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New Albergue in Burgos

#1
I would like to know any information any one has about the new Albergue that was to open in Burgos. I can not find any current information about whether it has opened and if not, when it will open. Thanks for the update.
 

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sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#2
Pili Pala press and the CSJ both reported two new albergues:
There are two new albergues: El Parral on Calle Lain Calvo 10 (18 beds, open all year), and Albergue de Burgos on Calle Mateo Cerezo 9 (15 beds, open spring to autumn).

Burgos: message received 12 September 2007:
L'auberge EMAÙS à BURGOS en ESPAGNE déménage et se transforme en:
CASA PARROQUIAL para PEREGRINOS à partir de mi-mars 2008, (si les travaux sont finis!). La casa de peregrinos sera ouverte de Pâques à la Toussaint
Accueil chrétien: Partage du repas, de la messe, la prière et des tâches matérielles
Horaire:Ouverture 14h/15h à 20h
20 lits
Repas 20h
On ne peut faire aucune réserve.

Adresse Parroquia San José Obrero, Calle San Pedro Cardeña nº 32 Bis, Burgos 09002, Espagne.
(Se situe à l’entrée de Burgos, Zone la QUINTA, à coté du collège des Jésuites, au bout de la Calle DIEGO LUIS VITORES.)

There are also links to three albergues here:

http://caminodesantiago.consumer.es/albergue-de-burgos
 
#3
Surely he's talking about the new bigger one (c 100 beds) built to replace the old huts in the park - previous posts have covered it's proposed opening and it's should be open now

But also on a broader note, why worry about planning your route to the nth degree beforehand? - much better to stop worrying about such minor details and adapt when you actually reach Burgos
 
#4
why worry about planning your route to the nth degree beforehand
Thank you Sil for supplying the straightforward helpful answer without comments. I have gleaned an immense amount of information from this forum from you, but unfortunately had to filter out many dogmatic statements, ah what would we do without you!
Kwaheri
 
#5
Well, for once, Sil's reply was slightly wide of the mark in mentioning two new small refugios that have opened rather than the very large new one that the original question was almost certainly referring to
 

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#6
I stayed at the one on calle Lain Calvo. It has 18 beds,very clean. What I liked most is that it was half a block from the cathedral, in the middle of it all. I understand the big one is on the outside of Burgos, far from downtown. I did not see that one.
Lillian
 
#8
I'm thinking of starting my camino in Burgos...lack of time, work commitments, yadda yadda yadda...can I pick up a pilgrim passport/credencial in Burgos?

Grateful for any help.

Red Kite
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#9
Many pilgrims start in Burgos. Remember, there is no beginning - only a destination! Spanish pilgrims don't have to go to France to start walking to the tomb of their saint, and if they live in Astorga or anywhere else along the way, they don't have to start further back unless they want to see a different landscape.
You can get your credencial from any albergue or at the cathedral.
Have a wonderful walk.
 
#10
Thanks for a lovely reply...you're absolutely right of course. The true distance of the camino is from my head to my feet via my heart.

I'm looking forward to it...It was in Burgos that I first decided to do the camino. So starting from there will be pretty cool for me. :D
 
#11
I hated the one in the park
As a moderator perhaps you could be more specific on reasons why the albergue has drawn such a blanket harsh comment? At least to those who have no alternative accommodation they could be forewarned of what to expect, on a more constructive plane perhaps someone who agrees with your comments could take steps to undertake the procedures to rectify any shortcomings.

Kwaheri
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#12
Unless the accommodation was appaling and the hospitalero was an axe-muderer, you might never get concensus on the popularity of any albergue!
For example, I LOVED Manjarin - others call it a Septic Tank.
El Parral, the albergue at the western edge of the city consists of large wooden huts in a park next to the Hospital del Rey. Walking into Burgos is a schlep in itself - about 8kms of tarred road, traffic, outer and inner city pavements. Then one still has to walk through the city to the park, under trees that shed thick fluff that gets in your hair in your nose, to reach the albergue. It can be freezing in winter (the wooden buildings don't contain heat) and often runs out of hot water for the showers. However, when I stayed there, the hospitalero was an extremely kind and caring person and I've heard many reports of pilgrims enjoying their stay there.
Until recently, this was the only albergue in Burgos.
 

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#13
For me, the hospitaleros can make it a great experience. It was like that for me in Villamayor del Jardin, a not that great albergue but wonderful people. I loved my stay while there.
The one you are talking about in Burgos, my only complain is that it is far from town. Some people would like that, but I wanted to be in town so that I could just walk to the cathedral and other spots of interest (like the hospital that xrayed my foot).
Lillian
 

Minkey

Active Member
#14
Ok, as a moderator, I shall explain. I personally didn't enjoy my stay there, because the hospitalero was unnecessarily rude to other people sleeping in the same dorm as I was. He came in after lights out with a torch and shouted at someone who'd committed no crime, all they'd done was to put something where he didn't want them to. The next morning he was equally as unkind to a group of people, including someone who needed to stay another night.

This, coupled with the fact that the showers were cold and that it's a fair walk back into Burgos left me with a rather negative feeling of the place.

I moderate on a purely voluntary basis. Perhaps I should keep my opinions to myself in future. Sadly, I mightn't always have time to explain my remarks, but I did express that the other albergue was better, possibly that might be deemed constructive, no?
 
#15
Hello, I am a relatively newcomer and have yet to start my Camino next month. The amount of information this site and you guys provide, is invaluable. I understand perfectly that sometimes somebody or other does not seem to appreciate the service that is offered here, however, let's think big and out of the box and remember that the number of people that enjoy and are grateful for all the help they can get, is so much bigger than the cranky ones, that it would be a sad day for all of us when any one that helps here stops doing it for some kind of misunderstanding. So, Minkey, do not let yourself be discoouraged and keep up the good work!!! :D :D :D Thanks, Sumachado
 
#16
When I walked the camino in 2001 with my brother-in-law we decided to stay in a hotel one night. I wanted a good shower! Gary could not have cared less where we stayed, he saw no difference between any of the places we stayed. great alberge or poor he could not see any difference. He did like the "sock dryer" in the hotel room! (read hair dryer)!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
#17
Someone said in Burgos "You can get your credencial from any albergue or at the cathedral."

I was at the cathedral a couple of days ago. You can get your credential stamped there, but the rather rushed young man behind the counter was sending those who wanted fresh credentials down to the refuge in the park, which is still very much open for business.

I hope those passing through Burgos will take some extra time there. The place is wonderful. I go back to visit every few months, and always find something new and wonderful there... and the food! Wow! Try the Vinoteca El Cordon, a restaurant popular with the locals. The toasted goat-cheese salad and a plate of home-made morcilla, and a glass (or two) of El Prado Rey tinto... mmm! Made my day.

Also, those with Spanish language skills and a fondness for the city and cathedral may enjoy a novel by Oscar Esquivias called "Inquietud en el Paraiso." It´s set there in the cathedral and the neighborhood around it, in early 1936, and gives unforgettable and funny insight into the city and its history and high self-regard.
 

Minkey

Active Member
#18
That's odd. Perhaps they'd run out, as you definitely can get them there. was it the small section in the far corner of the entrance to the Cathedral?
 
#19
I adore Burgos too Rebekah...it was there I was first introduced to Prado Rey...mmmmmmmmm heaven in a glass. And the notion of doing the camino got wedged in my brain when I was there too.

Love your blog...

I'll find a credencial from somewhere no doubt...he said getting chilled and into the spirit...

Red Kite
 
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
#20
Minkey:
It was in the entryway where you get your tickets to see the tourist areas of the cathedral, on the right side of the counter where you stamp your credentials.
 

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