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New member - Senda Litoral & Coastal route

2020 Camino Guides

Salpal

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to walk Coastal Camino in May 2020
Hello all. I am a new member that is planning to experience this amazing walk in May 2020.
I would like to start off along the Senda Litoral from Porto but then join into the Coastal route. I do apologise if this is either a silly question or has been asked before but how will you know when to 'cross over' to the other route?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugues May 2019
Most people cross over at Vila Do Conde on the coast to Arcos. There has been a lot said on this forum about the route being hazardous due to having to walk along the road with heavy traffic and fast drivers. I avoided that by taking a taxi from VdConde to Arcos for 5 euro. I went mid May this year and had beautiful weather, needing my poncho only once and the wild flowers were blooming like crazy. There were a fair number of pilgrims also walking both routes but I had lots of time alone on the way, yet with a feeling that if I needed help someone would be along shortly. Shortly after Pontevedra I crossed over to the Spiritual Variant and highly recommend it. I would suggest to break up that stage by staying at Combarro a lovely seaside village with an beautiful old town. It is the last place to buy food before a long hike up the mountain to Armenteira. The spiritual Variant also has the boat ride up the estuary from Vilanova de Arousa to Pontecesures/Padron. Not to be missed.
 

alipilgrim

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Listed in my signature
There isn't any "crossing over" necessary. The Senda Litoral and Coastal route shadow each other the whole way, with the Coastal often swerving up inland for the day, but rejoining the "coast" and therefore the same towns/albergues for most of the route. I just walked it in May and it was glorious! I stuck as close to the beach as I could and thoroughly enjoyed every step. Below is a snapshot of the routes from www.caminador.es website which shows all the routes in detail. The Green is the Senda, the red is the Coastal. Note: most often the arrows will be for the Coastal but there's lots of signs indicating the Senda route too. 58682
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
Most people cross over at Vila Do Conde on the coast to Arcos. There has been a lot said on this forum about the route being hazardous due to having to walk along the road with heavy traffic and fast drivers. I avoided that by taking a taxi from VdConde to Arcos for 5 euro. I went mid May this year and had beautiful weather, needing my poncho only once and the wild flowers were blooming like crazy. There were a fair number of pilgrims also walking both routes but I had lots of time alone on the way, yet with a feeling that if I needed help someone would be along shortly. Shortly after Pontevedra I crossed over to the Spiritual Variant and highly recommend it. I would suggest to break up that stage by staying at Combarro a lovely seaside village with an beautiful old town. It is the last place to buy food before a long hike up the mountain to Armenteira. The spiritual Variant also has the boat ride up the estuary from Vilanova de Arousa to Pontecesures/Padron. Not to be missed.
I think that is the cross over from the Senda Litoral to the Central, not to the Coastal, as the OP is asking about.
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
Hello all. I am a new member that is planning to experience this amazing walk in May 2020.
I would like to start off along the Senda Litoral from Porto but then join into the Coastal route. I do apologise if this is either a silly question or has been asked before but how will you know when to 'cross over' to the other route?
As has been pointed out, there are several points where you can switch from one to the other. One common place to do so is Vila do Conde. I accidentally did so in Vila Cha (or just after).

There are a couple of ways to tell that you've switched over to the Coastal (whether by accident or on purpose). The most obvious is that you will lose sight of the ocean as the route swings inland for a bit. Less obvious but there if you look carefully are camino signs and markers that will say in small letters under the arrow and stylized shell "Caminho Portugues da Costa".

Here are a couple of examples from just before Vila do Conde when I ended up on the wrong route (less beaches and boardwalks, more cobblestones).

 

Salpal

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to walk Coastal Camino in May 2020
Thank you all. So looking forward to it. I know it's still a whole year to go but I've started to train and already have a packing list :)
 

Kurt walters

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Santiago (2018)
Hello all. I am a new member that is planning to experience this amazing walk in May 2020.
I would like to start off along the Senda Litoral from Porto but then join into the Coastal route. I do apologise if this is either a silly question or has been asked before but how will you know when to 'cross over' to the other route?
Thank you all. So looking forward to it. I know it's still a whole year to go but I've started to train and already have a packing list :)
I also am planning to walk the same Camino in May of 2020. I walked the Camino France last summer and had a wonderful time and experience. Maybe we can be in touch before and walk together if the timing is the same.
 

formysons

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Roncesvalles - Santiago 2009; Portuguese, Ingles, Finesterre and Muxia - 2019.
As has been pointed out, there are several points where you can switch from one to the other. One common place to do so is Vila do Conde. I accidentally did so in Vila Cha (or just after).

There are a couple of ways to tell that you've switched over to the Coastal (whether by accident or on purpose). The most obvious is that you will lose sight of the ocean as the route swings inland for a bit. Less obvious but there if you look carefully are camino signs and markers that will say in small letters under the arrow and stylized shell "Caminho Portugues da Costa".

Here are a couple of examples from just before Vila do Conde when I ended up on the wrong route (less beaches and boardwalks, more cobblestones).

As has been pointed out, there are several points where you can switch from one to the other. One common place to do so is Vila do Conde. I accidentally did so in Vila Cha (or just after).

There are a couple of ways to tell that you've switched over to the Coastal (whether by accident or on purpose). The most obvious is that you will lose sight of the ocean as the route swings inland for a bit. Less obvious but there if you look carefully are camino signs and markers that will say in small letters under the arrow and stylized shell "Caminho Portugues da Costa".

Here are a couple of examples from just before Vila do Conde when I ended up on the wrong route (less beaches and boardwalks, more cobblestones).

Hi, so is the CP da Costa same as Coastal route, just another name?
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
Hi, so is the CP da Costa same as Coastal route, just another name?
I believe Caminho Portugues da Costa is the Portuguese name for the Coastal route.

I guess the Portuguese authorities prefer to write their signs in Portuguese rather than English. Portugal has a long history of good and close relations with England, but that will only go so far. :)
 
Last edited:

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
You can also join the central route after Caminha or Vigo. Good way making on both
And, you can switch over in the other direction, from the Central to the Coastal. I read about one person who walked the Senda Litoral out of Porto to Vila do Conde, then switched to the Central at Arcos and walked the Central to Valenca, then switched back to join the Coastal route at Caminha and walked the Coastal up to Redondela. They said that gave them about half on the coast and half on the central, and they preferred the Spanish part of the Coastal for more dramatic scenery. It is something I am considering for my next Caminho Portugues.
 
Having done both routes, that does sound like a great option, David Tallan, would give the best of both. Barcelos and Ponte de Lima are lovely, and you could stay at Fernandas, which is also a highlight. On the coastal Oia and Baiona were our favourite stops.
 

Tarina N

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino portuguese 2020
You learn something every day! Peregrina2000 posted this in another thread:
You know, all of you could add your start dates to the calendar and then it would be easy for anyone to see who is starting when. These threads tend to sink down to the bottom and then get lost, but the Calendar is always there!

Once you are on the calendar, any forum member can easily contact you by clicking on the entry on the calendar. Here are Ivar’s instructions on how to do that https://www.caminodesantiago.me/com...your-camino-to-the-new-camino-calendar.30392/
 

Indiana Mike

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
none, first time 2020
There isn't any "crossing over" necessary. The Senda Litoral and Coastal route shadow each other the whole way, with the Coastal often swerving up inland for the day, but rejoining the "coast" and therefore the same towns/albergues for most of the route. I just walked it in May and it was glorious! I stuck as close to the beach as I could and thoroughly enjoyed every step. Below is a snapshot of the routes from www.caminador.es website which shows all the routes in detail. The Green is the Senda, the red is the Coastal. Note: most often the arrows will be for the Coastal but there's lots of signs indicating the Senda route too. View attachment 58682
Alipilgrim, can you tell where the parts along the coast are difficult, i.e., rocks, too much sand. We are walking this year and want the SL but wouldnt be able to do very challenging rocks and sand.
Thanks, Mike
 

alipilgrim

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Listed in my signature
Hi, sorry for the late response. There were three instances I believe, where there was sand walking. One or two were rather significant in distance but I just walked slowly, trying to stick to tufts of grass as much as possible for traction (not Leave No Trace, I know, but necessary for my hip). In another case, I just used the app Maps.me to look for farm tracks/side roads to find away around the missing boardwalk sections.

If you're interested, there's some pictures on my blog: www.allisonswanderlust.travel.blog, I think the sandy bits start on my Day 4: https://allisonswanderlust.travel.blog/2019/05/01/day-4-amorosa-20-8-kms/.
 

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