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Luggage Transfer Correos

...On Being Short...

Camino Badges

KJFSophie

My Way, With Joy !
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2014 & 2015 ),Via San Francesco, Italy (2017 )Camino Portugese (2018 )Camino Ingles(
I've often thought there should be a special certificate to acknowledge all the extra effort required of a short person walking the Camino. Walking alone requires 3 steps to every single step of the tall ones. The least little series of stones to ascend is akin to climbing a steep mountain. There is no such thing as a quick jump over a puddle for someone short in stature, the result of any leap generally lands in the water. Let's talk climbing all those stairs!!!! What about having to climb into a top bunk...even worse, trying to get down. And then there's the ever present awful seat at every mass/blessing because it is impossible to see anything over the heads of the hoards. At any bar that has no queue, it's the tall ones who are served and the short ones ignored. When it comes to clothing, we need to pay for shortening the length of pants and all shirts fit like a dress. The one advantage is our clothes weigh less and the length of sleeping bags are hardly an issue. I'd like to think our efforts are three times those of the tall ones, making our hearts all that much more blessed.
Prayer for the short:
Dear Lord,
Help us wee ones on our walk
Help us realize that the tall ones can't possibly understand our plight
Give us the strength to continue
Reassure us that the steps to heaven will not be steep nor many
Bless us twice for trying and provide us with the humor we need to survive each day
Amen
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
Over my Camino experiences, I have observed that shorter persons seem to be able to walk faster over uneven terrain, as well as going up and down hills.

My observations conclude that there is a likely relationship between the distance of one's pelvic girdle to the earth. This distance makes one more or less stable.

Taller people, like me tend to be top-heavy, when wearing a rucksack. However, the more 'petite' pilgrims seemed to me to be able to cover rough terrain like a mountain goat.

This is empirical but VERY unscientific. But, all in all, I am jealous of the goat-like capabilities of short-people on Camino.

Embrace your advantage. You may have to take additional steps to get from point A to point B, but you see SO MUCH more along the way from your different perspective. Put, another way, the flowers are relatively easier for you to see, touch smell and appreciate.

I understand your feelings. I really do, I just see it differently. Most of the things you lament can be worked around. But the value of carrying a sub-10 kg rucksack is HUGE!

Embrace your uniqueness...

Hope this helps...
 

TaijiPilgrim

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2011), Camino Frances (2015), Camino Ingles (2017), Camino Muxia (2017)
As one short pilgrim to another, I agree!
A lot of those steep rocky trails take one giant stride for my husband to climb from boulder to boulder while I have to find footholds in the sheer vertical boulder surface and often scramble hand over hand. And the descents! If not by the seat of my - now dirty, must be washed - pants, it would be head over heels for want of a reachable foothold! And there is the scenic view - usually over the fences or walls and not at my eye level! Yes, the flowers and bugs and snails and rocks on the trail are beautiful but, once in a while, I'd like to see what my tall companion is photographing.
And by the way, do not think short pilgrims carry less weight. Unless we have managed, at great cost, to tailor all clothing, raingear, and sleeping bag, we are carrying gear that does not differentiate between short and tall. It still weighs the same. How many Brierley guides have you seen in short or tall specific sizes? Tubes of toothpaste or medications? Liters of water? Food?

So three cheers for the hard working pilgrims, and a bow to those challenged pilgrims - and not just short ones - who work a little harder. The effort for all is definitely worth it!
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
Help us realize that the tall ones can't possibly understand our plight.
How about the low hanging light fixtures installed by all the 5'8" Spaniards? Stitches anyone????;)

Six foot bunk beds with solid head and foot boards?

17th Century granite doorframe heads at about 5'8" (tall in those days)?

Bunks that do not allow sitting upright on the lower bunk?

Standard toilet height designed for a short nation requiring deep knee bends for taller or older persons?

Shower curtains hung at 5'10"?

Any of the notoriously short dictators and their attitude toward everyone of any height?:)


“Let us cultivate our garden.”
― Voltaire, Candide
 

Elle Bieling

Elle Bieling, PilgrimageTraveler
Camino(s) past & future
Inglés, '14 '17 Finisterre, '14 '17 '18 Primitivo, '15 '18 Portuguese, '17, '18 San Salvador, '18
@TaijiPilgrim, I agree! No special equipment for shorties! Plus we can't eat as much as you tall ones! I am always jealous that tall people can eat whatever they want on a Camino. Also, I have been trying to keep up with my husband's long stride all our married life, over hill and mountains! Part of the reason I have knee pain, I believe - pulling through an overstride. I have now learned to shorten my stride, but need to take twice as many to match his one! Oh well. We can squeeze into tight places, I guess, and can hide when we want to!
 

jozero

Been there, going again...
Camino(s) past & future
CF
Don't discount how thin the air is for those who are vertically gifted... They need 3 breaths to equal the oxygen content of those who are "closer to sea level", which interestingly corresponds nicely with your 3:1 stride lengths...

In my particular case, however, I suspect I take so many extra breaths because my vertical gifts are equally matched by my horizontal 'gifts'... :eek:
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015
I should have added that it is in a series that includes using a skateboard. You figure out the truth in the matter.
 

november_moon

Veteran Member
I'm 4'10" and my husband is 5'2", so yeah, I am right there with you.

I think T2 is onto something about the hills though. I am one heck of a hill walker. I remember on the Frances, that hill right after Castrojerez - the one randomly right in the middle of the Meseta. On the flat, people were passing us all morning, then we hit the hill and passed everybody right up.
 

nycwalking

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF: (2001, 2002, 2004, 2014). Hospitalera: 2002, Ponferrada. 2004, Rabanal del Camino.
I've often thought there should be a special certificate to acknowledge all the extra effort required of a short person walking the Camino. Walking alone requires 3 steps to every single step of the tall ones. The least little series of stones to ascend is akin to climbing a steep mountain. There is no such thing as a quick jump over a puddle for someone short in stature, the result of any leap generally lands in the water. Let's talk climbing all those stairs!!!! What about having to climb into a top bunk...even worse, trying to get down. And then there's the ever present awful seat at every mass/blessing because it is impossible to see anything over the heads of the hoards. At any bar that has no queue, it's the tall ones who are served and the short ones ignored. When it comes to clothing, we need to pay for shortening the length of pants and all shirts fit like a dress. The one advantage is our clothes weigh less and the length of sleeping bags are hardly an issue. I'd like to think our efforts are three times those of the tall ones, making our hearts all that much more blessed.
Prayer for the short:
Dear Lord,
Help us wee ones on our walk
Help us realize that the tall ones can't possibly understand our plight
Give us the strength to continue
Reassure us that the steps to heaven will not be steep nor many
Bless us twice for trying and provide us with the humor we need to survive each day
Amen
Just how short art thou?
 

freeflyer123

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
www.cyclingsofties.blog
Camino de Santiago, 2013
As a borderline short guy (5’8”), I feel your pain. 😏
When I met my husband he said that was his height. Then about forty year's later I saw his passport and it declared that he was 5'7"! He said he didn't want to appear short to me, but he actually complemented my 5'2" height perfectly.

We rode the Camino so were at an advantage when it came to steps taken. Having said that, we were definitely at a disadvantage because our Camino ended far too soon.
 

Isobeljc

Still walking
Camino(s) past & future
Frances “2017”
Aragones “2018”
Portuguese “2018”
Short, tall, thin, tubby.... we all have our gifts and challenges.
I am 5’4” (162cm) and my darling is 6’2” (188cm)
He has a big pack to fit his long back.
The beds are a problem as you can see. Bent legs and he still doesn’t fit in the bunk.
All in the day or night of a tall pilgrim.

60952
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
How about the low hanging light fixtures installed by all the 5'8" Spaniards? Stitches anyone????;)

Six foot bunk beds with solid head and foot boards?

17th Century granite doorframe heads at about 5'8" (tall in those days)?

Bunks that do not allow sitting upright on the lower bunk?

Standard toilet height designed for a short nation requiring deep knee bends for taller or older persons?

Shower curtains hung at 5'10"?

Any of the notoriously short dictators and their attitude toward everyone of any height?:)
How about the low hanging light fixtures installed by all the 5'8" Spaniards? Stitches anyone????;)

Brings the light closer to the page - less eye strain

Six foot bunk beds with solid head and foot boards?

Stops the pillow falling off at one end and contains those stinky feet at the other

17th Century granite doorframe heads at about 5'8" (tall in those days)?

It's taken you 400 years to notice?

Bunks that do not allow sitting upright on the lower bunk?

Beds are for sleeping in, not sitting on (ward sister when I was in hospital having tonsils out)

Standard toilet height designed for a short nation requiring deep knee bends for taller or older persons?

MUCH better for "evacuation" try raising your feet on a low stool or THIS

Shower curtains hung at 5'10"?

So you can peep over the curtain and see who has just entered the bathroom without having to open it

Any of the notoriously short dictators and their attitude toward everyone of any height?:)

"45" is 6' 1" or 6' 2" or 6' 3" well taller than Obama anyhow!

As for me, well I'm 6' 1" or 185cms or 0.37 of a US pole (a US Survey pole= 16.499967 ft)
 

KJFSophie

My Way, With Joy !
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2014 & 2015 ),Via San Francesco, Italy (2017 )Camino Portugese (2018 )Camino Ingles(
I am 5 foot three inches. I don't think it's a big deal at all as long as I am fit and well to walk.
Obviously, ( though apparently, not obvious to all ) the post is written with a sense of humor ...but it remains fact that the shorter you are, the more steps you have to take as the length of your stride is not the same as that of a 6 foot or taller person. I've walked 5 camino and embarking on my 6th this September. Two of those I've walked with a young woman I'd met in Spain who was 25 years my junior and 10" taller than myself. The only advantage I noted for being short was having a much taller friend to walk with !
Laughter gets you through life.IMG_2516.JPG
 
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Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
Obviously, ( though apparently, not obvious to all ) the post is written with a sense of humor ...but it remains fact that the shorter you are, the more steps you have to take as the length of your stride is not the same as that of a 6 foot or taller person. I've walked 5 camino and embarking on my 6th this September. Two of those I've walked with a young woman I'd met in Spain who was 25 years my junior and 10" taller than myself. The only advantage I noted for being short was having a much taller friend to walk with !
Laughter gets you through life.
Well it does give you somebody to look up too! ;)

But I'm sure you're right. Up in London over the weekend with my daughter we were watching a family go past us in a museum:

Mother about 5' 6" pacing steadily
Son about 4' 6" keeping up comfortably
Smaller son about 3' almost having to run to keep up

As my daughter said at the time: makes you appreciate your height (she's 5' 11")
 
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nycwalking

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF: (2001, 2002, 2004, 2014). Hospitalera: 2002, Ponferrada. 2004, Rabanal del Camino.
5'2"...lets keep in mind that in the US, 'petite' sizes in women are for 5'5" and under...Still having to hem pants!
Oh!

I’m 5’1”, but I have long legs so folks always think I am about 5’4, 5’5”.

Randy Newman’s Short People song is not flattering.

But, I love my heightness!
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
Well ... generally short people tend to live longer than tall people and .. hhmmm .. the Roman Legions were pretty tough (to say the least) and marched everywhere, thousands of miles, carrying some 60 lbs of equipment, and imperial regulations stated that 5' 7" (in Roman measurements) was the minimum for a soldier, which equates to 5' 5" in modern money and the average overall was 5' 7" - which is why the huge German tribal warriors burst out laughing when they first saw them ... which only lasted until the fight started, obviously. ;)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2005,2008,2010,2015.camino Portuguese 2007 .primativo2012.camino Norte 2009.sjpdp to finisterre and muxia 2007. Le Puy to jpdp 2006. Via francigena vercelli to Lucca 2014. Lucca to Rome 2016.
5'2"...lets keep in mind that in the US, 'petite' sizes in women are for 5'5" and under...Still having to hem pants!
5'2"...you are a giant
Love this thread thank you

I used to be 5'1"... and a half
Don't forget the half

Now I'm just 5'.....maybe less.....happens as we get older folks....sorry!
In my case...wider...and shorter!

When himself is walking......especially when he spots a bar, my legs are going like Pistons!!

We reached Santiago on Saturday from the Invierno ...and on Sunday, when crossing the square, I spotted a man crying his eyes out so I went over to him and said "well done, you did it"
He was so happy it was his first Camino

His partner was at least 6' ....so I said ...
" you know that before I started walking Caminos, I was as tall as you.....now look at me"
She said "Really"..I think she must have believed me ...
Then we both just burst out laughing

I always wanted to be tall....I blame my parents!!

When I was working, the patients would say "here comes the little nurse"
Little!!! Moi!
They must mean someone else ...not me
 

Saranger

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Samos-Santiago 2015 & 2016
Porto-Santiago 2017
Kumano Kodo March 2018
Ferrol-Santiago May 2019
As a 6’2” woman who has whacked my head on many light fixtures and literally other low hanging fruit (or fruit tree branches) I feel your pain.

And yes, our longer pants weigh more than your shorter ones, even if they’re the same waist size, not to mention shoes for our our “plus size” feet. (Stopped buying Gold Toe socks when they labeled their socks for longer feet “plus size” as I’m a 12N.)


How about the low hanging light fixtures installed by all the 5'8" Spaniards? Stitches anyone????;)

Six foot bunk beds with solid head and foot boards?

17th Century granite doorframe heads at about 5'8" (tall in those days)?

Bunks that do not allow sitting upright on the lower bunk?

Standard toilet height designed for a short nation requiring deep knee bends for taller or older persons?

Shower curtains hung at 5'10"?

Any of the notoriously short dictators and their attitude toward everyone of any height?:)


“Let us cultivate our garden.”
― Voltaire, Candide
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2012, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011
Well ... generally short people tend to live longer than tall people and .. hhmmm .. the Roman Legions were pretty tough (to say the least) and marched everywhere, thousands of miles, carrying some 60 lbs of equipment, and imperial regulations stated that 5' 7" (in Roman measurements) was the minimum for a soldier, which equates to 5' 5" in modern money and the average overall was 5' 7" - which is why the huge German tribal warriors burst out laughing when they first saw them ... which only lasted until the fight started, obviously. ;)
@David, you are correct to point out that there are many advantages to being a short person. When this thread was started, I couldn't decide between it being merely a humouresque or a case of short person special pleading. In any case, I had some time on my hands at home recovering from surgery to do some internet based research. There is a wonderful array of resources that all point to the advantages of being a short person. Amongst these were:
  1. step length is relatively closely correlated to height, so unless @KJFSophie is walking with someone around 15 foot tall, her claim to be doing three times as many steps as those she is walking with is hyperbole!! No doubt short people will do more steps, but the difference is more likely to be 10% to 20%.
  2. load carrying capacity as a function of body mass decreases with height, so short people are more capable of carrying extra weight than taller people. This relates to muscular strength being related to muscle cross section, and increasing in a square law relationship with height, while body mass increases are related to body volume. So generally body mass increases faster than muscular strength with height, leaving less residual load carrying capacity for taller people.
  3. Short people have shorter bones, so shorter lever lengths. This is a clear advantage when it comes to many walking activities. Where others might have to deliberately step short, short people are able to continue their normal walking pace longer.
I also found some maps of where all those tall people are, and clearly Scandinavia and northern Europe stand out on this score.
 

KJFSophie

My Way, With Joy !
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2014 & 2015 ),Via San Francesco, Italy (2017 )Camino Portugese (2018 )Camino Ingles(
@David, you are correct to point out that there are many advantages to being a short person. When this thread was started, I couldn't decide between it being merely a humouresque or a case of short person special pleading. In any case, I had some time on my hands at home recovering from surgery to do some internet based research. There is a wonderful array of resources that all point to the advantages of being a short person. Amongst these were:
  1. step length is relatively closely correlated to height, so unless @KJFSophie is walking with someone around 15 foot tall, her claim to be doing three times as many steps as those she is walking with is hyperbole!! No doubt short people will do more steps, but the difference is more likely to be 10% to 20%.
  2. load carrying capacity as a function of body mass decreases with height, so short people are more capable of carrying extra weight than taller people. This relates to muscular strength being related to muscle cross section, and increasing in a square law relationship with height, while body mass increases are related to body volume. So generally body mass increases faster than muscular strength with height, leaving less residual load carrying capacity for taller people.
  3. Short people have shorter bones, so shorter lever lengths. This is a clear advantage when it comes to many walking activities. Where others might have to deliberately step short, short people are able to continue their normal walking pace longer.
I also found some maps of where all those tall people are, and clearly Scandinavia and northern Europe stand out on this score.
@dougfitz Clearly humor is not a universal language on the forum. I can assure you, dear pilgrim, that in no way do I need, nor desire any special pleading. No idea where you fall in the category of height, and perhaps you've had that surgical procedure to remove your funny bone, but I can't see any deliberate autopsy of another's post to be beneficial in any way.
Since others have indeed endorsed my point of view, I'll assume these same others have been made to feel the same at some point walking amongst the tall ones. We don't need useless, correlations and skewed percentages to diminish our extra efforts, nor do we need anyone who is not short stature to smile upon our musings. We get it. That's all that matters.
 

Anamya

Keeping it simple
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015)
Portugues (2017)
Lebaniego (2019)
No idea where you fall in the category of height
@dougfitz is taller than me. But I'm 5-foot-nothing :p
I like that my entire camino gear fits in most people's day pack :)
I also like that I have no issue balancing in uneven terrain, having a very low centre of gravity.
I don't like I can never keep up a conversation with the German and Dutch Pilgrims for more than a few meters :p
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2012, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011
@dougfitz is taller than me. But I'm 5-foot-nothing :p
I am about 3cm shorter than the average Australian male, @KJFSophie appears to be about 5 cm shorter than the average woman from the US. Neither of us would fare well in any height comparison with the many pilgrims from most countries in Europe, where it appears (see the map I shared) that those populations are taller on average than those of us from Australia, Canada and the US (and many other places).
 

Becky 59

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (May 2018)
Camino Ingles (Aug 2019)
Yes, my hubby has larger feet and much heavier footwear than I. But if my hair is longer I may need to carry a larger shampoo bottle? And if I am shorter (which I am) I don’t have as far to fall and may injure myself less severely? And certainly short people fit in tiny trans-Atlantic flight seats way better than tall people, and my short-torso backpack is small enough to be carry on luggage where my long-torso hubby has to pay more to check his... There are so many pros and cons on each side. I for one am eternally grateful that my feet reach the ground! 😂
 

DevereUx

Devereaux
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sept-Oct 2018
Ha! This is a great post!
At 6'4" and 200+ Lbs, I had only a few complaints related to my bigness: 1. I couldn't bend over in hose showers to pick up the soap I dropped without banging my head and rear, which more than once cascaded me out of the shower; 2 . My head had multiple bruises from low church doorways no matter how carefully I entered; 3. I had bruised ankles from hanging my feet out over the bed rails; and, 4. I was one of those the @november-moon passed on the uphills...but I was a blaze on the Meseta 😂😎☀
My question is, for those mathematically inclined (e.g. dougfitz): who's feet spent more time treading ground in 500 miles, a shorter pilgrim's size 6 (US) or my size 15 (US)? 🙄💭
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
@David, you are correct to point out that there are many advantages to being a short person. When this thread was started, I couldn't decide between it being merely a humouresque or a case of short person special pleading. In any case, I had some time on my hands at home recovering from surgery to do some internet based research. There is a wonderful array of resources that all point to the advantages of being a short person. Amongst these were:
  1. step length is relatively closely correlated to height, so unless @KJFSophie is walking with someone around 15 foot tall, her claim to be doing three times as many steps as those she is walking with is hyperbole!! No doubt short people will do more steps, but the difference is more likely to be 10% to 20%.
  2. load carrying capacity as a function of body mass decreases with height, so short people are more capable of carrying extra weight than taller people. This relates to muscular strength being related to muscle cross section, and increasing in a square law relationship with height, while body mass increases are related to body volume. So generally body mass increases faster than muscular strength with height, leaving less residual load carrying capacity for taller people.
  3. Short people have shorter bones, so shorter lever lengths. This is a clear advantage when it comes to many walking activities. Where others might have to deliberately step short, short people are able to continue their normal walking pace longer.
I also found some maps of where all those tall people are, and clearly Scandinavia and northern Europe stand out on this score.

I don't get it - why there was a neg response as I really liked this post.
Truly informative and containing Dougs' dry humour - can't tell you how quickly I clicked on the map! :)
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2012, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011
My question is, for those mathematically inclined (e.g. dougfitz): who's feet spent more time treading ground in 500 miles, a shorter pilgrim's size 6 (US) or my size 15 (US)? 🙄
I think the simple answer is that the slowest pilgrim's feet spend more time on the road. Those with shorter step lengths could well walk with a faster cadence and progress at a similar rate to someone taller. Then both sets of feet would spend the same time walking.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015
My question is, for those mathematically inclined (e.g. dougfitz): who's feet spent more time treading ground in 500 miles, a shorter pilgrim's size 6 (US) or my size 15 (US)? 🙄💭
While walking one foot goes down and the other goes up. There is a foot on the ground all the way. That makes foot-to-ground time a matter of speed of the whole body.
 

nycwalking

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF: (2001, 2002, 2004, 2014). Hospitalera: 2002, Ponferrada. 2004, Rabanal del Camino.
As a 6’2” woman who has whacked my head on many light fixtures and literally other low hanging fruit (or fruit tree branches) I feel your pain.

And yes, our longer pants weigh more than your shorter ones, even if they’re the same waist size, not to mention shoes for our our “plus size” feet. (Stopped buying Gold Toe socks when they labeled their socks for longer feet “plus size” as I’m a 12N.)
It’s official you’re the reason the OP and I are so short.

You shorted us out by swiping our inches.

If I meet you on camino be prepared to slumber at 6’2” yet awaken at 5’8”.

The height heist will transpire; after the queimada; on an usually cloudy night; next to an albergue; near a stork nested church in a town near a Decathlon for obvious reasons.

Sueños dulces!
 
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VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
The height heist will transpire; after the queimada; on an usually cloudy night; next to an albergue; near a stork nested church in a town near a Decathlon for obvious reasons.
I'm staying up to watch.
(Or would it be like waiting for Santa Claus?)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015
errmmm .... makes it the length of paces, not speed.
I'm average height for a US male; Peg has some height. I have the longer stride. I've measured our speed many times by walking 10 minutes and noting that Peg reaches me in 5 minutes. Thus, while walking that distance my left foot has been in contact with the ground 5 minutes and the same for my right foot. Peg's feet had 7 and a half minutes ground contact each. Now if Peg were to hobble me to shorten my pace/stride when we do the same distance each one of our 4 feet will have ground contact for 7 and a half minutes. Now, if Peg kept her stride length but moved her legs faster to keep up with unhobbled me each of her feet would have 5 minutes ground contact time. Same distance done at the same speed means the same ground contact time no matter the height or stride length.

Hobble: to fasten together the legs of (a horse, mule, etc.) by short lengths of rope to prevent free motion.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
@dougfitz Clearly humor is not a universal language on the forum. I can assure you, dear pilgrim, that in no way do I need, nor desire any special pleading. No idea where you fall in the category of height, and perhaps you've had that surgical procedure to remove your funny bone, but I can't see any deliberate autopsy of another's post to be beneficial in any way.
Since others have indeed endorsed my point of view, I'll assume these same others have been made to feel the same at some point walking amongst the tall ones. We don't need useless, correlations and skewed percentages to diminish our extra efforts, nor do we need anyone who is not short stature to smile upon our musings. We get it. That's all that matters.
Doug is never nasty. He DOES however have one of the driest wits I have ever encountered. There is the famous dry "Brit wit." Then there is the "extra-dry Doug-wit." Perhaps it is living in Australia. Then again, it is winter there now...so perhaps not as dry...

This said, Doug is inclined towards objective analysis and evaluation. Many of his posts are engineering based.

So do not expect flippancy, hyperbole, or subterfuge. I too, was born without a funny bone..."born an old man" my parents always said. I do not do flippant or silly either, thought I do have a dry(ish) sense of humor.

Do try not to take things too seriously. I, Doug and others who post very dry, analytical or engineering based ideas here are simply trying to understand things through their perception of the world. I know I look at most things with a cold and deadly serious perspective, most of the time.

But never, forget, we all simply trying to understand and help.
 

Alsacia

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
El Camino Frances (2019)
I've often thought there should be a special certificate to acknowledge all the extra effort required of a short person walking the Camino. Walking alone requires 3 steps to every single step of the tall ones. The least little series of stones to ascend is akin to climbing a steep mountain. There is no such thing as a quick jump over a puddle for someone short in stature, the result of any leap generally lands in the water. Let's talk climbing all those stairs!!!! What about having to climb into a top bunk...even worse, trying to get down. And then there's the ever present awful seat at every mass/blessing because it is impossible to see anything over the heads of the hoards. At any bar that has no queue, it's the tall ones who are served and the short ones ignored. When it comes to clothing, we need to pay for shortening the length of pants and all shirts fit like a dress. The one advantage is our clothes weigh less and the length of sleeping bags are hardly an issue. I'd like to think our efforts are three times those of the tall ones, making our hearts all that much more blessed.
Prayer for the short:
Dear Lord,
Help us wee ones on our walk
Help us realize that the tall ones can't possibly understand our plight
Give us the strength to continue
Reassure us that the steps to heaven will not be steep nor many
Bless us twice for trying and provide us with the humor we need to survive each day
Amen
This is just for me. I hope I don’t have too much trouble. I will be starting el Camino September 30 !! Thanks for the prayer.
 

Marcus-UK

Old Git
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Ingles (2016) Camino Portuguese (2017) Considering Invierno 2019
I am a short tall person. My father and I had thyroid problems. He was 5'2" and I am 6' but had additional Iodine supplements when growing up. My brother was 6'4", my six uncles were all in the Coldstream guards. In family photos my father and I look children. My father was unable to join the "family firm" and enlisted in the the Navy. While growing up I always felt small. The only time I felt tall was while serving in the far east and meeting local Dyak tribesman who came up to my sternum. So I have some sympathy for anyone who is small.
 

John H.

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF - 2017
CP Central - 2017
CP Coastal - 2018
CF - [hopefully again someday]
Thanks for this post. I have never been so grateful to be a very average 5'8" :)
 

Fearless0

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Completed Sarria to Santiago June (2016)
Not at all, in fact quite the opposite - you shorties only have to carry half the body weight we carry!!! ;)
David--Not necessarily. I'm 5'0" and weigh as much as you do. My pack weighs just as much. I am top heavy to boot. Stepping over logs, stone piles, barriers is difficult. I agree with everything and more that KJFSophie said. And for those who think we shorties walk faster because we have short legs are just plain wrong. It may SEEM we are walking faster, but it's just a visual because our legs are having to move faster to equal your one step.
 
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Karl Oz

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances
Portuguese
Aragones
Sanabres
Piamonte
Elizabethpfad
I'm 5' 8" too. Below average where I come from, which used to make me glum. I do however have a half-brother who is 6' 4".
My Bodyguard...
 
Camino(s) past & future
(2014)
I have always loved being a really average height for my cohort (female, 5’4 3/4”) but I cracked up at Rick’s description of Peg: I too am shortish in altitude but tallish in attitude.

Yesterday my walking company was ahead by leaps and bounds at the end of the day (up and over the cross of Atapuerca then onward): one French man and a German teenager. I wondered why they were so far ahead all the time then I looked at their...bottoms...scientifically only, I assure you all...
One was a minimum of 6’2”, the other a minimum of 6’4”. Both had legs which came higher than my elbows as they were both quite short waisted with very long legs even for their respective heights. As a result I am having two nights in Burgos with a proper rest day because they were so fun to walk with that I forced myself to keep up. Now I have a sore hip and a tender foot. Lesson learned, I hope.
But I enjoyed myself enormously yesterday and I am also enjoying myself today enormously in a quiet “real” hotel in Burgos. Sheets! Towels! Shampoo and lotion in the bathroom! I not only showered after walking but I can also shower AGAIN in the morning!
Living the dream.
 

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