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Non-religious staying at Auberges

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baker_999

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
None!
I'm cycling the Camino Madrid in a few weeks but am non-religious and doing it purely for leisure and enjoyment. I respect I'm not a pilgrim, in this respect, and would be eligible for the 'certificate of welcome' - but what's the 'protocol' for me in terms of getting stamps, staying in auberges - am I eligible/welcome there, or are places reserved strictly for walking pilgrims? I have ordered a credencial via the post and just realised I'm not a 'propper' pilgrim , so wanted to get some feedback from the forum...

Thanks,
 
Camino(s) past & future
Jul-Sept 2019: Ruta Asturianos Lebaniego / Apr 2018 Asturias / May 2016 CP: Portuguese
I am SO thankful that you have at least ASKED! This is being respectful.

As I see it, you are looking to enjoy a spectacular vacation which just happens to be on a religious (Catholic) pilgrimage, which has roots for over one thousand two hundred years. I would treat this as a vacation and not use a credential (pilgrim passport) nor, would I use any manner of Municipal Pilgrim lodging.

I hope you have a wonderful time in Spain!!!
:)
ps...this is just, my humble opinion.
 
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dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2012, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011
Being non-religious, whatever that might mean, does not mean you will not undertake the journey in an attitude of search. Were this to be so, you would have as much 'right' to a credencial as any other person.

Further, while @RumAndChupacabras' view might reflect a strict, literal reading of the necessary considerations described in the credencial, I think that you would be one of very few who let that deter them from using albergues.
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
I'm cycling the Camino Madrid in a few weeks but am non-religious and doing it purely for leisure and enjoyment. I respect I'm not a pilgrim, in this respect, and would be eligible for the 'certificate of welcome' - but what's the 'protocol' for me in terms of getting stamps, staying in auberges - am I eligible/welcome there, or are places reserved strictly for walking pilgrims? I have ordered a credencial via the post and just realised I'm not a 'propper' pilgrim , so wanted to get some feedback from the forum...

Thanks,
Hi, baker. . .

The issue really isn't one of being religious, as there are lots of pilgrims who are seeking something that they hope to find as they journey who are not religious at all. I really appreciate that you are being honest by stating up front that you are essentially taking a bicycle riding vacation which happens to be on a Camino route.

It is up to you to do whatever you think is right, but using the inexpensive accommodations of an alburgue can mean that those who DO wish to undertake a Camino as a pilgrimage, and are depending on the availability of a pilgrim's inexpensive lodging, may be left out of a bed.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
It is up to you to do whatever you think is right, but using the inexpensive accommodations of an alburgue can mean that those who DO wish to undertake a Camino as a pilgrimage, and are depending on the availability of a pilgrim's inexpensive lodging, may be left out of a bed.
In areas where beds are in short supply I tend to reserve private rooms, and leave the albergue beds to those who are on a tighter budget than I am.
 

Robo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
Go for it, and enjoy........

Well, according to the official statistics, 11% of Pilgrims who received a Compostela (certificate issued by the Pilgrim office in Santiago) in April undertook the Pilgrimage for purely 'Cultural' reasons, not religious.

So I would suggest that not only is it OK to use Pilgrim facilities and carry a Pilgrim Passport, but it gets the seal of approval of the Cathedral in Santiago ;) (because they were issued a Compostela)

On your journey you will meet people of many faiths and no 'formal' faith.
They are one big family on Camino.....as they should be in every day life.
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
It seems as though as long as one is using a Camino path as a method for leisure and enjoyment, in pursuit of touristic sight seeing, then alburgues should be open to all as budget accommodations. Cool. :cool: This will probably help with the bottom line for the facilities, too.

I wonder if baker sought out the opinions on some of the other Camino sites, like APOC and the Confraternity as well. I'd be curious how other site's members view the same question as the OP.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015
Some albergues make bicylists wait until later in the afternoon to check in assuming that the cyclists have a better chance of finding accommodation if they fill up with walkers. In the hot weather most walkers like to finish by 2:00. You shouldn't feel much guilt about checking in at 4:00 unless the place has to turn away others afterwards. In that case you could volunteer to move on.
 
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MinaKamina

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Jacobspad 2017
I'm cycling the Camino Madrid in a few weeks but am non-religious and doing it purely for leisure and enjoyment. I respect I'm not a pilgrim, in this respect, and would be eligible for the 'certificate of welcome' - but what's the 'protocol' for me in terms of getting stamps, staying in auberges - am I eligible/welcome there, or are places reserved strictly for walking pilgrims? I have ordered a credencial via the post and just realised I'm not a 'propper' pilgrim , so wanted to get some feedback from the forum...

Thanks,
Well, you don't know what you may or may not become by going through the motions.
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
In areas where beds are in short supply I tend to reserve private rooms, and leave the albergue beds to those who are on a tighter budget than I am.
I tend to do that as well. I think of it as one way for me to give back to the Camino what it has given me, allowing others who are in need to be blessed in that same way. :)
 

Lindy Lou

Member
Camino(s) past & future
September 2018 Portuguese, VDLP September 2019
I'm cycling the Camino Madrid in a few weeks but am non-religious and doing it purely for leisure and enjoyment. I respect I'm not a pilgrim, in this respect, and would be eligible for the 'certificate of welcome' - but what's the 'protocol' for me in terms of getting stamps, staying in auberges - am I eligible/welcome there, or are places reserved strictly for walking pilgrims? I have ordered a credencial via the post and just realised I'm not a 'propper' pilgrim , so wanted to get some feedback from the forum...

Thanks,
Golly gosh. Half the fun was collecting the stamps (Sello btw) along the way. When you get home you can look at your “Pilgrim Passport” and reflect on all the kind cafe / bar / hostel / pop - up bars owners who were cheering you on. Even if you’re not ( in your opinion ) a propper pilgrim don’t miss out on this wonderful experience. What I particularly love about the Camino is how the locals embrace it. They design their own Sello ( some are truly works of art) and so proudly stamp your passport. One hostess even gave me a “post it note” to make sure the ink on her stamp didn’t smudge the next page. AND that was my first Sello. It was all good from that day on. Buen Camino baker 👍🏻 ☺
 
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Michael-FL

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Caminho Portugues (2017)
Frances/Salvador/Primitivo (2021)
Well, you don't know what you may or may not become by going through the motions.
To echo what Mina said, I would venture to say there are many pilgrims who walk the Camino in search of who they are and where they are - spiritually and/or religiously. I believe there are no coincidences and things do happen for a reason. You just don’t know what they might encounter along the “way” - and for some it may be a turning point in their lives. The early monasteries and refugios were COMMANDED to welcome all pilgrims. We should do the same.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (July 2016), Primitivo (July 2018), Portuguese (March 2019)
I'm cycling the Camino Madrid in a few weeks but am non-religious and doing it purely for leisure and enjoyment. I respect I'm not a pilgrim, in this respect, and would be eligible for the 'certificate of welcome' - but what's the 'protocol' for me in terms of getting stamps, staying in auberges - am I eligible/welcome there, or are places reserved strictly for walking pilgrims? I have ordered a credencial via the post and just realised I'm not a 'propper' pilgrim , so wanted to get some feedback from the forum...

Thanks,
Hi Baker

The pilgrim statistics for April this year split 50% religious/cultural, 39% religious and 11% cultural. I have chosen to assume that religious equates to Catholic whilst cultural equates to non Catholic and non religious whilst the combination equates to those of other faiths and those with a philosophical/spiritual approach to the Camino. I suspect that you’d qualify as cultural but given your thoughtfulness in posting I rather suspect that like the majority of pilgrims you’d more likely fall into the religious/cultural category. So I suggest that you do make full use of the credencial, perhaps waiting until the latter half of the afternoon to give pilgrims on foot the opportunity to get a bed as suggested by davebugg. I hope and suspect that having experienced the warmth of the Camino experience your doubts on status will quickly and quietly resolve themselves.

Buen Camino
 

DonnaS18

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sept (2018)
From “A Guide to the Camino de Santiago”
Although cycling is a relatively new way to undertake the Camino de Santiago it is an excellent choice for those who want to experience as much of ‘The Way’ as they can in a shorter time frame. Cycling the Camino is an accepted way to complete a Pilgrimage and your credencial stamps are as valid as a walkers are. You need to cycle the Camino de Santiago for at least 200km to earn your Compostela when you reach Santiago – so start from no closer than Ponferrada and once you hit the hills of the Cantabrian mountains you’ll feel you’ve really earned it!


.. that being said...
As per anywhere be respectful of pedestrians who have the right of way on trails.
Some walkers do get quite annoyed when cyclists zoom by them, ringing bells and shooting up dust.
Sometimes the road is more suitable for bikes than the trail- the locals can probably guide you- or a bike app.
You don’t have to be Catholic (many perhaps most aren’t) but hopefully you’ll end up having a spiritual adventure.
Buen Camino
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
So I would suggest that not only is it OK to use Pilgrim facilities and carry a Pilgrim Passport, but it gets the seal of approval of the Cathedral in Santiago ;) (because they were issued a Compostela)
Were they issued a Compostela, or "welcome certificate" which is given to those who don't walk for religious or spiritual reasons?
 

HeidiL

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2004-), Portugués, Madrid, 4/5 Plata, 1/8 Levante, 1/8 Lana, Augusta, hospitalera Grado.
How would you define "spiritual"?

I walk to have some time off from my everyday life while thinking about why we're here, who we are, how to behave towards others, what is "right".
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
Are you not a 'proper pilgrim'? Without breaking forum rules re religious posts - just being theoretical here ...
if there is one intelligence, one God, universal, that manifests this universe and is interested in it and there are 'special' or 'sacred' places and he calls certain people to go to them .. then surely all who arrive on Camino, for whatever reason they think they are there for, are 'called'?

and, probably without quite knowing why, they have answered .... surely so .... ??

As for refugios and pilgrim passports - the pilgrim passport is a record of your journey towards Santiago and St James .. it is also necessary for staying in refugios. It isn't the Spanish Inquisition, no one would be rude enough or dogmatic enough to question why you are on Camino and/or if you are 'genuine'- whatever they think that may be and there are no other requirements to stay in a refugio other than having a current pilgrim passport.
Though what you do with that passport on arrival in Santiago is a question that you must answer from deep within your heart.
and were I to be you I would be quite prepared to give up my bed to another in more need, as I am sure you would too.

Crikey - I have met Buddhists and Jews on Camino - let alone atheists and agnostics - not been aware of certified pagans yet ;).

I remember asking an old Irish catholic priest, a Monseigneur, if it was ok to attend his church, me being Unitarian and therefore heretic - his answer? "Sure, come on in, all are welcome here, heretics and all"

So don't fear being judged - it is a specifically Christian concept that we do not judge.

so Buen Camino!

p.s. - relax, enjoy, have fun .. maybe go into a church or two? and no one will arrive from the Spanish inquisition when you present your pilgrim passport ;)

 

The Kolbist

Member
Camino(s) past & future
past: Frances, inland Portuguese, Fatima
future: Del Norte, coastal Porugues, Englis
Hi, baker. . .

The issue really isn't one of being religious, as there are lots of pilgrims who are seeking something that they hope to find as they journey who are not religious at all. I really appreciate that you are being honest by stating up front that you are essentially taking a bicycle riding vacation which happens to be on a Camino route.

It is up to you to do whatever you think is right, but using the inexpensive accommodations of an alburgue can mean that those who DO wish to undertake a Camino as a pilgrimage, and are depending on the availability of a pilgrim's inexpensive lodging, may be left out of a bed.
This is really true... if one's intent is to cycle and happens to use the trail on the Camino, it would probably a good idea (some say ethical?) to give the bed space to the camino pilgrims whose intent is to walk/cycle the camino... I'm just gonna throw this out there... I have a lot of friends who wants to go and do pilgrimage to the holy places of Europe but they're not walking and use any transpo (trains, bus, etc) to get to these holy places, should they use the credentials so they can avail the cheap accommodations of the Camino.... if a non-pilgrim cyclist can avail the albergue for the Camino pilgrims, should the non-Camino pilgrims be able to avail the same albergues?... just my 2 cents...
 

Bala

Veteran member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: SJPdP-Burgos, (2015); Burgos-Sarria (2018); Sarria-Santiago (2018).
Frances (2020)
Under the individual listings in Gronze, there is a tag "exclusive to pilgrims?" Some say "yes", others say "no, but oriented to pilgrims", and others say "no".

Anyone concerned about whether or not they are overstepping certain protocols could use that as a guide.
 

jmcarp

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2013
Camino del Norte a Chimayó (USA), 2015
Camino Portugues, 2017
Hi, baker. . .

The issue really isn't one of being religious, as there are lots of pilgrims who are seeking something that they hope to find as they journey who are not religious at all. I really appreciate that you are being honest by stating up front that you are essentially taking a bicycle riding vacation which happens to be on a Camino route.

It is up to you to do whatever you think is right, but using the inexpensive accommodations of an alburgue can mean that those who DO wish to undertake a Camino as a pilgrimage, and are depending on the availability of a pilgrim's inexpensive lodging, may be left out of a bed.
Well said, Dave. That pretty much agrees with my thoughts.
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
How would you define "spiritual"?

I walk to have some time off from my everyday life while thinking about why we're here, who we are, how to behave towards others, what is "right".
In today's modern context, 'Spiritual' seems to have several variations of meaning apart from organized religion. But it does seem to have a central nexus that includes an individual's specific and directed focus on experiencing something which could be described as a 'sacred dimension'. A seeking.

The description on the Credencial does not disregard the spiritual seeker, it includes them. The OP gave specific information as to the purpose of his travel and he asked if what he wants to do - based on his recreational pursuits - conflicts with the purpose behind using pilgrim accommodations. He did not state anything about a spiritual aspect for his travel. I simply take him at his word and do not choose to read anything into his answer because he was very interested in being honest about the purpose of his trip in asking for our assessment.

The Credencial's inclusion of the definition of qualification provides an answer to his question.
 
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CharlieWart

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Via de la Plata (2018)
There are three things: a welcome certificate, compostela (religious) and certificate of distance (non-religious, for a few Euro). I ran the Camino last year and being non-religious, definitely wanted only the certificate of distance, not the compostela -- you get to fill in the register with your motives. Though I was erased from the register and not given a certificate of distance because doing the last 100km+ in one day wasn't considered a proper "peregrenation"! No idea about the accommodation etiquette though (as I didn't stay anywhere).
 

Helen O'Shaughnessy

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Via dela plata, via Francigena
This is really true... if one's intent is to cycle and happens to use the trail on the Camino, it would probably a good idea (some say ethical?) to give the bed space to the camino pilgrims whose intent is to walk/cycle the camino... I'm just gonna throw this out there... I have a lot of friends who wants to go and do pilgrimage to the holy places of Europe but they're not walking and use any transpo (trains, bus, etc) to get to these holy places, should they use the credentials so they can avail the cheap accommodations of the Camino.... if a non-pilgrim cyclist can avail the albergue for the Camino pilgrims, should the non-Camino pilgrims be able to avail the same albergues?... just my 2 cents...
I’ll just throw my two cents in here, ANYONE walking or cycling the Camiño should be welcome in the Refugio’s etc. Pilgrims on buses etc clearly no, because without walking or cycling or riding a horse, they simply don’t qualify.
 

Seamus68

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Apr 2017
Camino Del Norte April 2018
Camino Frances - St Jean to Burgos 2019
I'm cycling the Camino Madrid in a few weeks but am non-religious and doing it purely for leisure and enjoyment. I respect I'm not a pilgrim, in this respect, and would be eligible for the 'certificate of welcome' - but what's the 'protocol' for me in terms of getting stamps, staying in auberges - am I eligible/welcome there, or are places reserved strictly for walking pilgrims? I have ordered a credencial via the post and just realised I'm not a 'propper' pilgrim , so wanted to get some feedback from the forum...

Thanks,
According to the Official Pilgrim website as long as you travel with
Christian sentiment then this is ok. You don’t have to be a Christian
Just the practice of been a good human being...

So you can choose any Albergue you want , who are we to judge what Christian
Sentiment is. But on a note say their was one bed left , and you saw an exhausted
Pilgrim, I know what I would do. Also try and reserve as you go ahead
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
According to the Official Pilgrim website as long as you travel with
Christian sentiment then this is ok. You don’t have to be a Christian
Just the practice of been a good human being...So you can choose any Albergue you want , who are we to judge what Christian Sentiment is.
Two things are getting mixed up in this thread: getting a Compostela and staying in donativo, parochial and municipal albergues, i.e. any albergue that is not a privately run albergue which is often geared to foot (or bicycle) pilgrims but not exclusively for pilgrims of any sort.

In recent years, the management of the Santiago Cathedral has succeeded in cornering the market for credencials, so to speak.

To get a Compostela, you are supposed to do your pilgrimage in a spiritual quest where spiritual means Christian. It says so in the Cathedral approved credencials. You don’t get tested, though.

To stay in a municipal albergue you have to be a pilgrim. What that is is not clearly defined. It has nothing to do with religion. You are staying in an albergue financed and subsidised by the tax payers money of a secular state. Presenting your credencial is sufficient proof that you are pilgrim according to their requirements.

To stay in a parochial albergue ... I don‘t really know the implicit requirements. My guess would be that in true Christian tradition they would welcome the stranger, independent of his or her spiritual or religious affiliation.

Donativos can shape their rules as their sponsors see fit.
 
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MichelleElynHogan

Veteran Member
I'm cycling the Camino Madrid in a few weeks but am non-religious and doing it purely for leisure and enjoyment. I respect I'm not a pilgrim, in this respect, and would be eligible for the 'certificate of welcome' - but what's the 'protocol' for me in terms of getting stamps, staying in auberges - am I eligible/welcome there, or are places reserved strictly for walking pilgrims? I have ordered a credencial via the post and just realised I'm not a 'proper' pilgrim , so wanted to get some feedback from the forum...

Thanks,
Hey Baker,

Like anything that has some kind of structure or rules, the individual has to have respect for that set of rules and be willing to live by them for them to be effective in their life. In that respect, seek out the Ten Commandments and see how many you are living by right now. But I have to tell you, if you are living by 7 or more of 10, you may be Christian. Honestly, I find the word, "religion," being used by more people telling me they are spiritual but not religious a lot more than those who live a religious life. It has lost its use as an effective word.

Now, the Camino is really all about respect. And it is all created, or not, by those silly little bipedal entities out for a 5 week walk or 3 week ride, regardless of their motivation. But be forewarned, some who embark on the Camino, purporting to be non-religious come home with a much different outlook, and start seeking a Church Family, upon their return home. Regardless, enjoy the journey.
 

Walking Lover

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CdS from Leon to Santiago, June 16, 2016 to June 30, 2016.
I'm cycling the Camino Madrid in a few weeks but am non-religious and doing it purely for leisure and enjoyment. I respect I'm not a pilgrim, in this respect, and would be eligible for the 'certificate of welcome' - but what's the 'protocol' for me in terms of getting stamps, staying in auberges - am I eligible/welcome there, or are places reserved strictly for walking pilgrims? I have ordered a credencial via the post and just realised I'm not a 'propper' pilgrim , so wanted to get some feedback from the forum...

Thanks,
Just have the credential and your shell. No one asks questions.
 

The Kolbist

Member
Camino(s) past & future
past: Frances, inland Portuguese, Fatima
future: Del Norte, coastal Porugues, Englis
I’ll just throw my two cents in here, ANYONE walking or cycling the Camiño should be welcome in the Refugio’s etc. Pilgrims on buses etc clearly no, because without walking or cycling or riding a horse, they simply don’t qualify.
The point i’m making is that the albergues in the camino were provided for the pilgrims. If one doesnt consider oneself a pilgrim then he or she should give priority to pilgrims walking, bicycling or horseback riding in the albergues.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
I'm cycling the Camino Madrid in a few weeks but am non-religious and doing it purely for leisure and enjoyment. I respect I'm not a pilgrim, in this respect, and would be eligible for the 'certificate of welcome' - but what's the 'protocol' for me in terms of getting stamps, staying in auberges - am I eligible/welcome there, or are places reserved strictly for walking pilgrims? I have ordered a credencial via the post and just realised I'm not a 'propper' pilgrim , so wanted to get some feedback from the forum...

Thanks,
Reading all of the responses I think you already got a huge GO whether you'll be on a vacation or a "pilgrimage".

I would just add two things.
First you posted this in Camino de Madrid section and there would likely be no shortage of beds. But IF the albergue would be full you'll have your bike and cycling an hour further down the Camino won't be a problem. Even on other more populated Caminos walkers have priority taking beds over cyclists up to certain hour.

Second. My experience. On my last few Caminos I was walking with International Brigades flag from Spanish Civil War on the front of my Castro cap which clearly indicated my quite leftist political beliefs and I had no problems whatsoever. Never. I even got into very interesting debates (twice with priests) about it. And when asked how come that a liberal is undertaking Christian pilgrimage I answered that in religious sense (if I really must determine myself) I'm a pagan and if they (Christians) prey with their hands I prey with my feet. A few odd glances at first and then a lot of laughs and shoulder tapping.

Don't worry, just go and have a ball!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Jul-Sept 2019: Ruta Asturianos Lebaniego / Apr 2018 Asturias / May 2016 CP: Portuguese
I'm cycling the Camino Madrid in a few weeks but am non-religious and doing it purely for leisure and enjoyment. I respect I'm not a pilgrim, in this respect, and would be eligible for the 'certificate of welcome' - but what's the 'protocol' for me in terms of getting stamps, staying in auberges - am I eligible/welcome there, or are places reserved strictly for walking pilgrims? I have ordered a credencial via the post and just realised I'm not a 'propper' pilgrim , so wanted to get some feedback from the forum...

Thanks,
PLEASE...before you reply, READ and attempt to comprehend exactly what the O.P. exactly posed.
@baker_999 was more than considerate, polite, charming and ever so thoughtful in regard to even ASKING about this.

btw...
baker_999
New Member · From London
Joined Apr 26, 2019
Last seen Monday at 12:10 PM
 

Hobbyhorse

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (Sept 2014)
I think the respect and consideration the poster's question reveals makes a great start on being in the open-hearted mindset of an evolving 'accidental pilgrim'. If you really want to avoid that and have a better a touristic vacation, there is a reason to avoid albergues. They are locked and lights-out at 10 pm, which often makes it hard to access the full glories of Spanish restaurants. Except for less inspiring 'pilgrim menus' most restaurants time main operations to cater to local Spainards, late diners, compared to pilgrims. Relaxed Spanish dining or any night life wll leave you locked out of your non-commercial pilgrim albergue, but (My experience is only on the Frances however)
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
PLEASE...before you reply, READ and attempt to comprehend exactly what the O.P. exactly posed.
@baker_999 was more than considerate, polite, charming and ever so thoughtful in regard to even ASKING about this.

btw...
baker_999
New Member · From London
Joined Apr 26, 2019
Last seen Monday at 12:10 PM
Who exactly are you addressing with this post? I can't figure it out because you are quoting the OP (post) which would be answering by exactly the same OP (poster)... And then again why would the OP (poster) re-read his OP (post)??? o_O
 

janeen

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sept 2015 sept 2018
I'm cycling the Camino Madrid in a few weeks but am non-religious and doing it purely for leisure and enjoyment. I respect I'm not a pilgrim, in this respect, and would be eligible for the 'certificate of welcome' - but what's the 'protocol' for me in terms of getting stamps, staying in auberges - am I eligible/welcome there, or are places reserved strictly for walking pilgrims? I have ordered a credencial via the post and just realised I'm not a 'propper' pilgrim , so wanted to get some feedback from the forum...

Thanks,
The albergues are for anyone who is walking the camino. The credential also makes a wonderful keepsake at the end. I have walked the Camino all 800km and didn't even enter the cathedral at the end in Santiago. Formal religion is not my thing, i would rather feel God, the universe or whatever people prefer to call the creative force in a forest or in nature. . You are still a pilgram in the sense that you still go through an internal journey as well as a physical journey. Stay in the albergues , get your credential and enjoy your journey. The camino is a great lesson in embracing diversity. If only the world could be more like life on the camino we would be a world of peace.
 

hecate105

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2009 Portuguese Estellas 2014 Aurelia 2016 St Davids 2017 Via Augusta/V dl P. 2018 Michael Mary Way
You ARE a pilgrim, motivation can vary, and by undertaking pilgrimage all sorts of things can change... (I rented out my house and live in a shed now... so I can walk/cycle more!) After the journey you may well have changed several things in your mind and life... You may become a serial pilgrim like many on here....
If you are on a budget - then use the albergues - that is what they are there for. There are other ways than financial to 'payback' your experiences.... being a tolerant person, helping other pilgrims, travellers, strangers in a strange land... If there were a survey I would think that people who have undertaken pilgrimages are probably more considerate, compassionate, empathic and kind than they were before.... :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) Portugues(2013)
San Salvador (2017) Ingles (2019)
I have just taken a screenshot of a photo posted by @david1. is this of any use to you in finding an answer to your question?
Screenshot 2019-05-13 at 10.05.08.png
 

CaroleH

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
VdlP 2006, Portugues 2007;Madrid 2009, Finisterre 2009; Sur and VdlP 2011,2013; Manchego and Madrid 2014; VdlP (parts) 2016; Hospitalero plan 2017.
If only the world could be more like life on the camino we would be a world of peace.
Wonderful sentiment Janeen.
 

Marbe2

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 SJPD to Burgos
2017 Leon to Santiago
Pamplona to Santiago Mar. 2018
Burgos - SCDC (Oct 18)
I have walked seven Caminos to date...and entered SdC 6 times.
I only requested a Compostela once. Now, we get stamps from places we do not have. We stay in private albergues and hostels which are private and not much more costly than bunking in a public facility.

You clearly want to do what is right...by raising the question of eligibility to stay in a public Albergue in the first place. Ride in peace!
 

hecate105

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2009 Portuguese Estellas 2014 Aurelia 2016 St Davids 2017 Via Augusta/V dl P. 2018 Michael Mary Way
:)
and what was it written on the wall at Roncevalles...?
something about welcome all - christian, moor and pagan....
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
In recent years, the management of the Santiago Cathedral has succeeded in cornering the market for credencials, so to speak.
This got me thinking ... the credencial identifies you as a pilgrim.

The contemporary credencial is an invention of French and/or Spanish associations. Eventually, all sorts of actors issued their brand of credencial and the SdC Cathedral management stepped in and stated that only holders of credencials approved by them will get a Compostela at the end of the way. So now we have only credencials issued by the Cathedral themselves and by a number of associations in various countries such as France, Germany, Italy, USA, Australia and so on; their design has to be approved by the Cathedral.

You get a credencial without much ado and it identifies you as a pilgrim to the albergues.

But how Christian is your credencial? The Cathedral‘s credencial is explicit: it is only for those who go on pilgrimage in the Christian sense, with a Christian attitude (solo .... con sentido cristiano), although they include those who are „searching“ (the lost sheep who need to be guided to the way back, I guess). Of course, it’s all in Spanish so I suppose many credencial holders never read this and are not even aware of this requirement.

Many associations are secular and I get the impression that there‘s nothing like this condition in their credencials, just the odd old Christian prayer or good wish. Is that impression correct? A bit of a fudge, isn’t it? ☺
 

Purky

The Dutch guy
Camino(s) past & future
Reality is frequently inaccurate
Is that impression correct?
Just checked my Dutch credencial, and as you suspected: no mention of 'con sentido cristiano' or comparable religious requirements. It does state that the purpose of the credencial is for a "traditional pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela". And the "May God reward you!" to whoever helps, supports or shelters the owner of the credencial also points in a Christian direction.
 

lizlane

Small Town Girl, Small Town World
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2019
To echo what Mina said, I would venture to say there are many pilgrims who walk the Camino in search of who they are and where they are - spiritually and/or religiously. I believe there are no coincidences and things do happen for a reason. You just don’t know what they might encounter along the “way” - and for some it may be a turning point in their lives. The early monasteries and refugios were COMMANDED to welcome all pilgrims. We should do the same.
I disagree. Pilgrims numbers in those days are not what they are today. And those monasteries and refugios operating on the principle of charity were likely more well-staffed (which means more funding from Rome) in that time. People who are using support vehicles as with tours are requested by the Church not to present their credencial for admittance to the discounted places that @Kathar1na so eloquently and accurately described in her post. It is stated in the links Davebugg provided. It's on your passport. In an ideal world I would agree whole-heartedly with you. But someone is absorbing the costs of such charity and that sacrificed cannot be minimized or discounted.

This is really true... if one's intent is to cycle and happens to use the trail on the Camino, it would probably a good idea (some say ethical?) to give the bed space to the camino pilgrims whose intent is to walk/cycle the camino... I'm just gonna throw this out there... I have a lot of friends who wants to go and do pilgrimage to the holy places of Europe but they're not walking and use any transpo (trains, bus, etc) to get to these holy places, should they use the credentials so they can avail the cheap accommodations of the Camino.... if a non-pilgrim cyclist can avail the albergue for the Camino pilgrims, should the non-Camino pilgrims be able to avail the same albergues?... just my 2 cents...
Exactly. The Way is open to all but if you are not walking with the intent of OPENESS to the spiritual experiences you may or may not have, then the ethical thing to do is wait to take your vacation when you have the money to pour into the local economy. Someone is absorbing those costs of providing you with discounted shelter, discounted meals. Let's say you are a confirmed and unashamed atheist. I know plenty of "spiritual" atheists in 12-Step meetings. They can recover. They can have spirit-filled experiences. They can present their pilgrim passports all they want if they decide to do the Camino. But they are still very different from our OP who states plainly this is a vacation and nothing more. The original poster is to be praised for his honesty and I want to know this person! So maybe stay a few times for the experience and do hotels and private facilities for the regular practice of where to lay their head.
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
I'm a pagan and if they (Christians) prey with their hands I prey with my feet.
@KinkyOne
I do not normally pay much attention to spelling on this forum, but perhaps you might consider the meaning of "prey" in English, as I doubt this is your intention.
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
@KinkyOne
I do not normally pay much attention to spelling on this forum, but perhaps you might consider the meaning of "prey" in English, as I doubt this is your intention.

Hahaha - Mind you, a female Praying Mantis does become a Preying Mantis when she has sex ;) (she bites the head off the mail as a climax). :eek:
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
@KinkyOne
I do not normally pay much attention to spelling on this forum, but perhaps you might consider the meaning of "prey" in English, as I doubt this is your intention.
Of course it was a typo :D
It happens regularly to me being non-native English speaker and fast on the keyboard.
Thanks for correcting me, I meant "pray"(ing).
 
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KinkyOne Camino de Madrid 6
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Non-walking day on Camino de Madrid?

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