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Need any advice for an inexperienced student group hoping to hike 4 days on their first camino

Camino(s) past & future
none
#1
Greetings friends,
This is my first post here. I have never walked the Camino, but I am helping to arrange a group of students to do a short section. I know, this sounds strange, but let me explain.

I work for a gap year organization. We send students on 3 month trips all over the world. For this trip, the students (just out of high school, 18-19 years old), will be spending about 3 weeks in southern Spain, and then a little over 2 months in Morocco. They will be studying Human Migration, looking into the realities of people migrating into Europe from Africa, and people migrating from rural villages into larger cities. They will engage in various educational projects, and during their limited time in Spain, I would love for them to be able to actually do some "migration" themselves.

They will be flying into Malaga, and spending time in Tarifa, and Granada. I have been looking at the stages of the Camino Mozarabe, and I'm seeking advice.

The group will be inexperienced hikers. I would say that 12-17km a day would be a max for them. We do not have a particular place we need to start, or end, just that it is accessible by public transport where they start and end.

I have read many Camino blogs, and there is some amazing information available, but I am seeking first hand advice on what would be a good, not so strenuous, 4-5 day section in this area, with cheap accommodations along the way.

As the groups are students, we are operating on a limited budget. Typically $30-$40 per person, per day. I don't know if I am being too hopeful, but this is what I have to work with.

Any information would be helpful. I have downloaded the english guides, I have been to the major websites, and at this stage, I'm seeking advice from anyone who has been in this region before. Thank you to everyone out there in this community, and I truly look forward to hearing from you all!
Cheers
 

twh

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances from SJPdP May/June, 2018
#2
If your group traveled north to the Camino Frances, there are more choices and services on this route. Pamplona to Longrono might be a good 5 day section with lot's of transportation options from/to each city. If you stay at Municipal Albergues they are the cheapest for your budget (5 Euros) and have the basics. Another 25 Euro/person will handle going out for breakfast (6), lunch (7) and dinner (12). You can trim expenses by having some picnic lunches along the way where you buy bread, meat and cheese and fruit at the supermarket and then again the same for dinners using the kitchen facilities in the Albergues to prepare some inexpensive meals for the group. The kitchens are all fairly well equipped with pots, pans, plates, with some silverware but some flexibility might be necessary depending on the size of your group and you will be sharing the kitchen with others so eating early or late may be the better choice so other smaller groups or individuals have a chance to make their dinner too. Maybe have each participant bring a "Spork" with them on the trip. There are occasional stories about groups that a poorly chaperoned...the leaders stay in a different facility or different floor and the students are thus Un-chaperoned...please be responsible for your group and make sure they understand the significance of this trip that their fellow pilgrims are trying to experience. Quiet time lights out (after 10 pm) and respect for others throughout the night should be enforced. Hope you have a great trip.
 
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SabineP

Camino = Empathy + Compassion.
Camino(s) past & future
some and then more. see my signature.
#3
Pamplona to Longrono might be a good 5 day section with lot's of transportation options from/to each city. If you stay at Municipal Albergues they are the cheapest for your budget (5 Euros) and have the basics. Another 25 Euro/person will handle going out for breakfast (6), lunch (7) and dinner (12). You can trim expenses by having some picnic lunches along the way where you buy bread, meat and cheese and fruit at the supermarket and then again the same for dinners using the kitchen facilities in the Albergues to prepare some inexpensive meals for the group. The kitchens are all fairly well equipped with pots, pans, plates, with some silverware but some flexibility might be necessary depending on the size of your group and you will be sharing the kitchen with others so eating early or late may be the better choice so other smaller groups or individuals have a chance to make their dinner too. Maybe have each participant bring a "Spork" with them on the trip. There are occasional stories about groups that a poorly chaperoned...the leaders stay in a different facility or different floor and the students are thus Un-chaperoned...please be responsible for your group and make sure they understand the significance of this trip that their fellow pilgrims are trying to experience. Quiet time lights out (after 10 pm) and respect for others throughout the night should be enforced. Hope you have a great trip.
The OP asks about the Camino Mozarabe not the Frances.
Hopefully the Mozarabe veterans on this forum can shed some light.
 

KCristina

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (April, 2016)
#4
Hi, I live in Andalucia part of the year and, since you don't mention the time of year for your trip - I would strongly warn you that summers are VERY HOT there. Hiking that route in the summer may be uncomfortable for your group; avoid connecting with Via de la Plata since there are many stretches fully exposed to sun and flat. Good luck!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#6
I wouldn't recommend the Mozarabe, based on your description. It would be hard to find 4-5 days that are non-strenuous, under 20 km and suitable for an inexperienced student group. You might be underestimating their abilities, but you should still have a situation with flexibility to make adjustments if necessary.

You could probably find a section on the Via de la Plata that would work better. Just for example, try looking at Merida to Caceres, or Caceres to Galisteo.

The Camino Frances might be a better choice in many ways.
 
Camino(s) past & future
.
#7
We need more on which month of the year and how many in the group. Mid-summer in central Spain is exceptionally hard for anyone, let alone inexperienced hikers. And a big group is unlikely to find accommodation there over a succession of nights. Mozarabe and VdlP stages are going to be longer than 12-17km.
If the group is small enough and going later in the year, say October onwards, and the VdlP was in range, and if it turned out the group could walk more like 25km per day (which most young people can, even if they are not experienced hikers, but have decent footwear) then I'd say it's worth looking at Aldeanueva to Salamanca 4-5 days, staying at Fuenterroble for a significant camino experience and walking some of the transhumance route (admittedly animal migration rather than human, but possibly relevant..?)
 
Camino(s) past & future
none
#8
We need more on which month of the year and how many in the group. Mid-summer in central Spain is exceptionally hard for anyone, let alone inexperienced hikers. And a big group is unlikely to find accommodation there over a succession of nights. Mozarabe and VdlP stages are going to be longer than 12-17km.
If the group is small enough and going later in the year, say October onwards, and the VdlP was in range, and if it turned out the group could walk more like 25km per day (which most young people can, even if they are not experienced hikers, but have decent footwear) then I'd say it's worth looking at Aldeanueva to Salamanca 4-5 days, staying at Fuenterroble for a significant camino experience and walking some of the transhumance route (admittedly animal migration rather than human, but possibly relevant..?)

I'm sorry I forgot to mention this. The group will most likely be a total of 10. They will try to begin in late September, most likely around the 25th.
 
Camino(s) past & future
none
#9
If your group traveled north to the Camino Frances, there are more choices and services on this route. Pamplona to Longrono might be a good 5 day section with lot's of transportation options from/to each city. If you stay at Municipal Albergues they are the cheapest for your budget (5 Euros) and have the basics. Another 25 Euro/person will handle going out for breakfast (6), lunch (7) and dinner (12). You can trim expenses by having some picnic lunches along the way where you buy bread, meat and cheese and fruit at the supermarket and then again the same for dinners using the kitchen facilities in the Albergues to prepare some inexpensive meals for the group. The kitchens are all fairly well equipped with pots, pans, plates, with some silverware but some flexibility might be necessary depending on the size of your group and you will be sharing the kitchen with others so eating early or late may be the better choice so other smaller groups or individuals have a chance to make their dinner too. Maybe have each participant bring a "Spork" with them on the trip. There are occasional stories about groups that a poorly chaperoned...the leaders stay in a different facility or different floor and the students are thus Un-chaperoned...please be responsible for your group and make sure they understand the significance of this trip that their fellow pilgrims are trying to experience. Quiet time lights out (after 10 pm) and respect for others throughout the night should be enforced. Hope you have a great trip.

Thank you for your response. The leaders of the group will certainly help the group to understand the significance of the trip both for themselves and for other pilgrims. Cultural respect is highly important.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Nearly every year since 2006, often walking more than one route. 2018 was Camino #14
#10
I have a whole list but after my last Camino and experience with a group, my best advice is that they remember to be quiet at the albergues and not keep other weary pilgrims awake with loud talking etc. even in the early afternoons and evenings, pilgrims are resting. Just leave the noise at the bars.
 
Camino(s) past & future
none
#11
I have a whole list but after my last Camino and experience with a group, my best advice is that they remember to be quiet at the albergues and not keep other weary pilgrims awake with loud talking etc. even in the early afternoons and evenings, pilgrims are resting. Just leave the noise at the bars.
So true. The group will of course be respectful of the other pilgrims rest, and will be conscious of loud talking. Great advice. Any other advice is useful!
 
Camino(s) past & future
please see signature
#12
@Traveler1579 , kia ora (greetings)

I note those familiar with southern Spain are suggesting an inexperienced group may end in tears on those routes.

The suggestion of Pamplona to Logrono is excellent given the easy access by bus and/or train and infrastructure on the trail itself - more beds for your quite large group.

Having seen groups walking together and also encountered them at eating places, I suggest that your group walk in two, or threes at most, with advice to interact with other walkers en route, when in cafe etc and in the albergue. That way they are likely to gain more than being an impervious island of 10 and so be more acceptable to the likes of me and the wise @Anniesantiago .

Kia kaha tatou (all of you take care, be strong, get going)
 
Camino(s) past & future
none
#13
@Traveler1579 , kia ora (greetings)

I note those familiar with southern Spain are suggesting an inexperienced group may end in tears on those routes.

The suggestion of Pamplona to Logrono is excellent given the easy access by bus and/or train and infrastructure on the trail itself - more beds for your quite large group.

Having seen groups walking together and also encountered them at eating places, I suggest that your group walk in two, or threes at most, with advice to interact with other walkers en route, when in cafe etc and in the albergue. That way they are likely to gain more than being an impervious island of 10 and so be more acceptable to the likes of me and the wise @Anniesantiago .

Kia kaha tatou (all of you take care, be strong, get going)
This is an awesome idea, and we typically do something similar when on other treks. It helps the students to have a bit more reflective time, and as you said, not seem an impervious group of 10.
 
Camino(s) past & future
none
#14
Hello Friends,

OK, I have been doing some more research, and I have an idea. I wanted to see what you all thought, and if anyone could point me in the direction of anyone who has done this walk (someone I could be in contact with to ask questions, or some blogs that detail the experience).

It seems like begining in Granada is a good place to start, as the group will already be visiting there.

Stage 1: Granada to Pinos Puente

Stage 2: Pinos Puente to Moclin

Stage 3: Moclin to Alcala la Real

Stage 4: Alcala la Real to Alcuadete

On the 5th morning, get a bus into Cordoba.

I would love to have the group be able to spend a week on the Camino and walk Granada to Cordoba, but unfortunately there is not enough time.

Please let me know what you think of this idea. Does it seem feasible for a group of students? Is there access to cheap markets where the group can buy food for picnic lunches? Are there any sections where they are very far from civilization, and if one were to get hurt, they could be gotten out easily? Are there cheap options for the group to stay in each night?

Thank you very much to everyone who has contributed already, and to anyone else who has any information!
 
#15
Hi traveler1579, you should scroll through the other threads in the Mozárabe forum. There are several, including one by me, from people who walked just this past April. And @BadPilgrim is walking right now and posting his accounts. I also had a little blog, which is linked to my signature below this post, which might give you some ideas.

It’s a beautiful walk, but I would be afraid of ungodly temps in September. And I also think that the green of spring and the wildflowers and budding trees added a lot to the beauty, not available in September of course. I very much liked that section of the Mozárabe. A few stunning castles (Moclín and Alcalá in particular), lots of beautiful (at least to me) olive groves, some elevation gain.

Granada to Pinos Puente is not terribly inspiring, a lot of it through the outskirts and then along a canal. You might consider starting in Pinos Puente (surely there are buses from Granada) and adding Alcaudete to Baeza at the end.

Will you or someone else be accompanying them? The route is well marked, but there was a time or two when I had to consult my GPS.
 
Camino(s) past & future
none
#16
Hi traveler1579, you should scroll through the other threads in the Mozárabe forum. There are several, including one by me, from people who walked just this past April. And @BadPilgrim is walking right now and posting his accounts. I also had a little blog, which is linked to my signature below this post, which might give you some ideas.

It’s a beautiful walk, but I would be afraid of ungodly temps in September. And I also think that the green of spring and the wildflowers and budding trees added a lot to the beauty, not available in September of course. I very much liked that section of the Mozárabe. A few stunning castles (Moclín and Alcalá in particular), lots of beautiful (at least to me) olive groves, some elevation gain.

Granada to Pinos Puente is not terribly inspiring, a lot of it through the outskirts and then along a canal. You might consider starting in Pinos Puente (surely there are buses from Granada) and adding Alcaudete to Baeza at the end.

Will you or someone else be accompanying them? The route is well marked, but there was a time or two when I had to consult my GPS.

Thank you for the help. I'm hoping it wont be as hot as August. They would probably start walking around the 24th of September. I will not be accompanying them, but there will be two leaders with them who are very experienced with groups in outdoor situations.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#17
I would say that 12-17km a day would be a max for them.
Stage 1: Granada to Pinos Puente
Stage 2: Pinos Puente to Moclin
Stage 3: Moclin to Alcala la Real
Stage 4: Alcala la Real to Alcuadete
Your suggested plan has stages of: 20 km (mostly urban/industrial), 16 km (including a long steep hill at the end), 24 km, and 24 km.

I will pose a few questions...

Will your group be carrying well-fitted backpacks weighing no more than 6-7 kg before water? Will they all have suitable light weight shoes that are roomy and broken in? Do the group leaders have walking experience and Spanish language? Have the leaders been involved in these discussions?

If someone gets bad blisters by Moclín, will they take a taxi to the next stop? (I don't know about bus service.)

On the Camino Francés and Via de la Plata (to a lesser degree), there are albergues and hospitaleros who are accustomed to helping pilgrims deal with these problems. The Mozárabe is more suitable for pilgrims who are able to cope fairly well on their own.

Certainly this is do-able, but I question sending the group you describe out with leaders who are equally inexperienced with walking, the Camino, and the particular stages.
 
Camino(s) past & future
none
#18
Thank you for your reply. The group leaders are very experienced with long distance back packing trips, and have led many groups in longer situations. That is good! The students will have light backpacks (day bags) and good shoes. The leaders have been involved in these discussions as well. I am just doing some research for them as well.

The plan if someone gets blisters by Moclin will be to taxi or bus to the next stop yes. I think the group should be able to cope well on their own. The types of trips we send students on are fairly self sufficient and our leaders are very experienced, these two in particular being Outward Bound instructors.

I am now thinking to have them bus out to Pinos in the morning to begin walking, instead of starting in Granada, as many have pointed out that this is an industrial walking day, and not so nice. The group would then add one more day from Alcuadete to Baena, then either return to Granada by bus, or continue to Cordoba by bus.
 

SabineP

Camino = Empathy + Compassion.
Camino(s) past & future
some and then more. see my signature.
#19
I am now thinking to have them bus out to Pinos in the morning to begin walking, instead of starting in Granada, as many have pointed out that this is an industrial walking day, and not so nice. The group would then add one more day from Alcuadete to Baena, then either return to Granada by bus, or continue to Cordoba by bus.

Do not want to be the devil's advocate but don't you think that skipping the industrial part is contradictory to the group's initial idea? Learning about migration?
I do not think migrants or refugees have the liberty to choose the easy way...
Just my two cents....
 

Tincatinker

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
#20
My tuppence might be to suggest, as was mention previously, to focus on the Transhumance routes. An essential driver of human migration for millennia. Or take a look at the current migration routes from the beaches of the Costa del Sol into interior Spain. Though I can appreciate that you would probably not wish to seal your students into sub-structural voids on an overloaded artic and send them to Madrid or Merida.
Beyond that, your proposed route looks ok, and I agree with @SabineP that the urban experience is as essential as the rural sublimity. It will be a fairly challenging hike for the inexperienced walker. You seem to be aware of the potential hazards and have a management plan in place. If your leaders are OB qualified they'll know the difference between reluctance and capability.
I hope your students gain from their adventure.
 
Camino(s) past & future
none
#21
Do not want to be the devil's advocate but don't you think that skipping the industrial part is contradictory to the group's initial idea? Learning about migration?
I do not think migrants or refugees have the liberty to choose the easy way...
Just my two cents....
I like the way you think, and this is a great point to be honest. Migrants and refugees receive no choice often with where they have to go, and its usually not pretty. Thank you!
 
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Camino(s) past & future
none
#22
My tuppence might be to suggest, as was mention previously, to focus on the Transhumance routes. An essential driver of human migration for millennia. Or take a look at the current migration routes from the beaches of the Costa del Sol into interior Spain. Though I can appreciate that you would probably not wish to seal your students into sub-structural voids on an overloaded artic and send them to Madrid or Merida.
Beyond that, your proposed route looks ok, and I agree with @SabineP that the urban experience is as essential as the rural sublimity. It will be a fairly challenging hike for the inexperienced walker. You seem to be aware of the potential hazards and have a management plan in place. If your leaders are OB qualified they'll know the difference been between reluctance and capability.
I hope your students gain from their adventure.
The container experience into Madrid would be extremely experiential for sure, but I'm guessing the parents would be a bit displeased with me :) I am ok with the route being challenging to the group, I want them to be tired at the end of the day and have good discussion and learning about the nature of migration, but just enough so that I am not putting them in any danger. We trust the leaders completely, and have worked with them on multiple occasions. Thank you for your insight.
 

MinaKamina

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Jacobspad 2017
#23
I like the way you think, and this is a great point to be honest. Migrants and refugees receive no choice often with where they have to go, and its usually not pretty. Thank you!
You are referring to illegal migrants? Then why walk part of the Camino?
FYI Spain has an infrastructure for refugees.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
none
#24
The group will be studying migration in many forms, illegal, legal, from rural to urban and religious.

Yes, Spain has an infrastructure for refugees. The students will be learning a bit about this in Tarifa.
Thank you for your reply!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#25
Thank you for your reply. The group leaders are very experienced with long distance back packing trips, and have led many groups in longer situations. That is good! The students will have light backpacks (day bags) and good shoes. The leaders have been involved in these discussions as well. I am just doing some research for them as well...
I didn't raise the questions to be negative - rather to be realistic and help you assess the suitability of the plans. Sometimes people can be very naive but it seems like you are well aware of the issues. I hope you can report back on how it went.

In fact, aren't you tempted to walk one of the Caminos now yourself? :D
 
Camino(s) past & future
none
#26
I didn't raise the questions to be negative - rather to be realistic and help you assess the suitability of the plans. Sometimes people can be very naive but it seems like you are well aware of the issues. I hope you can report back on how it went.

In fact, aren't you tempted to walk one of the Caminos now yourself? :D
Hi! I didn't think you were being negative at all. I appreciate all the advice and perspective everyone has given me, it really helps me to consider all the variables in this. I have wanted to walk one of the Caminos for a very long time now, and hopefully that will be an option in the near future! Doing all this research into the Camino Mozarabe, I've very tempted to walk this one day!
 

hecate105

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2009 Portuguese Estellas 2014 Aurelia 2016 St Davids 2017 Via Augusta/V dl P. 2018 Michael Mary Way
#27
Maybe start in Seville as there are then plenty of albergues where they can stay cheaply. Otherwise the Via Augusta from Cadiz to Seville is fairly flat and easy walking, but no albergues - perhaps being young and enthusiastic they might want to wild camp or sleep out...? From experience the locals are very weloming..
The VdlP route ghosts the main roads so bus/train connections should be ok. Also as you are a youth group - if you contact local schools/colleges etc they would probably put you up in sports halls etc. Spain seems very good at this.
 

Walking Lover

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CdS from Leon to Santiago, June 16, 2016 to June 30, 2016.
#28
Greetings friends,
This is my first post here. I have never walked the Camino, but I am helping to arrange a group of students to do a short section. I know, this sounds strange, but let me explain.

I work for a gap year organization. We send students on 3 month trips all over the world. For this trip, the students (just out of high school, 18-19 years old), will be spending about 3 weeks in southern Spain, and then a little over 2 months in Morocco. They will be studying Human Migration, looking into the realities of people migrating into Europe from Africa, and people migrating from rural villages into larger cities. They will engage in various educational projects, and during their limited time in Spain, I would love for them to be able to actually do some "migration" themselves.

They will be flying into Malaga, and spending time in Tarifa, and Granada. I have been looking at the stages of the Camino Mozarabe, and I'm seeking advice.

The group will be inexperienced hikers. I would say that 12-17km a day would be a max for them. We do not have a particular place we need to start, or end, just that it is accessible by public transport where they start and end.

I have read many Camino blogs, and there is some amazing information available, but I am seeking first hand advice on what would be a good, not so strenuous, 4-5 day section in this area, with cheap accommodations along the way.

As the groups are students, we are operating on a limited budget. Typically $30-$40 per person, per day. I don't know if I am being too hopeful, but this is what I have to work with.

Any information would be helpful. I have downloaded the english guides, I have been to the major websites, and at this stage, I'm seeking advice from anyone who has been in this region before. Thank you to everyone out there in this community, and I truly look forward to hearing from you all!
Cheers
My first advice would be to teach them what it means to be a pilgrim, especially the history. I have seen a number of groups who walk and treat it as another casual walk in the park and behave accordingly. Youth groups can do a Camino easily on 30-40 Euros a day. Best wishes.
 
Camino(s) past & future
none
#29
My first advice would be to teach them what it means to be a pilgrim, especially the history. I have seen a number of groups who walk and treat it as another casual walk in the park and behave accordingly. Youth groups can do a Camino easily on 30-40 Euros a day. Best wishes.
I appreciate your help and advice! Yes, I agree, this is not something to be approached lightly, as just another trek. Our leaders will give lots of framing to the students before heading out.
 

george.g

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
French way 10, 11
Norte 12
Vdlp 13
Levante 14
Mozarabe/Malaga 15
Augusta 16
Mozarabe/Almeria 17
#30
Hi Traveler,
Sorry but I can’t help thinking “what’s the point of the exercise” you will have a group of students walking along a route that may or may not be a historically authentic pilgrim trail, I fail to see how that would help anyone understand the forces that encourage migration.
If the point of the experience is for your students to experience the hardship of life on the trail then wouldn’t any trail do? as long as it’s rough and remote?
Regards
George
For a first hand report on the days you are contemplating see Maggie’s blog in this section.
Plus there is a Mozarabe variant that starts in Malaga that may be more suitable.
 
Camino(s) past & future
none
#31
Hi George,
The theme of the program is human movement in general. This can also include additional reasons that have motivated people to travel vast distances, such as pilgrimage. They will also be spending time in Morocco and will have discussions regarding the Haj pilgrimage. As our programs are experiential education based, the time spent on the Camino will be a dedicated time to learn about pilgrimage while engaging in it in a limited fashion.
 
#32
Hi George,
The theme of the program is human movement in general. This can also include additional reasons that have motivated people to travel vast distances, such as pilgrimage. They will also be spending time in Morocco and will have discussions regarding the Haj pilgrimage. As our programs are experiential education based, the time spent on the Camino will be a dedicated time to learn about pilgrimage while engaging in it in a limited fashion.
Looks like you are all set with a route and an itinerary. I hope you will come back and tell us how it went. Buen camino, Laurie
 
Camino(s) past & future
none
#33
Quick question friends. On this route:

Stage 1: Granada to Pinos Puente
Stage 2: Pinos Puente to Moclin
Stage 3: Moclin to Alcala la Real
Stage 4: Alcala la Real to Alcuadete

Does anyone know just how rural it really gets? I'm thinking that if someone were to start hiking, then halfway through one of the stages, decide that they cannot make the rest of the day, is it realistic to think that with some help and a bit of walking, that they will be able to find someone who can help to call a cab, and or find a bus to the next stage town? I've found quite a lot of info on daily bus routes, but I'm just curious to know from the people who have done this before, if the group will be able to get a ride should they need it?

I'm already planning on shortening the their time on the Camino to just walking 3 stages, with the potential to do 4 should some feel up to it.
Thank you all so much for your help!
 
Camino(s) past & future
none
#34
Looks like you are all set with a route and an itinerary. I hope you will come back and tell us how it went. Buen camino, Laurie
Hi!
Well, I have a route planned yes, and I hope it all goes well. I'm trying to find ways that the group can get a ride partway should they not be able to walk an entire stage. I'm hoping it will go well though!
Thank you!
 

Raggy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Mozarabe Almeria (2017)
Cherhill to Canterbury - Pilgrims' Way (2018)
Via Francigena (2019)
#35
I've come late to this thread. I hope not too late.

Since you are teaching young people about migration, I recommend that you look at Michel Cerdan's Camino de Piedras project. Michel walked from Santiago retracing and remembering the steps of people who migrated through choice or necessity along the route - including his own ancestors, who moved from France to southern Spain, then Algeria, and back to France over the centuries. Along his journey (a camino in reverse), he collected stones to create an exhibition:
http://www.caminodepiedras.com/es/

Regarding the route that you're considering - Granada to Pinos Puente is such an unattractive stage. It seems a shame to spend one of your precious four days trudging through "la laideur des faubourgs." As an alternative, I might suggest:

Stage 1: Quentar to Granada
Stage 2: Bus from Granada to Olivares. Then walk Olivares to Alcala la Real
Stage 3; Alcala la Real to Alcaudete
Stage 4: (optional) Alcaudete to Baena
 

george.g

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
French way 10, 11
Norte 12
Vdlp 13
Levante 14
Mozarabe/Malaga 15
Augusta 16
Mozarabe/Almeria 17
#36
Hi.
I wonder what happened? Does anyone know?
 

MinaKamina

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Jacobspad 2017
#38

SabineP

Camino = Empathy + Compassion.
Camino(s) past & future
some and then more. see my signature.
#39

george.g

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
French way 10, 11
Norte 12
Vdlp 13
Levante 14
Mozarabe/Malaga 15
Augusta 16
Mozarabe/Almeria 17
#40
Ditto! Hope “pilgrim” found his way back home.
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#41
The Member last visited the Forum on July 17, 2018, two weeks after posting. I suspect we are not likely to hear more.:(
 
Camino(s) past & future
none
#42
Camino(s) past & future
none
#44
The Member last visited the Forum on July 17, 2018, two weeks after posting. I suspect we are not likely to hear more.:(
The students said that the small section of the Camino they hiked was really good. It was a time of reflection and learning for them. The next group that comes will be arriving in April, and will get to spend a bit longer, about a week, on this section. Thank you to everyone who has helped in this! Ideally, I would like if the students could have more time, and could walk from Granada to Cordoba, but at the moment, we do not have the time.
 

george.g

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
French way 10, 11
Norte 12
Vdlp 13
Levante 14
Mozarabe/Malaga 15
Augusta 16
Mozarabe/Almeria 17
#45
And “pilgrim?”
Chances are he’s wandering about lost.
Dogs, unlike pigeons do not have a homing instinct and soon become disoriented when they are outside their home range.
 
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