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My walking tour of Lisbon

2020 Camino Guides

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Since, as Kit noted, many people walking on the Portugues will pass through Lisbon, I am posting here my walking tour of the main touristy areas, which I regularly share with friends going to Portugal. This can be walked non-stop in a little more than two hours, but with stops, it'll easily fill two or three days. Suggestions and additions welcome!

Laurie

I have spent a couple of years in Lisbon, and I love showing it off to my friends. I’m an avid walker and we’ve gotten a lot of visitors, and those two things combined to give me the idea of putting together a “best of Lisbon” walking tour. I have taken a number of groups on this route and everyone has always been very happy. It’s not a strenuous walk, though there are lots of hills in Lisbon. If you get tired going up a hill, you are never far from a café or square where you can sit and enjoy the views. The directions here are not exact and precise, so having a city map with you will help..

Start at the Rato metro stop. The Largo do Rato is an old square with some big old government buildings and a small row of storefronts, where several busy streets intersect. There are a few cafes right there and a restaurant in an old royal factory called the “Fabrica Real.” (I forget what they used to make here, but I think it may be silk). If you are an Amalia Rodrigues fan, you can visit her house before starting the walk. It’s on the Rua Sao Bento, not far from the metro stop. When we visited, we were led through the house by the woman who was her maid for 40 or more years and lived in the house with Amalia and her husband. The house is crammed full of all Amalia’s personal things, awards, clothes, etc. Admission is about 5-6E.

From Rato, walk up the Rua Escola Politecnica to the Praca do Principe Real, making sure to get the views of the river and the bridge on your right as you go up higher. Before you get to the square, you will come to the entrance to the Botanical Gardens on your left. http://www.jb.ul.pt/ It’s a huge oasis right next to the Museum of Natural History (where I’ve never been so I can’t tell you much about it).

Principe Real is a very nice square with rubber trees and other beautiful plants. There’s a nice café right in the square and usually there are groups of men playing cards, kids playing on the swings, it’s just a very nice atmosphere. Keep going straight, you’ll pass the Pastelaria Sao Roque on the right side. This pastry shop was in the New York Times’ “36 hours in Lisbon.” It’s a very pretty tiled café, kind of art nouveau-ish, but I don’t think the pastries are great. The one exception is the “sonhos” (dreams), kind of a fried dough concoction. As the street starts to descend, you come to the Miradouro (look-out) Sao Pedro de Alcantara on your left. This is a two tiered square that has been very nicely renovated – fountains, gardens, and terrific views over the city. The Port Wine Institute is right across the street, but it’s usually a little too early to drink port when I get there.

Stay on the same street (whose name changes from Escola Politecnica to Sao Pedro de Alcantara, and then to Misericordia). At the next little square on your left, you’ll see the Sao Roque Church. The wooden painted ceiling and mosaics inside, along with a number of very ornate small chapels, is one of Lisbon's "must see" churches if you like to visit churches. Across the square from the church, on the Rua da Misericordia, is the Adega Sao Roque, one of my favorite casual restaurants in Lisbon. The seafood cataplana and the grilled fish plate are delicious.

Right around the Adega Sao Roque, turn left off of Misericordia and weave around and you’ll come to the Convento do Carmo, the gothic church/cloister/monastery that was left in ruins after the 1755 earthquake. There’s an archeological museum, even has some pre-Colombian artifacts inside. Walk on the narrow sidewalk alongside the edge of the church and you will be on the top of the Sao Justa elevator. Walk up the spiral staircases, there’s a café on the top. Another set of spectacular views. Head back to Rua Misericordia, which will take you down into the Praça de Camoes and the Largo do Chiado with its two heavily visited cafes. Keep going straight down the Rua Garrett and the building facing you at the end is a shopping mall that has a FNAC (huge book and music store, think Best Buy marries Barnes and Noble). Turn left and go down the Rua do Carmo (past the glove store Ulisses, it’s about six feet across, has its original facade from the early 20th century and sells reasonably priced and very nice handmade gloves). http://www.luvariaulisses.com/pt/pagina/1/home/

The Rua do Carmo will take you straight into the Praça do Rossio with its fountains and statue of King Pedro IV (?). Keep walking straight with the praça on your right and turn the corner at the end of the Praça, where you will see the beautiful Rossio train station (recently cleaned so it’s quite a show stopper). Cross the street (having the train station at your back) and you will come out on the Largo de Sao Domingos (church there of the same name), but the attraction here is the “ginja” store that looks like it’s been there for at least a hundred years. It’s a little hole in the wall with a very old storefront and sells a cherry liquor for 1E a shot. There’s always a line of people, and they’re not all tourists. We usually get the option that gives you a few soaked cherries in the little glass and 1 glass usually satisfies four or more people, especially if it’s morning. But trying it is part of the fun.

If you go past the Sao Domingos church (church on your left), you’ll emerge in the Praça da Figueira, which adjoins the Rossio. If you’re hungry, the Pastelaria Suica has a lot of great options for pastries and is a nice place to sit – since the store is in the line of buildings that forms the sides of both squares, you can sit outside in either the Rossio or Figueira.

Now it’s time to walk down to the river, through the grid streets of the Baixa (low area) that were rebuilt after the earthquake. Rua Agusta is pedestrian only and quite popular. Lots of those “hip” clothing stores for young people – H&M, Zara, Mango, Stradavarius, etc. At the end of the Rua Agusta, you will walk through the arch and emerge in the Terreiro do Paço (also called Praca do Comercio), the square adjacent to the water. Boats now leave from here to cross the river. Modern trams leave from here that take you straight to Belem with its many sights. An excellent restaurant in the square is Terreiro do Paço. http://www.terreiropaco.com/por/index2.html. It’s in a beautifully restored building with brick arches that are mesmerizing. I’ve eaten both lunch and dinner there, and the interior is glorious at night. Very good food, sort of “nouveau Portuguese.” In February, 2008, the square has been sort of walled off for a long overdue sewage project that will finally treat the sewage before it’s dumped into the Tejo River. The restaurant has also closed for renovations, but from what I understand, the restaurant will reopen long before the sewage project is completed.

From the Terreiro do Paço, retrace your steps a few blocks on the Rua Agusta until you hit the Rua da Conceiçao and follow the trolley tracks to your right and up. You will soon come to the Cathedral. It’s a 12th century fortress-like building. There’s a nice café with very good food, called Pois, Café, which is located on the street that runs along the right side of the Cathedral (if you’re facing its main door). The yellow arrows start there. As you face the cathedral door, they are to the right and on the bottom of the wall. The way from Lisbon is extremely well marked.

The street that Pois, Café is on is called Cruces da Se, and it is a good entrance into the Alfama district. Just wander around a while, there are churches, restaurants, small shops, etc. When you’re done visiting the Alfama, you will need to climb up and find the Miradouro that’s at the Largo das Portas do Sol. Right next to it is the Miradouro de Santa Luzia. The views are great from both, cafes in both.

From Santa Luzia it’s a short but steep climb up to the castle Sao Jorge. You will see signs pointing you in the right direction. Once inside (5E), you can climb and walk the walls to your heart’s content. Incredible views in all directions. Frequently there are very good “street musicians” playing guitar or violin and it makes the place just magical.

But since no Lisbon visit would be complete without a ride on the tram, I suggest that after you’re done with the castle, walk back down to the miradouro Santa Luzia and catch the Tram 28 in the downhill direction. Get on one that says “Prazeres” (the other option will say Estrela and it will not take you far enough). Take the tram up and down through the Bairro Alto, Santa Catarina, past the Parliament, up past the Estrela basilica and gardens (a very nice stop in themselves), to the stop where Saraiva de Carvalho crosses Domingos Sequeira. (You can ask your driver to tell you when you hit Campo d’Ourique). Campo d’Ourique is a very nice 19th century tree-lined residential neighborhood, with very good restaurants (Tasquinha d’Adelaide, Os Passarinhos, and Stop do Bairro are a few of them) and lots of little shops, cafes, a nice square, etc.

I know this route leaves out a few important destinations – the Gulbenkian, Sao Vicente de Fora, the Tile Museum, Belem, etc., but I think it is a great way to get a good view of Lisbon without a lot of backtracking.
 
L

Lise T

Guest
Laurie!!! Thank you for posting this.
While I wont be walking from Lisbon I am planning on stopping by there for three days before I fly home after completing my walk.
I really am amazed sometimes at how this forum seems to be able to read my mind. :D I was just planning my Lisbon visit and your post came up.

If its not to forward to ask...do you have a recommendation on a good walking beach near Lisbon that would make good place to stop and reflect on the Camino for a few days before returning to the real world?

Thank you again!!!! :D
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Hi, Lise,
I am not much of a beach person, but are you looking for a beach you can get to by public transportation from Lisbon and spend the day there and then go "home" to Lisbon? Or do you want to spend a day or two on the beach?

On the other side of the river, the Costa de Caparica is a pretty convenient place to go by bus. MANY Lisboetas go there, so if it's solitude you are after, this won't be the place. but with google you can see what the beach looks like.

On the Lisbon side of the river, you can get a train out to Cascais (another VERY touristy town), and from there get a bus to the huge huge sandy beach of Guincho. Again, though it's very touristy.

If you are looking for deserted beaches, I think going somewhere further from Lisbon, on the western ATlantic coast would be the best. There are lots of little towns. To the south are Vila Nova de Milfontes, Zambujeira are two that come first to mind, where you can find beaches that aren't overrun with people. But I'm not sure how you get there, though I assume there are buses.

To the north, there's Nazare, which is also pretty touristy but beautiful and has a little cable type car you can ride up to the upper level of town which has beautiful views. I'm pretty sure there is good public transportation.

I'm happy to help finding out how to get to these places if you tell me if any of them interest you.

Buen camino, Lise. Laurie
 
L

Lise T

Guest
Laurie Thank you!!!

None of those towns were on my radar before you suggested them.
Nazare looks to be the perfect one at the moment. Great beach and some nice accommodation...and opportunities to be a hermit and part of the scene :D
It also has a bus service to/from Lisbon which is handy as well.

You have hit the nail on the head Laurie.

Muchas gracias!!!!

Now..... if I can ever return the favour and offer tips on travelling to Middle Earth (NZ) please feel free to ask away :D
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Great, Lise. I don't know what time of year you will be going, but Nazare has retained more of its "quaint fishing village" origins than most of the other beaches. So even though it may be crowded, it is very pretty and not overrun with big high rise hotels or condos.

Glad to see that you can get there on a bus, it shouldn't be a terribly long ride.

Oh, would I love to take you up on your offer -- who knows, after I tire of walking caminos, I may spread out to another continent! Buen camino, Laurie
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
I spent a week in Nazare in a flat. Little ladies meet the bus and offer you lodging. The competition is fierce and we found no reason to book ahead. At 250 euros for 10 days, that was only around 12 euros each per night for a flat with a kitchen and bathroom one block from the beach!

Sintra is a town not to be missed!you can get a train there and the Albergue was only 9 euros when we stayed. Another time I rented a room for several days. I found it online. In Sintra are many sites to see, palaces and the wonderful Quinta Regalaria

My favorite site in Lisbon is the Museum of the Coaches. It houses those spectacular gilded coaches used before automobiles. They are unbelievably ornate. Quite a sight to see. The Military Museum is another place people often miss.

I've stayed at both the hostel in Lisbon central and the one on the coast. The city one is nice because it is central but it is unbelievably noisy. The other is quiet but a long walk into town. If you are with another person you can almost get private rooms just as cheap.

You can get a tour bus from Lisbon that will take you to Fatima, Obidos, Nazare, and several other places. Although not cheap, it was a wonderful day and well worth the 80 euros I paid.

Enjoy Portugal and eat some bacalau for me!
 

Gailsie

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances Fall '09 ;
Thanks for posting and reposting, I will be in Lisbon on my way to and from my Camino Portuguese. Will print this out and walk part or all of it. I loved Lisbon when I was there, unfortunately only for 1 1/ days. So looking forward to at least three full days and two part days.
 

eli

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances from St JPdP 2004
Camino Frances from Burgos 2010
Camino Via de la Plata from Merida 2011
Camino Portuguese from Lisbon (2014)
European Peace Walk (2016)
Way of St Francis - Florence to Rome (2016)
Yes, walking the Portuguese Camino from Lisbon does seem to popular at the moment, or is it just a case of seeing many VW Golfs on the road when you yourself have just bought one.
Looking forward to arriving in Lisbon next Tuesday. That interesting fluttery mix of trepidation and anticipation is building inside me.
Bom Caminho all,
eli
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Rather than start a new thread, I thought I'd just pull this up to the top so in case people are starting from Lisbon and will have some time to sightsee, this "tour" can be walked in a few hours, but with stops can take you a day or two.

happy to be a part of the growing "I love Lisbon" club! Bom caminho, Laurie
 

jostony

Camino del Vino
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015
Finisterre/Muxia 2015
Portugues/F'tre 2017
Ingles 2018
Primitivo 2019
Norte 2020
Since, as Kit noted, many people walking on the Portugues will pass through Lisbon, I am posting here my walking tour of the main touristy areas, which I regularly share with friends going to Portugal. This can be walked non-stop in a little more than two hours, but with stops, it'll easily fill two or three days. Suggestions and additions welcome!

Laurie

I have spent a couple of years in Lisbon, and I love showing it off to my friends. I’m an avid walker and we’ve gotten a lot of visitors, and those two things combined to give me the idea of putting together a “best of Lisbon” walking tour. I have taken a number of groups on this route and everyone has always been very happy. It’s not a strenuous walk, though there are lots of hills in Lisbon. If you get tired going up a hill, you are never far from a café or square where you can sit and enjoy the views. The directions here are not exact and precise, so having a city map with you will help..

Start at the Rato metro stop. The Largo do Rato is an old square with some big old government buildings and a small row of storefronts, where several busy streets intersect. There are a few cafes right there and a restaurant in an old royal factory called the “Fabrica Real.” (I forget what they used to make here, but I think it may be silk). If you are an Amalia Rodrigues fan, you can visit her house before starting the walk. It’s on the Rua Sao Bento, not far from the metro stop. When we visited, we were led through the house by the woman who was her maid for 40 or more years and lived in the house with Amalia and her husband. The house is crammed full of all Amalia’s personal things, awards, clothes, etc. Admission is about 5-6E.

From Rato, walk up the Rua Escola Politecnica to the Praca do Principe Real, making sure to get the views of the river and the bridge on your right as you go up higher. Before you get to the square, you will come to the entrance to the Botanical Gardens on your left. http://www.jb.ul.pt/ It’s a huge oasis right next to the Museum of Natural History (where I’ve never been so I can’t tell you much about it).

Principe Real is a very nice square with rubber trees and other beautiful plants. There’s a nice café right in the square and usually there are groups of men playing cards, kids playing on the swings, it’s just a very nice atmosphere. Keep going straight, you’ll pass the Pastelaria Sao Roque on the right side. This pastry shop was in the New York Times’ “36 hours in Lisbon.” It’s a very pretty tiled café, kind of art nouveau-ish, but I don’t think the pastries are great. The one exception is the “sonhos” (dreams), kind of a fried dough concoction. As the street starts to descend, you come to the Miradouro (look-out) Sao Pedro de Alcantara on your left. This is a two tiered square that has been very nicely renovated – fountains, gardens, and terrific views over the city. The Port Wine Institute is right across the street, but it’s usually a little too early to drink port when I get there.

Stay on the same street (whose name changes from Escola Politecnica to Sao Pedro de Alcantara, and then to Misericordia). At the next little square on your left, you’ll see the Sao Roque Church. The wooden painted ceiling and mosaics inside, along with a number of very ornate small chapels, is one of Lisbon's "must see" churches if you like to visit churches. Across the square from the church, on the Rua da Misericordia, is the Adega Sao Roque, one of my favorite casual restaurants in Lisbon. The seafood cataplana and the grilled fish plate are delicious.

Right around the Adega Sao Roque, turn left off of Misericordia and weave around and you’ll come to the Convento do Carmo, the gothic church/cloister/monastery that was left in ruins after the 1755 earthquake. There’s an archeological museum, even has some pre-Colombian artifacts inside. Walk on the narrow sidewalk alongside the edge of the church and you will be on the top of the Sao Justa elevator. Walk up the spiral staircases, there’s a café on the top. Another set of spectacular views. Head back to Rua Misericordia, which will take you down into the Praça de Camoes and the Largo do Chiado with its two heavily visited cafes. Keep going straight down the Rua Garrett and the building facing you at the end is a shopping mall that has a FNAC (huge book and music store, think Best Buy marries Barnes and Noble). Turn left and go down the Rua do Carmo (past the glove store Ulisses, it’s about six feet across, has its original facade from the early 20th century and sells reasonably priced and very nice handmade gloves). http://www.luvariaulisses.com/pt/pagina/1/home/

The Rua do Carmo will take you straight into the Praça do Rossio with its fountains and statue of King Pedro IV (?). Keep walking straight with the praça on your right and turn the corner at the end of the Praça, where you will see the beautiful Rossio train station (recently cleaned so it’s quite a show stopper). Cross the street (having the train station at your back) and you will come out on the Largo de Sao Domingos (church there of the same name), but the attraction here is the “ginja” store that looks like it’s been there for at least a hundred years. It’s a little hole in the wall with a very old storefront and sells a cherry liquor for 1E a shot. There’s always a line of people, and they’re not all tourists. We usually get the option that gives you a few soaked cherries in the little glass and 1 glass usually satisfies four or more people, especially if it’s morning. But trying it is part of the fun.

If you go past the Sao Domingos church (church on your left), you’ll emerge in the Praça da Figueira, which adjoins the Rossio. If you’re hungry, the Pastelaria Suica has a lot of great options for pastries and is a nice place to sit – since the store is in the line of buildings that forms the sides of both squares, you can sit outside in either the Rossio or Figueira.

Now it’s time to walk down to the river, through the grid streets of the Baixa (low area) that were rebuilt after the earthquake. Rua Agusta is pedestrian only and quite popular. Lots of those “hip” clothing stores for young people – H&M, Zara, Mango, Stradavarius, etc. At the end of the Rua Agusta, you will walk through the arch and emerge in the Terreiro do Paço (also called Praca do Comercio), the square adjacent to the water. Boats now leave from here to cross the river. Modern trams leave from here that take you straight to Belem with its many sights. An excellent restaurant in the square is Terreiro do Paço. http://www.terreiropaco.com/por/index2.html. It’s in a beautifully restored building with brick arches that are mesmerizing. I’ve eaten both lunch and dinner there, and the interior is glorious at night. Very good food, sort of “nouveau Portuguese.” In February, 2008, the square has been sort of walled off for a long overdue sewage project that will finally treat the sewage before it’s dumped into the Tejo River. The restaurant has also closed for renovations, but from what I understand, the restaurant will reopen long before the sewage project is completed.

From the Terreiro do Paço, retrace your steps a few blocks on the Rua Agusta until you hit the Rua da Conceiçao and follow the trolley tracks to your right and up. You will soon come to the Cathedral. It’s a 12th century fortress-like building. There’s a nice café with very good food, called Pois, Café, which is located on the street that runs along the right side of the Cathedral (if you’re facing its main door). The yellow arrows start there. As you face the cathedral door, they are to the right and on the bottom of the wall. The way from Lisbon is extremely well marked.

The street that Pois, Café is on is called Cruces da Se, and it is a good entrance into the Alfama district. Just wander around a while, there are churches, restaurants, small shops, etc. When you’re done visiting the Alfama, you will need to climb up and find the Miradouro that’s at the Largo das Portas do Sol. Right next to it is the Miradouro de Santa Luzia. The views are great from both, cafes in both.

From Santa Luzia it’s a short but steep climb up to the castle Sao Jorge. You will see signs pointing you in the right direction. Once inside (5E), you can climb and walk the walls to your heart’s content. Incredible views in all directions. Frequently there are very good “street musicians” playing guitar or violin and it makes the place just magical.

But since no Lisbon visit would be complete without a ride on the tram, I suggest that after you’re done with the castle, walk back down to the miradouro Santa Luzia and catch the Tram 28 in the downhill direction. Get on one that says “Prazeres” (the other option will say Estrela and it will not take you far enough). Take the tram up and down through the Bairro Alto, Santa Catarina, past the Parliament, up past the Estrela basilica and gardens (a very nice stop in themselves), to the stop where Saraiva de Carvalho crosses Domingos Sequeira. (You can ask your driver to tell you when you hit Campo d’Ourique). Campo d’Ourique is a very nice 19th century tree-lined residential neighborhood, with very good restaurants (Tasquinha d’Adelaide, Os Passarinhos, and Stop do Bairro are a few of them) and lots of little shops, cafes, a nice square, etc.

I know this route leaves out a few important destinations – the Gulbenkian, Sao Vicente de Fora, the Tile Museum, Belem, etc., but I think it is a great way to get a good view of Lisbon without a lot of backtracking.
This fab - I am going holidaying / travelling through Portugal and also visiting Lisbon for a few days after I complete my Camino end of June. Your suggestions are really helpful and I look forward to seeing this beautiful country and City. Thanks for posting.
 

marjude

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
4/2011 VdlP,
4/2014 Rota Vincentina, Portugues.
4/2016 Aragones, Frances.
4/2019 Madrid, Frances
I did Laurie's walking tour of Lisbon last year and it was great and if you have time catch a tram at the water front and go to the Belem district and visit the 16th century Mosteiro dos Jeronimos Monestery. It is really worth the trip, it is a wonderful building.
 

Albertinho

ninguém disse que era fácil !
Camino(s) past & future
2013 Lisboa - Sant.
2014 Ferrol -Sant.
2015 Porto -Sant.
2018 Porto -Valença
2019 Valença -Sant.
Do not forget to eat Laurie's, Diogo's -and many other's -favourite" pasteís de nata"
If you haven't eaten them you haven't been in Lisbon or even Portugal !:p
 
Last edited:

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Do not forget to eat Laurie's -and many other's -favourite" pasteís de nata"
If you haven't eaten them you haven't been in Lisbon or even Portugal !:p
And for the newbies, you will see lots of hype about eating a pastel de nata only at the place in Belem near the monastery. There are long lines there all day long. They serve them hot and no doubt they are good.

But, thanks to Diogo, AMSimoes, and Mario, the last time I was in Lisbon we got together, and they showed me that you don't have to stand in a long line to get an amazing pastel de nata, and that eating them room temperature is just as or more delicious. Not sure that's good for the diet, because what that showed me was that almost every little bar in Lisbon offers these delicious treats and there is no need to take a tram out to Belem to get them.

I don't know if the ones we ate near Praca do Comercio were unusually good, or whether that's typical for any little "hole in the wall" bar, but I am going to undertake a scientific sampling this May when I'm back in Lisbon for a few days!

Bom caminho, Laurie
 

amsimoes

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
I am out.
Friends have my email.
Hi Laurie.

In May we will eat "pastel de nata" in:
"Loja Nata de Lisboa", Rua da Prata, 78 - Lisboa
We wait for you.
AMSimoes
 

Texas Walker

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte (2017 summer)
Portugues (2015)
Frances (2014)
Since, as Kit noted, many people walking on the Portugues will pass through Lisbon, I am posting here my walking tour of the main touristy areas, which I regularly share with friends going to Portugal. This can be walked non-stop in a little more than two hours, but with stops, it'll easily fill two or three days. Suggestions and additions welcome!

Laurie

I have spent a couple of years in Lisbon, and I love showing it off to my friends. I’m an avid walker and we’ve gotten a lot of visitors, and those two things combined to give me the idea of putting together a “best of Lisbon” walking tour. I have taken a number of groups on this route and everyone has always been very happy. It’s not a strenuous walk, though there are lots of hills in Lisbon. If you get tired going up a hill, you are never far from a café or square where you can sit and enjoy the views. The directions here are not exact and precise, so having a city map with you will help..

Start at the Rato metro stop. The Largo do Rato is an old square with some big old government buildings and a small row of storefronts, where several busy streets intersect. There are a few cafes right there and a restaurant in an old royal factory called the “Fabrica Real.” (I forget what they used to make here, but I think it may be silk). If you are an Amalia Rodrigues fan, you can visit her house before starting the walk. It’s on the Rua Sao Bento, not far from the metro stop. When we visited, we were led through the house by the woman who was her maid for 40 or more years and lived in the house with Amalia and her husband. The house is crammed full of all Amalia’s personal things, awards, clothes, etc. Admission is about 5-6E.

From Rato, walk up the Rua Escola Politecnica to the Praca do Principe Real, making sure to get the views of the river and the bridge on your right as you go up higher. Before you get to the square, you will come to the entrance to the Botanical Gardens on your left. http://www.jb.ul.pt/ It’s a huge oasis right next to the Museum of Natural History (where I’ve never been so I can’t tell you much about it).

Principe Real is a very nice square with rubber trees and other beautiful plants. There’s a nice café right in the square and usually there are groups of men playing cards, kids playing on the swings, it’s just a very nice atmosphere. Keep going straight, you’ll pass the Pastelaria Sao Roque on the right side. This pastry shop was in the New York Times’ “36 hours in Lisbon.” It’s a very pretty tiled café, kind of art nouveau-ish, but I don’t think the pastries are great. The one exception is the “sonhos” (dreams), kind of a fried dough concoction. As the street starts to descend, you come to the Miradouro (look-out) Sao Pedro de Alcantara on your left. This is a two tiered square that has been very nicely renovated – fountains, gardens, and terrific views over the city. The Port Wine Institute is right across the street, but it’s usually a little too early to drink port when I get there.

Stay on the same street (whose name changes from Escola Politecnica to Sao Pedro de Alcantara, and then to Misericordia). At the next little square on your left, you’ll see the Sao Roque Church. The wooden painted ceiling and mosaics inside, along with a number of very ornate small chapels, is one of Lisbon's "must see" churches if you like to visit churches. Across the square from the church, on the Rua da Misericordia, is the Adega Sao Roque, one of my favorite casual restaurants in Lisbon. The seafood cataplana and the grilled fish plate are delicious.

Right around the Adega Sao Roque, turn left off of Misericordia and weave around and you’ll come to the Convento do Carmo, the gothic church/cloister/monastery that was left in ruins after the 1755 earthquake. There’s an archeological museum, even has some pre-Colombian artifacts inside. Walk on the narrow sidewalk alongside the edge of the church and you will be on the top of the Sao Justa elevator. Walk up the spiral staircases, there’s a café on the top. Another set of spectacular views. Head back to Rua Misericordia, which will take you down into the Praça de Camoes and the Largo do Chiado with its two heavily visited cafes. Keep going straight down the Rua Garrett and the building facing you at the end is a shopping mall that has a FNAC (huge book and music store, think Best Buy marries Barnes and Noble). Turn left and go down the Rua do Carmo (past the glove store Ulisses, it’s about six feet across, has its original facade from the early 20th century and sells reasonably priced and very nice handmade gloves). http://www.luvariaulisses.com/pt/pagina/1/home/

The Rua do Carmo will take you straight into the Praça do Rossio with its fountains and statue of King Pedro IV (?). Keep walking straight with the praça on your right and turn the corner at the end of the Praça, where you will see the beautiful Rossio train station (recently cleaned so it’s quite a show stopper). Cross the street (having the train station at your back) and you will come out on the Largo de Sao Domingos (church there of the same name), but the attraction here is the “ginja” store that looks like it’s been there for at least a hundred years. It’s a little hole in the wall with a very old storefront and sells a cherry liquor for 1E a shot. There’s always a line of people, and they’re not all tourists. We usually get the option that gives you a few soaked cherries in the little glass and 1 glass usually satisfies four or more people, especially if it’s morning. But trying it is part of the fun.

If you go past the Sao Domingos church (church on your left), you’ll emerge in the Praça da Figueira, which adjoins the Rossio. If you’re hungry, the Pastelaria Suica has a lot of great options for pastries and is a nice place to sit – since the store is in the line of buildings that forms the sides of both squares, you can sit outside in either the Rossio or Figueira.

Now it’s time to walk down to the river, through the grid streets of the Baixa (low area) that were rebuilt after the earthquake. Rua Agusta is pedestrian only and quite popular. Lots of those “hip” clothing stores for young people – H&M, Zara, Mango, Stradavarius, etc. At the end of the Rua Agusta, you will walk through the arch and emerge in the Terreiro do Paço (also called Praca do Comercio), the square adjacent to the water. Boats now leave from here to cross the river. Modern trams leave from here that take you straight to Belem with its many sights. An excellent restaurant in the square is Terreiro do Paço. http://www.terreiropaco.com/por/index2.html. It’s in a beautifully restored building with brick arches that are mesmerizing. I’ve eaten both lunch and dinner there, and the interior is glorious at night. Very good food, sort of “nouveau Portuguese.” In February, 2008, the square has been sort of walled off for a long overdue sewage project that will finally treat the sewage before it’s dumped into the Tejo River. The restaurant has also closed for renovations, but from what I understand, the restaurant will reopen long before the sewage project is completed.

From the Terreiro do Paço, retrace your steps a few blocks on the Rua Agusta until you hit the Rua da Conceiçao and follow the trolley tracks to your right and up. You will soon come to the Cathedral. It’s a 12th century fortress-like building. There’s a nice café with very good food, called Pois, Café, which is located on the street that runs along the right side of the Cathedral (if you’re facing its main door). The yellow arrows start there. As you face the cathedral door, they are to the right and on the bottom of the wall. The way from Lisbon is extremely well marked.

The street that Pois, Café is on is called Cruces da Se, and it is a good entrance into the Alfama district. Just wander around a while, there are churches, restaurants, small shops, etc. When you’re done visiting the Alfama, you will need to climb up and find the Miradouro that’s at the Largo das Portas do Sol. Right next to it is the Miradouro de Santa Luzia. The views are great from both, cafes in both.

From Santa Luzia it’s a short but steep climb up to the castle Sao Jorge. You will see signs pointing you in the right direction. Once inside (5E), you can climb and walk the walls to your heart’s content. Incredible views in all directions. Frequently there are very good “street musicians” playing guitar or violin and it makes the place just magical.

But since no Lisbon visit would be complete without a ride on the tram, I suggest that after you’re done with the castle, walk back down to the miradouro Santa Luzia and catch the Tram 28 in the downhill direction. Get on one that says “Prazeres” (the other option will say Estrela and it will not take you far enough). Take the tram up and down through the Bairro Alto, Santa Catarina, past the Parliament, up past the Estrela basilica and gardens (a very nice stop in themselves), to the stop where Saraiva de Carvalho crosses Domingos Sequeira. (You can ask your driver to tell you when you hit Campo d’Ourique). Campo d’Ourique is a very nice 19th century tree-lined residential neighborhood, with very good restaurants (Tasquinha d’Adelaide, Os Passarinhos, and Stop do Bairro are a few of them) and lots of little shops, cafes, a nice square, etc.

I know this route leaves out a few important destinations – the Gulbenkian, Sao Vicente de Fora, the Tile Museum, Belem, etc., but I think it is a great way to get a good view of Lisbon without a lot of backtracking.
Thank you for posting this and bouncing it to the top! We will be landing at the airport at 0800. Presumably the customs and baggage will be finished in time for releasing us upon the city about 0900. Is there a bus from the airport to the areas you talked about? And what do you think about making reservations before departure--we're supposed to arrive on a weekday, 4 June--is it necessary? (We traveled the Camino Frances without reservations, and since we generally stopped about 2 pm it worked out well. Gracias a dios.) Thanks very much for your thoughts!
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Hi, Texas Walker,
There is one of those hop-on hop-off buses that hits most of the places I've mentioned, if that's what you mean. When you arrive on June 4, are you going to start walking right away or spend a few days in Lisbon? I don't think reservations are necessary on the Caminho, but having a reservation in Lisbon for the first night or two is a good idea, IMO.

Bom caminho, Laurie

p.s. I hope you are right about customs and baggage -- I've had some inexplicably long waits in the Lisbon airport, but sometimes you whiz right through.
 

Texas Walker

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte (2017 summer)
Portugues (2015)
Frances (2014)
Hi, Texas Walker,
There is one of those hop-on hop-off buses that hits most of the places I've mentioned, if that's what you mean. When you arrive on June 4, are you going to start walking right away or spend a few days in Lisbon? I don't think reservations are necessary on the Caminho, but having a reservation in Lisbon for the first night or two is a good idea, IMO.

Bom caminho, Laurie

p.s. I hope you are right about customs and baggage -- I've had some inexplicably long waits in the Lisbon airport, but sometimes you whiz right through.
As to how long to stay in Lisbon, that is still a matter of discussion. Certainly the night of the day we arrive, we stay. It's a LONG plane flight. And about a 7 hour time difference. DH is looking at the idea of maybe having a reservation...I keep remembering that if we'd had a reservation for the first night, after landing in Biarritz, we'd have been coming over the Route Napoleon on May 20 and the weather that day was completely hideous for walkers. (Met a man in Santo Domingo who'd walked over that day and he told us about the long line of taxis summoned by people who just couldn't go on that day because of the snow, rain, wind, etc etc.) Now when we look back at the way our carefully worked out plans for arrival and a rest night and then going to St Jean were scooped up and rearranged on the fly, we see that actually that was Someone who was putting us where we actually needed to be before we even knew we were in problems. And that happened a LOT last summer on the Frances! Thus I personally am somewhat nervous about reserving way ahead. But it is true that Lisbon is a big city and the first day's walk isn't going over a mountain pass at the back of beyond, sort of, but instead along traveled roads and through landscape that has "stuff" in it, apparently.

On another subject, it looks like the entire route through Portugal is about the same distance from the ocean as Santiago is. Does the late-afternoon sea breeze thunderstorm thing apply throughout Portugal as well? (We saw those 1730 storms hit every day we were in Santiago. Reminded me of Florida, where the daily storm comes at 1630.)
 

davkel

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012, 2013,2017), Portugues (2015), Le Puy-GR10-Norte-Primitivo (May -July 2018)
I'm looking forward to walking this little tour in a couple of weeks. I'm thinking of it in the same way that, on the day before the start of the Tour de France, they schedule an easy prelude stage - something to help get over the jetlag and get the legs moving.

I also note that, and maybe it's just a coincidence, but that the route takes us past the following:
  • The churches were one can obtain a credencial (is that the correct Portugese?), which is the other objective for the day
  • And past our hostel - which makes me confident we have picked somewhere in a good spot
Thanks in advance for this
 

WalkingGeo

Sept/Oct 2016
Camino(s) past & future
Sept 2016 Frances
August 2018 CP - Lisbon to SDdC
? (August 2019) Norte ?
Wow, thanks Laurie! I’ve just about finished planning my Camino Portuguese for this August and was starting to think about meeting my wife back in Lisbon after finishing my walk. My idea was to stay in Lisbon for 3 or 4 days before going up to Porto, to start a slower paced Mini Camino (5 or 6 days, she’s very hesitant) before we fly back to New England. Who knows, maybe she’ll get the bug and we’ll come back and walk together! Your Walking Tour will fill our time in Lisbon beautifully. Thanks again!

George
 

Rex

Pilgrim Trekker
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP to Santiago (2013)
Lisboa to Santiago (2018)
Thanks for this post. I'll have parts of two days to spend in Lisboa in late August and was looking for something like this to give me an overview of what to see in Lisboa in a relatively short time period. Never been there and am looking forward to visiting and then commencing my hike to Santiago.
Obrigado...
 

valevenga

Member
Camino(s) past & future
I am currently walking the Camino del Norte summer 2018
Son and I did an electric bike tour....tons of fun....we both loved Lisbon!!!
 

wanderfrau

Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2018 Camino Frances
May 2019 Camino Portugués
Wow just what I was looking for to do during my short Lisbon stay. Thank you.
 

AJGuillaume

Pélerin du monde
Camino(s) past & future
Via Gebennensis (2018)
Via Podiensis (2018)
Voie Nive Bidassoa (2018)
Camino Del Norte (2018)
Laurie, this is fabulous information!
Thank you! Obrigado!
 

speachsue

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
May/June 2019
As to how long to stay in Lisbon, that is still a matter of discussion. Certainly the night of the day we arrive, we stay. It's a LONG plane flight. And about a 7 hour time difference. DH is looking at the idea of maybe having a reservation...I keep remembering that if we'd had a reservation for the first night, after landing in Biarritz, we'd have been coming over the Route Napoleon on May 20 and the weather that day was completely hideous for walkers. (Met a man in Santo Domingo who'd walked over that day and he told us about the long line of taxis summoned by people who just couldn't go on that day because of the snow, rain, wind, etc etc.) Now when we look back at the way our carefully worked out plans for arrival and a rest night and then going to St Jean were scooped up and rearranged on the fly, we see that actually that was Someone who was putting us where we actually needed to be before we even knew we were in problems. And that happened a LOT last summer on the Frances! Thus I personally am somewhat nervous about reserving way ahead. But it is true that Lisbon is a big city and the first day's walk isn't going over a mountain pass at the back of beyond, sort of, but instead along traveled roads and through landscape that has "stuff" in it, apparently.

On another subject, it looks like the entire route through Portugal is about the same distance from the ocean as Santiago is. Does the late-afternoon sea breeze thunderstorm thing apply throughout Portugal as well? (We saw those 1730 storms hit every day we were in Santiago. Reminded me of Florida, where the daily storm comes at 1630.)
D
 

Nan

Member
Camino(s) past & future
. April 2016. April 2017
Since, as Kit noted, many people walking on the Portugues will pass through Lisbon, I am posting here my walking tour of the main touristy areas, which I regularly share with friends going to Portugal. This can be walked non-stop in a little more than two hours, but with stops, it'll easily fill two or three days. Suggestions and additions welcome!

Laurie

I have spent a couple of years in Lisbon, and I love showing it off to my friends. I’m an avid walker and we’ve gotten a lot of visitors, and those two things combined to give me the idea of putting together a “best of Lisbon” walking tour. I have taken a number of groups on this route and everyone has always been very happy. It’s not a strenuous walk, though there are lots of hills in Lisbon. If you get tired going up a hill, you are never far from a café or square where you can sit and enjoy the views. The directions here are not exact and precise, so having a city map with you will help..

Start at the Rato metro stop. The Largo do Rato is an old square with some big old government buildings and a small row of storefronts, where several busy streets intersect. There are a few cafes right there and a restaurant in an old royal factory called the “Fabrica Real.” (I forget what they used to make here, but I think it may be silk). If you are an Amalia Rodrigues fan, you can visit her house before starting the walk. It’s on the Rua Sao Bento, not far from the metro stop. When we visited, we were led through the house by the woman who was her maid for 40 or more years and lived in the house with Amalia and her husband. The house is crammed full of all Amalia’s personal things, awards, clothes, etc. Admission is about 5-6E.

From Rato, walk up the Rua Escola Politecnica to the Praca do Principe Real, making sure to get the views of the river and the bridge on your right as you go up higher. Before you get to the square, you will come to the entrance to the Botanical Gardens on your left. http://www.jb.ul.pt/ It’s a huge oasis right next to the Museum of Natural History (where I’ve never been so I can’t tell you much about it).

Principe Real is a very nice square with rubber trees and other beautiful plants. There’s a nice café right in the square and usually there are groups of men playing cards, kids playing on the swings, it’s just a very nice atmosphere. Keep going straight, you’ll pass the Pastelaria Sao Roque on the right side. This pastry shop was in the New York Times’ “36 hours in Lisbon.” It’s a very pretty tiled café, kind of art nouveau-ish, but I don’t think the pastries are great. The one exception is the “sonhos” (dreams), kind of a fried dough concoction. As the street starts to descend, you come to the Miradouro (look-out) Sao Pedro de Alcantara on your left. This is a two tiered square that has been very nicely renovated – fountains, gardens, and terrific views over the city. The Port Wine Institute is right across the street, but it’s usually a little too early to drink port when I get there.

Stay on the same street (whose name changes from Escola Politecnica to Sao Pedro de Alcantara, and then to Misericordia). At the next little square on your left, you’ll see the Sao Roque Church. The wooden painted ceiling and mosaics inside, along with a number of very ornate small chapels, is one of Lisbon's "must see" churches if you like to visit churches. Across the square from the church, on the Rua da Misericordia, is the Adega Sao Roque, one of my favorite casual restaurants in Lisbon. The seafood cataplana and the grilled fish plate are delicious.

Right around the Adega Sao Roque, turn left off of Misericordia and weave around and you’ll come to the Convento do Carmo, the gothic church/cloister/monastery that was left in ruins after the 1755 earthquake. There’s an archeological museum, even has some pre-Colombian artifacts inside. Walk on the narrow sidewalk alongside the edge of the church and you will be on the top of the Sao Justa elevator. Walk up the spiral staircases, there’s a café on the top. Another set of spectacular views. Head back to Rua Misericordia, which will take you down into the Praça de Camoes and the Largo do Chiado with its two heavily visited cafes. Keep going straight down the Rua Garrett and the building facing you at the end is a shopping mall that has a FNAC (huge book and music store, think Best Buy marries Barnes and Noble). Turn left and go down the Rua do Carmo (past the glove store Ulisses, it’s about six feet across, has its original facade from the early 20th century and sells reasonably priced and very nice handmade gloves). http://www.luvariaulisses.com/pt/pagina/1/home/

The Rua do Carmo will take you straight into the Praça do Rossio with its fountains and statue of King Pedro IV (?). Keep walking straight with the praça on your right and turn the corner at the end of the Praça, where you will see the beautiful Rossio train station (recently cleaned so it’s quite a show stopper). Cross the street (having the train station at your back) and you will come out on the Largo de Sao Domingos (church there of the same name), but the attraction here is the “ginja” store that looks like it’s been there for at least a hundred years. It’s a little hole in the wall with a very old storefront and sells a cherry liquor for 1E a shot. There’s always a line of people, and they’re not all tourists. We usually get the option that gives you a few soaked cherries in the little glass and 1 glass usually satisfies four or more people, especially if it’s morning. But trying it is part of the fun.

If you go past the Sao Domingos church (church on your left), you’ll emerge in the Praça da Figueira, which adjoins the Rossio. If you’re hungry, the Pastelaria Suica has a lot of great options for pastries and is a nice place to sit – since the store is in the line of buildings that forms the sides of both squares, you can sit outside in either the Rossio or Figueira.

Now it’s time to walk down to the river, through the grid streets of the Baixa (low area) that were rebuilt after the earthquake. Rua Agusta is pedestrian only and quite popular. Lots of those “hip” clothing stores for young people – H&M, Zara, Mango, Stradavarius, etc. At the end of the Rua Agusta, you will walk through the arch and emerge in the Terreiro do Paço (also called Praca do Comercio), the square adjacent to the water. Boats now leave from here to cross the river. Modern trams leave from here that take you straight to Belem with its many sights. An excellent restaurant in the square is Terreiro do Paço. http://www.terreiropaco.com/por/index2.html. It’s in a beautifully restored building with brick arches that are mesmerizing. I’ve eaten both lunch and dinner there, and the interior is glorious at night. Very good food, sort of “nouveau Portuguese.” In February, 2008, the square has been sort of walled off for a long overdue sewage project that will finally treat the sewage before it’s dumped into the Tejo River. The restaurant has also closed for renovations, but from what I understand, the restaurant will reopen long before the sewage project is completed.

From the Terreiro do Paço, retrace your steps a few blocks on the Rua Agusta until you hit the Rua da Conceiçao and follow the trolley tracks to your right and up. You will soon come to the Cathedral. It’s a 12th century fortress-like building. There’s a nice café with very good food, called Pois, Café, which is located on the street that runs along the right side of the Cathedral (if you’re facing its main door). The yellow arrows start there. As you face the cathedral door, they are to the right and on the bottom of the wall. The way from Lisbon is extremely well marked.

The street that Pois, Café is on is called Cruces da Se, and it is a good entrance into the Alfama district. Just wander around a while, there are churches, restaurants, small shops, etc. When you’re done visiting the Alfama, you will need to climb up and find the Miradouro that’s at the Largo das Portas do Sol. Right next to it is the Miradouro de Santa Luzia. The views are great from both, cafes in both.

From Santa Luzia it’s a short but steep climb up to the castle Sao Jorge. You will see signs pointing you in the right direction. Once inside (5E), you can climb and walk the walls to your heart’s content. Incredible views in all directions. Frequently there are very good “street musicians” playing guitar or violin and it makes the place just magical.

But since no Lisbon visit would be complete without a ride on the tram, I suggest that after you’re done with the castle, walk back down to the miradouro Santa Luzia and catch the Tram 28 in the downhill direction. Get on one that says “Prazeres” (the other option will say Estrela and it will not take you far enough). Take the tram up and down through the Bairro Alto, Santa Catarina, past the Parliament, up past the Estrela basilica and gardens (a very nice stop in themselves), to the stop where Saraiva de Carvalho crosses Domingos Sequeira. (You can ask your driver to tell you when you hit Campo d’Ourique). Campo d’Ourique is a very nice 19th century tree-lined residential neighborhood, with very good restaurants (Tasquinha d’Adelaide, Os Passarinhos, and Stop do Bairro are a few of them) and lots of little shops, cafes, a nice square, etc.

I know this route leaves out a few important destinations – the Gulbenkian, Sao Vicente de Fora, the Tile Museum, Belem, etc., but I think it is a great way to get a good view of Lisbon without a lot of backtracking.
[/QUOT
 

Nan

Member
Camino(s) past & future
. April 2016. April 2017
Thank you all so much once again for great info. The walking ‘tour’ sounds great Laurie. Will definitely do that.
 

AJGuillaume

Pélerin du monde
Camino(s) past & future
Via Gebennensis (2018)
Via Podiensis (2018)
Voie Nive Bidassoa (2018)
Camino Del Norte (2018)
Since, as Kit noted, many people walking on the Portugues will pass through Lisbon, I am posting here my walking tour of the main touristy areas, which I regularly share with friends going to Portugal. This can be walked non-stop in a little more than two hours, but with stops, it'll easily fill two or three days. Suggestions and additions welcome!

Laurie

I have spent a couple of years in Lisbon, and I love showing it off to my friends. I’m an avid walker and we’ve gotten a lot of visitors, and those two things combined to give me the idea of putting together a “best of Lisbon” walking tour. I have taken a number of groups on this route and everyone has always been very happy. It’s not a strenuous walk, though there are lots of hills in Lisbon. If you get tired going up a hill, you are never far from a café or square where you can sit and enjoy the views. The directions here are not exact and precise, so having a city map with you will help..

Start at the Rato metro stop. The Largo do Rato is an old square with some big old government buildings and a small row of storefronts, where several busy streets intersect. There are a few cafes right there and a restaurant in an old royal factory called the “Fabrica Real.” (I forget what they used to make here, but I think it may be silk). If you are an Amalia Rodrigues fan, you can visit her house before starting the walk. It’s on the Rua Sao Bento, not far from the metro stop. When we visited, we were led through the house by the woman who was her maid for 40 or more years and lived in the house with Amalia and her husband. The house is crammed full of all Amalia’s personal things, awards, clothes, etc. Admission is about 5-6E.

From Rato, walk up the Rua Escola Politecnica to the Praca do Principe Real, making sure to get the views of the river and the bridge on your right as you go up higher. Before you get to the square, you will come to the entrance to the Botanical Gardens on your left. http://www.jb.ul.pt/ It’s a huge oasis right next to the Museum of Natural History (where I’ve never been so I can’t tell you much about it).

Principe Real is a very nice square with rubber trees and other beautiful plants. There’s a nice café right in the square and usually there are groups of men playing cards, kids playing on the swings, it’s just a very nice atmosphere. Keep going straight, you’ll pass the Pastelaria Sao Roque on the right side. This pastry shop was in the New York Times’ “36 hours in Lisbon.” It’s a very pretty tiled café, kind of art nouveau-ish, but I don’t think the pastries are great. The one exception is the “sonhos” (dreams), kind of a fried dough concoction. As the street starts to descend, you come to the Miradouro (look-out) Sao Pedro de Alcantara on your left. This is a two tiered square that has been very nicely renovated – fountains, gardens, and terrific views over the city. The Port Wine Institute is right across the street, but it’s usually a little too early to drink port when I get there.

Stay on the same street (whose name changes from Escola Politecnica to Sao Pedro de Alcantara, and then to Misericordia). At the next little square on your left, you’ll see the Sao Roque Church. The wooden painted ceiling and mosaics inside, along with a number of very ornate small chapels, is one of Lisbon's "must see" churches if you like to visit churches. Across the square from the church, on the Rua da Misericordia, is the Adega Sao Roque, one of my favorite casual restaurants in Lisbon. The seafood cataplana and the grilled fish plate are delicious.

Right around the Adega Sao Roque, turn left off of Misericordia and weave around and you’ll come to the Convento do Carmo, the gothic church/cloister/monastery that was left in ruins after the 1755 earthquake. There’s an archeological museum, even has some pre-Colombian artifacts inside. Walk on the narrow sidewalk alongside the edge of the church and you will be on the top of the Sao Justa elevator. Walk up the spiral staircases, there’s a café on the top. Another set of spectacular views. Head back to Rua Misericordia, which will take you down into the Praça de Camoes and the Largo do Chiado with its two heavily visited cafes. Keep going straight down the Rua Garrett and the building facing you at the end is a shopping mall that has a FNAC (huge book and music store, think Best Buy marries Barnes and Noble). Turn left and go down the Rua do Carmo (past the glove store Ulisses, it’s about six feet across, has its original facade from the early 20th century and sells reasonably priced and very nice handmade gloves). http://www.luvariaulisses.com/pt/pagina/1/home/

The Rua do Carmo will take you straight into the Praça do Rossio with its fountains and statue of King Pedro IV (?). Keep walking straight with the praça on your right and turn the corner at the end of the Praça, where you will see the beautiful Rossio train station (recently cleaned so it’s quite a show stopper). Cross the street (having the train station at your back) and you will come out on the Largo de Sao Domingos (church there of the same name), but the attraction here is the “ginja” store that looks like it’s been there for at least a hundred years. It’s a little hole in the wall with a very old storefront and sells a cherry liquor for 1E a shot. There’s always a line of people, and they’re not all tourists. We usually get the option that gives you a few soaked cherries in the little glass and 1 glass usually satisfies four or more people, especially if it’s morning. But trying it is part of the fun.

If you go past the Sao Domingos church (church on your left), you’ll emerge in the Praça da Figueira, which adjoins the Rossio. If you’re hungry, the Pastelaria Suica has a lot of great options for pastries and is a nice place to sit – since the store is in the line of buildings that forms the sides of both squares, you can sit outside in either the Rossio or Figueira.

Now it’s time to walk down to the river, through the grid streets of the Baixa (low area) that were rebuilt after the earthquake. Rua Agusta is pedestrian only and quite popular. Lots of those “hip” clothing stores for young people – H&M, Zara, Mango, Stradavarius, etc. At the end of the Rua Agusta, you will walk through the arch and emerge in the Terreiro do Paço (also called Praca do Comercio), the square adjacent to the water. Boats now leave from here to cross the river. Modern trams leave from here that take you straight to Belem with its many sights. An excellent restaurant in the square is Terreiro do Paço. http://www.terreiropaco.com/por/index2.html. It’s in a beautifully restored building with brick arches that are mesmerizing. I’ve eaten both lunch and dinner there, and the interior is glorious at night. Very good food, sort of “nouveau Portuguese.” In February, 2008, the square has been sort of walled off for a long overdue sewage project that will finally treat the sewage before it’s dumped into the Tejo River. The restaurant has also closed for renovations, but from what I understand, the restaurant will reopen long before the sewage project is completed.

From the Terreiro do Paço, retrace your steps a few blocks on the Rua Agusta until you hit the Rua da Conceiçao and follow the trolley tracks to your right and up. You will soon come to the Cathedral. It’s a 12th century fortress-like building. There’s a nice café with very good food, called Pois, Café, which is located on the street that runs along the right side of the Cathedral (if you’re facing its main door). The yellow arrows start there. As you face the cathedral door, they are to the right and on the bottom of the wall. The way from Lisbon is extremely well marked.

The street that Pois, Café is on is called Cruces da Se, and it is a good entrance into the Alfama district. Just wander around a while, there are churches, restaurants, small shops, etc. When you’re done visiting the Alfama, you will need to climb up and find the Miradouro that’s at the Largo das Portas do Sol. Right next to it is the Miradouro de Santa Luzia. The views are great from both, cafes in both.

From Santa Luzia it’s a short but steep climb up to the castle Sao Jorge. You will see signs pointing you in the right direction. Once inside (5E), you can climb and walk the walls to your heart’s content. Incredible views in all directions. Frequently there are very good “street musicians” playing guitar or violin and it makes the place just magical.

But since no Lisbon visit would be complete without a ride on the tram, I suggest that after you’re done with the castle, walk back down to the miradouro Santa Luzia and catch the Tram 28 in the downhill direction. Get on one that says “Prazeres” (the other option will say Estrela and it will not take you far enough). Take the tram up and down through the Bairro Alto, Santa Catarina, past the Parliament, up past the Estrela basilica and gardens (a very nice stop in themselves), to the stop where Saraiva de Carvalho crosses Domingos Sequeira. (You can ask your driver to tell you when you hit Campo d’Ourique). Campo d’Ourique is a very nice 19th century tree-lined residential neighborhood, with very good restaurants (Tasquinha d’Adelaide, Os Passarinhos, and Stop do Bairro are a few of them) and lots of little shops, cafes, a nice square, etc.

I know this route leaves out a few important destinations – the Gulbenkian, Sao Vicente de Fora, the Tile Museum, Belem, etc., but I think it is a great way to get a good view of Lisbon without a lot of backtracking.
We're going to be in Lisbon for 3 days before we start our Caminho Português, so I am going to be following @peregrina2000 's walk through Lisbon.
I thought I would map out the walk and the tram ride as a GPX track, so that I have a visual guide.
Attached is the GPX file (which I have also uploaded to my Wikiloc account). I included the walk to Amália Rodrigues' house, and swapped around Praça de Camões and Convento do Carmo (i.e. from Adega São Roque, continue along Misericordia, and then go to Convento do Carmo). I didn't expand on the walk through Alfama, around the Castelo de São Jorge, or at the end of the tram trip at Campo d'Ourique, as this would be left to the discovery of the moment.
Thank you Laurie for the information, and if you have any suggestions for improvement, please don't hesitate to add them :)
 

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peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Wow, my little old walk goes high tech. Thanks for doing that, AJ! Good idea to add Amalia Rodrigues’ house, too, it is very close. She has a very interesting life story, and if you like fado, it’s a must-see place.

One little tidbit I would add is that if you do manage to spend some time at Campo Ourique at the end of the 28 tram (and if you have time, the very best ride is the full one, IMO, getting on in Praça da Figueira and getting off at the end at Praçeres cemetery), there is a market-turned-destination (kind of like the ones in Madrid) that has a very good range of food options. Nice destination in a very nice old neighborhood.

I think that for most people who want to visit places while walking, this is more than one full day of touring. The walk itself can be done in two hours at a fast clip, so if it’s only for training purposes you could do it several times in one day, lots of ups and downs to get the cardio going. :).

Thanks again, AJ! Buen camino, Laurie
 

AJGuillaume

Pélerin du monde
Camino(s) past & future
Via Gebennensis (2018)
Via Podiensis (2018)
Voie Nive Bidassoa (2018)
Camino Del Norte (2018)
Wow, my little old walk goes high tech. Thanks for doing that, AJ! Good idea to add Amalia Rodrigues’ house, too, it is very close. She has a very interesting life story, and if you like fado, it’s a must-see place.

One little tidbit I would add is that if you do manage to spend some time at Campo Ourique at the end of the 28 tram (and if you have time, the very best ride is the full one, IMO, getting on in Praça da Figueira and getting off at the end at Praçeres cemetery), there is a market-turned-destination (kind of like the ones in Madrid) that has a very good range of food options. Nice destination in a very nice old neighborhood.

I think that for most people who want to visit places while walking, this is more than one full day of touring. The walk itself can be done in two hours at a fast clip, so if it’s only for training purposes you could do it several times in one day, lots of ups and downs to get the cardio going. :).

Thanks again, AJ! Buen camino, Laurie
With pleasure, Laurie!
This is definitely an itinerary we are going to do over a few days.
Thank you for all the suggestions!
Buen Camino!
 

Alfis

Wanderer
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (2020)
Thank you for this post.
Very informative for me.
I'm planning to visit it :)
 

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