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New Knees - User Experiences Please

Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
#1
I am starting to realise that my knees might be totally screwed up. After three Caminos walking overweight. Arthritis and torn meniscus might cause ongoing troubles.

My doctor warned that a knee replacement can be very painful.

Anyone had one? What was your before and after experience?
 

Brenda54

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017
#2
I met a man from Canada last year on the Camino Frances who had both knees replaced 6 months prior to walking from SJPDP to Santiago. I was rather amazed at his ability to trek up and down the mountain paths! He told me he just took it slow and easy and felt great, and that he would rather wear them out than rust them out! I know that doesn't answer your question but perhaps will offer you a ray of hope...he finished like a champ by the way!
 
Camino(s) past & future
This upcoming May 31st through July 1st approximately.
#4
I am starting to realise that my knees might be totally screwed up. After three Caminos walking overweight. Arthritis and torn meniscus might cause ongoing troubles.

My doctor warned that a knee replacement can be very painful.
I am getting new knees in January. Both at the same time. As my doctor said “You really don’t want to go through this painful procedure twice. With good rehab I hope to be back on the Camino within a year.
Anyone had one? What was your before and after experience?
I am starting to realise that my knees might be totally screwed up. After three Caminos walking overweight. Arthritis and torn meniscus might cause ongoing troubles.

My doctor warned that a knee replacement can be very painful.

Anyone had one? What was your before and after experience?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
#5
I am starting to realise that my knees might be totally screwed up. After three Caminos walking overweight. Arthritis and torn meniscus might cause ongoing troubles.

My doctor warned that a knee replacement can be very painful.

Anyone had one? What was your before and after experience?
@Robo
I can't really answer your question, because I have not yet had any joints replaced. But I can tell you what I know of my younger brother's experience. He had both his knees replaced in a hospital in Nairobi on Nov. 21 of last year, the day that I arrived in Santiago from the VdlP. He said that it was very painful, and he was up on his new joints right away. He is a physical education teacher by training and very disciplined in exercising, but he did not find it easy to recover. However, about six months later he was walking up a mountain in Africa, which another brother and his wife had decided not to climb, as it was too strenuous. A couple of weeks ago, he invited me to go for a walk with him and we walked for quite a ways along the river in Calgary. I was pushing it a bit to keep up. He said he was fine and his knees don't hurt any more. Sooner or later, I shall have to get at least one knee and one hip joint done, and I do not look forward to it. But I want to keep on walking, so I shall go ahead when the time comes. Good luck in doing what you decide to retain your mobility, and Buen caminos.
 

MeandIan

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
May2018
#6
I had a total knee replacement 20 months ago. A PSI joint. We started on 14 September and finished 21 October with days off in Pamplona, Burgos and Leon. At orisson my knee was swollen and stiff as I thought it would be. The next day we carried on to Roncesvalles and took the alternative route which wasn’t too bad. Again my knee was swollen and stiff although the pain was controlled with paracetamol and voltaren. After a week the swelling wasn’t too bad. In fact for the rest of the Camino I had no further problems. I had more problems with blisters on my little toes than my knee. I was comfortable doing 20-23km. If we exceeded that distance the swelling would start but the combination of the two above drugs were sufficient. Of course, walking poles were a must as was a knee brace, though sometimes I felt that it was psychological.
Sorry, to get back to your question, the surgery wasn’t as bad as I expected. I had had several surgeries on that knee before and the arthritis was quite severe. The surgeries included two reconstructions and a meniscectomy, the consequences of a sporting injury.The pain management prescribed by the anaesthetist after the replacement was adequate. As long as you do your exercises and manage the pain and swelling you could be comfortable. Rest, ice, compress and elevate. I took off 3 months from work as I am a theatre nurse. Walking in a heated pool increased mobility tremendously. In Melbourne if you don’t go to a rehab facility, the hospital allocates a nurse and a physio to go to your house and supply equipment you might need eg shower chair. Looking back it was the best decision I made because I could not have done the Camino on the knee that I had. I had been told that I needed a TKR when I was 45 but I wanted to wait till I was 60 because of the lifespan of a new knee.
If you have any other questions I will be happy to chat.
Good luck with your decision.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015
#7
You have to look into the pros and cons of having both knees done at the same time versus having one done and then the other after the first one has completely healed.
I apologise for my terseness in my earlier post. A good doctor would give you much information on your first visit but doing research beforehand allows you to ask for more detailed information about the type of operation you think is best suited for you. Be sure to talk to nurses and physical therapists before seeing the doctor; they are the ones that will be better able to describe problems and challenges in the recovery process. If you have one so-so knee and one that was operated on you might get a better chance of actually wanting to do your therapy than being disabled with two knees in recovery at the same time. The total recovery time would likely be longer though.

One webpage that may be a good place to start is: https://www.healthline.com/health/total-knee-replacement-surgery/bilateral

Then try a search for bilateral single double knee replacement simultaneous staged
 
Camino(s) past & future
Arles Route (2013/2014 onwards)
#8
They always tell you that it's painful but nothing prepares you for just how painful it really is! Having said that it gets a little better every day and, yes, it's well worth the pain and should give you comfortable walking all over again. When I had my one knee replaced I had the guidebook for walking hut-to-hut in the Austrian Alps which my surgeon said that I could do but not to try it too soon. I have met a number of people who have said that their knee replacements have been a waste of time and haven't helped them at all, the common factor has been that they all had little or no post operative physiotherapy. I benefited from RIGOROUS physiotherapy and cursed my Physio but it made all the difference between success and failure. Good Luck.
 

gerardcarey

Veteran Member
#9
I'm a hip replacement guy.
I remember lying in my hospital bed watching the knee replacement guys doing their exercises.
I was thinking "Blimey, glad I'm not going thru that."
It was the post operative exercises that were causing the pain.
I spoke to a few surgeons and they had similar stories.
"We get the blame if the operation does not have significantly good results. We know the main reason the operation is not a success. It's because patients have not been diligent with their exercising."
Regards
Gerard
 
#10
I have had both knees replaced. Wore them out working as a park ranger in the western mountains of the US -- all those mountains meant lots of downhills -- seriously hard on knees. I was in my 50s when the first was replaced and 10 years later I had a revision in that knee (the doctor said it was like a brake job, pull out the crumbling plastic, slip in a new one, easy, but still the same lengthy recovery). Here's a few things I suggest you remember: Everyone recovers differently. Some fast. Some not so fast. Do your exercises like a new religion -- with total devotion. Do NOT overdo. I did overdo after the second knee was replaced and it set me back several months. For most of us, our new knees will never be the same as our originals when they were good. But, I've put thousands of (mostly) pain free camino miles on these knees that I never ever could have done without the replacements. Downhills are still a challenge. But I feel blessed to live in an age when replacements are possible. We are so fortunate.
 
Last edited:
#11
I have 2 replaced knees, done when I was 54 and 55. Since then I have walked the CP and plan to finish the V de la P next year. Recovery from surgery was very painful and required much discipline - exercises on the hour, every hour from 9 to 5 then i allowed myself vino tinto. But now no pain. occasional stiffness and some loss of extension but SO much better. Highly recommended. You get your life back!
 

vwzoo

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2018
#12
I had both of my knees replaced in 2011, one in July and the other in December. My surgeon performed them using the traditional method where he cut the muscles verses minimally invasive where they don't cut the muscles. I was 50 and about 70 lbs overweight. The surgeon told me that he chose the traditional method as it allowed him to ensure he had the correct alignment of the new knees so that they would last longer. He said minimally invasive would lead to quicker less painful recovery but he thought the trade off was better long term for the knees. Recovery was painful and you have absolutely have to do the physical therapy. I since then lost my weight, a big part of it was really falling in love with walking. At my 5 year check up in 2016. I asked my surgeon about my dream of walking the Camino. He was all for it and gave me a phone number of a relative who had walked it. I built my self up over 2 years 10,000 steps a day, 15,000 steps a day, then 20,000 steps a day with a 17 mile walk once a week leading up to my actually walking the Camino in September. I completed the Camino and then walked to Muxia and then to Fisterra, an absolutely amazing experience. I was very cautious especially going down the hills, but my knees did great.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
#13
Thank you for all the responses and advice.
It's obviously not quite as simple as I thought!
Lots of things to consider and more doctors to talk to I think..........
 

Opa Theo

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francais to Santiago
#14
I am starting to realise that my knees might be totally screwed up. After three Caminos walking overweight. Arthritis and torn meniscus might cause ongoing troubles.

My doctor warned that a knee replacement can be very painful.

Anyone had one? What was your before and after experience?
Had left knee replaced in 2010. Before the replacement I could not sleep because of knee pain. I couldn't drive because I was falling asleep at the wheel. Regret I didn't have the operation sooner. It's miraculous.
Read statistics that about 15% of people with total knee replacement aren't happy.
Find surgeon who does lots of knee replacements. Religiously perform post operative physical therapy. Be very careful about opioid pain meds.
Just walked from Sarria to Santiago. Trekking poles are a huge help with protecting all leg joints.
You will ace it!
 

joanhull

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
9/13
#15
I am starting to realise that my knees might be totally screwed up. After three Caminos walking overweight. Arthritis and torn meniscus might cause ongoing troubles.

My doctor warned that a knee replacement can be very painful.

Anyone had one? What was your before and after experience?
I've had 2 and it changed my life. One in 2008 and 2015. Walked both the Sanabres and CF in 2017 plus 4 hundred plus walks in England and Italy (just back) since 2015.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2019 Camino Frances
#16
I had both knees replaced at same time at 50 years old. As someone above stated, doing your exercises and attending therapy should be like a new religion. The recuperation is painful and tough but, I’d do it again in a minute. I’ve been downhill skiing in western USA, day hiking in the Appalachian trail and planning on walking my first Camino in April 2019. I agree, certain activities, like kneeling, still give me some discomfort but I back to all my old activities. Best thing I ever did!
 
Camino(s) past & future
may-june (2016)
#17
I am starting to realise that my knees might be totally screwed up. After three Caminos walking overweight. Arthritis and torn meniscus might cause ongoing troubles.

Before changing knees use your old ones. I train my knees painless with a powder of rose hips with vitamin C.
Hips can be eaten without seeds as they are, but I found LITOMOVE Nyponpulver. Many of my friends have got their knees painless. Plenty of hips is available for free here in bushes (autumn).
My 5 cents.
Benny
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis, SJPDP-Santiago (May 2016) Via de la Plata, Sevilla-Santiago (Sept 2016), CM/CF 2018
#18
I am starting to realise that my knees might be totally screwed up. After three Caminos walking overweight. Arthritis and torn meniscus might cause ongoing troubles.

My doctor warned that a knee replacement can be very painful.

Anyone had one? What was your before and after experience?


Hi Robo,

Yes, a knee replacement is not the happiest thing to do, but like so many others it allows you to go back to enjoying life.

I had walked over 1,400 miles from my home in Southern California to Canada three years ago. Then a little over two years ago I walked my first Camino, CF from Saint John to Santiago, and I fell in love with the Camino. Four months later I went back and walked the CVDLP from Sevilla to Santiago, but struggled due to the pain I developed in my left knee.

Not wanting to quit, I took ibuprofen to get me through some days. Two days after getting back home I had an MRI and found that I had very little meniscus left, and had also developed fractures in my tibia. I went to five orthopedic surgeons, four recommended a full replacement, and one recommended a partial replacement. Not wanting surgery, I ended up walking with a knee brace for a year hoping it would heal somewhat, and hopefully just have a partial replacement.

During that time I was pretty miserable because I missed walking, and the Camino. I finally decided to have the replacement on January 9th of this year. Going from walking hundreds of miles to using a walker was very sobering. And yes, the rehab was not pleasant, but I wanted to get back to living life, and the Camino, and I made sure I did what the physical therapist and doctor told me to do. Much of my recovery was in my head.

Almost four months to the day after my replacement, May 11, I started walking the Camino de Madrid to Santiago (445 miles). I originally chose the Madrid learning that it was not so steep, other than cross the mountains just outside of Madrid. I connected with the CF in Sahagun and by then I had worked through the worries about my knee.

The first two weeks I had some stiffness and swelling at the end of the day, and a little pain but no real bad pain. I took ibuprofen to help reduce the swelling when I felt I needed it. The doctor had said swelling was fairly normal for a year or so.

One of the lessons I have learned from my knee replacement is that I just have to be better at listen to what my body is telling me. Everyone is different, so you can’t necessarily do the same thing as others. For me, having the replacement has allowed me to get back to living life. At 67, I look forward to many more treks and adventures, especially on the Camino.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis, SJPDP-Santiago (May 2016) Via de la Plata, Sevilla-Santiago (Sept 2016), CM/CF 2018
#19
Hi Robo,

Yes, a knee replacement is not the happiest thing to do, but like so many others it allows you to go back to enjoying life.

I had walked over 1,400 miles from my home in Southern California to Canada three years ago. Then a little over two years ago I walked my first Camino, CF from Saint John to Santiago, and I fell in love with the Camino. Four months later I went back and walked the CVDLP from Sevilla to Santiago, but struggled due to the pain I developed in my left knee.

Not wanting to quit, I took ibuprofen to get me through some days. Two days after getting back home I had an MRI and found that I had very little meniscus left, and had also developed fractures in my tibia. I went to five orthopedic surgeons, four recommended a full replacement, and one recommended a partial replacement. Not wanting surgery, I ended up walking with a knee brace for a year hoping it would heal somewhat, and hopefully just have a partial replacement.

During that time I was pretty miserable because I missed walking, and the Camino. I finally decided to have the replacement on January 9th of this year. Going from walking hundreds of miles to using a walker was very sobering. And yes, the rehab was not pleasant, but I wanted to get back to living life, and the Camino, and I made sure I did what the physical therapist and doctor told me to do. Much of my recovery was in my head.

Almost four months to the day after my replacement, May 11, I started walking the Camino de Madrid to Santiago (445 miles). I originally chose the Madrid learning that it was not so steep, other than cross the mountains just outside of Madrid. I connected with the CF in Sahagun and by then I had worked through the worries about my knee. I made sure that I stopped and listen to my body by starting off slow. I slowly picked up my own comfortable pace and finished in Santiago in about 27 days of walking.

The first two weeks I had some stiffness and swelling at the end of the day, and a little pain but no real bad pain. I took ibuprofen to help reduce the swelling when I felt I needed it. The doctor had said swelling was fairly normal for a year or so.

One of the lessons I have learned from my knee replacement is that I just have to be better at listen to what my body is telling me. Everyone is different, so you can’t necessarily do the same thing as others. For me, having the replacement has allowed me to get back to living life. At 67, I look forward to many, many, more treks and adventures, especially on the Camino.

Best wishes, and Buen Camino,
Ted
 

martin1ws

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Somport to Finisterre Jul-Aug 2018
#20
... Hips can be eaten without seeds as they are, but I found LITOMOVE Nyponpulver. ...
There seems to be some evidence for the positive effects of rose hips, e. g.:
(with uses and side effects)
https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-839/rose-hip
https://www.arthritis.org/living-wi...natural/supplements-herbs/guide/rose-hips.php

And I like it that so many pilgrims can report from positive knee replacement results...

Good luck, @Robo!
Buen Camino (hopefully in some months and hopefully more or less free of pain) !
 

gerip

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2018
#21
Bilateral knee replacements, R 2011, L 2013. Right knee had a much better recovery than the left, but just returned from walking the first half of the Camino from Lourdes to Burgos a few weeks ago. Everyone's experience is different, after the first 24 hours, there wasn't much pain for me, but it did take months before I felt completely comfortable walking on concrete, etc. Walking down steep hills was problematic before & after surgery, but uphill no problems. Everyone's right about the physio afterwards, maybe it's even more important than the actual surgery. But again, I wish I had gotten the surgery when it was first proposed, rather than waiting until my doctor practically yelled at me to get it done. I postponed for maybe five years because folks told me how painful the surgery and recovery was, and in the end that wasn't my experience at all.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino complteted (2015)
#22
I am starting to realise that my knees might be totally screwed up. After three Caminos walking overweight. Arthritis and torn meniscus might cause ongoing troubles.

My doctor warned that a knee replacement can be very painful.

Anyone had one? What was your before and after experience?
Robo.
I walked the 500 mile Camino Frances in 2015 with both HIPS resurfaced in metal due to Arthitis. The Operations were in 2010 and it was great. Look up my book on Amazon " SANTIAGO ON TWO FEET" My wife had a full knee replacement 12 months ago and within 2 days of the operation the new knee was great and No pain at all. She is now planning her other knee op!
Ally
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances #1 by bike Pamplona to SdC May - June, 2014...(duration 14 days). CF # 2 May, 2015 SJPdp to SdC on foot (duration 40 days)...planning for #3.
#23
I am 65 and had my (L) total; knee replacement a year ago, my right one was worse, it was done (tkr) a year before that. Prior to my knee replacements I walked from StJPdP to Santiago in 40 days (with 2 rest days), that was in 2015. It was difficult for me going down hill without much cartiledge left, uphill was ok. My walking poles were invaluable. I look forward to walking another Camino in the next year or so, with my wife. Do the rehab well, like it's your life depending upon it. Good luck with the knees.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugues March 2019
#24
I am starting to realise that my knees might be totally screwed up. After three Caminos walking overweight. Arthritis and torn meniscus might cause ongoing troubles.

My doctor warned that a knee replacement can be very painful.

Anyone had one? What was your before and after experience?
Knee replacements are miracles most of the time! I've been a nurse for years and have talked with a lot of patients and friends and relatives who had them done, often both at once. Most people do extremely well and return to all of their previous activities within 2-3 months. However, one problem can play havoc with your recovery. If indeed you weigh too much (#40 over your ideal weight for instance), it will not be as easy a recovery. Think about weight reduction before having that surgery. It will make your healing much faster and with a lot less discomfort. You will take pain pills but usually light ones like Tylenol #3's or extra-strength Tylenol for a few weeks, but heavy-duty pain pills won't be necessary after a week or two at the most for most people. There are always risks with every surgery, and age of course is also a factor in speedy recovery, but having two working knees again (as with hips) can make your life worth living again! I have rarely talked with anyone who had their painful knees replaced who didn't think eventually they were far better off with the new ones. Good luck!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Walked the France
#25
Hi there
I had both replaced two years ago was pretty hard three weeks in hospital because I am diabetic as well did CF with bad knees very painful did Norte 18 month after opp it was a breeze I think walking in a pool is the best exercises after the opp
Will go on the de la Plata in March next year can't wait
Cheers buen Camino
 

Tony Bobcat

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017
#26
I am starting to realise that my knees might be totally screwed up. After three Caminos walking overweight. Arthritis and torn meniscus might cause ongoing troubles.

My doctor warned that a knee replacement can be very painful.

Anyone had one? What was your before and after experience?
Hi Robo
After a fantastic flawless Camino back in 2017 I returned last May along with my wife to do the Camino again, as yourself I thought that I had meniscus issues with my left knee prior to leaving. My symptoms were .... after sitting for a lengthy time my knee would be sore and I would be limping for awhile until,it warmed up, after that I was fine. It was painful at night time 6 mths prior to the Camino.
We were fourteen days in when my knee really started aching really badly, on our last day we got as far as Castrojeriz the last kilometre was so painful that I knew that my Camino was over.
We spent the rest of our time in Finisterre and Santiago, upon returning back to Australia my specialist advised me that a knee replacement was required
Nearly eight weeks after surgery the knee is still slightly painful especially when trying to sleep at night. I have started walking on average about 13 km daily with no issue, trying to build my strength up once again. My suggestion is to find a good surgeon and make you you attend physiotherapy this really helps recovery.
Best of luck
Tony
 

KariC

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Caminho portugûes (2016)
#27
I am starting to realise that my knees might be totally screwed up. After three Caminos walking overweight. Arthritis and torn meniscus might cause ongoing troubles.

My doctor warned that a knee replacement can be very painful.

Anyone had one? What was your before and after experience?
I had a knee replacement (one knee) in 2014 biked for 7 days in Ireland six months later, then hiked the Camino in 2016.

VERY VERY successful replacement - the keys are prehab and rehab. Get in the best shape possible - including, if appropriate, losing weight, but get your legs as strong as possible before the surgery so you can do the rehab. Then do the rehab and keep doing it.

The surgery and recovery were far less painful than I'd feared. I think I was off the prescription painkillers within a couple weeks.

Suerte, y buenos caminos!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese (2015)
Primitivo (2018)
#28
I am starting to realise that my knees might be totally screwed up. After three Caminos walking overweight. Arthritis and torn meniscus might cause ongoing troubles.

My doctor warned that a knee replacement can be very painful.

Anyone had one? What was your before and after experience?
Yes, I had two complete knee replacements in 2017 (3 months apart) after having completed the C. Portuguse from Lisbon in 2015. In 2016 I could hardly walk ½ mile with my dogs without pain which was the reason for going through with the surgery. After both replacement operations I was walking with crutches within two days and was able to give up the crutches after about two weeks. After both operations I had only one day of pain between the declining effects of the anesthesia and the start of other painkillers which worked excellently and from which I did not have any side effects.

Afterwards took 6 months to get back into shape gradually walking greater distances each week; one longish and two short walks each week. Starting late April 2018 set out to walk the Primitivo starting from Oviedo.

Some days were very tough in many cases arriving at albergue around 5-6pm. After staying night in San Román de Retorta started for Melide but was forced off the road into the drainage ditch by speeding motorist who did not stop - luckily I was not hit. I twisted my right knee rather badly and ended up in Lugo hospital where I had excellent care from very competent medical staff. Eventually made it home where I had a rebridement operation and now just finishing several months on antibiotics and seem to have made a full recovery.

Summary of this experience - 1) knee operations worked well for me with minimal post-operational disruptions; 2) with suitable post-operation training was able to tackle one of the physically demanding routes without undue pain or stress except for lateness of arrival at albergues; 3) need to take care to avoid a sudden, violent slippage, 4) better to have a constant companion.

I am 76 years old and intend to go back in 2019 and finish the last 85km to Santiago.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Norte and Frances Sept 6 - Oct 11, 2016
#29
I had a
I am starting to realise that my knees might be totally screwed up. After three Caminos walking overweight. Arthritis and torn meniscus might cause ongoing troubles.

My doctor warned that a knee replacement can be very painful.

Anyone had one? What was your before and after experience?
knee replacement at 68 and it’s great. I climb mountains, volcanoes and did the Norte. No problems. But you must religiously do the therapy. I also had it done at home in Guatemala and surgeon was excellent and care in the hospital 10 times better than in the US
 
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