because they were a little thin on tread I could feel every stone and pebble. I bought inner soles and glued those on to the sandals after which they were fine.
 

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Anonymous

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#36
Awww ... I was eating a Cheddar cheese and strawberry jam wholemeal bread sandwich when I scrolled down to those photos ..... aaawww, Sil! Warning in future please - especially as the left heel looks like cheddar and the right like strawberry! (lol) Crikey! how sore that must have been, and how brave you are, and how frightened now are the pilgrims going in the New Year! I think I would have bought a donkey at that stage.

Thanks for that info ... I think its the way I shall go next time ... very enterprising, the glueing in the inserts .. my Merrells have a good thick ridged sole, though the inner sole (where the foot stands as it were) does smell if it isn't scrubbed regularly.
I do so dislike my feet being bound. They are wide, really wide, and it is so difficult to get wide boots. I've yet to go into a hiking/trekking shop that has an assistant that knows anything about their stock ..except, maybe, Itchyfeet down in Bath (West Country of England) as they all seem to be going off on adventures so they know their kit. The usual answer is that they aren't made wide so that they support the feet (nonsense to me). What I still have are my cheap pair of Hi-Tec Sierras which are much wider than anything else I've found. They don't make them now of course.
 

KiwiNomad06

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy-Santiago(2008) Cluny-Conques+prt CF(2012)
#37
Clarisa,
It's not the same as the Camino I know, but I got very nervous just before I started my cycling adventure in the Loire region last year. I had told everyone I was doing it , and a lot of children from the school I was teaching at had drawn these wonderful pictures of me cycling in France.... so I had to do it!
The week before I started cycling I lost a lot of sleep. So eventually I got up and wrote a list of all the things I thought of that could go wrong. In the calm light of day, I realised there was a solution to pretty much all of those things. Then just before I left, my French friend, a very prayerful Catholic, gave me big hug, and told me that my guardian angel would be looking after me. Just as well. The only bad thing that happened to me the whole time, happened on the very first day of cycling! And it wasn't something that I had even worried about on the list I had written down!
I got over my initial fears, and I got over my bad experience on Day 1, and then I had the most amazing five weeks cycling in and out of villages etc. It was a real adventure.
 
#38
vinotinto said:
But if you're going the "rainsuit" route, then you'll need a cover.
Well, I was hoping I'd be able to have the cover on the pack when sending it on the airplane. I'm brining both walking sticks and a swiss army knife, so I can't exactly bring it as carry-on.

Br. David said:
Agree with just about everything said there - and the planning is really exciting - then about seven days before you go you get the 'Gulp!'. "Oh my God! I've told everyone so I won't be able to back out now but I don't know if I will be able to do it, and I won't know anyone, and I can't speak Spanish, and I don't know why I thought I wanted to do it anyway anymore" ...all normal, it will be fine, life is good.
Well, I'm already in that phase... It's to do with always being afraid of failure, something I hope to rid myself of during my walk.

Br. David said:
And the walking, well, that is all you have to do. It isn't a route march and you haven't been shopping, done the laundry, finished off a project, visited parents and mowed their lawn, and then squeezed in a couple of hours to 'do a walk', you have all day, every day. 12 daylight hours? even with 3 hours on and a whole 1 hour off every three hours? 9 hours walking ... even at the slowest pace you will do 18+ miles (30km) easily ...and there are lots of tips.
That is very true. And I feel, quite often when I'm out walking, that I'm wasting time that I could have spent doing something else. Which is rather ridiculous as I don't do that much every day. But, on the camino that won't be the case, because I won't have anything else to do but the walking.

Arn said:
training hikes are just that “training”. And to be a bit crass “training sucks!”.
Arn, so true. I don't really enjoy my training, even though I do enjoy walking and the time spent on my own. I think I have negative feelings towards that word, "training". So I believe, and I hope, I will enjoy the camino much more.

Sil, that looks extremely painful. I have extremely sensitive feet so I'm expecting blister, even though I sincerely hope I'll be spared the pain and the trouble.

KiwiNomad06 said:
So eventually I got up and wrote a list of all the things I thought of that could go wrong. In the calm light of day, I realised there was a solution to pretty much all of those things.
I did that for the camino, before actually booking my tickets, and came to the same conclusion you did. There is a solution to most of the problems you can imagine will happen, and then neither of them will happen to you, but something you didn't see coming. Just like you mentioned. It's very typical.


Hilda
 
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Anonymous

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#39
You sound pretty competent and successful to me Hilda - you certainly have a strong name. I don't think anyone can 'fail' this pilgrimage ... it may not be what you expected, and the unexpected will definitely happen, so you have to expect the unexpected, but .. ermm .. where was I? ... but you can't fail, all you can have is an alternate experience.
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#40
Hilda,

Gosh young lady...I've been reading and rereading all the entries since you first began this thread back in September. IMHO, this thread beings so much information together...it nearly stands alone!

And, you, how you've grown in so many different ways...your confidence, your insight into yourself and others...fairly drips off the pages. You've made your planning...our planning!
Thanks...
Arn
 

omar504

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016,2017,2018
#41
I'll add my 2 bobs worth-I think your list is pretty good. I hate those damn poles! but you seem to want to take them. The pack getting wet comment can be overcome by using a liner which can double for wet clothes-leave those plastic bags at home!
8kgs seems a lot-I carried that weight from L Puy but had a tent and sleeping mat(which you certainly don't need)
 

vinotinto

Active Member
#42
atlanticheart said:
Well, I was hoping I'd be able to have the cover on the pack when sending it on the airplane. I'm brining both walking sticks and a swiss army knife, so I can't exactly bring it as carry-on.
Hmmm...I dunno if a regular rain cover will protect the pack from airline luggage workers, hard suitcases, and airport luggage conveyer tracks (the belts and buckles can get caught in them, or tangled up in other bags). Indeed, I don't think they even cover the entire pack - they leave the straps free. You may want to look into getting a backpack duffel bag that's specially for air travel.

I used one that was made by Osprey. It's strong, so it protects the entire pack (and anything you have strapped on the pack's outside) from damage. Plus, it comes with a nametag holder and a carrying strap. And even though it can hold the biggest packs, it folds down into a small size (I mailed mine to Santiago at the first opportunity, along with the other stuff I knew I'd need later, but didn't want to carry). I also tied a ribbon on mine for easy identification in baggage claim.

Of course, you can simply use a heavy-duty trash-bag for that as well. And some airlines will also provide their own version of a trash bag (Continental did, at least at one airport I saw).

Anyway, I'm sure whatever you do will work out. Buen Camino! :arrow:
 
#43
Thanks for the tips, vinotinto. I was a bit worried the raincover would be too thin for airtravel. And no, they don't cover the entire pack, but I was thinking of maybe trying to tie the straps back, under the cover... But, perhaps I need to look into buying an airline bag. I could, as you say, just mail it ahead to Santiago...

It's always smart to put a ribbon, or whatever, on any bag you send, because most stuff looks the same these days. A million and one black bags - difficult to know which is yours.

Arn, and David, thank you. =)


Hilda
 

Deirdre

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (2007), Camino Francés (2008), Camino Portugués (2010), Camino Aragonés - from Lourdes (2012)
#44
I'll add my 2 cents as well.... regarding the sleeping mat... I would say to bring it. I walked in July and August 2007. We have 5 sleeping bags in our household.... and all of them too heavy/hot to take in the summer. So I opted for the mat and a sheet and fleece blanket. They served quite well, but next time I would invest in a lightweight sleeping bag. Quechua, a French company has some that are quite reasonably priced. Where I live in the US is a VERY pricey area... and all the 1/2 kg sleeping bags were around USD$200. Since I'm not a camper nor an avid hiker, it seemed like an investment I didn't want to make. However, for the 40 Euros or so from Quechua, I will definitely purchase one for the next time.

As far as the mat? I would say definitely take it. I had one and while I didn't need it often, when I did need it, it was invaluable. On the few occasions when we had to sleep on a floor or a hard banquette, I was really happy to have it. We ended up on the floor in Ribadiso and a group of Italian cyclists who got beds (we did not) graciously gave us their mats to sleep - the floor was hard and it was very cold in Galicia. That small comfort can make a floor palatable...a mat weighs little and can come in very handy when you need it....or you might lend it to another pilgrim in need.
AMDG,
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
#45
The outlet for Quechua is/are the Decathlon stores - I like their products, still have one of their poles, the 500.

By the way, buying poles .. as they're telescopic you need to check that they don't rattle inside when you use them - you won't believe how many do, especially the three piece models... verr annoying (the 500 doesn't, and is two piece).
 

vinotinto

Active Member
#46
Deirdre said:
regarding the sleeping mat... I would say to bring it.
I second that, and recommend a foam one vs. a self-inflating model. I brought a short, self-inflating one, and never used it. I never needed it at night because I always got a bed. But if I'd had the foam type, I would've used it during walking breaks to lie down or sit upon.

My German friends would use theirs to lie down on during daily rest periods. I, however, was afraid to use my self-inflating one for that purpose because I worried about damage (and subsequent leakage) from rocks, sticks, mowed wheat stalks, or other pokey things. So I had to sit/lay on the bare ground with no padding while they were able to relax on their foam pads.

If I ever return to the Camino, I'll leave the self-inflating pad home and bring a foam pad. :arrow:
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#47
Deirdre said: So I had to sit/lay on the bare ground with no padding while they were able to relax on their foam pads.
I have a small of the back problem...so, sitting on my sleeping bag...hunched over or, taking a rest stop...hunched over...sucks and is both uncomfortable and...fatiguing.

When you stop to REST...you should regain as much strength as possible!

I apologize up front about my seemingly need to address most comments with..."on the AT", but it's my only point of reference, other than the forces, of course. But the AT was about me making myself as comfortable as possible, while the forces gave orders and I followed them.

May I suggest, (getting back to the original thread), a Crazy Creek trekking chair (stadium chair)...sold by many outlets mentioned here. The chair folds up, attaches easily to your pack. Completely folds down...so you can use it under your bag. It's easy to clean and, most of all, on the trail...you get genuine rest!

regards
Arn
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#48
Outside Pamplona we came across a couple starting off on their first day with a golf-trolley. On it they had 2 folding chairs, umbrellas, suitcases, a camping stove and a groundsheet and two rolled foam mattresses.
Knowing what the terrain was like between Pamplona and Puente La Reina, we tried to warn them about the steep, narrow, rutted, muddy, stony paths but they were unfazed. (I don't know how far they got because we never saw them again.)
If one really feels that they need to take a folding chair, why not buy one of those walking-stick-cum-chair contraptions? I googled them and there are a number of nifty models available like this one from Campmore.
 

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vinotinto

Active Member
#49
Arn said:
a Crazy Creek trekking chair
sillydoll said:
walking-stick-cum-chair contraptions
You guys are killing me with this stuff... :shock: :wink: You shouldn't need any sort of chair contraption, especially as you get closer to Santiago (some of the states have even gone overboard and made little pilgrim parks with picnic tables in what seems like every half-kilometer or so).

While there are some remote stages (like the one Sil mentioned), there are plenty of towns/bars/cafes along the way where you can take a proper sit-down break - and have some refreshments to boot. If that fails, find a spot and use your foam pad, or prop your pack up against something and use it for a backrest. Heck, if you hump all this extra crapola along, then sooner or later you'll need a chair - probably one with wheels - because your feet will be hosed (as I can attest).

Take it from one who almost blew the Camino by bringing too much junk in order to prepare for any eventuality - don't go overboard! If you find you absolutely have to add to your kit, then you can do so in Spain. Pamplona, Logrono, and Burgos have outdoor stores. Remember, you aren't hiking the Himalayas. :arrow:
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#50
Again, I only suggest the Crazy Creek (take a look as what it is on the REI website)...it takes the place of mat, seats with no backs, road sides with no parks, wet seats, keeps your seat from getting wet and, for someone with a painful small of the back problem...of a proven "personal" benefit.

That's probably the key here VT, it's a personal benefit!

Based on all the solid info I've read here...I've already chucked many things I considered "Gottos". Heck, on your recommendation alone I'm looking for a vino flask! Something I never would have thought of or considered!

Arn
 

vinotinto

Active Member
#51
Arn said:
for someone with a painful small of the back problem...of a proven "personal" benefit.

That's probably the key here VT, it's a personal benefit!
True enough - I certainly had no problem carrying a heavier load than most for personal benefit, and as an AT guy you know what you need on a trail. Indeed, I don't think I even came close to the holy grail of a 10k load. But one aspect of the Camino is simplicity - something that I, a natural packrat, needed to learn. I just needed instruction more than most, and in a harsher classroom (guess that's why I joined the Marines instead of the Coast Guard). :wink:

There were so many chairs available on the Way that I never seriously considered carrying one - and I don't remember seeing anyone else with one either (although here and there I did fantasize about sitting alongside a barren part of the Way on a camp chair, contentedly sipping cognac and nursing a stogie while watching pilgrims trek by - but I'm a bit twisted, so pay me no mind).

All said and done, I'm just trying to save you (and others) some poundage - because every ounce counts - especially since many times on the Camino you'll be adding extra weight, such as food and water in the more remote stages.

I'm remembering the times where my feet hurt so bad it took most of what I had just to put one in front of the other. And if I hadn't gotten ruthless and abandoned/gave away a bunch of gear (and it wasn't cheap stuff, either), I would probably be lamenting my failure to complete the Way vs. celebrating my entrance into Santiago. Bottom line, I want you & the rest of the class of 2008 to graduate with honors. But in the end, it's your Camino, and you gotta do what you gotta do...and I'll be pulling for you all the way. :arrow:
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#52
VT wrote: and I'll be pulling for you all the way
I'll take you up on that: let's see, in the cart VT will be pulling, I'll put:

a case of Newcastle ale
two real lounge chairs
a ten person tent for parties
two cases of arujo
and, just for VT...two boxes of fine Cuban stoggies

How's that VT?

Nothing's too good for my friends.
Arn

PS...now MUSH!!!
 

vinotinto

Active Member
#53
Arn said:
PS...now MUSH!!!
You must be drinking bourbon through a straw to write that kind of stuff... :wink: You better share the orujo with me though - it goes good with a stogie when no port is available. And I could probably pull a humvee after four or five shots... :mrgreen:
 
#54
Hi all,

I just bought a so called "Airporter" to transport my backpack in as I'll have to check it due to a swiss army knife. Thing is, it's a one-size-fits-all thing, and it is at least twice the size of my backpack. Anyway, I was thinking it'd probably be easier to send it in something that's not quite as big as the airporter. Any ideas for what I might use to send it in? Is a plastic bag okay?


Bought raincover too, which was a size too big so I need to return it and buy a smaller one. Also bought new rain clothes, Marmot Precip Pants and GoLite Gamut Jacket. I'll need to send the jacket back and change it for another size...

After this I'll have all the gear I need. And man, am I starting to get nervous! Good nervous, though, most of the time. With the occassional "Oh my god what have I gotten myself into! I must be crazy!" :D

It's very nice to be able to log into the forum and get an answer to any question that might pop up though.

Buen camino,
Hilda
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#55
Hi Hilda,
Our CSJ always recommends that people carry their backpack into the cabin and send their 'weapons' through in a smaller bag postal tube (to accommodate the walking pole).
Last year three pilgrims' backpacks didn't arrive in Spain with their flight and one person was held up for three days in Madrid.
Check the airline's ruling on weight and dimensions allowed in the cabin. Dimension is often more important than the weight as the bag must fit into the overhead compartment. Generally they are:
46cm X 25cm X 45cm.
We tied ours into shape with packing tape!
 
#56
Hilda

If your pack is small enough to carry on to the aircraft - why not simply leave the knife? Many people do this and either buy a cheap pen knife or borrow or buy if anything becomes essential along the way such as scissors.

If you are going to check in your rucksack as I usually do, I either use the wrapping service available at some airports or do it myself - a heavy duty plastic bag, cling film wrapping or just broad tape on some occassions.

But many walkers simply retract the shoulder straps and double the waist band aorund their pack and throw it on the conveyor belt!

I personally wouldn't carry the extra weight of a carry bag although somepeople do and then post it to Santiago - another option.

Buen Camino

John
 
#57
Hi,

Thanks for the advice. I'll probably take it as a carry-on. It's just a cm or two too high, but I'm hoping to get away with it. Would save time at the airport too, if you don't have to stand in line to check your luggage.

I'll probably ditch the swiss army knife, and buy one in St Jean, or somewhere else along the way. Might be good to have my own one (I was going to take my mum's). Then I could mail it home to myself when I get to Santiago. Only other thing I'm bringing that could be construed as a "weapon" is a combined spoon, fork, knife. But it's plastic, so I don't think it'll be a problem. It's not very sharp, not more so than the knives they already have on the flight in the food boxes.
I've decided not bringing my walking sticks, I figured I could probably find a good stick somewhere on the path, if I really need one.

Anyway, thanks so much for the help.

Hilda
 
#58
Good call about going carry-on. I always try to remember that there are just two basic categories of luggage: carry-on and lost. If they quibble about the plastic knife, just leave it at the security point. Annoying, I know, but replacable with ease.
 
#60
Hi,

Hope you have a fantastic trip! I'd ditch the purse if you have a belly pouch, it's just extra weight. If it rains for days as it did last August/Sept, three pairs of socks are good, I was happy to have a dry pair, when the other two were still wet. In the torrential rains we got, was really happy for the pack cover, can get a really lightweight one (I bought mine at REI), also, good to use a garbage liner inside the pack. I had brought a quick dry wash cloth, and really wanted a real one.

If it's hot, pick up an extra thing of water somewhere. I got a bit of heat exhaustion a couple of times, and ran out of water on other ocassions (Longrono to Najera, walking into Zubiri, the stretch after Carrion de los Condes, if it's hot, etc.) Also, something lightweight for your stomach. There was a "gripe" going around through most of my last camino, not always a farmacia in town.

All the best,
Liz
 
#61
Hi Again,

Ooh, test the Marmot gear before you go. I bought a Marmot jacket at REI the saleswoman swore was the best,and I was soaked through first time I wore it. You can always spray something on it at home, but harder to take care of on the camino.
Liz
 
#62
amgirl5 said:
Ooh, test the Marmot gear before you go. I bought a Marmot jacket at REI the saleswoman swore was the best,and I was soaked through first time I wore it. You can always spray something on it at home, but harder to take care of on the camino.
Liz
I actually did try the pants in the shower, before even cutting the tags off or anything. I had a horrible experience trying to get my money back for another set of "rainclothes" that didn't work. So I soaked them in the shower and they didn't get wet. Did the same with the jacket. Haven't tried them out in the rain yet though, we either haven't had any rain or I've been at work when it's rained. Very typical, the one time you actually want it to rain is obviously when it wont rain.

Thanks for the advice,
Hilda
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#63
Hilda,

I've been impressed by the diligence you've shown in making your choices in equipment. You've got a true sense of what it takes to make your Camino a positive and rewarding experience.

I sincerely hope we meet up along the Way.
Arn
 

alipilgrim

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2005), Frances (2007), Madrid/Frances (2011), 1/2 VdP (2012),
#64
Just thought I'd throw my 2 cents in on the knife issue - I highly recommend taking one (checking a small bag on the plane). I found on my two caminos that my lunches were almost always roadside and the knife was invaluable for peeling oranges, slicing salami/bread for sandwiches, etc. and of course the corkscrew on the Swiss Army knife for the bottle of vino at the end of the day!

And the walking stix - also invaluable, one for balance when crossing streams on those slippery rocks and traversing the inevitable mud pits that many earthern paths become after heavy rains, as well as stability for climbing slopes, and adding a nice rhythm to follow when you are tired and just can't bear to put one foot in front of the other.

Please reconsider....
 
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
#65
take out the muscle rub and put in a bit of Vaseline/petroleum jelly. If you coat your toes and feet every morning with the stuff you won´t have so much trouble with blisters or other friction problems.

I also toss a tin of sardines or mejillones or tuna in the bottom of my pack before I leave. When all else fails, I at least have something to eat while I wait for the helicopters to arrive!

Rebekah
 
#66
Arn said:
I've been impressed by the diligence you've shown in making your choices in equipment. You've got a true sense of what it takes to make your Camino a positive and rewarding experience.
Thanks Arn. I'm trying to make this experience as painfree as possible :)

alipilgrim, thanks for the advice re the knife (which I'm definitely bringing) and the walking stick. I'm thinking of just picking up a stick somewhere along the road, should I need one. Because, I know I don't like walking with them in general, so they'd spend most of the time strapped to the backpack, being in the way. I can't use my raincover on the pack if I have walking sticks hanging off it. Plus, for me, the pack is heavy enough as it is. But, thanks for the input.

Rebekah, thanks for the advice, but I'm not a big fan of petroleum jelly. I've been brought up with just natural oils and essential oils in my creams, lotions etc. so I don't really like mineral oils in creams.
Think I'm gonna go with a chocolate bar and some raisins, dried apricots or figues etc, instead of fish. Not really my cup of tea. :)


8 more days before I leave... I am so nervous!!!! What have I gotten myself into?! lol

Hilda
 
#67
you have got yourself into something wonderful. many will be with you and behind you. My daughter and I will be about a week behind you. Enjoy the Camino, it's a blessed experience.
 

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