A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement


Buy any book, get free camino shell

LIVE from the Camino Nick and Wendy on the Primitivo

Camino(s) past & future
Francés (Spring '17)
Primitivo (Spring '18)
TBD (2019)
#1
Edit: Most of what I posted in this thread is now available in blog form at this link, if you prefer to read it that way.

Right now we’re in the pre-Camino stage as we prepare to start walking on Friday. Last night we left Lisbon on the overnight train to Madrid. The Oriente station in Lisbon was quite beautiful as night fell on the city:

3E3C2A99-522E-448F-B395-A3257976EDDE.jpeg

Today we ate our way around Madrid and tomorrow we have a 7:05am train to Oviedo, which will give us the chance to spend the afternoon exploring Oviedo, a city we’ve never been to.

We’re excited about starting but the weather forecast sure doesn’t look good!

A08B3D12-2FE4-4877-8784-7A256FA5EC11.png
 
Last edited:
#2
Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain! Those are just some prognostications designed to make you deliriously happy when all you get are a few sprinkles. ;)

Wishing you a wonderful camino -- love that Calatrava train station, though it doesn't offer much protection from the elements.

I know vegans don't eat cheese, but if you ever were tempted, Asturias would be the place to do it. I always have a few mixed cheese plates when I'm there and have decided that La Peral is the best blue cheese in the world. Buen camino, Laurie
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (Spring '17)
Primitivo (Spring '18)
TBD (2019)
#3
Thanks Laurie, I hope you’re right about the weather! And I’ll just have to take your word about the cheese ;)
 
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
#4
Another point about being a vegetarian in Spain...it ain't easy... For the most part, they do not consider any meat that is not red as being meat, per se.

To a Spaniard, meat means beef. So be careful when you order something. Chorizo (pork sausage is a garnish in soups and salads, including bean and pasta dishes), chicken and fish are not "red" ergo, they cannot possibly be 'carne.' Just sayin...;)

On the other hand, and if you eat eggs and cheese (some vegetarians do), an excellent source of protein is the Spanish tortilla. It is a flaked potato and egg pie sometimes with added cheese. Just be mindful that "Tortilla Espanola" contains bits of ham mixed in.

Personally, after the first several hours of walking each day a good cup of Spanish coffee (oxymoronic as all Spanish coffee rocks!) plus a slice of Spanish Tortilla hits the spot.

If you search the forum for "vegetarian" or "vegan" you should come up with many articles contributed by others on these subjects.

Hope this helps.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (Spring '17)
Primitivo (Spring '18)
TBD (2019)
#5
@t2andreo, thanks so much for taking the time to reply with these tips. Fortunately we have already traveled widely in Spain as vegans, including on the Camino, and despite Spain’s reputation for not being veg-friendly, we have never had any difficulties and have always eaten well here. Hopefully our good fortune continues on the Primitivo!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (Spring '17)
Primitivo (Spring '18)
TBD (2019)
#6
Day 0: Madrid to Oviedo

After less than five hours of sleep following a dinner out with friends last night, we stumbled out of our hostal in Madrid at 6:20am for the 7:05 train to Oviedo. The scenery on the stretch from León to Oviedo - mountains, cliffs, gorges, valleys - was spectacular, and if that’s what you see on the Salvador, then I’m sold for next time!

In Oviedo, we went straight to the cathedral to pick up our credenciales and shells, which made us feel like pilgrims again.

BB563A52-FFB6-4CB0-A139-98A2E438FEBE.jpeg

The highlight for me in the cathedral, perhaps surprisingly, was not the Cámara Santa but the contemporary 9th-century crypt underneath it, accessible from the impressive Gothic cloister. There’s something about the small size, dim lighting and austere architecture of crypts that has always really appealed to me, and this was no exception!

50281344-A19B-4209-A7E4-67DA6EC0DA13.jpeg

We also visited San Julián de los Prados with its beautiful ninth-century paintings, San Tirso el Real opposite the cathedral and the Foncalada fountain.

Another highlight of the afternoon was discovering the Bulevar de las Sidrerías with all its cider bars. We picked an atmospheric one called El Ferroviario and enjoyed a bottle of cider poured from a height in the local style, a great way to pass some time while waiting for the Albergue Salvador to open at 4pm.

389ED554-321C-49E3-BAD6-FE2DC5EF77EC.jpeg

So after an exciting Day 0, we’ll see what Day 1 has in store for us tomorrow! Fingers crossed for no rain, or at least not much.
 
#7
If you liked Ssn Julian de Lis Prados, prepare to be totally bowled over by the Naranco sites. I don’t know how the timing will work since I don’t think they open till 10 or 11, but you will be awed if you can take the time to visit the interiors. Fingers crossed for good weather!!!

And kudos to you two for enjoying sidra. I enjoy the entire social ritual surrounding its consumption, but I just can’t find a way to enjoy the taste. And I have really tried!!!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Inglés (from Ferrol June 2014)
Camino Portuguese (from Tui May 2015)
#8
Just be mindful that "Tortilla Espanola" contains bits of ham mixed in.
I actually have found it quite rare that tortilla española has meat in it in Galicia, but @t2andreo must know of some good spots that do! The basic, most common, recipe is just potatoes poached in olive oil, then incorporated with beaten eggs and salt. Many times onion too (there seems to be a basic premise in Spain that you are either for or against the onion in tortilla, you must choose a side! That being said, I like it both ways!).
 
#9
(there seems to be a basic premise in Spain that you are either for or against the onion in tortilla, you must choose a side! That being said, I like it both ways!).
When my son was enrolled in a corse for foreigners in Oviedo, one of the questions on an early culture quiz was to name the three ingredients in a tortilla española. As he had had many tortillas made by friends in Madrid with a definite opinion on this topic, he wrote "eggs, potatoes, and olive oil." Onlly after determined arguing did he get credit for the question. The correct answer for the prof was that the three ingredients were "onion, eggs and potatoes."
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015); Camino Norte/Primitivo (2016); Camino Frances (2017); Le Puy (June 2018)
#10
Great photos and writing style @jungleboy. I will look forward to your reports along the way. Having walked this route in 2016, I will enjoy reliving some of my memories while reading your narative.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (Spring '17)
Primitivo (Spring '18)
TBD (2019)
#11
Day 1: Oviedo to Escampleros (via Naranco) - ~17km

We had braced ourselves for rain, and rain we got. It was not an auspicious beginning but we put on our ponchos and set out from Oviedo anyway.

The two Naranco churches (and Santa Maria de Naranco in particular) were fabulous and well worth the detour, although the conditions for outdoor photography were obviously not great. Looking out from the inside, the mist seemed a lot more atmospheric than when we were walking in it!

5A96CB0F-7E91-4A96-AA29-933852F46515.jpeg

After Naranco, thankfully, the rain more or less stopped for the rest of the day. We were glad to reach Lampaxuga and join the main trail, which made us finally feel that we were on the Primitivo. (As a side note, I’m surprised the Naranco alternative is not further promoted and/or signposted.)

The traditional lavandería at Loriana and the forest shortly before Escamplero were the other memorable things on the walk.

After a short day to ease ourselves back into the Camino, we’re now in the albergue at Escamplero with a lovely American family of seven, an interesting and talkative Swedish man and a quiet German woman.

On to day two!

P.S. Thanks @Camino Chris for the kind words!
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (Spring '17)
Primitivo (Spring '18)
TBD (2019)
#12
And kudos to you two for enjoying sidra. I enjoy the entire social ritual surrounding its consumption, but I just can’t find a way to enjoy the taste. And I have really tried!!!
I must say that the first sip was a bit of a shock as it’s nothing like the commercial cider we’re used to. But I think I acquired the taste pretty quickly!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Norte (2018)
#13
Love your post. We are a couple of days behind you. Having a rest in Oviedo tomorrow after turning in from the Norte. Starting Primitivo proper on Sunday. Will follow your progress with interest.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (Spring '17)
Primitivo (Spring '18)
TBD (2019)
#14
Thanks @perfectday. I recommend the Naranco sites, either on your day off or on the alternative route out of Oviedo. Also, if you’re planning to stay overnight in Grado, it’s really worth going the extra 4-5km to the albergue at San Juan de Villapañada, which is peaceful and has beautiful views.

You’ll also probably come across the American family of seven in 2-3 days as they’re pretty much doing half stages (the youngest child is eight). Say hello to them for us!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (Spring '17)
Primitivo (Spring '18)
TBD (2019)
#15
Day 2: Escamplero to Villapañada - ~17km

We walked in heavy rain from Escamplero all the way to Grado, which took a bit longer than three hours, including a detour to the Roman Baths after Premoño. We’re both former Roman tour guides so we’ll stop for anything Roman, and while these baths weren’t particularly noteworthy, it was nice to have something like that to break up the squelchy slog that was our morning.

We also walked for a time with the American family of seven who we met yesterday, and they seemed in good spirits despite the rain.

We arrived in Grado at about 11am, had some tea to warm up, and stocked up on two meals’ worth of groceries for the albergue at San Juan de Villapañada.

For the last hour or so to Villapañada, it stopped raining and the mist cleared, giving us much better views of the nearby rolling hills and the distant mountains. This was probably the most enjoyable part of the trail so far, and we stopped for a while to watch this young colt.

EA514787-8341-4B64-B2D5-A6EA38EAB04E.jpeg

The rural albergue in Villapañada is extremely peaceful, with beautiful views, and it’s definitely worth continuing here from Grado. For a while we were the only ones here but there are about 10 pilgrims here now.

85D5557C-C1D6-46BF-9ADA-DA4C5F68E56D.jpeg

Finally, I somehow ripped a huge hole in the front of my (only) hiking pants, so I’ll have to try to replace them at the next decent-sized town. At least my poncho covers the hole, so tomorrow’s rain might be more appreciated than today’s was! ;)
 
Last edited:
#16
Day 2: Escamplero to Villapañada - ~17km
Finally, I somehow ripped a huge hole in the front of my (only) hiking pants, so I’ll have to try to replace them at the next decent-sized town. At least my poncho covers the hole, so tomorrow’s rain might be more appreciated than today’s was! ;)
Well, that might mean waiting till Lugo, which has a Decathlon and a couple of other stores. I once shredded a pair of hiking pants sliding down a hill through total scrub "maleza", but was lucky to find a little hiking store in Potes, the next town, where I got a new pair. I could not have walked in those, poncho or no poncho!

A quick search shows that Tineo boasts a "tienda de deportes", so you might get something there. http://www.regalabien.com/tiendas/t...en-travesia-jesus-evaristo-casariego-30-tineo

Good luck, and I knew nothing about Roman baths near Premoño, so I learned something new about the Primitivo today!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (Spring '17)
Primitivo (Spring '18)
TBD (2019)
#17
Thanks for the Tineo tip Laurie! That’s two days away so we’ll see if I can hold on until then...

The baths are signposted 200-300m off the camino to the left about a kilometre past Premoño. There’s a small village (not sure of the name) with a café and a church, and the baths are next to the church.

33772B2E-FF20-488C-A7F4-78483287E834.jpeg
 
Camino(s) past & future
July 1, 2015
#18
I am so happy to hear about they primitivo,daily. We are headed out July 17 after our hospitalero stint. Have you had to have reservations for places to stay or are you just getting your albergue as you arrive?
 
#19
Thanks for the Tineo tip Laurie! That’s two days away so we’ll see if I can hold on until then...

The baths are signposted 200-300m off the camino to the left about a kilometre past Premoño. There’s a small village (not sure of the name) with a café and a church, and the baths are next to the church.

View attachment 42977
How cool! They are on my list for next time (along with the castro fort and museum after Grandas de Salime). I assume you know about Santa Eulalia de Bóveda on the day out of Lugo. Very short detour and easy to get back to the camino without backtracking (though I didn't know that when I went). Juanma of the Ferreira albergues has a good post about it. https://www.alberguesdeferreira.com/2015/02/primitive-way-santa-eulalia-de-boveda/?lang=en

And while I am at giving advice, I think the easiest way to visit Santa Eulalia is to make a reservation at either A Nave (modern post-industrial sleek in a sheed) or Ponte Ferreira (old stone house oozing charm). Juanma runs both of them, and both serve a great communal dinner. Then you won't have to worry about any crowds, and you are also well positioned to skip over some of the Camino crush the net day, by sleeping at Boente, in between the madhouses in Melide and Arzua. Yes, I know, you are still quite a bit away from that point! Enjoy, and I hope the weather improves for you. Buen camino, Laurie
 
Camino(s) past & future
Norte (2018)
#20
Thanks @perfectday. I recommend the Naranco sites, either on your day off or on the alternative route out of Oviedo. Also, if you’re planning to stay overnight in Grado, it’s really worth going the extra 4-5km to the albergue at San Juan de Villapañada, which is peaceful and has beautiful views.

You’ll also probably come across the American family of seven in 2-3 days as they’re pretty much doing half stages (the youngest child is eight). Say hello to them for us!
Will definitely keep an eye out for them and say hi!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (Spring '17)
Primitivo (Spring '18)
TBD (2019)
#21
I am so happy to hear about they primitivo,daily. We are headed out July 17 after our hospitalero stint. Have you had to have reservations for places to stay or are you just getting your albergue as you arrive?
Thanks! We aren’t making reservations but July might be a different story.

I assume you know about Santa Eulalia de Bóveda on the day out of Lugo.
Yes I do, but only because I’ve seen you talk about it in other threads! That seems a long way away but we’ll definitely see it. Thanks for the practicalities!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (Spring '17)
Primitivo (Spring '18)
TBD (2019)
#22
Finally, I somehow ripped a huge hole in the front of my (only) hiking pants, so I’ll have to try to replace them at the next decent-sized town. At least my poncho covers the hole, so tomorrow’s rain might be more appreciated than today’s was! ;)
The Camino provides. I thought the hole was beyond repair, but American pilgrim Donna did an amazing job of mending it for the very fair cost of a glass of wine. I just wish I took a ‘before’ photo too!

5F334FB3-ABCE-497E-8F8A-FA6A5AE602DF.jpeg
 

Aurigny

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés, 2016; Português Central, 2017; Port. Interior, 2017; Primitivo, 2018; Port. Coastal, 2018.
#23
There's a pretty good shop in the main street of Castroverde, on the left-hand side as you pass through, with lots of shoes, raingear, poles and other hiking requisites. Admittedly that's very nearly the greater Lugo metropolitan area, but if somebody needed, say, a pair of shoes as a matter of urgency, they're obtainable there.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (Spring '17)
Primitivo (Spring '18)
TBD (2019)
#24
Day 3: San Juan de Villapañada to Bodenaya - ~28km

After yesterday’s rain, we braced ourselves for more but the camino was kind to us today and it didn’t rain at all. We set out at 7:20am and walked about 28km, a big step up from the first two days. Thankfully, Wendy, who has plantar fasciitis in both feet, has finally found insoles that work and she is largely pain-free.

EEB9332A-8FF7-4BF5-8471-48FB6BEDCE92.jpeg

It was a beautiful walk today with a lot of the trail going through forests and alongside little rivers. Like Galicia, the greenery in Asturias is really something.

5F6F1ED8-7ECA-43A7-B2EC-A601C8BACA33.jpeg

We didn’t see much of historical interest today but we were happy to just enjoy the nature and not walk in the rain.

Now we’re resting at the fabulous albergue in Bodenaya, waiting for the communal dinner at 8pm. There are at least three other vegetarians/vegans here tonight so we’re looking forward to seeing what they can make for us!
 
#25
Day 3: San Juan de Villapañada to Bodenaya - ~28km

After yesterday’s rain, we braced ourselves for more but the camino was kind to us today and it didn’t rain at all. We set out at 7:20am and walked about 28km, a big step up from the first two days. Thankfully, Wendy, who has plantar fasciitis in both feet, has finally found insoles that work and she is largely pain-free.

View attachment 43021

It was a beautiful walk today with a lot of the trail going through forests and alongside little rivers. Like Galicia, the greenery in Asturias is really something.

View attachment 43020

We didn’t see much of historical interest today but we were happy to just enjoy the nature and not walk in the rain.

Now we’re resting at the fabulous albergue in Bodenaya, waiting for the communal dinner at 8pm. There are at least three other vegetarians/vegans here tonight so we’re looking forward to seeing what they can make for us!
So glad you had a beautiful day. Every time I’ve eaten at Bodenaya, lentils and tortilla española were on the menu. Delicious! But that was when it was still Alex’s place. Let’s see if David continues the tradition.

I was so sad that this year on the Mozarárabe I had no opportunity to eat lentils, but my friends in Madrid at the end made sure I got my fill. :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (Spring '17)
Primitivo (Spring '18)
TBD (2019)
#26
So glad you had a beautiful day. Every time I’ve eaten at Bodenaya, lentils and tortilla española were on the menu. Delicious! But that was when it was still Alex’s place. Let’s see if David continues the tradition.
No lentils tonight. Instead we had a lovely meal of pasta salad and sopa de ajo with potatoes and white beans.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (Spring '17)
Primitivo (Spring '18)
TBD (2019)
#27
Day 4: Bodenaya to Campiello - ~24km

No real rain again today, although there was a lot of mud on the way to Tineo which we had to slog through. We walked through a lot of fog and mist in the morning but that has just become a normal part of the Primitivo for me now. It’s already hard for me to imagine this camino ever having blue skies and full visibility.

6D99B551-5FDE-40D0-BB31-50573D3F3EF0.jpeg

That said, around midday, I briefly saw something for the first time on the Primitivo: my own shadow. Yes, we had about 15 minutes of sunshine which warmed the soul and the feet. Around this time we also saw some fun snails!

E59F0EA9-7F13-45FC-9BCD-7F0263ED4B0E.jpeg

We’ve been walking on and off for the last two days with a great group of pilgrims who are, for now, doing the same stages. The combination of this group and the incredibly welcoming nature of the Bodenaya albergue last night has meant that the spirit of the camino is alive and well, and shining as brightly as it ever has for us.

Tomorrow most of us are going via the Hospitales route as the forecast seems similar to the last two days. ¡Buena suerte a nosotros!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (Spring '17)
Primitivo (Spring '18)
TBD (2019)
#28
Day 5: Campiello to Berducedo (via Hospitales) - ~ 29km

Six of us set off together at about 7am this morning with five others about 15 minutes ahead. There hadn’t been rain the previous two days and none was forecast today, so we all decided to go for the Hospitales route.

It was foggy, as it has been for the entire Primitivo, but before we really started climbing the visibility was still pretty good. As always, the beautiful greenery of Asturias was on display.

C8298BA2-3B1E-494B-ABD9-0B993DE56EB7.jpeg

As we climbed it got foggier, but never so much that it caused way-finding difficulties. We stopped for some snacks at the second of the ruined pilgrim complexes with 5-6 others who we have been walking with for several days now, and had a nice moment reflecting on the history of the camino.

After we passed the third ruin, most of the fog lifted and we had decent views of the surrounding mountains as we started the decent. The tiny village of Montefurado (population: 1) was a highlight, although we were pretty tired by then with nearly 8kms still to go.

EE99D9A1-E50C-4E49-8673-5DD2CD192C43.jpeg

We made it to the albergue Casa Marquez at Berducedo at about 4:15pm and tonight we’re having a pasta party in the albergue with 10+ pilgrims, so that should be fun!

We’re hoping to make it to Castro tomorrow but we’ll see how we feel when we reach Grandas.
 
Last edited:
#29
Those are gorgeous pictures! I have always thought that Montefurado would be a great place for an albergue. Sort of like San Juan de Villapaada. With no stores, no bars, and no restaurants, it seems like its financial viability would be assured if meals and drinks were also served. There are also other paths leading from Montefurado for afternoon walks, so even if it is a short stage, there would be plenty to do!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (Spring '17)
Primitivo (Spring '18)
TBD (2019)
#31
Day 6: Berducedo to Castro - ~26km

Another great day on the Primitivo in similar conditions to the last four days: fog, mist, thick cloud cover, but no real rain.

Just before Buspol, a sign alerted us to a fire that took place in April 2017. There is a detour that is encouraged, but since it is nearly 2km longer, a group of us decided to take the regular route anyway. And we’re very glad we did, because the burnt out forest with spring wildflowers growing in it was a hauntingly beautiful sight.

28F760EC-C4DE-4CA7-BC0D-CB5B8D816458.jpeg

We reached Grandas in time for lunch and decided to press on to Castro so we could see the ruins there. We called ahead and got the last two beds in the albergue in Castro, and made it in time to rest up a bit and then go on the 5:30pm guided tour of the ruins.

We were the only two people on the tour, and it was well worth it. The main site dates from the 6th century BC as a fortified Iron Age settlement, with Roman modifications in the first two centuries AD before it was mysteriously abandoned.

9E5D0FD5-038B-41A3-B8F0-2103EDC89F86.jpeg
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (Spring '17)
Primitivo (Spring '18)
TBD (2019)
#32
Day 7: Castro to Fonsagrada - ~20km

Because we did the extra 5km yesterday from Grandas to Castro, that meant today was our shortest day for a while. Since it’s our wedding anniversary, that’s fine by us! (Last year we only did 9km on our anniversary on the Francés and spent the day in Logroño.)

I didn’t find the trail especially interesting today but passing into Galicia is always a special moment, which a few of us celebrated with photos.

9B5540D7-CBDA-4E52-A6CA-E24CBA49F47F.jpeg

Later, the distance to Santiago passed below 155.5km, which I think means we’re now more than halfway through the Primitivo.

Fonsagrada is really the only option for a place to stay in these parts. We’re at the Albergue Cantábrica in a private room, and we got upgraded to a very nice one (by our crummy standards) because of our anniversary. The camino provides, again!
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (Spring '17)
Primitivo (Spring '18)
TBD (2019)
#33
I assume you know about Santa Eulalia de Bóveda on the day out of Lugo. Very short detour and easy to get back to the camino without backtracking (though I didn't know that when I went).
Now that we have a better idea of our schedule, unfortunately we’re going to miss this church. We’ll be in Lugo Saturday and Sunday (rest day) nights, and the church is closed on Mondays.

Another reason to return to the Primitivo some other time!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (Spring '17)
Primitivo (Spring '18)
TBD (2019)
#34
Day 8: Fonsagrada to O Cádavo Baleira - ~25km

We started late today (about 8am) and for the first 2.5 hours this morning, we walked in the rain - the first real rain for six days. I arrived at the Casa Méson in Paradavella to find a few pilgrim friends sitting down and in good spirits. Barcelona pilgrim Carles bought some wine with him so we had a welcome glass at 10:30am. Along with tea and some breakfast (the Galician attempt at pan con tomate), it made for a great stop with great people, and it kept me in high spirits for the rest of the day.

C50B5575-6E30-42FF-B602-C80355E98967.jpeg

The day passed quickly, it didn’t rain again, and I felt good physically after feeling a bit lethargic yesterday.

Later, after we had arrived in O Cádavo Baleira, the sun came out for an extended period (30-ish minutes) for the first time since we arrived in Oviedo nine days ago. I went outside to try to take some photos but this isn’t a pretty town. This is the best I could do: a typically white and grey Galician building in storm light.

30482E38-7149-495A-A9BF-E874F5D0BE04.jpeg
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (Spring '17)
Primitivo (Spring '18)
TBD (2019)
#35
Day 9: Cádavo Baleira to Lugo - ~30km

Our longest day on the Primitivo, and our first day of walking in extended sunshine. We left at about 8am and arrived in Lugo just before 4pm.

It was lovely to walk in the sun for a change and to change headwear from buff to hat. There were some nice little stretches of forest along the way and the walk was mostly flat and pretty easy, though there was a bit of asphalt walking.

We stopped for lunch in a clearing in a forest, and I took a photo of Romanian pilgrim Cornelia as she walked past us. This is one of my favourite photos from the Primitivo so far.

169439D3-95CF-400C-A52D-DAC02D374545.jpeg

I’ve wanted to visit Lugo since I first heard about it around 10 years ago, because of the walls. And I finally made it! It was still mostly sunny when we arrived so I was able to get some decent shots including this one in the ‘late afternoon’ light (9pm).

19901C6C-1450-4F6E-8B03-2A33BE662267.jpeg

We’re taking a rest day in Lugo on Sunday before tackling the last 100km and hopefully arriving in Santiago on Thursday.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (Spring '17)
Primitivo (Spring '18)
TBD (2019)
#36
Day 10: Lugo (Rest Day)

We enjoyed our rest days in Burgos and León on the Camino Francés last year so we always planned to take one in Lugo this time around.

It was a pretty lazy day, although we did walk the full circuit of the Roman walls and visit the interpretation centre for the walls, which contained three interesting short films. A lot of the other sites were closed on Sunday afternoon but we didn’t mind as it allowed us to rest up for the last four days of walking. Unfortunately I’m coming down with a cold but hopefully I did enough today (soups, teas and cough drops) to limit the damage. I’ll find out tomorrow...

Meanwhile, some images of Lugo:

4D85377F-F741-4B79-8D12-07D0BAD35691.jpeg

790D9D01-9124-4F2C-8A62-CAD3F4EA59D0.jpeg

95EDF1E5-0457-4DAA-8777-53AA95916F10.jpeg
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (Spring '17)
Primitivo (Spring '18)
TBD (2019)
#37
Day 11: Lugo to Ferreira - ~26km

Day 12: Ferreira to Boente - ~26km

There isn’t much to say about the last two days, really. Today we walked in the rain all day, and yesterday we did a fair bit too. I’ve had a head cold and some sort of Achilles problem (swelling, soreness), so it hasn’t been a great way to wind down the Primitivo. There’s also been a lot of road walking, but mostly it’s the rain that is getting to me. We actually had a pretty good run avoiding heavy rain for most of the Primitivo in Asturias, but Galicia has been less kind to us.

Two more days to Santiago.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (Spring '17)
Primitivo (Spring '18)
TBD (2019)
#38
Day 13: Boente to Santa Irene - ~23km

After yesterday’s tough day, today was much better. We woke up refreshed after having a dormitory to ourselves last night at Os Albergues in Boente, a side benefit of our strategy to desynchronise from the main stages of the Francés.

There was some light rain today, but not much. Walking with dry feet/shoes after yesterday was much appreciated. There didn’t seem to be many people on the trail compared with our expectations, but that may have been due to our desynchronisation and/or a lower number of Spanish last 100km pilgrims than usual due to the long-term weather forecast.

In any case, it was an easy and pleasant day with some nice forest scenery.

375B2179-8115-4CCE-A77C-92BEFB4E1A70.jpeg

Albergue Santa Irene is our last albergue on the Primitivo as we’ll be in a pensión in Santiago. So far it looks like a great alternative to O Pedrouzo with its small capacity and nice bedding.

DC901F38-9F39-495D-80A4-E22D79166E48.jpeg

On to Santiago tomorrow! Rain is in the forecast but perhaps that will be an appropriate way to end this camino...
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (Spring '17)
Primitivo (Spring '18)
TBD (2019)
#40
Yes we did - the Ponte was full when we called at 9am so we reserved at the Nave instead. It was a great place actually but that was the height of my cold so I couldn’t really enjoy it much. The group paella had seafood in it so instead they made us a chickpea stew which was very good!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (Spring '17)
Primitivo (Spring '18)
TBD (2019)
#41
Day 14: Santa Irene to Santiago - ~23km

We left shortly after 7am so we could reach Santiago at a reasonable hour for lunch (which we did, and I recommend Petiscos for their veggie menu).

By the time we reached O Pedrouzo after 3km, we well and truly hit the Francés crowds that we’d mostly managed to avoid the previous two days. All our Primitivo friends were ahead of us (though not by as much as we thought) owing to our rest day in Lugo, so we just walked steadily, not stopping or talking much. There was some light rain but nothing we couldn’t handle after our pretty wet Camino.

The view of Santiago from Monte de Gozo was mostly obscured by fog - somewhat appropriate given the foggy nature of the first half of the Primitivo.

We arrived to find quite a bit less scaffolding on the cathedral than last year, which was nice.

AD3420F1-B9BA-4754-BA71-B4229BDFA107.jpeg

When we arrived, midday mass was just finishing up and we saw some of our companions from the Primitivo, which was great. We had already arranged to meet several more in the evening and in the end there were more than 20 of us. Full confession: I don’t know three of the people in the photo. But of the others, countries represented are USA, CAN, FRA, GER, SVK, KOR, ENG, DEN and AUS.

B76A624A-79A7-4037-AA81-B484C5D27F64.jpeg

We had a great evening reminiscing about our Caminos and pondering our next ones.

Today we’re resting up in Santiago before taking the bus home to Lisbon tomorrow.
 
#42
Today we’re resting up in Santiago before taking the bus home to Lisbon tomorrow.
Congrats, Nick and Wendy, and thanks so much for the posting. It's always fun to see these caminos through others' eyes.

If I were you, I would hit my head with a hammer and hope I pass out after getting on that bus to Lisbon. Maybe it has changed since I last did it in 2005, but it was awful. I particularly remember the 45 minute stop at one of those highway rest areas. But hey, you are filled with the glow of the Camino, so maybe it will be painless for you!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (Spring '17)
Primitivo (Spring '18)
TBD (2019)
#43
Thanks for the warning! But we once took an 81-hour bus in West Africa, so I’m sure we’ll be fine with 9.5 hours in Spain/Portugal ;)

We would have preferred the train, all things being equal, but there are only two connections per day for Santiago-Vigo-Porto-Lisbon, and one of them leaves Santiago at 6am, and the other leaves in the afternoon and doesn’t get you to Lisbon on the same day. Neither of those appealed much so we decided on the bus, which is also cheaper.
 
Last edited:


A few items available from the Camino Forum Store




Advertisement

Booking.com

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 9 1.2%
  • February

    Votes: 4 0.5%
  • March

    Votes: 34 4.4%
  • April

    Votes: 112 14.6%
  • May

    Votes: 188 24.6%
  • June

    Votes: 54 7.1%
  • July

    Votes: 15 2.0%
  • August

    Votes: 12 1.6%
  • September

    Votes: 228 29.8%
  • October

    Votes: 93 12.2%
  • November

    Votes: 11 1.4%
  • December

    Votes: 5 0.7%
Top