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Geodoc

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF 2018 (across Pyrenees, then Sarria to SdC), CF 2019 (SJPdP to Finisterra & Muxia), CI 2019
Nice list (wish I could have packed so light!)
 
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lt56ny

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
hi Pepi. i notice you aren't taking a sleeping bag. Do you not consider this necessary???
I really do not think a sleeping bag is necessary in the summer at all. You can bring a sleep silk sack and that will do the trick. I have read that some (all?) albergues are requiring a sleep sack or bag. If by some chance it gets a little cold at night put some extra clothes on.
 
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Charles Zammit

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
St Jean Pied de Port - Finisterra 2017
GR70 France 2018
Via Francigena 2019
You have inspired me to reduce weight!
I carried a power pack , only a small one good for one charge of my phone , never once used it . Instead invest in a really long ; plus one metre usb cable so you can lie in bed and use the phone while it charges .
One addition I would make is an extra pair of socks .
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
You have inspired me to reduce weight!
I carried a power pack , only a small one good for one charge of my phone , never once used it . Instead invest in a really long ; plus one metre usb cable so you can lie in bed and use the phone while it charges .
One addition I would make is an extra pair of socks .
As a woman traveling alone, I wouldn't be without my power bank, as I feel that it's important to always be able to contact someone in case of emergency. I also bring a 10 ft/3 meter cable, because sometimes it can be a long way from the electrical outlet to that upper bunk!
 

pepi

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
You have inspired me to reduce weight!
I carried a power pack , only a small one good for one charge of my phone , never once used it . Instead invest in a really long ; plus one metre usb cable so you can lie in bed and use the phone while it charges .
One addition I would make is an extra pair of socks .
@Charles Zammit, @trecile

You're absolutely right, for anyone walking with a smartphone (who doesn't), a power bank (or power pack) is recommendable. I often charge mine up at night instead of the much more expensive phone with all the data, which I would not want to "lose".
Mine has a capacity of 6'000 mAh, good enough for a couple of days of charges (peace of mind in case the vino tinto made me forget about charging! 🤪). It is on my daypack list with cable and plug. You may have noticed that I carry two standard-length cables; with a simple USB connection piece, I can double the length if needed.
On one of my earlier Camino's, I dragged along a solar panel, btw. I found it cumbersome and unreliable in comparison with a compact power bank.

For the many first-timers that responded to my post: Keep your packing basic and practical! Keep all "nice-to-have" items at home! Forgot to pack something? Stay easy! You're in Spain, a first-world country where you can buy everything 😎.
 

Charles Zammit

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
St Jean Pied de Port - Finisterra 2017
GR70 France 2018
Via Francigena 2019
As a woman traveling alone, I wouldn't be without my power bank, as I feel that it's important to always be able to contact someone in case of emergency. I also bring a 10 ft/3 meter cable, because sometimes it can be a long way from the electrical outlet to that upper bunk!
One invaluable thing I added to my phone was a battery saving application . It literally tripled the battery capacity of my Android phone . Three days on standby was the least capacity I achieved .
There are huge parasitic drains on phones especially from Face Book . Apple phones' battery drains are legendary .
Look into this , I found that it gave me a sense of security knowing that I had such reserve .
 
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mai

Member
Past OR future Camino
CF
Pamplona-S 4/18
SJPP-S-F/M 4/19
SJPP-S. (4/21)
Good job for organizing your camino backpack! The smaller the pack is, the happier your camino will be.

I carried Lowe Alpine 27L (weight 866g) for my 2nd camino in late March 2019. I didn't carry a camino shell to save weight. However, at the end of the camino at Fisterra, the host of the Albergue gave me a shell. So I still got a shell but save the weight of it during the long camino starting from SJPP, nice.
 
Past OR future Camino
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
This is off topic for packing light but is relevant to charging phones/batteries at night. On my Caminos Catalan and Aragonese I came across two albergues where, when the overhead lights were shut off, the power to the wall outlets were automatically cut off also. Since I was alone the first time and was sharing the place with only one other the second time the chargings took place in the shower rooms.

When the lights go out check if your LEDs do too.
 
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Past OR future Camino
2022
Thanks, @Geodoc; do you see anything missing, if so, please let me know!
Looks like a good, light list, but where is your water? Your spread of the entire contents has inspired me to do the same with the contents of my pack to see where I can reduce weight. I have more clothes backups (I.e. 2 pair of drawres, 2 pair of socks), so this might be a place to start. What type of bags are you using for toiletries, first aid, personal meds, etc.? Thanks for your post & help!
 

davebugg

A Pilgrimage is time I spend praying with my feet
Past OR future Camino
2019
Looks like a good, light list, but where is your water? Your spread of the entire contents has inspired me to do the same with the contents of my pack to see where I can reduce weight. I have more clothes backups (I.e. 2 pair of drawres, 2 pair of socks), so this might be a place to start. What type of bags are you using for toiletries, first aid, personal meds, etc.? Thanks for your post & help!

My guess is that the water is not included as his backpack's weight is for the gear only. Water and food are consumables and increase or decrease as you consuming them. For Base weight comparisons of how various gear types and combinations work, Base weights are how you want to do it.

Organizer bags, mine are silnylon with different colors. . .I use them to keep categories of things together like toiletries, and 'hardware-miscellaneous' which include any electronics (charging components -cable, adapter; repair kit - small sewing, repair tape, etc; hard to find button batteries for my teensy headlamp and small flashing bike light that I attach to my backpack when dark or foggy/gloomy.
 
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davebugg

A Pilgrimage is time I spend praying with my feet
Past OR future Camino
2019
This is off topic for packing light but is relevant to charging phones/batteries at night. On my Caminos Catalan and Aragonese I came across two albergues where, when the overhead lights were shut off, the power to the wall outlets were automatically cut off also. Since I was alone the first time and was sharing the place with only one other the second time the chargings took place in the shower rooms.

When the lights go out check if your LEDs do too.
That is a great point, Rick.
 

pepi

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Looks like a good, light list, but where is your water? Your spread of the entire contents has inspired me to do the same with the contents of my pack to see where I can reduce weight. I have more clothes backups (I.e. 2 pair of drawres, 2 pair of socks), so this might be a place to start. What type of bags are you using for toiletries, first aid, personal meds, etc.? Thanks for your post & help!
@jrewins

My pack list refers to my rucksack weight when I leave home, needing no water until I start walking from SJPdP. I usually buy half-liter bottles on the way. which I refill where I can.
If you check my list again, you'll notice that I have 3 pairs of drawers, 3 T-shirts, and 3 pairs of socks (two of each in the pack, 1 each on the body).
As for bags for toiletry, med's, first aid, etc., I use multipurpose pouches from EXPED, the best. (I still use those bought in 2013 for my first Camino; the new models' weigh only half and come in 5 sizes and colors.)

Talking weight: Imho, it is futile to save on the rucksack weight only; I try to lose the same amount of body weight as the pack weighs, to arrive at a zero-sum. Example: My normal weight is about 85-86 kg and to get it down to 82 kg (about 5% less) is easy, especially in summer with lots of fruit and vegetables.

Buen Camino
 

pepi

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
This is my Camino gear list. It is a variation of my gear for backpacking that would also include tent, a sleeping quilt rated for lower temperatures, air mattress, cooking gear and fuel, etc.

View attachment 106460
Hey @davebugg, Spain is in Europe and Europe is metric! 😄

(Btw: of course I carry sewing kit, soap, earplugs, toothbrush, and paste, etc., but all this is included in my Toiletry bag....instead of flash- and headlights, I use my iPhone.) 😏

BC
 

sisterj

New Member
Past OR future Camino
2022
As a woman traveling alone, I wouldn't be without my power bank, as I feel that it's important to always be able to contact someone in case of emergency. I also bring a 10 ft/3 meter cable, because sometimes it can be a long way from the electrical outlet to that upper bunk!
Great idea on the 10ft cable. Can you tell me what kind of outlet you use with it? Weight is a concern for me as I am really trying to keep it LOW. But agree on the power bank...female solo here too. I purchased a rechargeable solar bank, but am now wondering if it is too heavy. We'll see...
 
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trecile

Camino Addict
Past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Great idea on the 10ft cable. Can you tell me what kind of outlet you use with it? Weight is a concern for me as I am really trying to keep it LOW. But agree on the power bank...female solo here too. I purchased a rechargeable solar bank, but am now wondering if it is too heavy. We'll see...
I use a European plug wall charger with two USB outlets so that I can share when necessary. Similar to this one from Amazon. I wouldn't bother with a solar power bank since they are usually heavier, as it's not a nature hike - there will be lots of places to charge up your phone and power bank. I carry a lightweight power bank that will charge my phone at least one time that weighs about 4 ounces, similar to this one.
 

davebugg

A Pilgrimage is time I spend praying with my feet
Past OR future Camino
2019
Hey @davebugg, Spain is in Europe and Europe is metric! 😄

(Btw: of course I carry sewing kit, soap, earplugs, toothbrush, and paste, etc., but all this is included in my Toiletry bag....instead of flash- and headlights, I use my iPhone.) 😏

BC

;) But I live in America, and not in Spain. I can do a metric conversion for each item if there is interest in doing so, but I sorta figured folks would just do the conversion if they really wanted to know. However, the base weight of my backpack is 3.6 kg.

Pepi, I wasn't meaning to compare what I carry to your gear list, my friend. I was just posting it for a general perusal by those reading through your thread.

The flashing light thingy I attach to the back of my pack for automobiles if walking near roadways like the one listed below. I use a headlight, similar to the one below so that my hands are free while walking. It's just what I do. Others will use reflective tapes and such. :)

The pictures below have an attached link to Amazon if anyone wants more information. Just click on the pics.

Warning Light
1628538400634.png

Headlamp
1628538489725.png
 
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jsalt

Jill
Past OR future Camino
Portugués, Francés, LePuy, Rota Vicentina, Norte, Madrid, C2C, Salvador, Primitivo, Aragonés, Inglés
Starting in SJPdP in 10 days, I finalized my pack, couldn't resist sharing it.
Nice.
Just curious, but what would you add or change if you were walking the same route 6 months later, in February?
 

davebugg

A Pilgrimage is time I spend praying with my feet
Past OR future Camino
2019
I wouldn't bother with a solar power bank since they are usually heavier, as it's not a nature hike - there will be lots of places to charge up your phone and power bank.

I agree. Plus, they are so inefficient and heavy that I wouldn't carry one even on a multi week backpacking wilderness hike. With careful management. . like keeping the phone completely powered down since cell reception can be non-existent . . a lightweight power bank is sufficient between resupply points.
 

sisterj

New Member
Past OR future Camino
2022
I use a European plug wall charger with two USB outlets so that I can share when necessary. Similar to this one from Amazon. I wouldn't bother with a solar power bank since they are usually heavier, as it's not a nature hike - there will be lots of places to charge up your phone and power bank. I carry a lightweight power bank that will charge my phone at least one time that weighs about 4 ounces, similar to this one.
Very helpful!! Thank you soooo much for the links :)
 
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Past OR future Camino
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
Great idea on the 10ft cable. Can you tell me what kind of outlet you use with it? Weight is a concern for me as I am really trying to keep it LOW. But agree on the power bank...female solo here too. I purchased a rechargeable solar bank, but am now wondering if it is too heavy. We'll see...
The solar bank is useful for camping/backpacking but not for a camino where there is power each night. Besides the charger that @trecile pointed you to a cheaper solution is to get your hands on an adapter like the one here to plug into a charger you already have.

There are two problems with this. Getting just one to save money and you also have to tape it to your charger so when you leave an albergue you take both ( :oops::rolleyes:).

I also use a battery pack like the one @trecile linked to. I often walk with GPS on and need to recharge. I can easily hold the phone and power bank together during charging and even easily take photos with the two connected I find the flat power packs more comfortable to carry in my pocket than cylindrical ones. It is quite nice always having the cable handy too.
 

pepi

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Nice.
Just curious, but what would you add or change if you were walking the same route 6 months later, in February?
Sorry, @jsalt, I've never done a winter Camino, so I could not give you competent advice; it would be "trial by error" 🤷. (warmer clothes, I guess)
 

Geodoc

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF 2018 (across Pyrenees, then Sarria to SdC), CF 2019 (SJPdP to Finisterra & Muxia), CI 2019
Thanks, @Geodoc; do you see anything missing, if so, please let me know!
Two 1-liter bottles of water. I found one was insufficient (I also carried mine in the pack bottle pockets and ran a tube from one of the bottles to my front shoulder - easy to drink from without having to pull out the bottle).
 
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Geodoc

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF 2018 (across Pyrenees, then Sarria to SdC), CF 2019 (SJPdP to Finisterra & Muxia), CI 2019
I usually take a small torch, a whistle and a light sleeping bag.
Your list and items seem fine for this time of year.
Most rucks now have a whistle in the chest strap (at least, Osprey's do, and a quick online search shows the Mountain Wear packs do, too)
 

pepi

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Two 1-liter bottles of water. I found one was insufficient (I also carried mine in the pack bottle pockets and ran a tube from one of the bottles to my front shoulder - easy to drink from without having to pull out the bottle).
The need for water is very individual and much depends on physical constitution, route, and temperature. On the CF, there are perhaps 2-3 stretches with more than 12-15 km in between shops, bars, etc. (Easy to find out on Gronze.com)
There, I carry two half-liter bottles. For the rest, half a liter is adequate for me to make it comfortably from one watering hole to the next.
 

Smallest_Sparrow

Life is rarely what you expect or believe it to be
Past OR future Camino
2012: most of some, all of a few, a bit of others
This is off topic for packing light but is relevant to charging phones/batteries at night. On my Caminos Catalan and Aragonese I came across two albergues where, when the overhead lights were shut off, the power to the wall outlets were automatically cut off also. Since I was alone the first time and was sharing the place with only one other the second time the chargings took place in the shower rooms.

When the lights go out check if your LEDs do too.
As a corollary, I often found in hotel rooms that electricity was only available when your room key was in a special slot—so if you plugged something in then left to see the city, it wouldn’t be charged upon return to the room.
 
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domigee

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Sorry, @jsalt, I've never done a winter Camino, so I could not give you competent advice; it would be "trial by error" 🤷. (warmer clothes, I guess)
I walked in Winter once and the only additions to my Summer kit were merino tights, merino jumper and wooly gloves. I fully assumed I would have to buy a warmer jacket once there but there was no need.
 

jsalt

Jill
Past OR future Camino
Portugués, Francés, LePuy, Rota Vicentina, Norte, Madrid, C2C, Salvador, Primitivo, Aragonés, Inglés
I walked in Winter once and the only additions to my Summer kit were merino tights, merino jumper and wooly gloves. I fully assumed I would have to buy a warmer jacket once there but there was no need.
I would also add rain pants (which also act as insulation against the cold), a buff and a warm hat. And the gloves would be waterproof. But otherwise the kit remains the same as Pepi’s.
 

jsalt

Jill
Past OR future Camino
Portugués, Francés, LePuy, Rota Vicentina, Norte, Madrid, C2C, Salvador, Primitivo, Aragonés, Inglés
I fully assumed I would have to buy a warmer jacket once there but there was no need.
When it got cold on the Norte, in November, I bought a puffy sleeveless jacket from a China store for about 15 euros. It was the best thing I have ever bought on a camino . . .

. . . oh, apart from an umbrella when it started raining for a week . . .
 

henrythedog

Loved and fed by David
Past OR future Camino
Frances 2017, 2018, 2019, Ingles 2018, (Madrid 2019 partial - retired hurt!) (more planned)
As a corollary, I often found in hotel rooms that electricity was only available when your room key was in a special slot—so if you plugged something in then left to see the city, it wouldn’t be charged upon return to the room.
It’s worth carrying a plastic card (like a credit card, but not a credit card!) for the occasional hotel room which needs the room key (or card) in the slot. It allows you to go out and still leave the power on.

I carry an expired UK driving licence which is basically a photo ID, but which serves for the above also. Additionally, whenever I have to leave something as a ‘deposit’ - e.g. audio guides in most museums - I confidently hand over my expired licence.
 
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jsalt

Jill
Past OR future Camino
Portugués, Francés, LePuy, Rota Vicentina, Norte, Madrid, C2C, Salvador, Primitivo, Aragonés, Inglés
It’s worth carrying a plastic card (like a credit card, but not a credit card!) for the occasional hotel room which needs the room key (or card) in the slot. It allows you to go out and still leave the power on.
Brilliant idea.

Even the mini-fridge (if there is one) gets cut-off too, so you wonder why there is actually a fridge in the room when everything in it is room-temperature when you get back . . .
 

Smallest_Sparrow

Life is rarely what you expect or believe it to be
Past OR future Camino
2012: most of some, all of a few, a bit of others
It’s worth carrying a plastic card (like a credit card, but not a credit card!) for the occasional hotel room which needs the room key (or card) in the slot. It allows you to go out and still leave the power on.

I carry an expired UK driving licence which is basically a photo ID, but which serves for the above also. Additionally, whenever I have to leave something as a ‘deposit’ - e.g. audio guides in most museums - I confidently hand over my expired licence.
I wondered if that would work but didn’t have anything like that on me. Luckily for me, I figured out why my lights wouldn’t come on just before I went down to reception to ask for a different room in my first hotel (Barcelona). Almost an embarrassed American…plenty of opportunities for that came later
 

vjpdx

camino-curious
Past OR future Camino
2022
Two 1-liter bottles of water. I found one was insufficient (I also carried mine in the pack bottle pockets and ran a tube from one of the bottles to my front shoulder - easy to drink from without having to pull out the bottle).
So, about this tube, please. Is there a bite valve? What's it called (if I wanted to look for it at REI/Decathlon/other outdoor retailer)? Someone on the youtube has talked about it (Robo? Kate/Wanderlusting Lawyer) but I can't recall what they called it. Many thanks in advance!
 
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trecile

Camino Addict
Past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
So, about this tube, please. Is there a bite valve? What's it called if I wanted to look for it at REI/Decathlon/other outdoor retailer. Many thanks in advance!
Here's one that you can buy on Amazon. I believe that Camelback and other companies make them too.

 

davebugg

A Pilgrimage is time I spend praying with my feet
Past OR future Camino
2019
As a corollary, I often found in hotel rooms that electricity was only available when your room key was in a special slot—so if you plugged something in then left to see the city, it wouldn’t be charged upon return to the room.
Good tip. I always ask for two ‘keys’ so that I can leave one in the sly switch.
Ah. My misunderstanding, when I saw your quilt I thought you were preparing to bivouac if needed.

If I planned to camp outdoors on Camino, I would add a tarp-style tent and my air mattress, which would add an additional 18oz / 510 gms
 
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Smallest_Sparrow

Life is rarely what you expect or believe it to be
Past OR future Camino
2012: most of some, all of a few, a bit of others
Good tip. I always ask for two ‘keys’ so that I can leave one in the sly switch.
Great idea…I also wondered if that worked, and if I’d be charged for two people in the room. At the end of a long day I lacked the will and vocab to explain I was just trying to bypass their energy saving rules. I was having enough trouble trying to get a SIN HUMO room, which apparently meant no one smoking in the room right that second.
 

davebugg

A Pilgrimage is time I spend praying with my feet
Past OR future Camino
2019
Great idea…I also wondered if that worked, and if I’d be charged for two people in the room. At the end of a long day I lacked the will and vocab to explain I was just trying to bypass their energy saving rules. I was having enough trouble trying to get a SIN HUMO room, which apparently meant no one smoking in the room right that second.
:) When I have stayed in lodgings, be they hotels or casa rurals, if they use a card interlock system for accessing the electricity, I have never been refused a second card - - be it incorporated as a 'key' or as a separate electric-only card..

For charging, most of the electricity interlock systems will have at least one circuit that will remain on without the need for the key. It is often one of the light fixtures. If that light fixture is plugged in, then you can use that outlet for charging.
 

davebugg

A Pilgrimage is time I spend praying with my feet
Past OR future Camino
2019
So, about this tube, please. Is there a bite valve? What's it called (if I wanted to look for it at REI/Decathlon/other outdoor retailer)? Someone on the youtube has talked about it (Robo? Kate/Wanderlusting Lawyer) but I can't recall what they called it. Many thanks in advance!

If considering easy hydration methods, do not rule out a hydration bladder. Here's a repost of information I previously had provided.
-------------------------------------

I'm NOT writing this post to suggest that I and others who prefer reservoirs are making the best and most superior choice; I am posting this to preempt those who misstate facts - or who have insufficient facts -to claim that using hydration reservoirs is the WRONG way to go.

1. Sanitation. With water carry, bottles have no advantage. Reservoirs stay just as sanitary. They do not require cleaning every day, nor do they need to be dried.

As with plumbing, it is the change of water and water flow through frequent use which keeps bottles, reservoirs, and tubing fresh and sanitary. With normal use, both bladders and bottles are constantly refilled and emptied That keeps them sanitary UNLESS contaminated water is introduced, or other fluids with sugars (juices, energy drinks, soda pop, etc) are put into a bottle or a reservoir.

While working for the local public health district, I did a review of the literature, which I again did in 2016. Comparisons of bacterial contamination levels between bottles and hydration bladders were indistinguishable -- both had equally low rates of bacterial contamination. And both were at about equal risk for developing significant levels of bacteria and mold if not cleaned and dried properly prior to storage. In the last few years, the hydration reservoirs have become more modular in nature and have wider openings to access the water compartments, making it much easier to clean and prepare for storage than previous generations of the product.

One example study, from 2009:
https://www.wemjournal.org/article/S1080-6032(09)70419-3/fulltext

When it is time to store bottles or bladders away for the season, they can be sanitized if desired with a bit of bleach added to the final rinse water during cleaning. It is not necessary, but there is no harm in doing so. Then they can be rinsed out and be allowed to dry.

Molds and other nasty things occur if either container is stored with water over a period of time, or have contained other fluids which might have sugars and then are not properly washed out prior to long term storage. Mold may also form in the shorter term when fluids with sugars are exposed to warmth and sun.

Also, not all discolorations are harmful molds. Most times, it may be an algae growth from leaving stagnant water exposed to light.

2. Ease of Use. I find it personally easier to raise the mouth tube on my shoulder strap to drink from. I do not like to reach around to a side pocket, or even need to take off my pack to do so. I definitely do NOT like stuff hanging on my shoulder straps like bottles of water.

Again, this is personal preference and choice, not an issue of something being 'better'.

3. Weight. Here is where two major claims are made, one is correct and the other is not.

A typical empty 2 liter reservoir weighs around 4 to 6 ounces. The equivalent in bottles around 1.5 to 3 ounces. Depending on bottle material used, though, bottles can weigh up to 8 ounces.

So while it is correct that bottles can weigh less, it is not a significant issue of consideration with overall backpack weight.

The other issue is reservoir water capacity and total weight.

You do not have to fill a reservoir to the tippy top. I will carry as much water as I need to carry from water source to water source. If the next water source is 32 kilometers distant under a hot sun, I will carry up to 4 liters. If the next water source is a few kilometers distant in cool weather, I might carry a half liter.

4. Refills. This is actually a subheading under 'ease of use', but it is frequently pointed to as why bottles are better than reservoirs.

I can refill my reservoir without even removing my backpack. One does not need to pull a reservoir out of the pack. It is a matter of using a quick disconnect system which is a simple and cheap add on accessory.

For those interested in adding a Quick Connect adapter to your hydration reservoir/bladder, I've added a link below. With the quick disconnect added, I don't even need to remove my backpack or daypack to do a quick and easy refill of the bladder.

NOTE: The video shows the quick disconnect being used with a water filter as used when wilderness backpacking. However, on camino I leave off the filter altogether. The refill cap is simply attached to my collapsible water bottle, after it is filled with water from a fountain or faucet.

For refill bottles.... I use an extremely lightweight collapsible bottle that can hold up to 1.5 liters. Empty, it rolls down to a small bundle that are easily stashed in an outside pocket.

Many times, I will carry 1/2 liter in the collapsible bottle as a quick backup as the weather or the distance between water refills dictates. So, if I decide to, say, carry 1 liters of water between water resupply points, I will fill the reservoir with 1/2 liter, and then carry 1/2 liter in the bottle, keeping the bottle partially collapsed and tucked into a side pocket.

By doing the above I do not need to see the water bladder itself in order to be assured of adequate water or to avoid accidentally running out of water.

The collapsible bottle I use is just one container option. The refill adapter with the Quick Connect kit can also fit on a variety of empty bottled water containers.

So those are the major issues that always seem to come up. There are others, but those are the major ones.

 
Last edited:

trecile

Camino Addict
Past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
If considering easy hydration methods, do not rule out a hydration bladder. Here's a repost of information I previously had provided.

On my first Camino I brought a Smart-Tube and a collapsible water bottle. Since it was August, the water got warm pretty quickly in the side pocket of my backpack, so I put it inside my backpack - voila! I had "invented" a hydration bladder! 😄 Albeit one that didn't work quite as well as one purpose made for the job. I have since switched to a wide-mouth hydration bladder with a tube adapter that allows me to refill it without removing it from my backpack.
 

linkster

¡Nunca dejes de creer!
Past OR future Camino
2022
As a corollary, I often found in hotel rooms that electricity was only available when your room key was in a special slot—so if you plugged something in then left to see the city, it wouldn’t be charged upon return to the room.
I know it defeats the purpose of conserving energy, but it is easily overcome with a 2nd room key etc.

Sorry, I should have read all of the posts before responding.:eek:
 
Peaceable Projects Inc.
Peaceable Projects Inc. is a U.S.-based non-profit group that brings the vast resources of the wide world together with the ongoing needs of the people who live, work, and travel on the Camino de Santiago pilgrim trail network in Spain.
Rent a house in Santiago (1 month minimum)
300m from the cathedral and around the corner from the fresh food market in Santiago. Perfect place to tele commute from (1GB symmetrical connection).

Old Kiwi

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2019
Hi Pepi, Your list is similar to mine but I see no use for a day pack as everything is in my pack and if I go sightseeing once I have arrived at my albergue I only carry a camera. I also don't carry poles or electrical equipment of any kind. My pack and everything in it weighs 4.5 kilos and by the time I add a 500mil water bottle I have 5 kilos.
 

pepi

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
@Old Kiwi, of course, you are absolutely right. It is basically irrational to reduce the main pack weight to the max and then add an extra 172 gr. for a daypack, and I should have given an explanation.
Because of my heart condition and on MD's advice, I chose to split my gear, yet to keep the total weight low. This enables me to decide on a spur to carry the entire pack when I feel physically OK, or to forward the main rucksack when not– or in a heatwave.
The point of my post was not to brag about my low pack weight, because that could be easily undercut, as numerous forum members keep demonstrating. Rather, I wanted to show Camino newcomers (especially the not-so-young) that with good planning it is possible to put together a very comfortable, complete gear with a reasonable weight.

(A tip to senior Peregrino couples: Consider packing one main mutual rucksack to be forwarded and two light daypacks to carry.)

Buen Camino
 
Last edited:

pepi

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Items that make weight scrutiny worthwhile
Evidently, the things that you don't take with you are the lightest.
But when I weighed each individual item for my final pack, I noticed that some of them have an over-average impact on the total weight and that it pays to take a critical look at them.

Toiletry bag
One of the biggest "weight-guzzlers"! It is amazing what people (not only women) stuff into their bags, often enough after they spent lots of money on ultralight clothes.
In the first place, leave out electric toothbrushes, shavers and beard trimmers, aftershave bottles, hairdryers, superfluous skincare- and cosmetics products.
Small portions of moisturizer/sunscreen– (Nivea) and shower/shampoo combos replace many heavy bottles and can be repurchased all along the Camino. A disposable razor used every 3-4 days is totally adequate on a trek, besides that the many barbers on the way will be happy to pamper you.
In short, be minimalistic. (Also with the bag itself, a light plastic one will do)

Rucksacks
Your first attention when buying a rucksack is COMFORT! While you'll find enormous weight differences, often more than 50%, comfort and fit are more important than a few hundred grams. So start with the size; a 30 to 35 lt. pack is perfectly capable to hold all your (summer-) gear if you observe the 2/1 rule (2 clothes sets to carry, one to wear).

Guidebooks, Maps
Very heavy. Nowadays, modern smartphone apps replace all paper.

Rain gear, off-Camino shoes
These are items where it pays to be picky. When I decided to buy a pair of flip-flops, I was surprised that some weigh 3 or 4 times more than others! The same goes for garments in general, compare!

Food
I know that some people cannot stand to walk 5 to 6 hours without eating. But instead of carrying whatever food you think you'll need, how about contributing a little to the local economy and have a bite at a friendly bar. (This refers not to solitary trails, but to the popular Caminos like the CF, CN, etc.)

This small list meant for first-timers is far from being complete.
Looking forward to savvy member's contributions, please give us the benefit of your experience!
 

henrythedog

Loved and fed by David
Past OR future Camino
Frances 2017, 2018, 2019, Ingles 2018, (Madrid 2019 partial - retired hurt!) (more planned)
Starting in SJPdP in 10 days, I finalized my pack, couldn't resist sharing it. View attachment 106397


View attachment 106415


The backpack is 28 lt. and with all the above (incl. daypack) it is only 2/3rd full
Pepi,

if you don’t mind a personal question; might I ask roughly how large you are physically?
My packing list is slightly more extensive than yours, but still vastly reduced through experience. Even specifically ‘lightweight’ items, especially if clothing, weigh more than yours. Probably because I’m borderline ‘extra large’ in UK terms, although I also have personally shed more than my now 6.7kg pack weight.

Cancel that: I just saw your later post. I don’t weigh very much more than you, so that’s another excuse I can’t use.
 

jsalt

Jill
Past OR future Camino
Portugués, Francés, LePuy, Rota Vicentina, Norte, Madrid, C2C, Salvador, Primitivo, Aragonés, Inglés
Guidebooks, Maps
Very heavy. Nowadays, modern smartphone apps replace all paper.
Nope, not an option for me, as I just can’t do the Face In The Phone thing all the time.

I can’t see it anyway in bright sunlight 🤣.

I need paper maps, which I use during the day, with lots of notes scribbled on, and then in the evening I write up my journal on the back – with a glass of vino tinto of course ;).

An app is a useful backup to have on the phone, to check out occasionally.
 
Peaceable Projects Inc.
Peaceable Projects Inc. is a U.S.-based non-profit group that brings the vast resources of the wide world together with the ongoing needs of the people who live, work, and travel on the Camino de Santiago pilgrim trail network in Spain.
Original artwork based on your pilgrimage or other travel photos.

Charles Zammit

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
St Jean Pied de Port - Finisterra 2017
GR70 France 2018
Via Francigena 2019
One really useful purpose of a light day pack is to carry clothes and valuables into bathrooms .
This way the most essential and vital objects are right with you and never unattended . The added advantage is that your fresh clothes are protected from spray and ready to wear once you are finished .
 

Old Kiwi

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2019
Hi Pepi, I don't try to get the lightest packed weight possible. I only take what I need but I do carry a guide book. I am 78 and used to books and I don't have one of those walk-around phone things (never needed one). My toiletry bag has only a toothbrush, comb, sunscreen and a cake of general purpose soap. My photo on this forum was taken just after I had a heart operation and had to shave off the beard that I had for 50 years. The beard is back so I don't need to shave on the Camino. I get all of my stuff into a 20 litre pack (just).
 
Past OR future Camino
I plan to walk this year 2020 in September
Two questions re packing lists. I am starting my walk second week of September. I can’t decide whether I need to take a lightweight down jacket that I have for the evenings especially in the first two evenings on the Camino Francais. I will have a light fleece. Do I need anything warmer for the evenings?
Second question, should I take my steri pen for water purification, is this necessary??? I will be hopefully filling my hydration pack at accommodation along the way, or should I just stick to bottled water to refill??
 

nidarosa

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Inglés 2009+2017, Francés 2012+2018, Astorga-Santiago repeatedly
@Happyinharrogate No need for water purification, just don't drink from the Non Potable taps. I have a Brita filter water bottle I always take, more for the taste of the water than to purify it. Top it up with tap water along the way and I am fine.
I would/will take a lightweight down or synthetic jacket though and not just for the first couple of nights. If you are going to Santiago, there will be more hills and mountains and chilly evenings, guaranteed. Also with covid regs I would prefer to sit outside where possible and after a long hot day walking you can feel the chill. I keep my fleece for walking and down jacket for evening, that way I always have a clean, dry warm layer to hand.
 
Past OR future Camino
I plan to walk this year 2020 in September
@Happyinharrogate No need for water purification, just don't drink from the Non Potable taps. I have a Brita filter water bottle I always take, more for the taste of the water than to purify it. Top it up with tap water along the way and I am fine.
I would/will take a lightweight down or synthetic jacket though and not just for the first couple of nights. If you are going to Santiago, there will be more hills and mountains and chilly evenings, guaranteed. Also with covid regs I would prefer to sit outside where possible and after a long hot day walking you can feel the chill. I keep my fleece for walking and down jacket for evening, that way I always have a clean, dry warm layer to hand.
Thanks really helpful
 
Learn Spanish for the Camino
Enhance your Camino experience by learning about the Spanish language and culture.
When you walk the Camino, and suddenly a pandemic appears

pepi

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Two questions re packing lists. I am starting my walk second week of September. I can’t decide whether I need to take a lightweight down jacket that I have for the evenings especially in the first two evenings on the Camino Francais. I will have a light fleece. Do I need anything warmer for the evenings?
Second question, should I take my steri pen for water purification, is this necessary??? I will be hopefully filling my hydration pack at accommodation along the way, or should I just stick to bottled water to refill??
@Happyinharrogate
#1: Around mid-September, expect night temps of 12-14°C, but the Peregrinos go usually to bed early (albergues curfews are at 10:00 pm.) 🥱 Hence, I'd go with a fleece with a windbreaker in reserve.
#2: No water purification needed. I stick to bottled mineral water in half-liter bottles, but that's me.

Buen Camino
 

henrythedog

Loved and fed by David
Past OR future Camino
Frances 2017, 2018, 2019, Ingles 2018, (Madrid 2019 partial - retired hurt!) (more planned)
Two questions re packing lists. I am starting my walk second week of September. I can’t decide whether I need to take a lightweight down jacket that I have for the evenings especially in the first two evenings on the Camino Francais. I will have a light fleece. Do I need anything warmer for the evenings?
Second question, should I take my steri pen for water purification, is this necessary??? I will be hopefully filling my hydration pack at accommodation along the way, or should I just stick to bottled water to refill??
Personally, I would take the down jacket - largely because my preference is for a complete change of clothing in the evening; and I like to be sure it’s warm and dry. I use a PHD down gilet.

No need for the steri pen. I have half a dozen sterilising tablets in my first aid kit largely through habit. I’ve never felt the need to use them.
 
Past OR future Camino
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
Two questions re packing lists.
If you have room in your pack and already own a poly filled vest then that is what I would suggest taking instead of the down jacket. It can get wet in Galicia and wet synthetic fill works better than wet down. Don't buy a vest though if you don't already own one. Use the down jacket and keep it dry.

Don't bother with the filter. You are in agriculture areas and water that is labelled non-potable may be due to fertilizers or pesticides spread over fields. Filters will not remove them.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Past OR future Camino
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
For spring Caminos I much prefer taking a synthetic puff jacket over my down filled one should I get caught out in rain unexpectedly.
 
Original artwork based on your pilgrimage or other travel photos.
Camino Jewellery
A selection of Camino Jewellery

Faye Walker

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF 2014, CF 2018, CP 2019 from Coimbra
Thanks really helpful

It is fantastically true that the water in Spain is just fine *unless it is marked as otherwise, or is a grotty old pipe in the middle of a posturing meadow — you’ll know what I mean when you see it. Some taps are for animals… Some villages do not promise that the fountain has been maintained… but the village bar will provide water for your bottle.

All that said, I have a collapsible 1.5 L bottle with a filter in it; I use it to drink river water in the province where I live when I am away at my shack in the woods. If you’re going to cart your water anyway *as is required* … and if you’re a real water drinker (I actually carry milk, but I’m weird)… then the bottle may be very useful. You won’t have to worry about asking for water from the bar-keeper, or about long stretches in which the only fountains you encounter say “sin guarantita”.

Here’s the bottle… comes in many sizes, and the bottle includes your first filter — good for about 1000 litres: Katadyn Filter bottle
 
Past OR future Camino
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
… and if you’re a real water drinker (I actually carry milk, but I’m weird)…
Not so weird.
fountains you encounter say “sin guarantita”.
The water might be good but it is cheaper to put up the sign than regularly test the water.

Peg got ahead of me coming down a mountain and drank about a half liter of water from a fountain before I pointed to its "not guaranteed" sign. She was very upset because she had already been terribly sick on the meseta. Fortunately a local showed up to fill some bottles and assure her that the water was safe to drink.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Past OR future Camino
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
Here’s the bottle… comes in many sizes, and the bottle includes your first filter — good for about 1000 litres: Katadyn Filter bottle
A That's an awesome bottle, but at that price I would hate to lose it or set it down and forget it. I have a bit of ADD, and I have forgotten several hats and sunglasses behind on pub tables or rocks while resting. My dad always said I would lose my head if it weren't attached.🙄
 

Faye Walker

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF 2014, CF 2018, CP 2019 from Coimbra
A That's an awesome bottle, but at that price I would hate to lose it or set it down and forget it. I have a bit of ADD, and I have forgotten several hats and sunglasses behind on pub tables or rocks while resting. My dad always said I would lose my head if it weren't attached.🙄

Yes, my large one is hanging from a nail over my sink… and I won’t take it on a hike… because… again: milk…

But there are people who might like this option, rather than buying water or requesting it (and leaving a euro)….
 

Faye Walker

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF 2014, CF 2018, CP 2019 from Coimbra
Not so weird.

The water might be good but it is cheaper to put up the sign than regularly test the water.

Peg got ahead of me coming down a mountain and drank about a half liter of water from a fountain before I pointed to its "not guaranteed" sign. She was very upset because she had already been terribly sick on the meseta. Fortunately a local showed up to fill some bottles and assure her that the water was safe to drink.


Yea, I know… I’m not actually weird (on the milk point)… I was just raised really to trust my feelings of hunger and thirst and not to listen to fashion or clocks…. So I drink milk… about 2 liters per day in my pack on an average summer Camino, a liter per day on my late autumn Portuguese.

As to the water — totally: for sure! We have a spring pipe in town near my shack. It has a notice from the municipality about not being tested, etc etc. We’ve been filling our water jugs for 45 years now from that spring. As it’s not anywhere near to agriculture or industry, we don’t worry. But a stranger hiking past it might feel better with the filter bottle.
 
A Quest of St. James, Tommy Ray, Book Cover, Image
Come follow the vivid imagery of this life-changing adventure.
When you walk the Camino, and suddenly a pandemic appears
Past OR future Camino
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
So I drink milk… about 2 liters per day in my pack on an average summer Camino, a liter per day on my late autumn Portuguese.
How about a little more on this. Do you carry the ultra-pasteurized in the cardboard cartons? If regular milk do you transfer it to a plastic bottle or bladder? Do you attempt to keep it cool with ice or "blue ice" packs?
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Past OR future Camino
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
Those were my curious questions too, Rick.
I must have a milk allergy because I always get extra phlegm from milk products afterwords. I also dislike plain milk, but love cheese, and use rich cream in my coffee.
 

Faye Walker

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF 2014, CF 2018, CP 2019 from Coimbra
How about a little more on this. Do you carry the ultra-pasteurized in the cardboard cartons? If regular milk do you transfer it to a plastic bottle or bladder? Do you attempt to keep it cool with ice or "blue ice" packs?
Sure… it’s simple: I buy the UHT milk which is already at room temperature. I do like it cold if possible, do if there’s a communal fridge I will chill it overnight. A few swigs in the morning when we are leaving before bars open and I’m good for energy to the first food opportunity. I simply keep the milk in the bottles it’s been packaged in and pop those bottles (or cartons) into my side pockets. If it’s *really* hot, I will start with just one bottle and purchase a second when I arrive at the midway point to a tienda of some sort. But I do check to make sure there are such shops coming up in my day.
I don’t worry about keeping it cool because it’s UHT and I will drink it before it can go off, even once opened.
I was delighted when here at home a major seller began producing UHT 3.8% milk in plastic bottles (which I re-use for hanging seedlings in my basement window in winter…. And eventually recycle).
I learned the dangerous way that I ought not ignore my body on the issue of milk vs. water. I had 3.5 litres of water in me on the day from Pamplona to Puenta de la Reina, and became badly dehydrated and overheated. For the rest of that, my first camino, I carried the milk. And we were in a massive heatwave all the way to Léon.
 

Old Kiwi

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2019
I usually buy a bottle of water, either 500mils or 350mils when I arrive at the start point of a Camino. I just keep filling it up from water fountains as I go.. There are some that have a "Not potable" sign, or similar and I don't use those. I have never had a problem with water from these fountains not matter how grotty they look.
 

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