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...on painted toenails...

KJFSophie

My Way, With Joy !
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2014 & 2015 ) ,Via San Francesco, Italy (2017 )
Camino Portugese (2018 )
#1
There's a buzz in other forums/FB pages about getting pedicures before walking the camino and I'd like to offer my two cents. I suggest getting a "mini-pedi', not a full pedicure. Please do have your nails trimmed and cuticles checked, but do not allow the pedicurist to scrape off all of the callous from under your feet. You need that tough skin to walk the upcoming miles. Fresh, exposed skin without protection will be subject to blisters. Secondly, Please do not get polish/laquer on your toe nails. If you have an extreme injury,medical professionals check for perfusion on your nail beds. You also want to be able to see any bruising or trauma yourself to address it right away. And it goes without saying you need to see if your nails/toes are clean to avoid infection. Painted piggies may look pretty, but save that pedicure for your return home !

I tended to the blisters of a poor walker rom Ireland. She had no idea the extent of trauma to her big toe after a long day of downhill until the pus oozed from beneath her pretty pink nail. Gross.
 

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Anamya

Keeping it simple
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015)
Camino Portugues (2017)
Norte/Liebana (Planning)
#3
As a girl that loves trekking but also loves nice nails, I second everything the OP said! Very good advice!

I also always carry a mini paper nail file with me to keep my nails short along the way, weighs nothing :)
 
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Anamiri

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances
#5
Blisters under calloused skin are awful. They really hurt but are hard to drain and take ages to heal. In my 20's I learnt the hard way to always make sure I do have a full pedicure (podiatrist) to remove all hard skin before I do long treks as that skin causes deep blisters to form on my feet in predictable areas.
By the time I reached my 30's I had realised that looking after my feet was paramount, I spend what I need to on shoes that are right for me, socks that work, and generally making sure that my feet are in good order. So now I rarely get a blister. Even in summer months I didn't get blisters on the Camino.
Rather than trying to have thick skin on my feet, I focus on getting shoes that wont cause any blisters. They are usually 1 1/2 sizes bigger than the store staff try to sell me.

(I also painted my toes - by the time I reached Santiago it had half grown out)
 

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Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2017
#6
While I agree with getting a pedicure before a Camino, like share Jillgat's concern. I suffer from blood accumulating under really thick calluses on both heels. This congenital condition nearly led to infection and terminating my first Camino in 2013. In 2018, the same issue led to an interruption and an enforced rest stop. Both times, I had to seek medical intervention to repair my heels before I could continue.

It is neither my boots, socks, or insoles. It is rather the particularly odd geometry of my right foot. It is about 9 degrees off-center to the right, and has a more pronounced pronation as compared to the left foot. It drove my drill instructors batty in basic training many years ago. While the left foot was standing rigidly at attention, my left foot was 'at ease.' Sir, I was made from spare parts SIR!

I was born that way and have had callus issues my entire life. It is too late to fix it surgically. So, I cope as best I can. It just requires regular observation and attention to detail.

One of the things I do is to have a proper pedicure monthly while home. Recently, I have accrued a new podiatrist. So, the future plan is to have the doctor give my feet a once over shortly before my next and future Caminos.
 
Camino(s) past & future
This upcoming May 31st through July 1st approximately.
#7
While I agree with getting a pedicure before a Camino, like share Jillgat's concern. I suffer from blood accumulating under really thick calluses on both heels. This congenital condition nearly led to infection and terminating my first Camino in 2013. In 2018, the same issue led to an interruption and an enforced rest stop. Both times, I had to seek medical intervention to repair my heels before I could continue.

It is neither my boots, socks, or insoles. It is rather the particularly odd geometry of my right foot. It is about 9 degrees off-center to the right, and has a more pronounced pronation as compared to the left foot. It drove my drill instructors batty in basic training many years ago. While the left foot was standing rigidly at attention, my left foot was 'at ease.' Sir, I was made from spare parts SIR!

I was born that way and have had callus issues my entire life. It is too late to fix it surgically. So, I cope as best I can. It just requires regular observation and attention to detail.

One of the things I do is to have a proper pedicure monthly while home. Recently, I have accrued a new podiatrist. So, the future plan is to have the doctor give my feet a once over shortly before my next and future Caminos.
AND on my return.
 

november_moon

Veteran Member
#8
I think the key with regard to callouses is to go for the middle ground. Thick callouses can cause problems. Having baby-soft feet can also cause problems. I have found, at least for myself, that having thin callouses on my feet works well - good for protection, but not so calloused as to cause problems. I get pedicures regularly and the nail techs always want to attack my feet with the pumice and make them baby-smooth. I have tell them to take it easy and leave a bit behind.

And I definitely agree about foregoing the toenail paint on the Camino - I love my painted toes, but my first Camino, having painted toenails hid an issue with one of the nails. I think if it hadn't been painted, I would have noticed the problem earlier and could have done something to stop the darned nail from falling off. Also, if you have issues with your toenails and need to remove the polish, it frickin' stings and burns if you have blisters on your toes - OMG. Better to just skip the paint.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2017); Finisterre (2018)
#10
I have had painted nails as long as I can remember. I absolutely agree on the callous issue but compromise on the polish by using a very light translucent barely pink. Also I know after two caminos which toes have skin that don’t mind their manners and routinely blister. Prophylactic Compeed does the trick. No blisters and feet that can be seen in public.... a win win. And trauma that can easily be seen under the nail.
 

Walking Lover

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CdS from Leon to Santiago, June 16, 2016 to June 30, 2016.
#11
There's a buzz in other forums/FB pages about getting pedicures before walking the camino and I'd like to offer my two cents. I suggest getting a "mini-pedi', not a full pedicure. Please do have your nails trimmed and cuticles checked, but do not allow the pedicurist to scrape off all of the callous from under your feet. You need that tough skin to walk the upcoming miles. Fresh, exposed skin without protection will be subject to blisters. Secondly, Please do not get polish/laquer on your toe nails. If you have an extreme injury,medical professionals check for perfusion on your nail beds. You also want to be able to see any bruising or trauma yourself to address it right away. And it goes without saying you need to see if your nails/toes are clean to avoid infection. Painted piggies may look pretty, but save that pedicure for your return home !

I tended to the blisters of a poor walker rom Ireland. She had no idea the extent of trauma to her big toe after a long day of downhill until the pus oozed from beneath her pretty pink nail. Gross.
Good advice.
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#12
You also want to be able to see any bruising or trauma yourself to address it right away. And it goes without saying you need to see if your nails/toes are clean to avoid infection. Painted piggies may look pretty, but save that pedicure for your return home !
I watched a peregrina doing foot maintenance in Arzua after a few days of blisters from Sarria. She did her toenail polish before attending to her suppurating blisters. I mean, what is a few more minutes of pain if your nails look bad?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Aug-Sept(2016) SJPDP-Finisterre, July-Aug(2017) SJPDP-Muxia-Finisterre, July-Aug(2018) El Norte
#13
I have had painted nails as long as I can remember. I absolutely agree on the callous issue but compromise on the polish by using a very light translucent barely pink. Also I know after two caminos which toes have skin that don’t mind their manners and routinely blister. Prophylactic Compeed does the trick. No blisters and feet that can be seen in public.... a win win. And trauma that can easily be seen under the nail.
Compeed isn't designed to be used to prevent blisters, and should only be used on deroofed blisters. https://www.blisterprevention.com.au/blister-blog/how-to-use-hydrocolloid-dressings And it's pretty expensive for that use. A roll of Omnifix stretch tape is less expensive, and can cover a larger area.
 

KJFSophie

My Way, With Joy !
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2014 & 2015 ) ,Via San Francesco, Italy (2017 )
Camino Portugese (2018 )
#14
Compeed isn't designed to be used to prevent blisters, and should only be used on deroofed blisters. https://www.blisterprevention.com.au/blister-blog/how-to-use-hydrocolloid-dressings And it's pretty expensive for that use. A roll of Omnifix stretch tape is less expensive, and can cover a larger area.
"COMPEED" is a brand name for an entire line of foot care products, one of which is Compeed Antiblister Stick, which is indeed a blister preventative and has nothing to do with treating blisters that have already formed with plasters. I too, use Compeed Stick as prophylactic against blisters. Not one blister in last four Caminos . Wise to know the available products and not correct others offering sound information without the absolute surety that they are incorrect.
 


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