Camino Forum Store

Advertisement

My stages on the Vdlp

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
Donating Member
#1
I thought I'd post my stages and the approximate kms so others could get a basis for comparison when trying to figure out how long they should plan for the Vdlp. My walk had a lot of short days, and 3 rest days, so it was a pretty leisurely pace. In retrospect, I could have shaved 4 or 5 days off without any suffering, but I had the time and there were things I wanted to see, so why rush?

Day 1 -- Guillena (22 km)
Day 2 -- Castilblanco (17 km)
Day 3 -- Almaden (29 km)
Day 4 -- Real de la Jara (16 km)
Day 5 -- Monesterio (18 km)
Day 6 -- Fuente de Cantos (22 km)
Day 7 -- Zafra (25 km)
Day 8 -- Villafranca de los Barros (20 km)
Day 9 -- Torremegia (28 km)
Day 10 -- Merida (16 km)
Day 11 -- Aljucen (17 km)
Day 12 -- Alcuescar (21 km)
Day 13 -- Caceres (38 km)
Day 14 -- Casar de Caceres (11 km)
Day 15 -- Canaveral (33 km)
Day 16 -- Galisteo (28 km)
Day 17 -- Carcaboso (11 km)
Day 18 -- Oliva de Plasencia (25 km -- using Isabelle's very wise off-road route)
Day 19 -- Banos de Montemayor (36 km)
Day 20 -- Fuenterroble (33 km)
Day 21 -- San Pedro (28 km)
Day 22 -- Salamanca (24 km)
Day 23 -- Valdunciel (15 km)
Day 24 -- Villanueva del Campean (33 km)
Day 25 -- Zamora (18 km)
Day 26 -- Montamarta (19 km)
Day 27 -- Granja de Moruela (22 km)
Day 28 -- Tabara (26 km)
Day 29 -- Santa Croya (20 km)
Day 30 -- Rionegro (26 km)
Day 31 -- Palacios de Sanabria (28 km)
Day 32 -- Puebla de Sanabria (13 km)
Day 33 -- Requejo de Sanabria (13 km)
Day 34 -- Lubian (20 km)
Day 35 -- A Gudina (24 km)
Day 36 -- Laza (34 km)
Day 37 -- Vilar de Barrio (20 km)
Day 38 -- Xunqueira de Ambia (13 km)
Day 39 -- Ourense (16 km)
Day 40 -- Monasterio de Oseira (34 km)
Day 41 -- Laxe (29 km)
Day 42 -- Punte Ulla (31 km)
Day 43 -- Santiago (22 km)

Plus four days Santiago - Finisterre - Muxia
 

Advertisment

lynnejohn

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2005), VDLP(2007), Madrid(2009), Ingles(2009), Sur (2011), VDLP(2011)-partial, VDLP(2014)
#2
:D Thanks :D Laurie - was going to ask if you could publish this list, but had a feeling you'd get to it anyway!

Back to the godesalco planner!

lynne
 

JohnnieWalker

Nunca se camina solo
Donating Member
#3
Hola Laurie

I think these stages are really helpful. If my arithmetic is approximately correct it looks like an average of 23/24 kms per day. The VdlP is demanding in places so to do it in manageable chucks is sensible.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
Donating Member
#4
I have gone through my journal and collected whatever info I had about where I stayed on the Vdlp. I've sent this to a couple of people via pm, but thought I'd post it here in case it helps anyone else. Let me say that this is a pretty relaxed schedule. Actually, I didn't find much of this route to be very demanding, but then I walked in a beautiful, cool springtime. I usually average a few more kms a day, but had the time this year and so I took it slow. But if you have less time, you shouldn't worry that you need to devote this many days, you can do it in fewer without feeling squeezed. I will break this into two separate posts, here is Day 1-15

I stayed in Sevilla at the Hotel Simon, about one block off the Camino, 41E. Nothing special, but Sevilla is expensive. Others got on the camino, crossed the river, and easily found a place to stay in Triana. There were a lot of cheap hostales, they said, and they were still a stone's throw from Sevilla.

Day 1 -- Guillena (22 km) -- stayed at Bar Frances, adequate. 23 euros, bed and breakfast. Albergue has 10 beds, isn't terrific, and is usually full. Bar Frances will take phone reservations.

Day 2 -- Castilblanco (17 km) -- this albergue isn't one of my favorites either. Cramped, not many bathrooms. I stayed in a beautiful little rural hotel, cheap for peregrinos 26 euros, and with a good restaurant, Hospederia de la Plata, http://www.hospederiadelaplata.com. There is also the possibility of a 10E room with Senora Salvadora, Avenida Espana 43, phone, 955-73-4509

Day 3 -- Almaden (29 km) -- I have stayed in the albergue and it's fine. Big rooms with lots of beds, but bathrooms are sex segregated and high quality. I made a reservation ahead of time, not sure why, in the Casa Concha. rooms are 20E for pilgrims and are very clean and newly constructed. Restaurant has a decent pilgrim's meal and better food back in the dining room.

Day 4 -- Real de la Jara (16 km) -- stayed in a pension, kind of a strange place, but the albergue wasn't open when I got there. Pension el Molino, right on the camino, and it's a little weird but fine. I stayed in a room that had millions of boxes piled high to the ceiling.

Day 5 -- Monesterio (18 km) --no albergue here, I stayed in Hostal El Pilar, I liked it a lot. There are a couple of hotels as well. The village priest is in the process of converting his home into an albergue, it should be open by September he told me. He's a wonderful man, I would stay there if I had had the chance.

Day 6 -- Fuente de Cantos (22 km) -- excellent albergue, extremely clean, large rooms with few beds in each. Very clean sheets on all the bunks. Private pensiones here always get bad reviews.

Day 7 -- Zafra (25 km) -- stayed in the albergue (in 2009, I was bitten by bed bugs here, in 2010, no problem). Rooms have bathrooms attached to them, to be used only by people sleeping in the room. Rooms range from 2 people to 8 or 10.

There is an incredible albergue in between these two towns, it's out in the middle of nowhere in an old building that used to be used for making olive oil, and the press is still there. Very nice rooms, good food, lots of grass and lounge chairs. We spent a while there for coffee and a snack and if it hadn't been so early, would have definitely stayed here. I think it's called Almanzara or Almanara or something like that. It's a very short (3 min) walk off the camino, there are signs.

Day 8 -- Villafranca de los Barros (20 km) -- Casa Perin is the only place to stay here, IMO. For eating, go to the Restaurante Monterrey, I had an excellent meal there, and the owner of Casa Perin will give you directions.

Day 9 -- Torremegia (28 km) -- Private albergue is not great value, and the food in the bar connected with albergue is terrible. Single rooms in hotel nearby are almost as cheap and have private bath. Hotel Milenium. This place has been the victim of some pretty horrible smears by the owners of the albergue. The hotel's new phone number is 924-34-1095. There is a second albergue in town, the albergue turistico, which is in a beautiful old building, the one with conch shells all around the doorway. It wasn't open when I was there, but I know people who have stayed there and liked it very much.

Day 10 -- Merida (16 km) -- have heard bad things about the albergue, stayed in a nice pension, Hostal Senero, Calle Holguin no. 12, phone 924-31-72-07, info@hostalsenero.com

Day 11 -- Aljucen (17 km) -- nice enough albergue, clean and space for sitting, the hospitalera also owns a casa rural. No reservations possible at the albergue.

Day 12 -- Alcuescar (21 km) -- casa rural in this town gets bad reviews. The albergue is very nice, so long as you're on the first floor of the albergue (which is the second floor of the monastery). The third floor of the albergue is a huge room with at least 50 beds, bathrooms smelly, but the other floor has some small rooms (I got a SINGLE!!!) and a few with 6 beds or so.
(This is the town where the 3.5 km walk to the 9th century church, Santa Lucia del Trampal, starts in front of the town hall. Highly recommended, at least if you like old churches).

Day 13 -- Caceres (38 km) -- stayed in a small hotel, very nice, Don Carlos. http://www.hoteldoncarloscaceres.net

Day 14 -- Casar de Caceres (11 km) -- albergue is ok, nothing to write home about, in a nice old building, but the bathrooms are about 2" from bunk beds. The only restaurant in town (or one of them), the Majuca, is across the street from the albergue and excellent. I spent the morning in Caceres, and walked out the 11 easy kms in the afternoon. It was the first salad I had had since leaving home that did not use iceberg lettuce.

Day 15 -- Canaveral (33 km) -- albergue is small and cramped, I was told. I stayed at the Hotel Malaga, very clean, simple, about 20E. And the restaurant below serves decent food as well.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
Donating Member
#5
Ok, here is part II

Day 16 -- Galisteo (28 km) -- private albergue is fine, it is small, and bathroom space is extremely limited. But there aren't a lot of people, I think there are two rooms, one with beds for 8, one with beds for 4. And maybe a private room as well. Rooms also available at the Bar Emigrantes, which you will pass on the way into town, and which is where I ate dinner and breakfast.

Day 17 -- Carcaboso (11 km) -- I took a short day today, so that I was well positioned to walk to Oliva de Plasencia without having to walk on the highway. Stayed at a very nice hotel, cheap for pilgrims http://www.ciudaddecaparra.com/ (maybe 20 E?). There is also a pension here that's not too much cheaper, but it has shared rooms and shared bathrooms and I would definitely recommend the hotel over the pension Elena, I think it's called. the hotel fills up quickly because there are only four or five rooms, so calling for reservations is probably a good idea. There is also a municipal albergue, looked very basic, in a garage-like structure, on the edge of town as you leave on the Camino.

The books will tell you that from Carcoboso to Aldeanueva del Camino it's 38 km. That's true, but there are several ways to break that up:

Option one: Walk from Carcaboso to Venta Quemada (13 km), then 6 km along the highway to Oliva de Plasencia (this 6 km takes you off the Camino, but it's easy to get back on it the next day). So that's a 19 km day. If you feel like doing more, you could start your day in Galisteo and to Oliva de Plasencia it would be a total of 29 or 30, all very easy kms. From Oliva, it's 5 km on a very nice path to Arco de Caparra, then 18 or so to Aldeanueva del Camino.

Option two: Walk from Carcaboso to the Arco de Caparra, and the Hostal Asturias will pick you up and take you to their place on the highway about 6 (?) kms off the Camino. The next day you have to follow their blue arrows back to the Camino and it's a very doable day from Hostal Asturias to Aldeanueva del Camino. (The owner of Hostal Asturias and elena in Carcaboso are in cahoots in some way -- she must get a kickback for everyone she sends to Hostal Asturias, because she got very aggressive with a friend who told her he was going to Oliva instead of Hostal Asturias).

Option three: Walk from Carcaboso to Arco de Caparra (19km), then take the well marked turnoff on the nice path back to Oliva de Plasencia. This avoids highway walking, which I detest. Details are here, with a very nice map drawn by Isabelle of the forum: camino-mozarabe-and-via-de-la-plata/topic7625.html

This is the option I took, for two reasons: I do not like walking on the shoulder of the road, and second, I wanted to visit the Arco de Caparra, where there is a visitors center and lots of ruins to walk through. The timing worked out very well for me doing Isabelle's route.

Day 18 -- Oliva de Plasencia (25 km -- using Isabelle's very wise off-road route) -- there is an albergue turistico here in this town with NOTHING, absolutely nothing else. Well, there's a pharmacy that may open for an hour in the afternoon, and there is a grocery store but it only opens in the morning so you are unlikely to be able to use it. But the albergue is VERY nice, small rooms, and comfortable and clean, and the hospitalera serves an evening meal. The meal is nothing to write home about but it's edible.


Day 19 -- Banos de Montemayor (36 km) -- I was planning to stay in Aldeanueva del Camino, the albergue is fine, but it was early, so I decided to continue on Banos de Montemayor. There is another one of these Albergue Turisticos in Banos, and it's GREAT -- small rooms (3-4 people each), a very nice hospitalero, and several decent restaurants in town. If you like staying in nice hotels every now and then, there was a very nice newly opened place, http://www.hrlospostigos.com -- the owner told me they give good piligrim prices. I just ate in their restaurant, and it was good.


Day 20 -- Fuenterroble (33 km) -- one of the emblematic albergues of the camino, with the Priest Don Blas. It's the only game in this very small town, but there are two bars and a pharmacist who comes in the afternoon, takes orders for medicines, etc, and comes back at night to bring them to all the needy pilgrims! I was suffering from very bad allergies in all parts of my body from my chest upwards so I don't have too much of a recollection of this place. But I remember that there are two or three bars, and at least one opened early.

Day 21 -- San Pedro (28 km) -- There is a small albergue here, and a casa rural right next to it. I stayed in the third option, which was a new hotel type place (rooms about 20E for pilgrims) http://www.turismoruralviicarreras.com/ Good choice, had a decent dinner here as well.

Day 22 -- Salamanca (24 km) -- millions of options. The albergue is very nice, but pretty small (16 beds?) I stayed here an extra day and splurged on a hotel, there are tons of choices in all price ranges.

Day 23 -- Valdunciel (15 km) -- only possibility in town was the small (maybe 6 beds total) but very nice municipal albergue. Kind of looked like the house I'd expect the hobbits to live in. Keys available in the library, I liked it very much. Took a short day because I was meeting a friend in Zamora and would have arrived too early if I did Salamanca to Zamora in two stages like most people do. Good restaurant about 1/2 km away, out on the highway. And the library has very good internet.

Day 24 -- Villanueva del Campean (33 km) -- stayed in a private albergue in town, pretty nice, connected with a bar where you can eat dinner. There is a municipal albergue, also, in a small old house, but the woman who ran it was very ill and the townspeople don't know if it will open again, and if so, when.

Day 25 -- Zamora (18 km) -- this is a STUNNING albergue. Beautifully redone old building, lots of space, rooms are small with bathroom attached. I spent three days total here, because I visited San Pedro de la Nave, which is 24 km out of town, and met a friend here. We stayed in Hostal Trefacio for several nights, http://www.hoteltrefacio.com/ , I think a double room was about 50 E.

Day 26 -- Montamarta (19 km) -- Casa Rural is Casa del Sastre. It was 25E each, a little pricey, but definitely worth it if the alternative is the albergue. Tel.: +34 650834055/ +34 637303240 . We just called a day or two ahead, the owner lives out of town but has a resident who takes care of things. Great restaurant in town, on the highway, a very nice surprise! It's the restaurante Rosamary. Another non-iceberg lettuce salad! This is a restaurant run and operated by three women, kind of unusual. A man we know who stayed in the albergue had food and clothing taken from him. The albergue is out near the highway, not right in town, so its isolation probably is a factor.

Day 27 -- Granja de Moruela (22 km) -- The albergue looked fine, but we stayed at another Casa Rural, again a little pricey (25 E each) but very nice. Casa del Tio Quico, http://www.casadeltioquico.com/ On weekends you may find that the entire house has been rented out, but we were lucky and arrived on a Sunday. (they rent the whole house out to families/goups, but will rent individual rooms if it's open).

Day 28 -- Tabara (26 km) -- there is a lot of construction for the new high speed train the AVE, which makes the private accommodations hard to get in at times. We stayed in a room in an apt owned by the local hotel, nothing special at all but fine. There is an albergue, I walked out to it, it's about a km outside of town, it looked fine too.

Day 29 -- Santa Croya (20 km) -- Casa Anita is DEFINITELY the place to stay, it's a fabulous albergue.

Day 30 -- Rionegro (26 km) -- albergue is in an old building, recently renovated, two floors with two rooms of beds. My friend and I were the only two in the whole albergue the night we were there (we locked the door). It seemed basically clean to us, but someone later told me that he saw a rat in a drawer and had the hospitalera come and get it. Ugh. There are two bars that serve meals, fairly standard but edible. Everyone recommended to us that we eat at the bar to the left from the front door of the albergue, not the one to the right.

Day 31 -- Palacios de Sanabria (28 km) -- you won't find an albergue listed here but there is a private home that offers rooms. They are very clean but not fancy. The evening meal was pretty bad, but she was such a nice woman we didn't really care. But be careful, the wine she serves is totally un-drinkable, and I am NOT a wine snob. We had bought a bottle in the little grocery store in town just because I had a hunch, and I'm very glad I did!

Day 32 -- Puebla de Sanabria (13 km) -- we did a short day to here because we wanted to visit this very nice old town. It's quite a popular tourist place, so there are many hotels to choose from (we stayed in one and were shocked by the 120 euro bill for the room and breakfast, but live and learn). There is also a very nice albergue, you'll pass it coming into town, I'd recommend it. Albergue Casa Luz, http://www.alberguecasaluz.es . And the owners of the albergue own a meson in town where we had an excellent meal.

Day 33 -- Requejo de Sanabria (13 km) -- if you stop here, stay in the private albergue, right on the highway. It's the Albergue Casa Cervino, tel. 980-62-05-05. The owners are a couple with two daughters, they are helpful and friendly. They will also send you to eat at Hostal Tu Casa, it's about a 20 minute walk but WELL WORTH IT. Good food, very nice people. Do not go to the dirty municipal albergue, though the hospitalera frequently tries to pull people into it. It's filthy.

Day 34 -- Lubian (20 km) -- We stayed at the Casa Pachaca, http://www.lapachaca.turcastilla.com, email is lapachaca@turcastill.com, tle. 980-624-127. This is a pretty little town, very pretty. The albergue and a private place, Casa Irene, are right at the entrance to town. I would recommend ignoring both of them, as we did. The albergue,on the day we arrived, had no running water. The Casa Irene, right next door, was tempting but seemed kind of dirty to me. So I continued on to Casa Pachaca, which is on the other end of town but right on the camino, and it was great. I recommend it highly. Prices were pilgrim-friendly, can't remember the exact amount.

Day 35 -- A Gudina (24 km) -- liked the albergue very much

Day 36 -- Laza (34 km) -- another great albergue-- I had an excellent meal in the meson in town, not the bar,they are right across the street from each other. But I had an excellent breakfast in the bar in town.

Day 37 -- Vilar de Barrio (20 km) -- terrific albergue.

Day 38 -- Xunqueira de Ambia (13 km) -- great albergue. There's a new restaurant in town, on the way into town from the albergue. It's run by two women and has good food and good wine.

Day 39 -- Ourense (16 km) -- great albergue. We took the little "touristic train" out to the thermal baths, (a euro and change for a 5 km ride) and it was the one time I wished I had brought a bathing suit. The baths are beautiful and free.

In between Ourense and the monastery is the very nice albergue in Cea. We stopped and had lunch there, though those who stayed there said the hygiene wasn't top notch (but by this point on the Vdlp, you'll be used to that!). There is a casa rural also, and the bar/restaurant in town (a pulperia) is terrific.

Day 40 -- Monasterio de Oseira (34 km) -- if you have an interest in old monasteries, I'd highly recommend staying in their very basic albergue. Otherwise, getting to the monastery at the time they give visits is difficult. We walked from Ourense, got there around 3:30 pm and were able to take a tour at 4 or 5. Two bars in town, one will serve sandwiches, one will serve hot meals, very basic.

Day 41 -- Laxe (29 km) -- big modern albergue, its upkeep is less than stellar but it's fine. Restaurant on the road gives overpriced but edible meals, nothing special.

Day 42 -- Punte Ulla (31 km). I stayed in the pension across the street from the Dia supermarket. There are also rooms at the restaurant right over the bridge as you enter town. I liked the people at the pension better so stayed there. The albergue is another 4 or 5 km outside of town and it's an uphill walk. By the time I got there in the afternon, I was ready to stop walking, especially because there are detours that add on kilometers from the construction of the AVE train. It's a pretty little town, and I had a very decent meal in the pension, which is right next to the gas station on the way out of town.

Day 43 -- Santiago (22 km). We stopped at the Colegiata de Sar on the way into town. Parts of what must have been a beautiful romanesque cloister are still there, just a very nice place for a stop before your last km up into town.

There are of course tons of places to stay in Santiago. My favorite is the Hotel Costa Vella, which has pretty reasonable rates if you want to stay in a private place. For a cheaper pension, I'd recomment the Pension Linares where I have stayed several times. For eating, don't miss the Bodeguilla de San Roque, it has great simple food.

So, there you have it. I don't know if you like to plan all your stages or walk by the seat of your pants, but if you have specific questions about other places, I may also have some knowledge that I could dredge up out of my brain to help you out.

Hope lots of you are planning to walk the Vdlp -- it's spectacular. Laurie
 

Advertisment

#6
Hi Laurie, thanks for sharing. This will be most helpful as I plan for my next camino. It is a toss up between VDLP or del Norte, but I must admit I am more inclined towards VDLP. I realised from your comments you had walked in May. When did you start your walk ? What was the weather like through your walk ? I had walked the Camino Frances last year in Autumn (Oct) and was thinking I will walk the next in Spring; but a little apprehensive about snow and heat (the extremes!).

Best regards
Rebecca
 
#7
Hi there,

Thanks for posting the stages and extra info regarding the refugios. I walked the Portugese camino from the 1st till the 10th of April (from Porto) this year and the french camino (from st jean) from the 21st April till the 24th of May. I had first intended to do the La Plata route straight after the Portugese camino but did the french instead after chatting to a few people the first time I reached Santiago. Am now intending to walk the La Plata from the middle of September this year and have learned lots of valuable (and sometimes painful) lessons the last few months on the first two walks but loved the experience all the same. You're info is certainly great help as most of the recent guides seem to be outdated or in the wrong language for me. Which guide did you use?
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
Donating Member
#8
Hi muppet and Rebecca,

Muppet, I found that the guides in English were not terribly helpful, so I printed out the online Eroski guides (in Spanish) and annotated them with information from this forum and elsewhere. There was a way to do it so that the each of their 35 stages fit on one piece of paper printed back to back. It worked fine, the walking instructions on those pages were detailed enough to help out when needed. The Vdlp is well marked and I rarely had doubts about which way to go. The information I added to the pages I printed was mainly dealing with accommodations, favorite places to eat, churches to visit, etc. And I threw out the pages as I progressed, so there wasn't a lot of extra weight.

Others have commented on the guides in English -- you have the choice of Brierley, Raju, or CSJ (the British confraternity). I don't think any of them is really up to date. In 2009, I walked a couple of weeks on the Vdlp with the CSJ guide and it wasn't very helpful. So this year, I didn't bring it.

Rebecca, I started in Sevilla right at the beginning of May. In 2009, I started in the middle of April (had to stop after 10 days or so because of foot problems), and there were some differences. One is the crowds. Mid-late April 2009 was more crowded than May 2010 (I can only compare the Sevilla to Caceres stretch). This may be because of the "holy year avoidance" factor or something else. But I do think that April is a very popular month on the Vdlp.

In terms of weather, I had more rain in April 2009. This year, I got only a few drops one day before Merida, and then a couple of days right before Ourense with some on again off again rain. But I don't think my experience has any predictive value, given how the weather is so changeable. In fact, those who started in Sevilla in late April this year had very hot weather for a few days, in the 30s. When I started in early May that heat wave was gone, and it was downright cool almost all the way to Zamora. In fact, I frequently wore my lambswool gloves for a couple of hours in the morning, during many stages up till and even after Caceres.

So, based on my non-scientific "N" of one, and some anecdotal experiences of others, I think starting in Sevilla in early May is perfect. Mid-late April might be more rainy and more crowded. And late May gets you very close to summer. If you compare my pictures with those posted by a forum member who started in late May, http://mariannecamino.blogspot.com/ you will see how much drier and browner the landscape had gotten in those 3 weeks. The month of May was green, flowery, and cool, but who knows if next year will be anything like this year.

If you do start in early May, remember that May 1 is a national holiday. This year it fell on a Saturday so it didn't give Spaniards an option for a three or four day weekend, but crowds around May 1 might be a concern. I wasn't sure what the effect would be, so I had reserved my first couple of days in non-albergue accommodations, but it turned out that the only night the albergue was full was in Guillena, and that is because it's so small (10-12).

I remember when I was deciding on which Camino to walk, lynnejohn, mermaid lilli and others on this forum sang the praises of the Vdlp. They were right! Buen camino, Laurie
 

ranthr

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
C Frances 2005, 2007
Le Puy en Velay -SdC 2009
Via de la Plata 2011
gr 653 from Oloron to Puente la Reina 2012
Gr65 from le Puy to Figeac 2013
Irun to Santander 2013
Porto to SdC 2014
Astorga to SdC 2015
#9
Thank you Laurie, both for all this useful information about your stages and places to sleep and your pictures that I enjoyed very much.
I am going to start from Sevilla 29.04.11, so it seems to be the right time.
Randi
 
#10
hi Laurie,

Thanks for the tip in regard to the eroski guide. I'll look for it online. I have bought the alison raju guide but it was last updated in 2005 and I'm sure a lot has changed since then. I'll probably take some info out of it and use my own notes gathered from different sources....the raju book is also relatively heavy in my opinion and as we all know weight is important :). I also got hold of a little booklet from the belgium confraternity from 2009 which lists places along the way which should be useful. The most up to date one seemed to be the german book but i cant read german only dutch and english.
 

bjorgts

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Caminos in Spain, France, Portugal, Germany since 2003. 2017: Mozarabe. Plan 2018: Finish Levante.
#11
if you read German, this might be a good guide: Conrad Stein Verlag. Spanien: Jacobsweg - Via de la Plata, Mozarabischer Jecobsweg (2009).
 

alipilgrim

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2005), Frances (2007), Madrid/Frances (2011), 1/2 VdP (2012),
#12
Hi Laurie,

I was wondering if you could re-post the link for Isabelle's route from Arco de Caparra to Oliva de Plascencia (Day 17, Option #3)? It seems to be missing and I'm interested in looking at the map..

Option three: Walk from Carcaboso to Arco de Caparra (19km), then take the well marked turnoff on the nice path back to Oliva de Plasencia. This avoids highway walking, which I detest. Details are here, with a very nice map drawn by Isabelle of the forum:
ca ... c7625.html
This is the option I took, for two reasons: I do not like walking on the shoulder of the road, and second, I wanted to visit the Arco de Caparra, where there is a visitors center and lots of ruins to walk through. The timing worked out very well for me doing Isabelle's route.

Thanks! alipilgrim
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
Donating Member
#13
Hi, Alipilgrim,

Sorry if I gave the wrong link -- I hope this one works. Isabelle's map is about halfway down through the postings. She also attached a picture that shows you where to expect the turnoff, because it comes about 4 minutes before you hit the Arco de Caparra. But I would continue on the trail for those few minutes to see the site before going to Oliva -- as I've said before, that gives you the opportunity to visit the visitors center and walk around the much larger excavated site. The next day, as you come back through on your way to Aldeanueva, it's likely to be way before opening time. And there is absolutely nothing to do in Oliva anyway! (though it is a nice little village).

https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/galisteo-arco-de-caparra.7625/#post-45618

Buen camino a todos, Laurie
 

+@^^

Active Member
#15
omg peregrina2000
! thanks for the inspiration
i'm doing online hyperventilations
i've just booked my flight on Iberia
as well as the 1st night's accommodation in Seville
there's no turning back now
i'll be starting on 14 Sept
and need to be back in Seville to catch the return flight on 30 Oct
47 days
i like you suggestion of ending at Finnisterra and avoiding the frenetic SdC
? is this feasible, given my timeframes
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
Donating Member
#16
Hi, tam,

Now that I've counted up the days, I can see that it took me 43 days to walk to SdC, then 4 more to go to Finisterre and Muxia. But I met many people who were no more fit than I am who took many fewer days -- anywhere from 32 to 37 or 38. Some of them had a "charge through" mentality and walked on highways whenever they could to shorten the stages, but some just did longer etapas. If I look at my stages, I can see many places where I could have combined two stages into one or three into two without really suffering or losing any of the magic. But I was in a low key stroll mode, that's for sure.

So, assuming you're basically fit, I bet you can easily do all that you want to do in 47 days without feeling stressed or overworked. And I would put in a plug for considering the Finisterre to Muxia stage, Muxia is a pretty cool place. I actually think that Finisterre would be a better place to end the pilgrimage, but I think that the SdC to Muxia to Finisterre route is less appealing than the SdC to Finisterre to Muxia route (mainly because you would miss the wonderful entrance into Cee/Corcubion). We met some who walked round trip SdC - Finisterre-Muxia-Santiago and that would be 7 days. So if I were you I would just leave that part up in the air and see how much time you actually have when you get to Santiago, knowing you can spend as long as a week walking out and back to Finisterre.

I know that hyperventilation stage very well. It usually starts a couple of months before a Camino and there is nothing I can do to stop it. Buen camino, Laurie
 
Camino(s) past & future
Via de la Plata (2010, 2011) Camino Madrid (2013) Camino Mozarabe (March, April 2015) Camino Madrid (October 2015) Camino Mozarabe de Almeria a Granada (March 2017)
#17
Laurie,
Thankyou for referencing my blog. Glad to know it is useful. My experience was similar, didn't need a guidebook much, the waymarkings are pretty good.
We found it different starting in the middle of the week - more individual pilgrims. The groups seemed to have started on the weekends.
I have bookmarked all your really great information - I am plotting a return in late April 2011 to walk from Merida to Salamanca.
Buen Camino, Marianne
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
Donating Member
#18
Hi, marianne,

After all these caminos, and I never made that very astute observation about the groups vs. individuals. That's probably a good tip for starting any camino, especially with the rise in the number of guided/package tour type things. I'll shoot for midweek starts from now on, thanks.

Ah, Merida to Salamanca in May -- you will love it, the wildflowers are spectacular.

Buen camino, Laurie
 
#19
Hi John,

Thanks for those links! My preparations are in full swing but need to do some preparatory walking the coming weeks as I havent done much since finishing the French Camino at the end of May...
I leave for Seville on the 9th and will probably start a few days later after soaking up the sights and sounds of Seville.
 

+@^^

Active Member
#20
hello Laurie and thanks for the 'take it slow' advice
i'm generally competitive, and it will be a real gift if i can take my foot off the petrol and breathe
thanks, too, from adding to my newest quandary - SdC / Finisterra / Muxia
i haven't really spent too much time looking into this, so much happy research lies ahead
finally, thanks for the 'wait and see what happens' approach
i guess that will be one of my great teachers
thanks
tam
 

CaroleH

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
VdlP 2006, Portugues 2007;Madrid 2009, Finisterre 2009; Sur and VdlP 2011,2013; Manchego and Madrid 2014; VdlP (parts) 2016; Hospitalero plan 2017.
#21
Hello Laurie,

You are a 'wonder' woman, and I am so excited . . . . just found this stream which is so, so helpful as we sit and ponder our stages for next year's VdlP. What a wonderful summary. Thankyou for your efforts.
When are you going to write a book?

Your thoughts on starting dates are also helping us, as we have been "discussing" ours for months. :? Finally settled on April 24 from Huelva (maybe a couple of days longer than Sevilla) but I have been uneasy and wondering if we should start earlier, as most of the Australians we hear of are planning end of March and early to mid April VdlP starts. (Do they know something we don't?). Plus I remember the heat wave we walked in back in 2006, which stuck end of May and continued all through June and July. Your observations and recommendations confirm my husband's choice.

Spring weather is difficult to predict, so volatile, but we have to go with normal weather patterns, do the homework, and choose a date. Extremes, as in 2006, and the flooding in April, May this year, are not the norm . . . . we hope.
Thankyou again Laurie. All the best. Carole.
 
Camino(s) past & future
4/2011 VdlP,
4/2014 Rota Vincentina, Portugues.
4/2016 Aragones, Frances.
#22
Hi Carol and Laurie,
Thank you Laurie for the very informative site.

I chose my starting time for the VdlP after reading Tony Kevin's book "WALKING THE CAMINO". He started his walk in May and walked through some hot days. I thought if I start in March I should be through the hot area before it gets to hot. But being a first timer I may have it all wrong. I have allowed more rest days than Laurie because I don't know how my body is going to cope. And also 4 extra days to walk onto Finisterre, and a couple of rest days before making my way back to Barcelona. I will certainly be leaving my comfort zone at home, and it will be interesting to experience the adventures that await me.
Laurie's information on the accomodation in each village will also be very helpfull, I have printed a copy to take with me.

Talk to you soon Judy.
 

lynnejohn

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2005), VDLP(2007), Madrid(2009), Ingles(2009), Sur (2011), VDLP(2011)-partial, VDLP(2014)
#23
Hi Laurie -

It looks as if you started after Semana Santa. Given our starting date of 2nd week of April, (we don't know where yet) we may be anywhere from Merida to Zamora for the Easter weekend. Do you suggest making reservations ahead for the Friday to Monday? I think it might be a good idea...

lynne
 

CaroleH

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
VdlP 2006, Portugues 2007;Madrid 2009, Finisterre 2009; Sur and VdlP 2011,2013; Manchego and Madrid 2014; VdlP (parts) 2016; Hospitalero plan 2017.
#24
Hi Judy, a quick response . . . . thought I should point out . . . . Tony Kevin's book is about the camino he walked in 2006, the year an early heat wave struck Spain and a lot of Europe. We were doing part of the VdlP the same time he was walking from Granada and up the VdlP and the unseasonally hot weather started about 26 May and continued for months. It was hot and hard going but not the norm.

In a 'normal' year, it can be very cold and wet, sometimes snow, in March and April inland in Andalucia, and "normally" mild in May and early June. Just something to keep in mind, and maybe Tony Kevin's wonderful book is one of the reasons why most Australians I hear about are going to do the VdlP in March and April next year. I had wondered about that. Cheers Carole
 

bjorgts

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Caminos in Spain, France, Portugal, Germany since 2003. 2017: Mozarabe. Plan 2018: Finish Levante.
#25
If you walk in Spain in Easter, I would recomend making reservations ahead in the cities f eks Merida. At Easter there are big feasts with many prosessions (or what you call it in English). That is one of the great things walking in Spain at Easter. Be prepared and enjoy it! If you want to see what the prosessions are like, google for example "semana santa" on You Tube. Bjørg
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
Donating Member
#26
So many lucky people planning a 2011 visit to the Vdlp!

Lynnejohn, I agree with Bjorts that it would be a very smart idea to reserve for Holy Week. You're right, I left after Easter and didn't have to deal with it. If you are staying in municipal albergues you won't be able to reserve and there will be no non-pilgrims there so you should be ok. But private accommodations will all be in high demand. I have heard that the "albergue turisticos" in Extremadura (Fuente de Cantos, Almanzara, Zafra, Torremegia, Oliva de Plasencia, Banos de Montemayor and maybe one or two I've forgotten) will admit non-walkers but I've never seen that. so maybe you can actually reserve in those places, though I never have.

And the weather... as others have pointed out, abnormal is the new normal. Who can predict? This year, there was a brief hot spell in Andalucia in late April, I arrived a few days later and it was cool again. I do think that if you look at averages of temp and rainfall, though, it is still the case that April tends to be a fair amount wetter than May. Those huge rains in northern Spain this May didn't affect the Vdlp much, I don't think. May was actually pretty dry the whole month on my walk.
And May is not that much hotter than April, again based on averages.

I don't know why, but it seems like April is a lot more crowded than May, but that is all based on anecdotal evidence. I had no crowding issues at all this past May, while in April 2009 I walked Sevilla to Merida and it was crowded!

Laurie
 

lynnejohn

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2005), VDLP(2007), Madrid(2009), Ingles(2009), Sur (2011), VDLP(2011)-partial, VDLP(2014)
#27
Thanks, all, for your advice. Every camino we've walked we've started out on around 25 April - don't know why we got it into our heads to start off so early. :? Added to that, the booking ahead for accommodation during Semana Santa could end up to be frustrating.. And we've already had the wonderful opportunity to witness Semana Santa in both Sevilla and Malaga. Added to that, RAINY April. OK, I've convinced myself, with your help. April 20-something it is! :D Thanks again!

lynne
 
Camino(s) past & future
4/2011 VdlP,
4/2014 Rota Vincentina, Portugues.
4/2016 Aragones, Frances.
#28
Hi Carol,

Thanks for the information, yes Tony's book influenced my decision on when to start my walk. At least now I know what I may be in for as far as the weather goes. I have already arranged my flight, so the end of March it is.I will just have to deal with what ever comes my way. Should I take the same attitude with accommodation over easter?

Thanks, talk to you soon ,
Judy.
 

CaroleH

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
VdlP 2006, Portugues 2007;Madrid 2009, Finisterre 2009; Sur and VdlP 2011,2013; Manchego and Madrid 2014; VdlP (parts) 2016; Hospitalero plan 2017.
#29
You'll be fine, Judy, and will have a wonderful camino. People walk caminos in all seasons. We used to read the guest books of some albergues and marvel at the stamino of pilgs who walked in winter, sometimes through feet of snow. Don't know how they knew where the path was!

The general consensis, as Laurie says . . . .it's a good idea to book ahead for Easter, tho may be tricky to predict where you'll be along by then. We'll be starting from Huelva on Easter Sunday (I think) so will book for the few days beforehand in Huelva, and try to book for first night along the way.

PM me if you like and I'll send my email. Happy planning.
Buen camino. Carole
 

bjorgts

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Caminos in Spain, France, Portugal, Germany since 2003. 2017: Mozarabe. Plan 2018: Finish Levante.
#30
Judy, one thing that will come your way is flowers! bjørg
 
Camino(s) past & future
4/2011 VdlP,
4/2014 Rota Vincentina, Portugues.
4/2016 Aragones, Frances.
#31
Hi Carole,
Have sent you a PM, I hope it arrives, I had a few attempts. As my husband says, the more you try the easier it is. I know he is right. :wink:

Cheers Judy.
 

hel&scott

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2004 St Jean - Santiago, 2008 Seville - Finestere, 2010 Ferrol - Lisbon, 2012 from Cartehenga.
#32
marjude said:
I will just have to deal with what ever comes my way. Should I take the same attitude with accommodation?
You shouldn't find it too bad, we did this walk in 2008 and have had contact with a number of people who like you have elected to walk this route rather then the French route, longer but less crowded (and less set up) then the French but we really liked that about it. Watch your water and foot care, and you will be able to cope with what ever comes your way.
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
#33
Laurie,

Thank you very much! I have this bookmarked and will print itbring it with me.

I plan to leave home on apr. 26, first day after Easter and start from Sevilla. Your itinerary seems to fit me well, too. I have no rush aboujt getting to SdC. It is the journey with all its implications that are calling me back to the Camino, Did Frances last autumn got camino infected :lol: .
 

mmm042

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
VDLP 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014
#34
Hi. My husband and I are heading out to Sevilla to start the first 219 km next month. Some of you say Bar Frances in Guillena is "O.K." Is it clean and relatively quiet? I'm picky about cleanliness and nervous about bedbug stories. Also, what about Hotel El Pilar vs. La Castua in Monesterio? Has anyone stayed at either one of those? Thanks!
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
Donating Member
#35
Hi,

I stayed in the Bar Frances on a Saturday night in early May. My single room was very small, even by Spain standards. It had no outside ventilation (instead, it had a window that looked out on a hallway, and there was a window at the end of the hallway, so there wasn't much air circulation). I would say it's clean, not spotless, but it was very noisy and I wouldn't say the soundproofing is great. The bar/restaurant downstairs is a popular place, and I think it was well past 1:30 when things quieted down, but that was on a Saturday.

I also stayed in Hotel el Pilar in Monesterio and this place was very clean, simple, but comfortable. I hadn't heard of La Castua, but I see that it's a Casa Rural and the whole house is rented out. They may very well take people for a room and a day at a time, though, because I also stayed in some casas rurales further north on the Vdlp. The Pilar is very centrally located (and right on the Vdlp) so I think it's a good choice.

Buen camino, Laurie
 

bjorgts

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Caminos in Spain, France, Portugal, Germany since 2003. 2017: Mozarabe. Plan 2018: Finish Levante.
#36
We stayed in Hostal Extremadura (one star) in Monesterio, also on the main street through the town. See that prices now is 12€ for a single room and 24€. We found that a OK place to stay. Bjørg
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
Donating Member
#37
I wonder if anyone has any updated information on the Hostal Extremadura in Monesterio? I stayed there in May 2009, and it was very dirty. I shared a room with another peregrino whose sheets clearly were not clean. The bathroom was grimy.

In May, 2010, when I walked back through, the Hostal Extremadura was closed, and people told me it was going out of business. I see on the most recent post on the thread, from oct. 2010, though, that someone stayed there and found it acceptable.

Any updates? I have a friend starting out in about three weeks, hopefully after the heat wave is well behind. Thanks, Laurie
 
#38
I stayed at the Hostal Moya in Monestario in May this year (first Hotel on left after the roundabout at the entrance to the town). 18euro (pilgrim price) for a single room with own bathroom, including breakfast. Very good. A number of people I met stayed at the Extramadura and seemed satisfied with it. Hope this helps.
I'm off in two weeks time to continue the VdLP from Merida to Salamanca.
Regards to everyone!
Tom
 

grilly

Active Member
#39
Monasterio now has an albergue, right in front of Hotel El Pilar. I missed it but another pilgrim I met stayed there and liked it. I guess you will see sign before you get there. My mind must have been somewhere else. The Extramadura seemed closed when we walked by it in early September.
 

Anniesantiago

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2006,9,11,12,13,14, 16, Aragones 2011,12,
VDLP 2011, 13, Lourdes 2012, Portuguese 2008, Madrid 2014, (2016)
#40
I am so happy I found this thread!
I'm getting excited and now I'm sure I'll walk from SdC to Finisterre to Muxia.
Hooray!
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
Donating Member
#41
Hi, Annie,
My info as originally posted is a little out of date -- for starters, there are new albergues popping up all over -- Guillena, Castilblanco, and Monesterio all have new or newly refurbished albergues, just to name a few. But I'm sure the spring beauty is unchanging and still spectacular!

Buen camino, Laurie
 

Anniesantiago

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2006,9,11,12,13,14, 16, Aragones 2011,12,
VDLP 2011, 13, Lourdes 2012, Portuguese 2008, Madrid 2014, (2016)
#42
I'm hoping the sun will come out and dry up some of the mud from all the rain they've had in Spain! I imagine some of those paths are wallows by now! Maybe I should take some skis! Not for snow, but for mud! lol
 

Peregrinopaul

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
VdlP(2012) Madrid/Frances (2014) SJPdP(2015) VdlP(2016)to Plasencia
VdlP(2017) Mozarabe-VdlP(2018)
#43
I have gone through my journal and collected whatever info I had about where I stayed on the Vdlp. I've sent this to a couple of people via pm, but thought I'd post it here in case it helps anyone else. Let me say that this is a pretty relaxed schedule. Actually, I didn't find much of this route to be very demanding, but then I walked in a beautiful, cool springtime. I usually average a few more kms a day, but had the time this year and so I took it slow. But if you have less time, you shouldn't worry that you need to devote this many days, you can do it in fewer without feeling squeezed. I will break this into two separate posts, here is Day 1-15

I stayed in Sevilla at the Hotel Simon, about one block off the Camino, 41E. Nothing special, but Sevilla is expensive. Others got on the camino, crossed the river, and easily found a place to stay in Triana. There were a lot of cheap hostales, they said, and they were still a stone's throw from Sevilla.

Day 1 -- Guillena (22 km) -- stayed at Bar Frances, adequate. 23 euros, bed and breakfast. Albergue has 10 beds, isn't terrific, and is usually full. Bar Frances will take phone reservations.

Day 2 -- Castilblanco (17 km) -- this albergue isn't one of my favorites either. Cramped, not many bathrooms. I stayed in a beautiful little rural hotel, cheap for peregrinos 26 euros, and with a good restaurant, Hospederia de la Plata, http://www.hospederiadelaplata.com. There is also the possibility of a 10E room with Senora Salvadora, Avenida Espana 43, phone, 955-73-4509

Day 3 -- Almaden (29 km) -- I have stayed in the albergue and it's fine. Big rooms with lots of beds, but bathrooms are sex segregated and high quality. I made a reservation ahead of time, not sure why, in the Casa Concha. rooms are 20E for pilgrims and are very clean and newly constructed. Restaurant has a decent pilgrim's meal and better food back in the dining room.

Day 4 -- Real de la Jara (16 km) -- stayed in a pension, kind of a strange place, but the albergue wasn't open when I got there. Pension el Molino, right on the camino, and it's a little weird but fine. I stayed in a room that had millions of boxes piled high to the ceiling.

Day 5 -- Monesterio (18 km) --no albergue here, I stayed in Hostal El Pilar, I liked it a lot. There are a couple of hotels as well. The village priest is in the process of converting his home into an albergue, it should be open by September he told me. He's a wonderful man, I would stay there if I had had the chance.

Day 6 -- Fuente de Cantos (22 km) -- excellent albergue, extremely clean, large rooms with few beds in each. Very clean sheets on all the bunks. Private pensiones here always get bad reviews.

Day 7 -- Zafra (25 km) -- stayed in the albergue (in 2009, I was bitten by bed bugs here, in 2010, no problem). Rooms have bathrooms attached to them, to be used only by people sleeping in the room. Rooms range from 2 people to 8 or 10.

There is an incredible albergue in between these two towns, it's out in the middle of nowhere in an old building that used to be used for making olive oil, and the press is still there. Very nice rooms, good food, lots of grass and lounge chairs. We spent a while there for coffee and a snack and if it hadn't been so early, would have definitely stayed here. I think it's called Almanzara or Almanara or something like that. It's a very short (3 min) walk off the camino, there are signs.

Day 8 -- Villafranca de los Barros (20 km) -- Casa Perin is the only place to stay here, IMO. For eating, go to the Restaurante Monterrey, I had an excellent meal there, and the owner of Casa Perin will give you directions.

Day 9 -- Torremegia (28 km) -- Private albergue is not great value, and the food in the bar connected with albergue is terrible. Single rooms in hotel nearby are almost as cheap and have private bath. Hotel Milenium. This place has been the victim of some pretty horrible smears by the owners of the albergue. The hotel's new phone number is 924-34-1095. There is a second albergue in town, the albergue turistico, which is in a beautiful old building, the one with conch shells all around the doorway. It wasn't open when I was there, but I know people who have stayed there and liked it very much.

Day 10 -- Merida (16 km) -- have heard bad things about the albergue, stayed in a nice pension, Hostal Senero, Calle Holguin no. 12, phone 924-31-72-07, info@hostalsenero.com

Day 11 -- Aljucen (17 km) -- nice enough albergue, clean and space for sitting, the hospitalera also owns a casa rural. No reservations possible at the albergue.

Day 12 -- Alcuescar (21 km) -- casa rural in this town gets bad reviews. The albergue is very nice, so long as you're on the first floor of the albergue (which is the second floor of the monastery). The third floor of the albergue is a huge room with at least 50 beds, bathrooms smelly, but the other floor has some small rooms (I got a SINGLE!!!) and a few with 6 beds or so.
(This is the town where the 3.5 km walk to the 9th century church, Santa Lucia del Trampal, starts in front of the town hall. Highly recommended, at least if you like old churches).

Day 13 -- Caceres (38 km) -- stayed in a small hotel, very nice, Don Carlos. http://www.hoteldoncarloscaceres.net

Day 14 -- Casar de Caceres (11 km) -- albergue is ok, nothing to write home about, in a nice old building, but the bathrooms are about 2" from bunk beds. The only restaurant in town (or one of them), the Majuca, is across the street from the albergue and excellent. I spent the morning in Caceres, and walked out the 11 easy kms in the afternoon. It was the first salad I had had since leaving home that did not use iceberg lettuce.

Day 15 -- Canaveral (33 km) -- albergue is small and cramped, I was told. I stayed at the Hotel Malaga, very clean, simple, about 20E. And the restaurant below serves decent food as well.
Re the albergue you mention in Day 8. I showed up there in 2012, and was shocked to find that it was not just closed, but abandoned. Peering through the damaged doors I could see the beautiful courtyard all overgrown. I was very disappointed,because it is, as you say, a beautiful place. The weird thing was that there was a brand-new bridge over the railway giving access. I can't remember the name of the place, (there's no village) but it was about six km south of Villafranca. I went on to V and stayed in Hostal Carmen which was very nice.
 

Houlet

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2014
Via de la Plata 2015
Camino Sanabres 2015
Camino Norde (2017)
#44
May be a bit out of date but I have cut and pasted for info although I hope to do longer stages.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
Donating Member
#45
May be a bit out of date but I have cut and pasted for info although I hope to do longer stages.
Hi, Houlet, You know, it's funny. In the past few years I've started doing longer stages and find I really much more enjoy a day of 35 than a day of 25. It would never have happened if I hadn't started walking with some pilgrims who typically walked longer days than I, and I just didn't want to lose them! But I never would have imagined that would have happened to me in my 60s. Buen camino, Laurie
 

Anniesantiago

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2006,9,11,12,13,14, 16, Aragones 2011,12,
VDLP 2011, 13, Lourdes 2012, Portuguese 2008, Madrid 2014, (2016)
#46
So nice to revisit this thread.
I stopped at Caceres and am aching to finish.
I wonder how the rail construction is going?
 

Noey

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Oct 2015 began on the Camino Frances and then moved to Via de la Plata and ended in Santiago. Hope to walk more of the Camino Frances someday
#47
I thought I'd post my stages and the approximate kms so others could get a basis for comparison when trying to figure out how long they should plan for the Vdlp. My walk had a lot of short days, and 3 rest days, so it was a pretty leisurely pace. In retrospect, I could have shaved 4 or 5 days off without any suffering, but I had the time and there were things I wanted to see, so why rush?

Day 1 -- Guillena (22 km)
Day 2 -- Castilblanco (17 km)
Day 3 -- Almaden (29 km)
Day 4 -- Real de la Jara (16 km)
Day 5 -- Monesterio (18 km)
Day 6 -- Fuente de Cantos (22 km)
Day 7 -- Zafra (25 km)
Day 8 -- Villafranca de los Barros (20 km)
Day 9 -- Torremegia (28 km)
Day 10 -- Merida (16 km)
Day 11 -- Aljucen (17 km)
Day 12 -- Alcuescar (21 km)
Day 13 -- Caceres (38 km)
Day 14 -- Casar de Caceres (11 km)
Day 15 -- Canaveral (33 km)
Day 16 -- Galisteo (28 km)
Day 17 -- Carcaboso (11 km)
Day 18 -- Oliva de Plasencia (25 km -- using Isabelle's very wise off-road route)
Day 19 -- Banos de Montemayor (36 km)
Day 20 -- Fuenterroble (33 km)
Day 21 -- San Pedro (28 km)
Day 22 -- Salamanca (24 km)
Day 23 -- Valdunciel (15 km)
Day 24 -- Villanueva del Campean (33 km)
Day 25 -- Zamora (18 km)
Day 26 -- Montamarta (19 km)
Day 27 -- Granja de Moruela (22 km)
Day 28 -- Tabara (26 km)
Day 29 -- Santa Croya (20 km)
Day 30 -- Rionegro (26 km)
Day 31 -- Palacios de Sanabria (28 km)
Day 32 -- Puebla de Sanabria (13 km)
Day 33 -- Requejo de Sanabria (13 km)
Day 34 -- Lubian (20 km)
Day 35 -- A Gudina (24 km)
Day 36 -- Laza (34 km)
Day 37 -- Vilar de Barrio (20 km)
Day 38 -- Xunqueira de Ambia (13 km)
Day 39 -- Ourense (16 km)
Day 40 -- Monasterio de Oseira (34 km)
Day 41 -- Laxe (29 km)
Day 42 -- Punte Ulla (31 km)
Day 43 -- Santiago (22 km)

Plus four days Santiago - Finisterre - Muxia
Thank you for this. I will be traveling from Oursense to Santiago. What I didn't see is the difficulty levels from that point on. I'm okay with uphill on the descend I'm afraid to slip in wet weather. Could you offer any insight on the rugged terrain and what I might need to watch out for. Also do you have an app you'd recommend?
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
Donating Member
#48
Hi Noey,
I would not describe any of the terrain after Ourense as rugged. There is a steep ascent for about 2 km at the exit from Ourense (about 250-300 m of ascent, so not too much in terms of the total, but the problem is that it's pretty steep). And that is all along the road. After that there is no serious up or down at all, basically just some rolling hills. So I wouldn't worry about slippery descents.

I know that Melanie McManus has a Vdlp ap that others have used but I have no first hand information. http://www.melaniemcmanus.com/apps/

If you can read Spanish the Eroski site has a free downloadabe ap with very good and detailed information about the route, accommodations, etc. I printed out a paper version and it was my only guide, it is very complete. http://caminodesantiago.consumer.es/mobile/los-caminos-de-santiago/sanabres/
Good luck with your planning and don't worry! Buen camino, Laurie
 

Noey

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Oct 2015 began on the Camino Frances and then moved to Via de la Plata and ended in Santiago. Hope to walk more of the Camino Frances someday
#49
Hi Noey,
I would not describe any of the terrain after Ourense as rugged. There is a steep ascent for about 2 km at the exit from Ourense (about 250-300 m of ascent, so not too much in terms of the total, but the problem is that it's pretty steep). And that is all along the road. After that there is no serious up or down at all, basically just some rolling hills. So I wouldn't worry about slippery descents.

I know that Melanie McManus has a Vdlp ap that others have used but I have no first hand information. http://www.melaniemcmanus.com/apps/

If you can read Spanish the Eroski site has a free downloadabe ap with very good and detailed information about the route, accommodations, etc. I printed out a paper version and it was my only guide, it is very complete. http://caminodesantiago.consumer.es/mobile/los-caminos-de-santiago/sanabres/
Good luck with your planning and don't worry! Buen camino, Laurie
Thank you Laurie! Appreciate the reassurance.
 

Noey

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Oct 2015 began on the Camino Frances and then moved to Via de la Plata and ended in Santiago. Hope to walk more of the Camino Frances someday
#51
I found this part of the Camino to be easy breezy compared to the two days I was on the Camino Frances.

I was chased by a dog that would not go away and then a cow and horse got a little crazy about my presence. Other than that, great!
 

Jun Meng

The Only Way I know
Camino(s) past & future
VLDP Spring, 2016
#52
I thought I'd post my stages and the approximate kms so others could get a basis for comparison when trying to figure out how long they should plan for the Vdlp. My walk had a lot of short days, and 3 rest days, so it was a pretty leisurely pace. In retrospect, I could have shaved 4 or 5 days off without any suffering, but I had the time and there were things I wanted to see, so why rush?

Day 1 -- Guillena (22 km)
Day 2 -- Castilblanco (17 km)
Day 3 -- Almaden (29 km)
Day 4 -- Real de la Jara (16 km)
Day 5 -- Monesterio (18 km)
Day 6 -- Fuente de Cantos (22 km)
Day 7 -- Zafra (25 km)
Day 8 -- Villafranca de los Barros (20 km)
Day 9 -- Torremegia (28 km)
Day 10 -- Merida (16 km)
Day 11 -- Aljucen (17 km)
Day 12 -- Alcuescar (21 km)
Day 13 -- Caceres (38 km)
Day 14 -- Casar de Caceres (11 km)
Day 15 -- Canaveral (33 km)
Day 16 -- Galisteo (28 km)
Day 17 -- Carcaboso (11 km)
Day 18 -- Oliva de Plasencia (25 km -- using Isabelle's very wise off-road route)
Day 19 -- Banos de Montemayor (36 km)
Day 20 -- Fuenterroble (33 km)
Day 21 -- San Pedro (28 km)
Day 22 -- Salamanca (24 km)
Day 23 -- Valdunciel (15 km)
Day 24 -- Villanueva del Campean (33 km)
Day 25 -- Zamora (18 km)
Day 26 -- Montamarta (19 km)
Day 27 -- Granja de Moruela (22 km)
Day 28 -- Tabara (26 km)
Day 29 -- Santa Croya (20 km)
Day 30 -- Rionegro (26 km)
Day 31 -- Palacios de Sanabria (28 km)
Day 32 -- Puebla de Sanabria (13 km)
Day 33 -- Requejo de Sanabria (13 km)
Day 34 -- Lubian (20 km)
Day 35 -- A Gudina (24 km)
Day 36 -- Laza (34 km)
Day 37 -- Vilar de Barrio (20 km)
Day 38 -- Xunqueira de Ambia (13 km)
Day 39 -- Ourense (16 km)
Day 40 -- Monasterio de Oseira (34 km)
Day 41 -- Laxe (29 km)
Day 42 -- Punte Ulla (31 km)
Day 43 -- Santiago (22 km)

Plus four days Santiago - Finisterre - Muxia
Hola. Thanks for The useful info here. I wanna ask How About The albergue along This route And The arrows Are all good??
Thanks.
 

VNwalking

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2014, 2015)
St Olav/Francés (2016)
Baztanés/Francés (2017)
Ingles (July 2018)
#53
Hi, Laurie,
Thanks for this very long-lasting thread!
Day 32 -- Puebla de Sanabria (13 km)
Day 33 -- Requejo de Sanabria (13 km)
Day 34 -- Lubian (20 km)
Day 35 -- A Gudina (24 km)
Day 36 -- Laza (34 km)
Day 37 -- Vilar de Barrio (20 km)
Day 38 -- Xunqueira de Ambia (13 km)
Day 39 -- Ourense (16 km)
Day 40 -- Monasterio de Oseira (34 km)
Day 41 -- Laxe (29 km)
Day 42 -- Punte Ulla (31 km)
Day 43 -- Santiago (22 km)
9-10 days from Puebla de Sanbria? Possible? (You can see what I'm doing...methodically going through the options...:D)
 

Donna Sch

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
VdLP-Sanabres-Fisterra (Summer 2015); Future? Levante-VDLP-Invierno (Feb/Mar 2019);
#54
We walked straight through from Vilar to Ourense. There are plenty of bars along the way so it is a longish day but not an exhausting one.
And people earlier in the thread were wondering about Monesterio? The parroquial albergue run by Father Angel. This albergue has everything a peregrino could want.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
Donating Member
#55
And people earlier in the thread were wondering about Monesterio? The parroquial albergue run by Father Angel. This albergue has everything a peregrino could want.
Hi Donna, thanks for the update. I had heard good things about this albergue. A local Canadian association supports the parroquial albergue with annual donations. I learned from two of their members that the town of Monesterio doesn't let Father Angel advertise or publicize his albergue at all because of the competition it would create with local businesses. That frankly seems a bit backwards to me since after all this is a Catholic pilgrimage. But in any event, pilgrims wanting to stay there will have to search it out and know about it given the lack of publicity.

Buen camino, Laurie
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
Donating Member
#56
Hi, Laurie,
Thanks for this very long-lasting thread!

9-10 days from Puebla de Sanbria? Possible? (You can see what I'm doing...methodically going through the options...:D)
Hi, Viranani,

That's entirely possible, I see you are expanding your horizons to be all-encompassing in your camino searching. What you will wind up with is a list of many wonderful options and an even tougher decision!

When I look at these stages, I see how my walking habits have changed. I used to automatically divide any 30+ stage into two on the assumption I could never make it that far. Then on the Levante I met two Frenchmen, the only two other people I had seen walking on my first four days. They were doing much longer days, we got along well, and rather than lose them and walk alone again, I found I could easily up my distances. I think it may have been you on another thread who pointed out something about not knowing what you can do until you try it, and this was certainly my experience here. Not that there's anything wrong with walking 15-16 kms, but I find that I enjoy the longer walking days much more. I'm assuming that in a few years I will start back on the shorter day program, but for now, I'm going to try to keep at it!
 

VNwalking

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2014, 2015)
St Olav/Francés (2016)
Baztanés/Francés (2017)
Ingles (July 2018)
#57
We walked straight through from Vilar to Ourense. There are plenty of bars along the way so it is a longish day but not an exhausting one.
I'm assuming that in a few years I will start back on the shorter day program, but for now, I'm going to try to keep at it!
Well, Brava, Laurie, long may you stride on!!
And thanks very much to you and Donna for your very helpful and quick replies....
In the end I hope to have a shortlist of possibilities that are do-able in the time frame I have.
(I'm with you about distance, Laurie. I've never had the nerve to try more than 32-3 kms or so and have no idea of my outside limit on easy terrain. I'm a strong walker but have an ankle that hates a lot of unevenness and for some reason all my long stages were hilly.)

Yes...exploring many options, reading many threads. Even re-thinking the 'no Primativo'--but would prefer to do that route over a longer time in the context of what many pilgrims would have done in the past, Leon-Oviedo-SdC. The Picos...I love mountains but assume this is not so good a route for March.

About this route, just now looking at a thread that died out last year about train/highway construction on the Sanabres...and remembering seeing some of it from the train in April and thinking 'yuk, what a pity...'
Dodging that might be a deal-breaker--is there anything more recent? Donna? What was your experience?
I did find this blog: https://stevebarhamramblingman.wordpress.com/2014/12/24/camino-sanabres-a-quieter-pilgrim-way/

Oh...and late March-Early April...doable?
 

Donna Sch

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
VdLP-Sanabres-Fisterra (Summer 2015); Future? Levante-VDLP-Invierno (Feb/Mar 2019);
#58
https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/anyone-starting-the-vldp-in-june-2015.32196/ I kept posting in this thread while on the camino itself so you can get an idea of the stages I did. The main stage where the construction was a pain was walking up the hill to Lubian. Some of the camino route has been blocked so you end up on the highway. We struck a really hot day so we just wanted to get up the hill as fast as we could and ended up following the highway for all of the uphill bit because we didn't want to risk any extra kilometres. In Spring though in cooler weather I'd be happy to rejoin the camino route sooner. Once over the hill the walk to Lubian is lovely.
I also walked to Verin rather than straight to Laza from A Gudina so missed the AVE construction on that segment. Long story about that day!
Lubian to A Gudina was a lovely day but I bet it will be very wet and muddy at that time of the year. That hill up to the Galician border is great to walk up first thing though when you are fresh. There were parts with mud even though it hadn't rained for days and it was in the middle of a heatwave.
I like hills when I am fresh which is one reason why we stayed in Ponte Ulla. It is a very steep descent down to Ponte Ulla and nobody fancied the inevitable hill after a nice lunch in Ponte Ulla. We stayed at the bar first on the right over the bridge which has lovely individual rooms and great food. They were also celebrating Mary Magdalena on the day we arrived so the place was in party mode and we were in a similar frame of mind from Ourense onwards.
And we certainly weren't in a hurry from Ourense onwards. We had time on our side and as long as we did at least 20 km each day we would be on schedule. The aim was to be in Santiago in time to watch the fireworks on July 24th. Our fitness was at the stage where anything under 30 km was an easy day. There was certainly an element of slowing down because in some ways we didn't want it to finish.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
Donating Member
#59
https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/anyone-starting-the-vldp-in-june-2015.32196/ I kept posting in this thread while on the camino itself so you can get an idea of the stages I did. The main stage where the construction was a pain was walking up the hill to Lubian. Some of the camino route has been blocked so you end up on the highway. We struck a really hot day so we just wanted to get up the hill as fast as we could and ended up following the highway for all of the uphill bit because we didn't want to risk any extra kilometres. In Spring though in cooler weather I'd be happy to rejoin the camino route sooner. Once over the hill the walk to Lubian is lovely.
I also walked to Verin rather than straight to Laza from A Gudina so missed the AVE construction on that segment. Long story about that day!
Lubian to A Gudina was a lovely day but I bet it will be very wet and muddy at that time of the year. That hill up to the Galician border is great to walk up first thing though when you are fresh. There were parts with mud even though it hadn't rained for days and it was in the middle of a heatwave.
I like hills when I am fresh which is one reason why we stayed in Ponte Ulla. It is a very steep descent down to Ponte Ulla and nobody fancied the inevitable hill after a nice lunch in Ponte Ulla. We stayed at the bar first on the right over the bridge which has lovely individual rooms and great food. They were also celebrating Mary Magdalena on the day we arrived so the place was in party mode and we were in a similar frame of mind from Ourense onwards.
And we certainly weren't in a hurry from Ourense onwards. We had time on our side and as long as we did at least 20 km each day we would be on schedule. The aim was to be in Santiago in time to watch the fireworks on July 24th. Our fitness was at the stage where anything under 30 km was an easy day. There was certainly an element of slowing down because in some ways we didn't want it to finish.
Thanks, Donna! I have renamed your post (to make clear that it is actually talking about a completed Vdlp) and made it a sticky because it has a TON of recent good information! Thanks for this. Laurie
 

VNwalking

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2014, 2015)
St Olav/Francés (2016)
Baztanés/Francés (2017)
Ingles (July 2018)
#60
I love this forum...good information goes round and round.
Thank you to both!
 

jerbear

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de madrid, camino francis, camino inverino (2012, 2013,2014)
CdM, Francis, San salvador, primativo june 2015 CDM , francis, inverino 2016
Camino madrid, via de Plata. Santiago.
Coast of the dead malpica to muxia
#61
hey laurei to bite into the vdlp from the cdm where would the spilt be and how much road walk? Salamaca? thanks
 

Peregrinopaul

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
VdlP(2012) Madrid/Frances (2014) SJPdP(2015) VdlP(2016)to Plasencia
VdlP(2017) Mozarabe-VdlP(2018)
#63
Day 7 -- Zafra (25 km) --

There is an incredible albergue in between these two towns, it's out in the middle of nowhere in an old building that used to be used for making olive oil, and the press is still there. Very nice rooms, good food, lots of grass and lounge chairs. We spent a while there for coffee and a snack and if it hadn't been so early, would have definitely stayed here. I think it's called Almanzara or Almanara or something like that. It's a very short (3 min) walk off the camino, there are signs.
Peregrina200, is this the place where you cross a railway bridge next to the Autovia, a few km before Villafranca? I had planned to stay there in 2012, but when I arrived it was abandoned and the garden all overgrown. Looked great though. I'll change my plans if it has re-opened.
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: CF winter 2016/17

Now: http://egeria.house/
#64
It was still there spring this year, some fellow pilgrims had a meal there. Not sure if they are offering accommodation now. But if not, just have a bite and a drink there and then walk the few remaining km to Villafranca. Buen Camino, SY
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
Donating Member
#65
Peregrina200, is this the place where you cross a railway bridge next to the Autovia, a few km before Villafranca? I had planned to stay there in 2012, but when I arrived it was abandoned and the garden all overgrown. Looked great though. I'll change my plans if it has re-opened.
When I walked through the last time it was totally closed, but SYates has more to to date info than I since she was there this year. I did hear that a restaurant in Villafranca had gotten the concession and maybe they couldn't make a go of the albergue part and just kept the restaurant open.
 

Peregrinopaul

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
VdlP(2012) Madrid/Frances (2014) SJPdP(2015) VdlP(2016)to Plasencia
VdlP(2017) Mozarabe-VdlP(2018)
#66
SYates has more to to date info than I since she was there this year
Just noticed,peregrina2000, that your original post dated back to 2010. It's easy to miss the small grey type at the bottom. And thanks SYates for your update. I'll certainly visit the place again.
 

SUSIE

Camino addict....
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2010)
Camino Portuguese Lisbon to Santiago via Fatima(2013)
Via Podiensis Le Puy - Roncevalles (2014)
Via Tolosana via Lourdes (2015)
Planning Via Francigena [2017]
#67
Hello does anyone have a recent up to date list of Stages and advice where to stay....thank you
 

bsewall

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Via de la Plata & Camino Frances (2013 & 2016).
#68

alipilgrim

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2005), Frances (2007), Madrid/Frances (2011), 1/2 VdP (2012),
#69
There aren't set 'stages' on the VdLP, nor on any Camino. You walk as far or as short as you want. Saying that, there are more limited options of accommodation on the VdLP so it's best to pre-plan a little but still no set stages. Check out the many threads in this section of the Forum, the Resources section of the site, different guidebooks, phone apps, and the internet for different camino planning websites to plan your walk. A few Camino websites are: http://www.mundicamino.com, www.gronze.com, http://www.godesalco.com/plan/plata,
 

Pierre Julian

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
St Jean - Finisterre (August 2014)
Pamplona - Burgos (January 2015)
Bilbao - Santander (May 2015)
St Jean - Sahgún (2nd Sept - 20 Sept 2015)
León - Sarria (26/12/2015 - 04/01/2016)
Lisbon - Tomar (02/04/16 - 10/04/16)
Pau - Pamplona (August 2016)
#70
This thread is so helpful, thanks Laurie
 

OLDER threads on this topic



Advertisement

Most read today

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 3 1.2%
  • February

    Votes: 2 0.8%
  • March

    Votes: 14 5.6%
  • April

    Votes: 47 18.8%
  • May

    Votes: 58 23.2%
  • June

    Votes: 17 6.8%
  • July

    Votes: 8 3.2%
  • August

    Votes: 2 0.8%
  • September

    Votes: 65 26.0%
  • October

    Votes: 29 11.6%
  • November

    Votes: 2 0.8%
  • December

    Votes: 3 1.2%