• PLEASE NOTE: Please think twice before you travel to Spain now. More here.

Search over 55.000 Camino Questions

A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it


Advertisement
Camino Maps
A collection of Camino Maps from the Camino Forum Store
Camino Masks
12 different designs, shipped world wide from Santiago.

My stages on the Mozárabe from Almería -- April 2018

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
A forum member asked about my stages, prodding me into action! I was one of the forum mob that started in Almería in April. I wound up not walking with many of the mob, so I hope some of them will post stages as well. Since some are still out walking, those lucky dogs, we should wait till everyone is back on the forum so we can have some general discussion and opinion-sharing. I am one who thinks this is a great camino. The infrastructure is fabulous, especially from Almería to Granada, getting to visit Almería, Córdoba, and Granada was wonderful, and the springtime flowers, snow in the mountains, and greenery everywhere were just spectacular. I also posted live from the camino, at least from Granada until I got to the Vdlp in Mérida. https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/no-mob—just-me-—-on-the-mozárabe.54735/ And a link to my findpenguins blog should be below in my signature.

Happy to answer questions! Buen camino, Laurie

Day 1 -- Almería to Rioja (15 km). I took a bus back to Almería that afternoon to be able to attend the group gathering with association angels that night. But there is an albergue there.

Day2 -- Rioja to Alboloduy (23 km). Strong walkers could combine days 1 and 2 but this day's walk had some tough descents and a fair amount of elevation gain.

Day 3 -- Alboloduy to Abla (27 km). Good albergue

Day 4 -- Abla to La Calahorra (35 km). Very nice small hotel, about 20-25 euros.

Day 5 -- La Calahorra to Guadix (32 km). Albergues

Day 6 -- Guadix to La Peza (22 km). good albergue

Day 7 -- La Peza to Quentar (30 km). albergue and hotels

Day 8 -- Quentar to Granada (20 km). convent and hotels

Day 9 -- Granada to Moclín (35 km). albergues and casa rural

Day 10 -- Moclín to Alcalá la Real (23 km). hotel

Day 11 -- Alcalá la Real to Alcaudete (23 km) hotel

Day 12 -- Alcaudete to Baena (24 km) albergue and hotel

Day 13 -- Baena to Santa Cruz (43 km) hostal.

Day 14 -- Santa Cruz to Córdoba (26 km). youth hostels and tons of hotels, etc.

Day 15 -- Córdoba to Villaharta (39 km). bar has rooms

Day 16 -- Villaharta to Alcaracejos (36 km). hostal

Day 17 -- Alcaracejos to Hinojosa del Duque (21 km). albergue and hostal

Day 18 -- Hinojosa del Duque to Monterrubio de la Serena (33 km). hotel

Day 19 -- Monterrubio to Campanario (40 km). pension and albergue

Day 20 -- Campanario to Medellín (37 km). hostal

Day 21 -- Medellín to Mérida (40 km). albergue and hotels

Day 22 -- Mérida to Aljucén (16 km). albergues

Day 23 -- Aljucén via Santa Lucía del Trampal to Alcuéscar and finally Aldea del Cano. (42 km) Albergue

Day 24 -- Aldea del Cano to Cáceres (23 km). albergue and hotels

Day 25 -- Cáceres to Embalse de Alcántara (33 km). albergue

Day 26 -- Embalse to Grimaldo (21 km). albergue and casa rural

Day 27 -- Grimaldo to Carcaboso (31 km) albergue and hotel

Day 28 -- Carcaboso to Aldeanueva (39 km). albergue and hotels

Day 29 -- Aldeanueva to Calzada Béjar (22 km). albergue and casas rurales

Day 30 -- Calzada Béjar to Fuenterroble (20 km). albergue

Day 31 -- Fuenterroble to San Pedro (29 km). albergues and pension

Day 32 -- San Pedro to Salamanca (23 km). albergue and hotels.
 
Camino Maps
A collection of Camino Maps from the Camino Forum Store
Camino Way Markers
Original Camino Way markers made in bronze. Two models, one from Castilla & Leon and the other from Galicia.

OzAnnie

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2020
Hi Laurie
I did hit ‘like’, but more in terms of ‘wow’.
It must have been a fantastic experience but includes some huge stages. You certainly don’t go muck about. .
Buen Camino
Annie
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
I am attaching a PDF file that I took with me on the Mozarabe in April. I didn't walk exactly what it outlines - for example I jumped ahead by bus from Medellin to Merida at the end. However, the table shows most of the towns along the route that you'd want to know about, to decide on your stages. As you can see, only 2 days required more than 30 km. The population numbers are shown beside each town's name as that gives an idea of the services that are likely to be available.

The guide published by the Association at this link, or their Facebook page, provides very up-to-date information on accommodation, and the route is very well marked.

I found the first week of the Mozarabe to be particularly tough, partly because I was slow to get into the Camino rhythm for various reasons. Those days of walking on dry rocky river bed into a head wind, were relentless and I don't think I would choose to repeat them! Other elements of the route were fascinating and I'm really glad I experienced this part of Spain.

As @peregrina2000 said, maybe we'll get into a more thorough discussion as others get back onto the forum.

If anyone wants the Excel file behind the PDF attachment, send me a PM.
 

Attachments

  • 2018 Mozarabe .pdf
    567.8 KB · Views: 278
Last edited:

pelerine

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Norte 10, Primitivo 13, Plata 14+15, Salvador 16, Torres 17, Portugues 18, Mozarabe 19
Thank you, Laurie and C clearly, for your info. I am thinking of walking the Mozárabe next year or in 2020.
 

Bad Pilgrim

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
Thanks for info, C & Laurie,

I will start the Mozárabe around the 21 of June, so it's rapidly approaching.......... Do you think I will be totally alone (as always in summer...) ??

The length of Laurie's stages are what I usually walk as well... But the one with 43 kms, is there no way to stop half way...?

Byyyye

BP
 
Camino Masks
12 different designs, shipped world wide from Santiago.
Camino Passport
Original passport made by the Cathedral in Santiago de Compostela. Shipped from Santiago all around the world with DHL.

NTange

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
El Camino de Santiago
A forum member asked about my stages, prodding me into action! I was one of the forum mob that started in Almería in April. I wound up not walking with many of the mob, so I hope some of them will post stages as well. Since some are still out walking, those lucky dogs, we should wait till everyone is back on the forum so we can have some general discussion and opinion-sharing. I am one who thinks this is a great camino. The infrastructure is fabulous, especially from Almería to Granada, getting to visit Almería, Córdoba, and Granada was wonderful, and the springtime flowers, snow in the mountains, and greenery everywhere were just spectacular. I also posted live from the camino, at least from Granada until I got to the Vdlp in Mérida. https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/no-mob—just-me-—-on-the-mozárabe.54735/ And a link to my findpenguins blog should be below in my signature.

Happy to answer questions! Buen camino, Laurie

Day 1 -- Almería to Rioja (15 km). I took a bus back to Almería that afternoon to be able to attend the group gathering with association angels that night. But there is an albergue there.

Day2 -- Rioja to Alboloduy (23 km). Strong walkers could combine days 1 and 2 but this day's walk had some tough descents and a fair amount of elevation gain.

Day 3 -- Alboloduy to Abla (27 km). Good albergue

Day 4 -- Abla to La Calahorra (35 km). Very nice small hotel, about 20-25 euros.

Day 5 -- La Calahorra to Guadix (32 km). Albergues

Day 6 -- Guadix to La Peza (22 km). good albergue

Day 7 -- La Peza to Quentar (30 km). albergue and hotels

Day 8 -- Quentar to Granada (20 km). convent and hotels

Day 9 -- Granada to Moclín (35 km). albergues and casa rural

Day 10 -- Moclín to Alcalá la Real (23 km). hotel

Day 11 -- Alcalá la Real to Alcaudete (23 km) hotel

Day 12 -- Alcaudete to Baena (24 km) albergue and hotel

Day 13 -- Baena to Santa Cruz (43 km) hostal.

Day 14 -- Santa Cruz to Córdoba (26 km). youth hostels and tons of hotels, etc.

Day 15 -- Córdoba to Villaharta (39 km). bar has rooms

Day 16 -- Villaharta to Alcaracejos (36 km). hostal

Day 17 -- Alcaracejos to Hinojosa del Duque (21 km). albergue and hostal

Day 18 -- Hinojosa del Duque to Monterrubio de la Serena (33 km). hotel

Day 19 -- Monterrubio to Campanario (40 km). pension and albergue

Day 20 -- Campanario to Medellín (37 km). hostal

Day 21 -- Medellín to Mérida (40 km). albergue and hotels

Day 22 -- Mérida to Aljucén (16 km). albergues

Day 23 -- Aljucén via Santa Lucía del Trampal to Alcuéscar and finally Aldea del Cano. (42 km) Albergue

Day 24 -- Aldea del Cano to Cáceres (23 km). albergue and hotels

Day 25 -- Cáceres to Embalse de Alcántara (33 km). albergue

Day 26 -- Embalse to Grimaldo (21 km). albergue and casa rural

Day 27 -- Grimaldo to Carcaboso (31 km) albergue and hotel

Day 28 -- Carcaboso to Aldeanueva (39 km). albergue and hotels

Day 29 -- Aldeanueva to Calzada Béjar (22 km). albergue and casas rurales

Day 30 -- Calzada Béjar to Fuenterroble (20 km). albergue

Day 31 -- Fuenterroble to San Pedro (29 km). albergues and pension

Day 32 -- San Pedro to Salamanca (23 km). albergue and hotels.
Thank you for this. I have totally just stumbled upon this Camino. I was checking out the info on Camino Portgues, hoping to walk May 2019 when I came across your posts. Hubby and I did Camino Frances April 2018. I only have a month including travel time from Australia so as we don't like to rush, maybe Mozarabe
is a better option. Is it the same as Frances with waymarkers, albergues etc? It would also give us another opportunity to use our Spanish (the little we have)!!!!
 

Paul J W

Paul J
Year of past OR future Camino
Miscellaneous camino routes since 2000.
A forum member asked about my stages, prodding me into action! I was one of the forum mob that started in Almería in April. I wound up not walking with many of the mob, so I hope some of them will post stages as well. Since some are still out walking, those lucky dogs, we should wait till everyone is back on the forum so we can have some general discussion and opinion-sharing. I am one who thinks this is a great camino. The infrastructure is fabulous, especially from Almería to Granada, getting to visit Almería, Córdoba, and Granada was wonderful, and the springtime flowers, snow in the mountains, and greenery everywhere were just spectacular. I also posted live from the camino, at least from Granada until I got to the Vdlp in Mérida. https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/no-mob—just-me-—-on-the-mozárabe.54735/ And a link to my findpenguins blog should be below in my signature.

Happy to answer questions! Buen camino, Laurie

Day 1 -- Almería to Rioja (15 km). I took a bus back to Almería that afternoon to be able to attend the group gathering with association angels that night. But there is an albergue there.

Day2 -- Rioja to Alboloduy (23 km). Strong walkers could combine days 1 and 2 but this day's walk had some tough descents and a fair amount of elevation gain.

Day 3 -- Alboloduy to Abla (27 km). Good albergue

Day 4 -- Abla to La Calahorra (35 km). Very nice small hotel, about 20-25 euros.

Day 5 -- La Calahorra to Guadix (32 km). Albergues

Day 6 -- Guadix to La Peza (22 km). good albergue

Day 7 -- La Peza to Quentar (30 km). albergue and hotels

Day 8 -- Quentar to Granada (20 km). convent and hotels

Day 9 -- Granada to Moclín (35 km). albergues and casa rural

Day 10 -- Moclín to Alcalá la Real (23 km). hotel

Day 11 -- Alcalá la Real to Alcaudete (23 km) hotel

Day 12 -- Alcaudete to Baena (24 km) albergue and hotel

Day 13 -- Baena to Santa Cruz (43 km) hostal.

Day 14 -- Santa Cruz to Córdoba (26 km). youth hostels and tons of hotels, etc.

Day 15 -- Córdoba to Villaharta (39 km). bar has rooms

Day 16 -- Villaharta to Alcaracejos (36 km). hostal

Day 17 -- Alcaracejos to Hinojosa del Duque (21 km). albergue and hostal

Day 18 -- Hinojosa del Duque to Monterrubio de la Serena (33 km). hotel

Day 19 -- Monterrubio to Campanario (40 km). pension and albergue

Day 20 -- Campanario to Medellín (37 km). hostal

Day 21 -- Medellín to Mérida (40 km). albergue and hotels

Day 22 -- Mérida to Aljucén (16 km). albergues

Day 23 -- Aljucén via Santa Lucía del Trampal to Alcuéscar and finally Aldea del Cano. (42 km) Albergue

Day 24 -- Aldea del Cano to Cáceres (23 km). albergue and hotels

Day 25 -- Cáceres to Embalse de Alcántara (33 km). albergue

Day 26 -- Embalse to Grimaldo (21 km). albergue and casa rural

Day 27 -- Grimaldo to Carcaboso (31 km) albergue and hotel

Day 28 -- Carcaboso to Aldeanueva (39 km). albergue and hotels

Day 29 -- Aldeanueva to Calzada Béjar (22 km). albergue and casas rurales

Day 30 -- Calzada Béjar to Fuenterroble (20 km). albergue

Day 31 -- Fuenterroble to San Pedro (29 km). albergues and pension

Day 32 -- San Pedro to Salamanca (23 km). albergue and hotels.

Hello Laurie,
Just picked up on this post and found it very interesting and potentially helpful.
My plan is to walk Almería - Granada in March 2019. (I have completed Granada - CdeS and, with other completed routes, consider myself reasonably well experienced in walking in Spain. This year in March I walked Malaga - Baena.)
Proposal is to complete in 9 days. (I have 10 available but allow additional day should circumstances require.)
Any observations/recommendations from you - and/or others would be much appreciated.
Thanks.
Paul
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Hi, Paul,
I think that 9 days is plenty. You can see I took 8 days and one was very short. And no huge days either. But what’s not to like about having an available rest day to enjoy Granada?!

I assume you have seen the online guide written by the Almería amigos. https://drive.google.com/file/d/1dMVIXVunE82lC-ON8x5o3ycAwL10g-TI/view. Updated every month,so check back before you go!

If you have the full day to walk on Day 1, it is really quite do-able to continue on. There is an albergue in Santa Fe de Mondujar, about 8-9 km beyond Rioja.

I’m sure you’ve seen many comments and threads from our little Mob that started in Almería in April. But if you have specific questions, ask away. Mid-April was an absolutely phenomenal time to start. You say you are going in March – if you had done that this year, you would have walked in almost continuous rain. Fingers crossed that next March will be better. Buen Camino, Laurie
 

Paul J W

Paul J
Year of past OR future Camino
Miscellaneous camino routes since 2000.
Hi, Paul,
I think that 9 days is plenty. You can see I took 8 days and one was very short. And no huge days either. But what’s not to like about having an available rest day to enjoy Granada?!

I assume you have seen the online guide written by the Almería amigos. https://drive.google.com/file/d/1dMVIXVunE82lC-ON8x5o3ycAwL10g-TI/view. Updated every month,so check back before you go!

If you have the full day to walk on Day 1, it is really quite do-able to continue on. There is an albergue in Santa Fe de Mondujar, about 8-9 km beyond Rioja.

I’m sure you’ve seen many comments and threads from our little Mob that started in Almería in April. But if you have specific questions, ask away. Mid-April was an absolutely phenomenal time to start. You say you are going in March – if you had done that this year, you would have walked in almost continuous rain. Fingers crossed that next March will be better. Buen Camino, Laurie

Thanks Laurie for this v speedy response. Much appreciated. Will certainly follow Almería amigos’ webpage.
Yes indeed, it was very wet this March with some sections which had to be by-passed, sadly resorting to roads.
Will continue research!
Thanks again.
Paul
 
Camino Masks
12 different designs, shipped world wide from Santiago.
Create your own ad
Have a camino related project that you are interested in promoting on the forum? Create your own ad right now.

jenny.s

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Cam francés (2004,2007) Voie d'Arles (2008), V de Vézelay (2012) V de la Plata (2015), Camino de Lev
A forum member asked about my stages, prodding me into action! I was one of the forum mob that started in Almería in April. I wound up not walking with many of the mob, so I hope some of them will post stages as well. Since some are still out walking, those lucky dogs, we should wait till everyone is back on the forum so we can have some general discussion and opinion-sharing. I am one who thinks this is a great camino. The infrastructure is fabulous, especially from Almería to Granada, getting to visit Almería, Córdoba, and Granada was wonderful, and the springtime flowers, snow in the mountains, and greenery everywhere were just spectacular. I also posted live from the camino, at least from Granada until I got to the Vdlp in Mérida. https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/no-mob—just-me-—-on-the-mozárabe.54735/ And a link to my findpenguins blog should be below in my signature.

Happy to answer questions! Buen camino, Laurie

Day 1 -- Almería to Rioja (15 km). I took a bus back to Almería that afternoon to be able to attend the group gathering with association angels that night. But there is an albergue there.

Day2 -- Rioja to Alboloduy (23 km). Strong walkers could combine days 1 and 2 but this day's walk had some tough descents and a fair amount of elevation gain.

Day 3 -- Alboloduy to Abla (27 km). Good albergue

Day 4 -- Abla to La Calahorra (35 km). Very nice small hotel, about 20-25 euros.

Day 5 -- La Calahorra to Guadix (32 km). Albergues

Day 6 -- Guadix to La Peza (22 km). good albergue

Day 7 -- La Peza to Quentar (30 km). albergue and hotels

Day 8 -- Quentar to Granada (20 km). convent and hotels

Day 9 -- Granada to Moclín (35 km). albergues and casa rural

Day 10 -- Moclín to Alcalá la Real (23 km). hotel

Day 11 -- Alcalá la Real to Alcaudete (23 km) hotel

Day 12 -- Alcaudete to Baena (24 km) albergue and hotel

Day 13 -- Baena to Santa Cruz (43 km) hostal.

Day 14 -- Santa Cruz to Córdoba (26 km). youth hostels and tons of hotels, etc.

Day 15 -- Córdoba to Villaharta (39 km). bar has rooms

Day 16 -- Villaharta to Alcaracejos (36 km). hostal

Day 17 -- Alcaracejos to Hinojosa del Duque (21 km). albergue and hostal

Day 18 -- Hinojosa del Duque to Monterrubio de la Serena (33 km). hotel

Day 19 -- Monterrubio to Campanario (40 km). pension and albergue

Day 20 -- Campanario to Medellín (37 km). hostal

Day 21 -- Medellín to Mérida (40 km). albergue and hotels

Day 22 -- Mérida to Aljucén (16 km). albergues

Day 23 -- Aljucén via Santa Lucía del Trampal to Alcuéscar and finally Aldea del Cano. (42 km) Albergue

Day 24 -- Aldea del Cano to Cáceres (23 km). albergue and hotels

Day 25 -- Cáceres to Embalse de Alcántara (33 km). albergue

Day 26 -- Embalse to Grimaldo (21 km). albergue and casa rural

Day 27 -- Grimaldo to Carcaboso (31 km) albergue and hotel

Day 28 -- Carcaboso to Aldeanueva (39 km). albergue and hotels

Day 29 -- Aldeanueva to Calzada Béjar (22 km). albergue and casas rurales

Day 30 -- Calzada Béjar to Fuenterroble (20 km). albergue

Day 31 -- Fuenterroble to San Pedro (29 km). albergues and pension

Day 32 -- San Pedro to Salamanca (23 km). albergue and hotels.
 

jenny.s

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Cam francés (2004,2007) Voie d'Arles (2008), V de Vézelay (2012) V de la Plata (2015), Camino de Lev
Dear Peregrina,
Camino Mozárabe seems very nice indeed. I have one question which of course is impossible to answer: Would you imagine I would have difficulties as I am a bit frightened of heights and steep tracks.? It's not the effort that I'm worried about but the slight vertigo I have experienced when it's so steep you don't seem able to control your steps and the gravel underneath your feet seem to push you down the hill. Obviously I can't ask anyone else about their experience, it's all so very personal, and yet this is my question to you. Best,
J Margareta
 
Year of past OR future Camino
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
Dear Peregrina,
Camino Mozárabe seems very nice indeed. I have one question which of course is impossible to answer: Would you imagine I would have difficulties as I am a bit frightened of heights and steep tracks.? It's not the effort that I'm worried about but the slight vertigo I have experienced when it's so steep you don't seem able to control your steps and the gravel underneath your feet seem to push you down the hill. Obviously I can't ask anyone else about their experience, it's all so very personal, and yet this is my question to you. Best,
J Margareta
On the third day, from Alboloduy, definitively walk the road at the start of the day. I am not afraid of heights, but I was still worried on the first part of the path: narrow and veery steep ascent in some parts. As soon as you are at the top, you can continue on the (well-marked) path.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I don't like heights much either, but actually I thought the descents on the day into Alboloduy were much worse than the ascents on the day leaving Alboloduy. On the day in, it sometimes felt like you were just sliding down over gravel, and even though they had tried to make a switch-back it was still pretty treacherous. I remember the early morning walk out of Alboloduy as really wonderful and invigorating, but steep, and don't remember feeling like I was on a dangerous edge or anything. Just goes to show how our memories and reactions are so different. If @C clearly or any of the other members of the Mozárabe mob sees this, maybe they can weigh in here as well.
 

Raggy

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2017, 2018, 2019
It's a bit of a scramble up, but I enjoyed that climb out of Alboloduy. I can understand that others don't feel the same - that it's not what many camino walkers expect.
 
Donation to the Forum
A donation to this forum helps it continue to exists and also removes all ads for you.
Silver Oxide Camino de Santiago pendent
Camino de Santiago pendent that has a shell on the front, and "Camino de Santiago" engraved on the back. Comes with a black cord. Pendent is slightly larger than a 50 euro cent coin, about 25mm.

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
I remember the early morning walk out of Alboloduy as really wonderful and invigorating, but steep, and don't remember feeling like I was on a dangerous edge or anything. Just goes to show how our memories and reactions are so different. If @C clearly or any of the other members of the Mozárabe mob sees this, maybe they can weigh in here as well.
Yes, our memories are funny. I remember the steep climb out of Alboloduy was OK. But up at the top, there were some impressive drops. The walk was very dramatic and I enjoyed it, but I thought the path down the slope was a bit treacherous. It was important for me to have 2 poles!
 

jenny.s

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Cam francés (2004,2007) Voie d'Arles (2008), V de Vézelay (2012) V de la Plata (2015), Camino de Lev
Thanks a lot to all of you who wrote about your different experiences! I think that gave me an idea of what to expect. It will probably be the Mozárabe next time when the urge gets hold of me. I think it's so inspiring to find all these different caminos. New ones seem to pop up all the time.
Best,
Margareta
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
A forum member asked about my stages, prodding me into action! I was one of the forum mob that started in Almería in April. I wound up not walking with many of the mob, so I hope some of them will post stages as well. Since some are still out walking, those lucky dogs, we should wait till everyone is back on the forum so we can have some general discussion and opinion-sharing. I am one who thinks this is a great camino. The infrastructure is fabulous, especially from Almería to Granada, getting to visit Almería, Córdoba, and Granada was wonderful, and the springtime flowers, snow in the mountains, and greenery everywhere were just spectacular. I also posted live from the camino, at least from Granada until I got to the Vdlp in Mérida. https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/no-mob—just-me-—-on-the-mozárabe.54735/ And a link to my findpenguins blog should be below in my signature.

Happy to answer questions! Buen camino, Laurie

Day 1 -- Almería to Rioja (15 km). I took a bus back to Almería that afternoon to be able to attend the group gathering with association angels that night. But there is an albergue there.

Day2 -- Rioja to Alboloduy (23 km). Strong walkers could combine days 1 and 2 but this day's walk had some tough descents and a fair amount of elevation gain.

Day 3 -- Alboloduy to Abla (27 km). Good albergue

Day 4 -- Abla to La Calahorra (35 km). Very nice small hotel, about 20-25 euros.

Day 5 -- La Calahorra to Guadix (32 km). Albergues

Day 6 -- Guadix to La Peza (22 km). good albergue

Day 7 -- La Peza to Quentar (30 km). albergue and hotels

Day 8 -- Quentar to Granada (20 km). convent and hotels

Day 9 -- Granada to Moclín (35 km). albergues and casa rural

Day 10 -- Moclín to Alcalá la Real (23 km). hotel

Day 11 -- Alcalá la Real to Alcaudete (23 km) hotel

Day 12 -- Alcaudete to Baena (24 km) albergue and hotel

Day 13 -- Baena to Santa Cruz (43 km) hostal.

Day 14 -- Santa Cruz to Córdoba (26 km). youth hostels and tons of hotels, etc.

Day 15 -- Córdoba to Villaharta (39 km). bar has rooms

Day 16 -- Villaharta to Alcaracejos (36 km). hostal

Day 17 -- Alcaracejos to Hinojosa del Duque (21 km). albergue and hostal

Day 18 -- Hinojosa del Duque to Monterrubio de la Serena (33 km). hotel

Day 19 -- Monterrubio to Campanario (40 km). pension and albergue

Day 20 -- Campanario to Medellín (37 km). hostal

Day 21 -- Medellín to Mérida (40 km). albergue and hotels

Day 22 -- Mérida to Aljucén (16 km). albergues

Day 23 -- Aljucén via Santa Lucía del Trampal to Alcuéscar and finally Aldea del Cano. (42 km) Albergue

Day 24 -- Aldea del Cano to Cáceres (23 km). albergue and hotels

Day 25 -- Cáceres to Embalse de Alcántara (33 km). albergue

Day 26 -- Embalse to Grimaldo (21 km). albergue and casa rural

Day 27 -- Grimaldo to Carcaboso (31 km) albergue and hotel

Day 28 -- Carcaboso to Aldeanueva (39 km). albergue and hotels

Day 29 -- Aldeanueva to Calzada Béjar (22 km). albergue and casas rurales

Day 30 -- Calzada Béjar to Fuenterroble (20 km). albergue

Day 31 -- Fuenterroble to San Pedro (29 km). albergues and pension

Day 32 -- San Pedro to Salamanca (23 km). albergue and hotels.
Hi Peregrina! Just checking if this route can be broken into shorter stages. My max is 25 ish km...thank you.
Gitti
 

Raggy

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2017, 2018, 2019
Hi Peregrina! Just checking if this route can be broken into shorter stages. My max is 25 ish km...thank you.
Gitti
The guide from the Almeria Association facebook page (in the "Posts" section), lists distances between recommended accommodations:

Of course, distance is not the only thing to consider. Walking under an Andalusian sun, with rocky riverbeds underfoot can be exhausting. Fortunately, the network of albergues from Almeria to Granada allows for very short stages at the start of this Camino. You could do the first three stages (67km from Almeria to Abla) over three days or five days, depending on how you find the conditions.

On the route from Almeria to Merida, you can plan daily distances of less than 25km between accommodations, except for
Stage 20: Villaharta to Alcaracejos - 35.53 km
Stage 22: HInojosa del Duque to Monterubio de la Serena - 32.19 km

For Stage 20, you can arrange for Angel (owner of the Hostal Miraseira in Villaharta), to drive out to collect you at the fountain at the half way point of the stage and return you there the next day. There's a fee for this taxi service, of course.

For Stage 22, you could make arrangements with a taxi firm in Hinojosa. Much of the stage is on the A3280 highway, so it's possible to arrange a meeting point. Perhaps at the border of Extremadura and Andalusia, which these two hikers are about to cross. (Just follow the road for another km or two to see the signs at the border):

Or you could skip the entire stage by taking a bus (Mondays to Fridays only):
 
Last edited:
Donation to the Forum
A donation to this forum helps it continue to exists and also removes all ads for you.
Camino Masks
12 different designs, shipped world wide from Santiago.

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
The guide from the Almeria Association facebook page (in the "Posts" section), lists distances between recommended accommodations:

Of course, distance is not the only thing to consider. Walking under an Andalusian sun, with rocky riverbeds underfoot can be exhausting. Fortunately, the network of albergues from Almeria to Granada allows for very short stages at the start of this Camino. You could do the first three stages (67km from Almeria to Abla) over three days or five days, depending on how you find the conditions.

On the route from Almeria to Merida, you can plan daily distances of less than 25km between accommodations, except for
Stage 20: Villaharta to Alcaracejos - 35.53 km
Stage 22: HInojosa del Duque to Monterubio de la Serena - 32.19 km

For Stage 20, you can ask Angel (owner of the Hostal Miraseira in Villaharta), to drive out to collect you at the fountain at the half way point of the stage and return you there the next day.

For Stage 22, you could make arrangements with a taxi firm in Hinojosa. Much of the stage is on the A3280 highway, so it's possible to arrange a meeting point. Perhaps at the border of Extremadura and Badajoz, where these two hikers are:

Or you could skip the entire stage by taking a bus (Mondays to Fridays only):
Thank you! That is so helpful.
 

Raggy

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2017, 2018, 2019
You're welcome. A couple more thoughts:

1. On Stage 22 you cross the border between Andalusia and Extremadura.
(Badajoz is a province within Extremadura). I'll correct my post.

2. If you wanted to have a taxi meet you there, it might be better to contact a taxi in Monterubio de la Serena, since it's closer.
 

pelerine

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Norte 10, Primitivo 13, Plata 14+15, Salvador 16, Torres 17, Portugues 18, Mozarabe 19
Hi to the short distance walkers! I arrived at Granada yesterday with my two daughters. Aged 79 I took great care to keep the stages short, especially at the beginning. Here they are:

Almeria - Hotel
Rioja - Albergue municipal
Santa Cruz - Albergue municipal
Nacimiento - Casa rural
Abla - Pension
Huéneja - Albergue municipal
Alquife - Albergue priv.
Guadix - Casa rural
La peza - Albergue municipal
Quentar - Hotel
Granada - Hotel

There is a new albergue in Tocón between La Peza - Quentar. Too late for me because I have my return flight booked for today. However I did manage the long stage after all.

The Asociacion Jacobea de Almeria-Granada has all the details on their website, including the latest additions to accommodation. Their members are most helpful. I had especial support from Mercedes who sends you a big hug, Laurie! I send one too with a thank you for your support! If anybody is interested, here is my blog which shows my struggles and the tremendous pleasure on this camino:


Buen camino!
Ina
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
Hi to the short distance walkers! I arrived at Granada yesterday with my two daughters. Aged 79 I took great care to keep the stages short, especially at the beginning. Here they are:

Almeria - Hotel
Rioja - Albergue municipal
Santa Cruz - Albergue municipal
Nacimiento - Casa rural
Abla - Pension
Huéneja - Albergue municipal
Alquife - Albergue priv.
Guadix - Casa rural
La peza - Albergue municipal
Quentar - Hotel
Granada - Hotel

There is a new albergue in Tocón between La Peza - Quentar. Too late for me because I have my return flight booked for today. However I did manage the long stage after all.

The Asociacion Jacobea de Almeria-Granada has all the details on their website, including the latest additions to accommodation. Their members are most helpful. I had especial support from Mercedes who sends you a big hug, Laurie! I send one too with a thank you for your support! If anybody is interested, here is my blog which shows my struggles and the tremendous pleasure on this camino:


Buen camino!
Ina
Thank you!
 
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Del Estrecho, Ruta Fray Leopoldo,
Vía Serrana, Camino Francés
Camino Passport
Original passport made by the Cathedral in Santiago de Compostela. Shipped from Santiago all around the world with DHL.
Create your own ad
Have a camino related project that you are interested in promoting on the forum? Create your own ad right now.

apoivre

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Mozárabe de Almería in March 2019
On the route from Almeria to Merida, you can plan daily distances of less than 25km between accommodations, except for
Stage 20: Villaharta to Alcaracejos - 35.53 km
Stage 22: HInojosa del Duque to Monterubio de la Serena - 32.19 km

There is a better-spaced alternative from Villaharta to Monterrubio de la Serena via Espiel, referenced on this forum I think.

Now this could be easily broken in stages of less than 25 km each.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Hi Peregrina! Just checking if this route can be broken into shorter stages. My max is 25 ish km...thank you.
Gitti

Oh, Gitti,
So sorry to have just seen this! I am glad @Raggy and pelerine gave you the info you needed. Are you planning to walk from Almeria? If so, there's a bunch of us who would be able to react to any stages you are working on. But I do think you will be able to keep things to distances in your comfort range. Buen camino, Laurie
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Hi to the short distance walkers! I arrived at Granada yesterday with my two daughters. Aged 79 I took great care to keep the stages short, especially at the beginning. Here they are:

Almeria - Hotel
Rioja - Albergue municipal
Santa Cruz - Albergue municipal
Nacimiento - Casa rural
Abla - Pension
Huéneja - Albergue municipal
Alquife - Albergue priv.
Guadix - Casa rural
La peza - Albergue municipal
Quentar - Hotel
Granada - Hotel

There is a new albergue in Tocón between La Peza - Quentar. Too late for me because I have my return flight booked for today. However I did manage the long stage after all.

The Asociacion Jacobea de Almeria-Granada has all the details on their website, including the latest additions to accommodation. Their members are most helpful. I had especial support from Mercedes who sends you a big hug, Laurie! I send one too with a thank you for your support! If anybody is interested, here is my blog which shows my struggles and the tremendous pleasure on this camino:


Buen camino!
Ina

Hi, Ina, I have just seen your blog for the first time. Can't wait to read it slowly. Congrats, and how wonderful it must be to walk with your kids! Buen camino, Laurie
 

pelerine

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Norte 10, Primitivo 13, Plata 14+15, Salvador 16, Torres 17, Portugues 18, Mozarabe 19
Hi, Ina, I have just seen your blog for the first time. Can't wait to read it slowly. Congrats, and how wonderful it must be to walk with your kids! Buen camino, Laurie

And their present for my 80th next year is walking with me, all of them, my children, their spouses, and their children - 7 adults and 7 children ( 19 - 7) the 120 or so km from Mondoñedo to Santiago!
And thank YOU for your involvement(?) with all those who struggle to find their feet on the caminos.
The Olvidado was on my plaaning list - however my partner’s Alzheimer did not want me to continue.We’ll see what I can work out....
 
Camino Way Markers
Original Camino Way markers made in bronze. Two models, one from Castilla & Leon and the other from Galicia.
Silver Oxide Camino de Santiago pendent
Camino de Santiago pendent that has a shell on the front, and "Camino de Santiago" engraved on the back. Comes with a black cord. Pendent is slightly larger than a 50 euro cent coin, about 25mm.

Karl Oz

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances
Portuguese
Aragones
Sanabres
Piamonte
Elizabethpfad
I have a question posters: Is Spanish a necessity for this stretch of camino? I have none and am consequently discouraged from walking it.
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
I have a question posters: Is Spanish a necessity for this stretch of camino? I have none and am consequently discouraged from walking it.
That's a hard question to answer! It isn't a necessity, in that you probably won't starve and probably will eventually communicate your needs. How have you managed on your other travels when people don't speak English?

It depends a lot on your personality - some people don't mind, struggling, miming, etc. Others will feel too frustrated with the challenge to be happy. So, it is really up to you and how you feel. I'm sure many have done it with very little Spanish. If you walk in the Spring, there will likely be others on the route who can help.

But don't expect the locals to necessarily speak English. I would recommend that you get familiar with a smartphone translation app that you speak into and get a spoken translation.
 

Karl Oz

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances
Portuguese
Aragones
Sanabres
Piamonte
Elizabethpfad
I don't expect English from the locals; two weeks on the Sanabres last June illustrated that. A very different animal to the CF. I generally don't expect English from anyone, anywhere, but it is nice if it happens. I speak German and some Italian, by the way. I guess I should have been more specific; I believe that proprietors of albergues need to be telephoned prior to arrival, in order that they can provide a key, or similar. That I think would be difficult even with a translation app, and it would take a mind-bending amount of ingenuity to make your point using mime.
 

Raggy

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2017, 2018, 2019
I don't expect English from the locals; two weeks on the Sanabres last June illustrated that. A very different animal to the CF. I generally don't expect English from anyone, anywhere, but it is nice if it happens. I speak German and some Italian, by the way. I guess I should have been more specific; I believe that proprietors of albergues need to be telephoned prior to arrival, in order that they can provide a key, or similar. That I think would be difficult even with a translation app, and it would take a mind-bending amount of ingenuity to make your point using mime.
For municipal albergues, you can pretty much communicate by text message on whatsapp.

For private albergues you need to phone ahead. It requires a handful of phrases that can be learned quite easily -

My opening gambit is:
I’m a pilgrim. Im walking from X to Y tomorrow. I need a bed in Y tomorrow night. Do you have a bed?

From that stsrt, the next response is usually easily discernible as affirmative or negative. There are sometimes follow up questions about the time of arrival or need for meals.

If you can handle such scripted interactions you will find it easy to fulfil your basic needs. Some people feel out of their element with such a limited level of communication. Others are relax about it. As a prev poster said.
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
Oh, Gitti,
So sorry to have just seen this! I am glad @Raggy and pelerine gave you the info you needed. Are you planning to walk from Almeria? If so, there's a bunch of us who would be able to react to any stages you are working on. But I do think you will be able to keep things to distances in your comfort range. Buen camino, Laurie
Thank you Laurie! It might be a walk I do in the future.
 
Create your own ad
Have a camino related project that you are interested in promoting on the forum? Create your own ad right now.
Camino Way Markers
Original Camino Way markers made in bronze. Two models, one from Castilla & Leon and the other from Galicia.

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
On the route from Almeria to Merida, you can plan daily distances of less than 25km between accommodations, except for
Stage 20: Villaharta to Alcaracejos - 35.53 km
Stage 22: HInojosa del Duque to Monterubio de la Serena - 32.19 km

Very helpful post, @Raggy. In preparation for the Mozárabe zoom, where questions inevitably turn to shorter distances, I have been jotting down ideas for trying to keep things under 20. That is a bit harder than under 25, but surprisingly not much because of all the private accommodation placed nicely in the midpoints of many stages!

But I have been stumped by these two stages as well. Seems like the taxi (or weekday bus you describe) will be necessary. I’ve checked to see that there are taxis in all of the towns, both start and end points.

But that is a pretty amazing situation for a camino that is so untraveled!
 
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Del Estrecho, Ruta Fray Leopoldo,
Vía Serrana, Camino Francés
But I have been stumped by these two stages as well. Seems like the taxi (or weekday bus you describe) will be necessary. I’ve checked to see that there are taxis in all of the towns, both start and end points.

For the stage from HInojosa del Duque to Monterubio de la Serena, would Casa Rural Pozo la Torre be of any help? It is just north of the Mozarabe at a point about 14 km after leaving Hinojosa Del Duque.
The house is visible on Google Maps if you zoom way in and switch to satellite view. There is a dirt track connecting it to the camino. Its address is an area called Cachiporro, in an olive orchard, 10 km west of Belalcazar. Turn north off the camino where the blue dot is on the first map below.
Screen Shot 2020-05-19 at 4.42.43 PM.png
Screen Shot 2020-05-19 at 4.53.09 PM.png
 

Raggy

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2017, 2018, 2019
But I have been stumped by these two stages as well. Seems like the taxi (or weekday bus you describe) will be necessary. I’ve checked to see that there are taxis in all of the towns, both start and end points.
Yes. Here's a summary of the options mentioned upthread and a NEW idea from me.

For Stage 20: Villaharta to Alcaracejos - 35.53 km the two workarounds are mentioned upthread:
1) Angel, the hospitalero of the private accommodation and owner of Bar Mirasierra provides taxi service.
2) Alternative route - between Alcaracejos and Monterrubio de la Serena (not in the guidebooks)
Official: Alcaracejos => Villaharta => Hinojosa del Duque => Monterrubio
Alternative: Alcaracejos => Espiel => Belmez => Valsequillo => Monterrubio

For Stage 22: HInojosa del Duque to Monterrubio de la Serena - 32.19 km
1) Call a taxi for a pick up (mentioned upthread)
2) Bus on weekdays (mentioned upthread)
3) From Hinojosa walk 10km to Belacazar (off the camino). Stay in Belacazar. Next day walk 25km to Monterrubio.
In Belacázar, there's an albergue - Albergue de Camino de Santiago - which can be booked on line
I have no idea why this is not indicated in the guides and I will try to remember to ask the association
From Belacázar leave town on the A-3280 road. After 3km turn right onto a smaller road, which leads to an official hiking route - PISTA DEL HINOJO
According to Google maps, the walk via the PISTO DEL HINOJO is 25.5km. It is marked as a hiking route and the photos that I can find look more pleasant than the walk from Hinojosa del Duque to Monterrubio.

It still doesn't get you the stage down to 20km but it helps those who can handle 26km.
 

Raggy

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2017, 2018, 2019
For the stage from HInojosa del Duque to Monterubio de la Serena, would Casa Rural Pozo la Torre be of any help? It is just north of the Mozarabe at a point about 14 km after leaving Hinojosa Del Duque.
Good find. It's a way off the official Camino route but would definitely allow you to break the stage.
 

Anthony Rocco

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances, Ignaciano, Aragones, Arle, Tolosana, Salvador, Primitivo, Madrid, Olvidado/Invierno (2020)
A forum member asked about my stages, prodding me into action! I was one of the forum mob that started in Almería in April. I wound up not walking with many of the mob, so I hope some of them will post stages as well. Since some are still out walking, those lucky dogs, we should wait till everyone is back on the forum so we can have some general discussion and opinion-sharing. I am one who thinks this is a great camino. The infrastructure is fabulous, especially from Almería to Granada, getting to visit Almería, Córdoba, and Granada was wonderful, and the springtime flowers, snow in the mountains, and greenery everywhere were just spectacular. I also posted live from the camino, at least from Granada until I got to the Vdlp in Mérida. https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/no-mob—just-me-—-on-the-mozárabe.54735/ And a link to my findpenguins blog should be below in my signature.

Happy to answer questions! Buen camino, Laurie

Day 1 -- Almería to Rioja (15 km). I took a bus back to Almería that afternoon to be able to attend the group gathering with association angels that night. But there is an albergue there.

Day2 -- Rioja to Alboloduy (23 km). Strong walkers could combine days 1 and 2 but this day's walk had some tough descents and a fair amount of elevation gain.

Day 3 -- Alboloduy to Abla (27 km). Good albergue

Day 4 -- Abla to La Calahorra (35 km). Very nice small hotel, about 20-25 euros.

Day 5 -- La Calahorra to Guadix (32 km). Albergues

Day 6 -- Guadix to La Peza (22 km). good albergue

Day 7 -- La Peza to Quentar (30 km). albergue and hotels

Day 8 -- Quentar to Granada (20 km). convent and hotels

Day 9 -- Granada to Moclín (35 km). albergues and casa rural

Day 10 -- Moclín to Alcalá la Real (23 km). hotel

Day 11 -- Alcalá la Real to Alcaudete (23 km) hotel

Day 12 -- Alcaudete to Baena (24 km) albergue and hotel

Day 13 -- Baena to Santa Cruz (43 km) hostal.

Day 14 -- Santa Cruz to Córdoba (26 km). youth hostels and tons of hotels, etc.

Day 15 -- Córdoba to Villaharta (39 km). bar has rooms

Day 16 -- Villaharta to Alcaracejos (36 km). hostal

Day 17 -- Alcaracejos to Hinojosa del Duque (21 km). albergue and hostal

Day 18 -- Hinojosa del Duque to Monterrubio de la Serena (33 km). hotel

Day 19 -- Monterrubio to Campanario (40 km). pension and albergue

Day 20 -- Campanario to Medellín (37 km). hostal

Day 21 -- Medellín to Mérida (40 km). albergue and hotels

Day 22 -- Mérida to Aljucén (16 km). albergues

Day 23 -- Aljucén via Santa Lucía del Trampal to Alcuéscar and finally Aldea del Cano. (42 km) Albergue

Day 24 -- Aldea del Cano to Cáceres (23 km). albergue and hotels

Day 25 -- Cáceres to Embalse de Alcántara (33 km). albergue

Day 26 -- Embalse to Grimaldo (21 km). albergue and casa rural

Day 27 -- Grimaldo to Carcaboso (31 km) albergue and hotel

Day 28 -- Carcaboso to Aldeanueva (39 km). albergue and hotels

Day 29 -- Aldeanueva to Calzada Béjar (22 km). albergue and casas rurales

Day 30 -- Calzada Béjar to Fuenterroble (20 km). albergue

Day 31 -- Fuenterroble to San Pedro (29 km). albergues and pension

Day 32 -- San Pedro to Salamanca (23 km). albergue and hotels.
Since 2021 is a holy year, we're looking for a southern route ending well before Santiago. Of Mozarabe, Levante and Lana, which would you recommend?
 
Create your own ad
Have a camino related project that you are interested in promoting on the forum? Create your own ad right now.
Camino Way Markers
Original Camino Way markers made in bronze. Two models, one from Castilla & Leon and the other from Galicia.

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Hi, Anthony,

I haven’t walked the Lana, but as between the Mozárabe and the Lana, I would be hard pressed to choose. Levante, especially in the earlier parts before Toledo has a lot of flat, wide open spaces. Mozárabe’s terrain is more varied. Both have tons of castles. Levante may have more in the way of small interesting towns. Mozárabe’s big cities are Granada and Córdoba, Levante boasts Toledo and Ávila.

Here is a short summary of the highpoints of the Levante, IMO. I also have a detailed stage by stage post for the Levante here.

I haven’t walked a fall camino from the south, but based on what others have posted, I am glad I’ve been able to do my starts in the springtime. Green fields and spring flowers, as compared to brown fields and no flowers. If fall 2021 is a possibility for me, I will try to walk in the northern parts — Portugal has three that are calling — Geira e dos Arrieiros, Interior, and Zamorano-Sanabrés (one from Braga, one from Viseu, one from Zamora). Or the Viejo from Pamplona to Aguilar de Campoo (16 days according to @VNwalking’s terrific planning thread). The Sanabrés from Zamora to Santiago is another possibility. It is not a heavily trafficked camino, and even though you end in Santiago, I can’t imagine things will be all sold out in the fall.

If you give a few more of the criteria that you use when choosing your caminos, I might be able to weigh in more.

Buen camino, Laurie
 

jungleboy

Spirit of the Camino (Nick)
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés 2017
Primitivo 2018
Madrid 2019
Kumano Kodo 2019
Português 2020
Since 2021 is a holy year, we're looking for a southern route ending well before Santiago. Of Mozarabe, Levante and Lana, which would you recommend?
I've posted this elsewhere already in recent days but I think it's worth questioning our pre-pandemic thoughts about how 2021 would see a massive increase in pilgrims and to avoid them we might look at measures such as seeking out less-traveled routes, not finishing in Santiago, walking in the off-season etc.

In the current climate, and even with recent positive developments about vaccines, I personally can't really imagine that 2021 will have more pilgrims than 2019. I would guess that spring will have much, much fewer, and numbers will increase as the year goes on and more people become vaccinated. I wrote about how the pandemic might affect Holy Year in more detail in this article.

All that said, I'm also looking at the Mozárabe as part of a longer camino in spring and the Lana as potentially part of several caminos in autumn. The Levante is not really on my radar yet but you can't do them all in one go!
 

Raggy

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2017, 2018, 2019
Mozárabe’s big cities are Granada and Córdoba
... and Merida (and Almeria if you start in Almeria / Malaga if you start in Malaga).
I'll also mention Guadix; a very beautiful small city on one branch of the Mozarabe, shortly before Granada... and I'm told that Jaen (a less famous starting point) is also a beautiful small city.
 

Anthony Rocco

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances, Ignaciano, Aragones, Arle, Tolosana, Salvador, Primitivo, Madrid, Olvidado/Invierno (2020)
Hi, Anthony,

I haven’t walked the Lana, but as between the Mozárabe and the Lana, I would be hard pressed to choose. Levante, especially in the earlier parts before Toledo has a lot of flat, wide open spaces. Mozárabe’s terrain is more varied. Both have tons of castles. Levante may have more in the way of small interesting towns. Mozárabe’s big cities are Granada and Córdoba, Levante boasts Toledo and Ávila.

Here is a short summary of the highpoints of the Levante, IMO. I also have a detailed stage by stage post for the Levante here.

I haven’t walked a fall camino from the south, but based on what others have posted, I am glad I’ve been able to do my starts in the springtime. Green fields and spring flowers, as compared to brown fields and no flowers. If fall 2021 is a possibility for me, I will try to walk in the northern parts — Portugal has three that are calling — Geira e dos Arrieiros, Interior, and Zamorano-Sanabrés (one from Braga, one from Viseu, one from Zamora). Or the Viejo from Pamplona to Aguilar de Campoo (16 days according to @VNwalking’s terrific planning thread). The Sanabrés from Zamora to Santiago is another possibility. It is not a heavily trafficked camino, and even though you end in Santiago, I can’t imagine things will be all sold out in the fall.

If you give a few more of the criteria that you use when choosing your caminos, I might be able to weigh in more.

Buen camino, Laurie
Our criteria:

1. No "race" to get to a place to stay. In other words, not many fellow pilgrims. We love to savor everything along the way.
2. Things to savor, especially villages and villagers who embrace the pilgrim.
3. More things to savor, especially cultural (churches, castles, monasteries, convents, etc.)

Last year we walked from Loyola to Logrono, then hopped a bus to Madrid and did the Camino Madrid to Sahagun. Two totally different camino experiences, the first all mountain hikes (not walks) with some breathtaking views in Basque Country until reaching La Rioja and the lovely La Guardia. The Madrid was varied terrain until Segovia, then meseta but also the most delightful and welcoming villages, villagers, albergues and hosts we experienced anywhere. We weren't expecting to love this camino experience as much as we did. Of course, comparing caminos is not what being a pilgrim is all about. Every camino has so much to savor, so much to refresh body and soul.
 

Similar threads

Camino Conversations

Camino Conversations

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

Most downloaded Resources

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 16 1.2%
  • February

    Votes: 10 0.7%
  • March

    Votes: 57 4.2%
  • April

    Votes: 205 15.1%
  • May

    Votes: 333 24.6%
  • June

    Votes: 98 7.2%
  • July

    Votes: 27 2.0%
  • August

    Votes: 29 2.1%
  • September

    Votes: 391 28.9%
  • October

    Votes: 163 12.0%
  • November

    Votes: 17 1.3%
  • December

    Votes: 8 0.6%

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store
Top