Search 59,165 Camino Questions

A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it


Advertisement
Camino Way Markers
Original Camino Way markers made in bronze. Two models, one from Castilla & Leon and the other from Galicia.
Peaceable Projects Inc.
Peaceable Projects Inc. is a U.S.-based non-profit group that brings the vast resources of the wide world together with the ongoing needs of the people who live, work, and travel on the Camino de Santiago pilgrim trail network in Spain.

On the Camino, on this date in December...

trecile

Camino Addict
Past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Here's a new thread to post pictures, musings, etc. from any year for any dates in December on any Camino route.

When you respond, please mention the year, route you were on and where you walked (or rested) that day. Thanks!

Also, if you are posting multiple pictures upload them as thumbnails.
 
Camino Way Markers
Original Camino Way markers made in bronze. Two models, one from Castilla & Leon and the other from Galicia.
John Brierley 2022 Camino Guide
The most selling Camino Guide is shipping November 1st. Get your today and start planning.

mspath

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
December 1, 2008
Across the Hills
Mailly le Chateau


After yesterday's full day of bedrest it was an easier 14 km to Mailly le Chateau following in part the Canal du Nivernais.
At Trucy sur Yonne I turned slightly west to walk alone through farmland along l'ancien route d'Auxerre á Vézelay/the old route from Auxerre to Vézelay! I was getting closer.

Mailly le Chateau.jpg


My husband Bill arrived by car. Our chambre d'hote/b&b for the night was called El Camino with a painted shell, the shell of Saint James, for its sign. Warm and cosy it also boasted a fine collection of books about the trail. Our friendly hostess had walked to Santiago in 2000; she and I compared memories of earlier walks.
 

mspath

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
December 2, 2008
Across the Hills
Châtel Censoir


towards Chatel Censoir.jpg

It was lonely and cold walking past these huge rocks known as the Rocher du Saussois.
My right leg still hurt a lot. Since Bill had the car he took my backpack while I limped 12 km following the Nivernais canal to Châtel Censoir, a small village, which takes its name from Saint Censure or Censoire, 5th c. bishop of Auxerre.

After a good lunch I rested all afternoon at a chambre d'hote/b&b; unfortunately even indoors whenever I moved my walking stick was necessary for support.

...to be continued
 

mspath

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
December 3-4, 2008
Across the Hills
Vézelay


Without a pack beneath light rain I followed routes D21/D36 the final 19 km into Vézelay. Staggering up the last hill I knew that physically a long pause was necessary; my right leg was almost useless.
Bill and I checked into the very comfortable, L’Hôtel de la Poste and tried to relax.

Next morning together we visited the magnificent Abbey church of Saint Mary Magdelaine, which is a UNESCO world heritage site. For the last 50 years or so ever since university days I have loved the interior of this structure. Romanesque, Gothic, and 19th c. intervention are combined into timeless beauty. Here eternal peace is blended with man-made perfection. Might this incomparable site endure for another thousand years.

Vezelay.jpg

Bill took a photo of me entering the light of the ambulatory silently thankful to be here once again while vowing to continue when possible.

... We then drove back 220 km to our farmhouse following in 3 1/2 hours the route which had taken me almost 2 weeks to walk.

.....And today in December 2021 more than ever I am thankful for these memories.

"This thou perceiv'st, which makes thy love more strong, To love that well, which thou must leave ere long."
Shakespeare, Sonnet LXXIII
 
Last edited:
Pilgrim Pouch carry bags with different designs
A lightweight carry bag handy for walking, biking, traveling, & Caminos
Peaceable Projects Inc.
Peaceable Projects Inc. is a U.S.-based non-profit group that brings the vast resources of the wide world together with the ongoing needs of the people who live, work, and travel on the Camino de Santiago pilgrim trail network in Spain.

mspath

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
December 5, 2011
Negreira


Two days earlier I had walked into Santiago de Compostela and completed my 7th camino. Thus December 5, 2011, after a farewell view of the cathedral I started towards Finisterre on the Atlantic coast.

Following rua de Hortas and rua Poza de Bar to the Carballeira (oak wood) of San Lourenzo I eventually crossed the tiny pedestrian bridge over the Sarela river.

bridge, rio Sarela.jpg

At this rather ad hoc gate a narrow dirt path began.

ad hoc gate.jpg

The path was up/down but never steep across many hills through eucalyptus wood. Being back in the countryside was relaxing; everyone took the time to say Hola, point out the route, and wish Buen Camino.

Ponte Maceira.jpg

At Ponte Maceira the Tambre river rapids moved swiftly. The thought of crossing was rather frightening but I did it.

After 22km tired and hungry in Negreira I stopped at the Cafe Bar Imperial for a VERY good and copious menu del dia. The friendly barman/owner is English and his wife Spanish; they diplomatically recalled my previous visits.

Walking to the Xunta albergue took only a few minutes; it was quite busy with 18 pilgrims for 20 single beds, not bunks, but I quickly unrolled my sleeping bag and tried to fall asleep because the next day would be difficult.
 
Last edited:

mspath

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
December 6, 2011
Vilaserio


towards Vilaserio.jpg


Through unceasing rain and sticky mud I walked 12 km to Vilaserio yet the hamlet seemed extremely remote.

There were two albergues, one private and one municipal. The municipal winter albergue where I had stayed during earlier caminos was very basic in a repurposed school.

Since last year it had been bitter cold in the old school this year I chose the private Albergue O Rueiro near to and run by the only bar/resto.This had comfortable facilities, hot water and many blankets but no heat!! Indeed, I was the only pilgrim.

Nevertheless after eating at their bar a copious hot meal next door in the albergue dorm I chose a bunk away from any cold outer wall and placed my sleeping bag within a folded blanket or two. Wearing my wooly hat and winter tenue de soirée/evening attire slept chilled but not frozen for 15 hours.
 
Last edited:

mspath

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
December 7, 2011
Olveiroa



The winding trail meandered through tiny hamlets and many pastures. After 20 km in the rain I arrived soaked and muddy at the Xunta albergue in Olveiroa; the kind hospitalera remembered me by name!

Olveiroa albergue.jpg

Here adjacent stone buildings have been handsomely repurposed; a narrow path separates dining/commons room and dorms.

Olveiroa albergue, dorm.jpg

Bright plaid blankets cover bunks; tiled bathrooms have hot water and good showers. Pilgrims can relax and/or eat together in the commons room.

Nearby is a great pension/resto, As Pias This pilgrim friendly bar/restaurant is open to all since 2007 and private accommodation is also available. In recent years I often ate a delicious menu del dia in their small back dining room next to a blazing fireplace; this was very cosy during late autumn/winter visits.

Nevertheless I always slept in the Xunta albergue dorm.
 
Last edited:

mspath

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
December 8, 2011
towards Cée



Sunrise at Olveiroa was splendid; the rain had finally ceased. All was good to go; early without breakfast I started walking.

A footbridge crossed the rio Hospital; looking at the cold water I was glad that the bridge was sturdy and new!

leaving Hospital.jpg

The river and nearby hamlet are named for a pilgrim hostel, which probably existed in the middle ages.


Petroglyph, map.jpg

The routes to Muxia and Finisterre split at the juncture DP 3404/ DP 2302. On the right DP 3404 went to Muxia; I turned left on DP 2302 towards Finisterre.

Petroglyphs.jpg

Hidden in the wood on a dirt path off DP 2302 this giant rock with petroglyphs seemed magical and a bit threatening as if it might erupt.

The soon widened trail slowly climbed/crossed stoney hills and broad pastures as well as eucalyptus and pine wood.


above Cee, the sea.jpg

At last from a hilltop near Cée I could glimpse the silvery Atlantic ocean and Finisterra in the far distance. What excitement medieval pilgrims must have felt when they first saw that sea!

Descending to Cée was steep and slippery. After crossing to Corcurbion, then turning west, following a creek and some very muddy lanes I finally arrived at the pleasant hilltop albergue San Roque de Corcubión. In a repurposed school this was a very friendly place run by local volunteers. After enjoying a donativo dinner with 2 other pilgrims and tired from walking 21 km, I needed to sleep.

Through a bunk-side window in the dark dorm I could see the Finisterre lighthouse beacon shining on the sea.
...All was molten silver.
 
Last edited:

mspath

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
December 9, 2011
towards Finisterre


Just after dawn I walked alone the final kilometers along the sea to Finisterre and beyond towards Cape Finisterre.

view from Corcurbion     .jpg

Wayside views were shore, scrub, and endless sea. The wind was brutal and the surf rough, but it was glorious to just be in the salty air.

Finisterre 09.12.2011 .jpg

Entering Finisterre on the camino path along the beach I happily relaxed by these boats to enjoy some local mariscos. Nearby at the municipal albergue I asked for a Fisterrana certificate, after confirming that I had walked from Santiago de Compostela. Indeed, I had!

Cape Finisterre, Iron Cross.jpg

Rain and tears were pouring down when later I finally reached kilometer 0 at the old iron cross by the famous lighthouse.

There at land's end my 7th Camino Frances ended after 1000 kilometers and nine weeks walking; silently I gave my heartfelt thanks for all that had been and for all those that had helped to make it so.

....
PS.
Late that night during a sleet storm I returned to Santiago de Compostela and walked into San Martin Pinario without any reservation. My poncho and pack were coated with ice. The rather elegant concierge said "Good evening Madame I trust that you ARE a pilgrim" and promptly handed me a key to this regular private room for which I was only charged the 23€ pilgrim rate!

San Martin Pinario.jpg

There was no need to show any Credencial since no regular tourist would be out walking during such weather!!

Such serendipity was sybaritic !
 
Last edited:
Camino Cups
Browse our selection of Camino Cups on the forum store
Peaceable Projects Inc.
Peaceable Projects Inc. is a U.S.-based non-profit group that brings the vast resources of the wide world together with the ongoing needs of the people who live, work, and travel on the Camino de Santiago pilgrim trail network in Spain.

mspath

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
December 10, 2011
Backward to Portugal


After completing my 7th CF and continuing to Finisterre I then walked to the Portuguese border at Tui/Valença do Minho to join Bill, my husband, for a holiday. This involved going backward down the Camino Portuguese from Santiago and not up the CP to Santiago.

Backward arrow.jpg

To go backward was more complicated than you might think; searching for the painted yellow arrows pointing opposite my direction was not easy. Viewed backwards the arrows resembled anchors. In reverse of the norm I needed to walk from the arrow tip up the shaft.

Thus it all was a bit of an unending treasure hunt!
 

mspath

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
December 10, 2011
Backward to Portugal
Padron


Walking southwest from Santiago de Compostela I crossed much of old and new suburbia plus a few vegetable gardens to finally arrive after 20 km at Padron near where tradition states that Santiago's stone boat landed.

Padron 10.12.2011.jpg

I was too tired to explore in depth but the Fuente del Carmen was centrally located. Legend says that here water flowed miraculously when James struck three times with his staff. In the niche his figure baptizes Queen Lupa, whom he converted to Christianity. A panel below depicts the
" traslación del apóstol Santiago por sus discípulos". Traslación is the act of moving Saint James body in a stone boat.

Nearby was the centrally located
Xunta albergue. Although this was a handsomely renovated stone townhouse, it had little heat and no blankets that cold December night.

Next morning at an early breakfast in a local cafe the barmaid bemused by my
backward route at 71 alone in winter asked for this memento.

me with barmaid.jpg
 
Last edited:

mspath

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
December 11, 2011
Backward to Portugal
to Caldas das Reis


Symbols on the way.jpg

A few hours after leaving Padron I passed two basics, a pilgrim's water gourd and shell, which in their tangibile materiality seemed far more meaningful than many carved symbols.

Next came a long cold slog through foggy forest to finally reach Caldas das Reis, a Roman thermal town.

Much was closed for siesta; I was pooped and could neither find the tourist office nor an open albergue.

When I entered to ask at the local police station they formally stamped my Credential

11.Dec.2011.jpg

and pointed me towards an open albergue. Luckily it was next to a friendly bar/resto which had the key and near the town's famous thermal fountain which freely spewed hot water.

20211210_105416.jpg

After getting the key and eating a copious/delicious menu del dia I took a long hot shower. Although without room heat the albergue did provide plenty of very hot water. Naturally.
 
Last edited:

mspath

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
December 12, 2011
Backward to Portugal
to Pontevedra


After an easy hour on the camino, during a dense fog I lost the path near Briallos and then nervously walked along the verges of busy highway N-550 as trucks rumbled past.

towards Pontevedra.jpg

Thus at Lugar San Amaro 6 on the N-550 roughly 12 km south of Caldes das Reis /9 km north of Pontevedra I passed this bizarre airplane. It is perhaps the oddest object I have ever seen while walking in Spain; there was no sign of why or how it "landed".

By mid afternoon or Spanish lunch time I finally arrived in Pontevedra. This prosperous maritime city on the rio Lérez which leads to the sea boasts a handsome central historic district crossed by small intriguing streets.

I quickly visited the 18th c. circular Santuary of the Virgin Pilgrim and later found a seat nearby on the Praza Ourense at a resto/bar where I enjoyed a great menu del dia. It was good to sit after my morning stroll.

Mellow and relaxed after lunch I followed the Rua de Gorgullon south to the bus/train station and the Xunta albergue which was new and commodious with wonderful calefacción central/heat!

The heat was a treat for the one other pilgrim, a young woman who had walked from Lisbon, and me! We happily chatted in French about our walks; she was going up and I was going down. However we both were tired and went to bed soon after sunset.

12.12.11.jpg
 
Last edited:

mspath

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
December 13, 2011
Backward to Portugal
to Redondela


Walking 18 km to Redondela mostly on highway N-550 verges the rain was incessant.
Giant trucks splashed puddles as they whizzed past making me move fast. All was a wet mess!

I was truly soaked upon arrival at the
Xunta albergue. Original stone, plus new wood and black ceramic tile had been used in this repurposed renovation of an historic townhouse, Casa da Torre. It was both comfortable with cosy heat and hot showers and handsome with sophisticated spaces.

Redondela.jpg

Only one other pilgrim and I shared the open dorm. He was a lonely young baker from southern France; chatting with him I learned a bit too much about farine/flour, the good, the bad, etc. Thus I went to bunk early exhausted from hearing his seemingly endless knowledge of wheat plus the drumming of constant rain!

13.12.2011.jpg
 
Last edited:
John Brierley 2022 Camino Guide
The most selling Camino Guide is shipping November 1st. Get your today and start planning.
Camino Magnets
A collection of Camino Fridge Magnets

mspath

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
December 14, 2011
Backward to Portugal
to 0 Porriño


Dry weather helped make walking 14 km to O Porriño much more comfortable than yesterday. Nevertheless it still was not easy to see/find those "backward" arrows.

Roman marker.jpg

This Roman milestone was 6 km south of Redondela in a camino path/back lanes mix near Capela de Santiaguño. It marked the Via XIX which had connected Braga to Lugo via Santiago. This is located on Google maps as Milario de Vilar long./lat.42.229640,-8.610992.

map, Roman marker.jpg

For an informative site with photos/maps of some Roman routes which crossed present day Spain and Portugal see Vias Atlanricas

Back again on the camino path I continued to O Porriño and found the Xunta albergue. It was new, comfortable, well heated and had many separate sitting areas. Before checking in I ate a menu del dia at Hostal Maracaibo a small pension/resto nearby. The good food, inexpensive price and welcome were great.

14.12.2011.jpg

Tonight would be my last of 2011 in an albergue. Before I went to sleep Bill texted me this billet doux ,
"Congratulations! Now let's have some holiday, kiddo! See you TOMORROW in Portugal!"
 
Last edited:

mspath

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
December 15, 2011
Backward to Portugal
to Tui/Valencça do Minho


Today was a long final slog from 0 Porriño to Tui through the last downpours, following muddy forest paths and urban sidewalks.

After 2 months 5 days of walking it was time to rejoin Bill who was waiting for me parked in front of the Tui cathedral!! I opened the car door and as if passing through the famous Narnia wardrobe I no longer was a pilgrim walking alone.

Together (!) we drove (!) to Valença do Minho, Portugal, crossing the river on the 19th c. International Bridge attributed to Eiffel.

Valenca do Minho, Fortress rampart.jpg

After entering the hilltop 17th c. fortress designed by Vauban we stayed at the very comfortable Pousada Sao Teotonio.

All seemed sybaritic. At dusk as the lights were lit across the river the panoramic view of Tui from room 68 was very special.

What joy it was to share this together!
 
Last edited:
Past OR future Camino
Camino Francés, Oct 2020
December 12, 2011
Backward to Portugal
to Pontevedra


After an easy hour on the camino, during a dense fog I lost the path near Briallos and then nervously walked along the verges of busy highway N-550 as trucks rumbled past.

View attachment 114708

Thus at Lugar San Amaro 6 on the N-550 roughly 12 km south of Caldes das Reis /9 km north of Pontevedra I passed this bizarre airplane. It is perhaps the oddest object I have ever seen while walking in Spain; there was no sign of why or how it "landed".

By mid afternoon or Spanish lunch time I finally arrived in Pontevedra. This prosperous maritime city on the rio Lérez which leads to the sea boasts a handsome central historic district crossed by small intriguing streets.

I quickly visited the 18th c. circular Santuary of the Virgin Pilgrim and later found a seat nearby on the Praza Ourense at a resto/bar where I enjoyed a great menu del dia. It was good to sit after my morning stroll.

Mellow and relaxed after lunch I followed the Rua de Gorgullon south to the bus/train station and the Xunta albergue which was new and commodious with wonderful calefacción central/heat!

The heat was a treat for the one other pilgrim, a young woman who had walked from Lisbon, and me! We happily chatted in French about our walks; she was going up and I was going down. However we both were tired and went to bed soon after sunset.

View attachment 114709
did you ever find out about this plane?
 
Camino Jewellery
A selection of Camino Jewellery
2022 Camino Guides
The 2022 Camino guides will be coming out little by little, most of them by the end of 2021. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.

Did not find what you were looking for? Search here

Popular Resources

“All” Albergues on the Camino Frances in one pdf ivar
  • Featured
“All” Albergues on the Camino Frances in one pdf
4.95 star(s) 102 ratings
Downloads
15,332
Updated
A selection of favorite albergues on the Camino Francés Ton van Tilburg
Favorite Albergues along the Camino Frances
4.83 star(s) 35 ratings
Downloads
7,999
Updated
Profile maps of all 34 stages of the Camino Frances ivar
Profile maps of all 34 stages of the Camino Frances
4.88 star(s) 24 ratings
Downloads
7,767
Updated

Similar threads

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Updates on YouTube

Camino Conversations

Most downloaded Resources

Top