Search 69,459 Camino Questions

On the Norte and want to avoid the Frances until last possible moment into SdC

Simperegrina

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Last Camino: Norte, May-Jun 24
Am on the Norte rn, looking to walk into SdC the morning on Sun 23 Jun. I have read of a way of avoiding joining the Frances till SdC’s airport perimeter, but I can’t easily find any directions or guides when I search. Any help - much appreciated…
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
The last possible place you are joining the Frances will probably by at the airport.
In 2017 this have been my last towns before ScC.
Boimorto - Monte dos Campos, Monte do Vilar, Traitosende, Lugar do Río - Santiso - A Esquipa - As Quintas - Cimadevila - Aeropuerto de Santiago de Compostela (Lavacolla) - San Paio - A Lavacolla – Vilamaior - Camping Monte Do Gozo - San Marcos - Monte do Gozo - Santiago de Compostela
Check on GRONZE the doted way.
 
The last possible place you are joining the Frances will probably by at the airport.
In 2017 this have been my last towns before ScC.
Boimorto - Monte dos Campos, Monte do Vilar, Traitosende, Lugar do Río - Santiso - A Esquipa - As Quintas - Cimadevila - Aeropuerto de Santiago de Compostela (Lavacolla) - San Paio - A Lavacolla – Vilamaior - Camping Monte Do Gozo - San Marcos - Monte do Gozo - Santiago de Compostela
Check on GRONZE the doted way.
this alternative route branches off at Boimorto. We took it but weren’t impressed - little if interest, lots of road walking and no albergues.
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
Last edited:
I would just go to Arzua and power through the rest of the Frances. I went from Arzua to Lavacola in one day and I was prepared to keep going if I didn't get a bed. I would have went to Monte do Gozo. From Arzua it is just two short stages of less than 20 km each to get to Santiago. From Arzua I did 29 km to Lavacolla. I would start out early because it seems that the high school kids only hike in the daylight. If you start in the dark, that gives you more time to hike without the high school kids, then it takes them a while to catch up to you. If you are in shape because you've done all of the Norte, you should be fine with powering through the last 40 km.
 
I just did it backwards. It splits off in Boimorto at the end of town but little info actually about it. I stayed at Twin Pines B&b at Goimil which leaves 31km to SdeC and is 22km from Sobrado. It's big benefit is avoiding the Sarria "party" section for longer but really isn't all that exciting with alot of road walking then on gravel track beside a main road.
 
Train for your next Camino (or keep the Camino spirit alive) on Santa Catalina Island
I did the split after boimotto and took the road to where it joins the Frances shortly before o Pedruzo. It's all pavement, no services and I didn't see any pilgrims until joining the Frances. I ended up walking Sobrado to Lavacola, about 50k and once I walked past O Pedruzo I saw only a few pilgrims.

This was Aug last year.
 

Attachments

  • Screenshot_20240615-214852.png
    Screenshot_20240615-214852.png
    2.3 MB · Views: 37
I took this route. You can find a map on the Wise Pilgrim Norte app. I slept between Sobrado and Boimorto and then at a casa rural, O Muino de Pena. Then walked to Santiago the next day. There is a B&B Twin Pines about 10km (if I remember correctly) past Boimorto. It’s true it is along a road but I saw two cars in 2 days, including one man who stopped to tell me I was going the wrong way! So, it’s very quiet, in the country. I saw two pilgrims. I did stop at one open bar. I was a little disappointed because I had expectations of a new route through woods and fields but essentially it’s along the DP602 and N634 roads. I could have just google mapped the shortest route on my own. It’s a good route if you don’t mind the lack of albergues, and if you don’t want to see a lot, or any, other pilgrims. You will completely miss the wave of pilgrims coming from O Pedrouzo. I saw about four pilgrims between Lavacolla and Santiago in July 2022. It was really strange! I would probably do it again.
 
Just did it in late May and enjoyed being alone and off the “pilgrim highway” until Llavacola. It’s mostly road, but it’s quiet and it’s quaint and definitely better than the craziness of the CF at that point if you want to avoid all the hub-bub. The route has great waymarking now, too, so no real need to worry about that. If you REALLY want to avoid the CF, you can actually walk straight where the path turns to join the CF and follow a path into Santiago with zero pilgrims on it.
 
Ideal sleeping bag liner whether we want to add a thermal plus to our bag, or if we want to use it alone to sleep in shelters or hostels. Thanks to its mummy shape, it adapts perfectly to our body.

€46,-
I would just go to Arzua and power through the rest of the Frances. I went from Arzua to Lavacola in one day and I was prepared to keep going if I didn't get a bed. I would have went to Monte do Gozo. From Arzua it is just two short stages of less than 20 km each to get to Santiago. From Arzua I did 29 km to Lavacolla. I would start out early because it seems that the high school kids only hike in the daylight. If you start in the dark, that gives you more time to hike without the high school kids, then it takes them a while to catch up to you. If you are in shape because you've done all of the Norte, you should be fine with powering through the last 40 km.
Good on you, we think alike! 😎🇳🇿
 
I know of 2 Brazilian ladies who powered through from Arzua right into SdC.
I also saw a video of one Pilgrim who powered through something like 52km into SdC walking through the night...
The question posed by OP remains on how to get from del Norte to Lavacolla presumably bypassing all and any previous Frances intersections. Once they find that route perhaps they will power through as per @roving_rufus and @WalkingLester suggested
 
July last year I split off in Boimorto, (signposted). I stayed at Twin Pines in Goimil, nice rooms, (just three beds in each) very clean, pleasant garden, average food. You can either call or book them on booking. Most reports on the place are average, because they literally charge for every little thing - you pay for the wine by the glass for example. And there is a distinct lack of trust: everything but your breakfast needs are removed from the fridge overnight! But if you are aware of this that needn't distract from your stay.

Yes it's predominantly just a long slog on the tarmac, but as others have mentioned the road is not overly popular, over the two days I probably saw a dozen vehicles. And there are shaded areas.
No water sources though so make sure you top up your water bottle before leaving Boimorto.

Of note for me was the cafe/bar ' Casa Moncho' shortly before leaving Boimorto. It's the third (and last) cafe in town, I got standard pilgrim fare - a slice of an excellent freshly made tortilla, excellent fresh bread, fresh OJ and a great Cafe con leche, plus a friendly welcome. It was notable because locals were coming for exactly the same. I was told later that the bread is made on the spot.
 
Ideal sleeping bag liner whether we want to add a thermal plus to our bag, or if we want to use it alone to sleep in shelters or hostels. Thanks to its mummy shape, it adapts perfectly to our body.

€46,-
July last year I split off in Boimorto, (signposted). I stayed at Twin Pines in Goimil, nice rooms, (just three beds in each) very clean, pleasant garden, average food. You can either call or book them on booking. Most reports on the place are average, because they literally charge for every little thing - you pay for the wine by the glass for example. And there is a distinct lack of trust: everything but your breakfast needs are removed from the fridge overnight!
They must have had some bad experiences with pilgrims/guests since I stayed there in 2019 because I don't remember such restrictions. It was a very nice place to stay. I had a private room with one bed with shared bath.
 
They must have had some bad experiences with pilgrims/guests since I stayed there in 2019 because I don't remember such restrictions. It was a very nice place to stay. I had a private room with one bed with shared bath.
Possibly, @ratherbefollowingflechas reported :
Overall, it is a lovely place, but you will be charged for everything, including wine with dinner. Breakfast was super grim and is listed exactly on the fridge. Plain white bread, warm juice, coffee without milk or sugar, and measured to be one cup per person. The juice is warm because they lock the refrigerator overnight - which is what left the bad taste in my mouth... The total lack of trust that pilgrims would steal from them. You will also not get your sello until after dinner and you have settled your bill...
I guess they've replaced the fridge (no lock)and they simply remove everything. And I got two cups of coffee, with sugar and milk, so things are improving. My experience with the sello was the same.

That said they were a pleasant couple, and as noted the property is great. I WOULD stay there again!
They may still also have private rooms, but I note that @NadineK videos show a triple bedroom which was the twin of the one that I slept in. Hers was pink, mine was blue! There's a shared bathroom in between.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
About 20km after Boimorto I had a beer at Estanco Bar Suarez and I did spend a night 6km later at at Santiso, which is 26km from Boimorto at Hotel Bello for €45.-
 
So... since I am eyeing del Norte for the future (and most likely will be walking with my wife to boot) and probably will cut to Frances even at Melide ( pulpo and subsequent plethora of Queso in Arzua will trump the hoards of unruly school kids any time) I'm better off to skip this Twin Pines aptly noted fir their friendly hospitality... or is it that I won't even get there?
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
Walked the same in 2018. Spent the night at the albergue in Boimorto. Took the west path out of town thru O Espino and Oins. Connected to the French at Oxen. Spent the night off path in Astrar ( Albergue Rural Astrar , nice ) . Next day final 22 km. to Santiago. Did not meet any pilgrims out of Boimorto til the French .Very quiet. Only soul I came across was the old Spaniard who struck up a conversation with me as I took lunch at a bus stop. ( I don't speak Spanish, he must have been lonely. ) I was using Mapy.cz as my map. Have fun.
 
Am on the Norte rn, looking to walk into SdC the morning on Sun 23 Jun. I have read of a way of avoiding joining the Frances till SdC’s airport perimeter, but I can’t easily find any directions or guides when I search. Any help - much appreciated…
I'm really bad at remembering names.. but I hopped from Norte to Primitivo, then at Lugo, hopped over to Camino Norte through Camino San Roman (I think that is name) and then in Sobrado d. Baamonde???), there are 2 options, ... Most do the option to the left... I do option to the right and end up with 1 night on CF (near O Pedrouza?) and into Santiago early next morning.

Use Mapy.cz to help you see possible walking routes.

You can even grab a blablacar back out again to Leon, if you have any days left).. then train up to Bonar and a couple of fab days on Camino Olvidado.

Easy access back by train to main route of transport as you require..

Spain is so amazing for transport options. I am always so impressed.
 

Attachments

  • Screenshot_2024-06-16-15-48-54-041-edit_cz.seznam.mapy.jpg
    Screenshot_2024-06-16-15-48-54-041-edit_cz.seznam.mapy.jpg
    1.4 MB · Views: 25
You can see the route on the interactive map on the bottom of this page of the Dutch association.
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
In early June next year, I'm planning to use the Ruta/Camino Verde to cut from the Primitivo to the Norte, probably staying in Sobrado dos Monxes - then heading for Santiago de Compostela. It looks like we will have at least three choices on where to join the Camino Francés - on the Norte at Arzúa, taking the variante toward Lavacolla but then walking along 6601 to O Pedrouzo, or staying on the variant all the way to Lavacolla.

Eliminating pilgrim traffic as a factor in deciding how much of the Camino Francés to walk in these three scenarios, can anyone recommend which of these ways to walk (including the Camino Francés portion if joining the Francés before Lavacolla), based on overall scenery, preference for paths over road-walking, and any interesting sites, historical or otherwise?

I walked that stretch of the Camino Francés in 2021, but I'm having difficulty remembering much detail about those last couple of days into Santiago. I was leaning toward staying on the variant to Lavacolla just to avoid the Camino Francés in early June as much as possible, but now I'm wondering if I should be more flexible. There is a certain sense of joy and excitement about the scores of pilgrims approaching SdC on the Francés. So I'm thinking of just focusing on the which choice would result in the nicest walking.

Thanks!
 
I walked the last 100km on the frances the week before last. Whilst it was definitely busier than before Sarria, it was definitely not full of young school kids. Maybe a group or two of college kids but most people on the Way were adults. It was fine. The only day I did not enjoy it was the day walking out of Portomarin when there was a conga line up the first hill and then a huge queue at the first cafe (but not the second!). It was nothing like my experience walking in Sept 2014 or when I came off the Primitivo in May 2017.
 
Am on the Norte rn, looking to walk into SdC the morning on Sun 23 Jun. I have read of a way of avoiding joining the Frances till SdC’s airport perimeter, but I can’t easily find any directions or guides when I search. Any help - much appreciated…
Walked it. Easy to follow. After Biomorto there is a split, marked with the arrows. There is another split later again taking you to the French. If you keep following the arrows to the right you come onto the French Camino at the end of the runway at Lavacolla. Good luck
 
Ideal sleeping bag liner whether we want to add a thermal plus to our bag, or if we want to use it alone to sleep in shelters or hostels. Thanks to its mummy shape, it adapts perfectly to our body.

€46,-
In May 2023, my wife and I took the route from Boimorto that ends up meeting the Frances at Lavacolla. The first 10k were along a narrow, newly paved highway with lots of eucalyptus farms. It was uneventful and mostly boring. (My wife disliked it and said if we do it again, she'd probably take the route to Arzua.) That said, we stayed at Twin Pines BnB and found the host couple friendly and hospitable. The room we were in was very comfortable and we both had the best sleep we experienced on the Norte. Special props to the owner of the BnB. We inadvertently left a plastic bag that contained some painted rocks. About two hours after we left, the BnB owner found the bag and surmised correctly that the rocks had great sentimental value to us. He got in his car and found us along the route to return the bag. We are grateful to him for that. We stayed at a hostel in Lavacolla that night with the idea that we would have a short walk to Santiago the next day and could arrive early in the day. That worked well for us.
 
The only day I did not enjoy it was the day walking out of Portomarin when there was a conga line up the first hill and then a huge queue at the first cafe (but not the second!).
This situation can usually be avoided by leaving later in the morning if possible. And/or not staying in popular end stage towns.
 
This situation can usually be avoided by leaving later in the morning if possible. And/or not staying in popular end stage towns.
Agree, but I also stayed in Palas de Rei, Arzua, Melide and O Pedrouzo, all stage towns. I left only slightly earlier each day but did not encounter anything like the conga line, just a steady trickle of pilgrims to begin with and later I often walked alone. The whole 'last 100km' experience was nothing like as bad as I had feared. Maybe I was between waves.
My reason for staying at stage towns was that I never booked and I correctly guessed that there was so much accommodation in a stage town that I would easily find something. Walking on a few kms to a village with only 1 or 2 albergues was too much of a risk as my daily distances are limited.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
I know of 2 Brazilian ladies who powered through from Arzua right into SdC.

I did this in 2019. I was sick of the crowds and decided "That's it, I'm done...today's the day". It was early November - not much in the way of daylight hours, so I arrived after dark. Stumbled into San Martino Pinaro, downed an Estrella Galicia and fell into bed.
 
I honestly do not think I would even want to attempt it although November cool weather may help
However that said the aforementioned "reward" (🍺🍻) may just propel😁 me to some 'craziness'
 
Thanks everyone. Took the split in Biomorte yday and stayed in Twin Pines. The 10km along the road to the B&B was fine. The first part of the way to Lavacolla this morning was really rather nice, whereas the long stretch beside the busy highway till the airport just requires a head down-get on with it approach. Or a walking companion with whom you can chat - which is what I had. We saw no other pilgrims today from leaving Twin Pines, until the airport perimeter. Amazing! No one else opted for max Frances avoidance. Seeing pics other Norte people were sending me, having started from Arzúa this morning, the contrast seemed surreal.
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
The first part of the way to Lavacolla this morning was really rather nice, whereas the long stretch beside the busy highway till the airport just requires a head down-get on with it approach.
I swear... I must've been in some Twilight zone. I ABSOLUTELY do NOT remember any long stretch beside the highway! :oops:
... I left O Pedrouso around 8AM. Although the morning started clear and sunny the fog started rolling in shortly thereafter and I was passing the airport by 9:00AM in complete fog (I could see folks walking next to me of course but not the planes; if it wasn't for the roar of the engines on the runway I wouldn't have even known that I was walking next to the airport) But I was on a path not next to any highway at all....
 
In 2011 I walked the Airport route in the semi-darkness in a hurry/race to get to Santiago? This year when I walked past the Airport having come from the San Salvador/Primitivo I met hardly any other Pilgrims? I can't say what time time of day (morning) but my experience was relaxed, I loved the small bars that were open and just enjoyed myself. I had a bed booked in Lavacolla. Albergue A Fabrica.
 
I swear... I must've been in some Twilight zone. I ABSOLUTELY do NOT remember any long stretch beside the highway! :oops:
... I left O Pedrouso around 8AM. Although the morning started clear and sunny the fog started rolling in shortly thereafter and I was passing the airport by 9:00AM in complete fog (I could see folks walking next to me of course but not the planes; if it wasn't for the roar of the engines on the runway I wouldn't have even known that I was walking next to the airport) But I was on a path not next to any highway at all....
Oh it definitely goes alongside the highway for a while! I had yet another reminder of how similar aspects of Spain can be to New Zealand there - logging truck after logging truck flying along the highway!
Mind you the trees they log in Spain seem to be a hell of a lot younger than the ones we tend to log in New Zealand, the trunks were less than half the diameter.
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
Walked that highway portion in a cold, driving rain and was greeted by a lot of truckers honking their horns and waving. I was alone, but appreciative of their well-wishes
 
Am on the Norte rn, looking to walk into SdC the morning on Sun 23 Jun. I have read of a way of avoiding joining the Frances till SdC’s airport perimeter, but I can’t easily find any directions or guides when I search. Any help - much appreciated…
What about skipping over to the Ingles and coming a completely different way? I’ve thought about that..
 
...and ship it to Santiago for storage. You pick it up once in Santiago. Service offered by Casa Ivar (we use DHL for transportation).
What about skipping over to the Ingles and coming a completely different way? I’ve thought about that..
That's what I'm planning on doing, the next time I'm on the Norte.
I'll continue along the coast on the Ruta Del Mar (?) until Ferrol and then follow the Ingles.
When I last did the Norte, 2 years ago, I only spoke to a few pilgrims during the evening as all the municipal albergues were closed so when I reached Arzua I found it hard to cope with the large number of pilgrims I saw there. I had intended doing the last 40kms in two days but I just couldn't wait to get away from the crowds so I did it in one go. 40kms wasn't that abnormal for the Norte so it wasn't a problem.
My plan for next year is to do the Catalan and join the Frances, either at Logroño or Burgos and then join the Invierno just so I can avoid those crowds. I prefer the quiet routes.
 
That's what I'm planning on doing, the next time I'm on the Norte.
I'll continue along the coast on the Ruta Del Mar (?) until Ferrol and then follow the Ingles.
When I last did the Norte, 2 years ago, I only spoke to a few pilgrims during the evening as all the municipal albergues were closed so when I reached Arzua I found it hard to cope with the large number of pilgrims I saw there. I had intended doing the last 40kms in two days but I just couldn't wait to get away from the crowds so I did it in one go. 40kms wasn't that abnormal for the Norte so it wasn't a problem.
My plan for next year is to do the Catalan and join the Frances, either at Logroño or Burgos and then join the Invierno just so I can avoid those crowds. I prefer the quiet routes.
Great idea, John.
I'm starting my Camino del Norte in mid August next year.
How many extra days, do you think that this alternative route will take?
 
I had intended doing the last 40kms in two days but I just couldn't wait to get away from the crowds so I did it in one go. 40kms wasn't that abnormal for the Norte so it wasn't a problem.
Some people get irritated with me when I suggest that you power through the last 100 km of the Frances. But that's what a fair amount of people actually do.
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
Some people get irritated with me when I suggest that you power through the last 100 km of the Frances. But that's what a fair amount of people actually do.
In this case, coming from the Norte there is another option that completely avoids the Francés until Lavacolla (which is exactly what @Simperegrina did). No "powering through" necessary.
 
In this case, coming from the Norte there is another option that completely avoids the Francés until Lavacolla (which is exactly what @Simperegrina did). No "powering through" necessary.
Dick Bird took the other option and wasn't impressed. He said there was little of interest, and a lot of road walk. So, yes, you can completely avoid the CF until Lavacolla, but going to Arzua and powering through is a perfectly good option. So, is switching over to the Ingles. So, yes, those are all viable options. If you really want to avoid the CF until the end, take the road walk option. But perhaps the person needs to reevaluate what they are hiking. If they want to avoid crowds, going to Santiago is not the way to do it.
 
Dick Bird took the other option and wasn't impressed. He said there was little of interest, and a lot of road walk. So, yes, you can completely avoid the CF until Lavacolla, but going to Arzua and powering through is a perfectly good option. So, is switching over to the Ingles. So, yes, those are all viable options. If you really want to avoid the CF until the end, take the road walk option. But perhaps the person needs to reevaluate what they are hiking. If they want to avoid crowds, going to Santiago is not the way to do it.


Ahem. I will certainly give due consideration to your advice when I starting planning my 5th, 6th and 7th Caminos to Santiago.

And disregard it.
 
Ideal sleeping bag liner whether we want to add a thermal plus to our bag, or if we want to use it alone to sleep in shelters or hostels. Thanks to its mummy shape, it adapts perfectly to our body.

€46,-
Some people get irritated with me when I suggest that you power through the last 100 km of the Frances. But that's what a fair amount of people actually do.
It is certainly feasible. But the vast majority certainly can't do it and don't want to do it. It does not necessarily correspond to the idea of pilgrimage.
This is what the PCT, AT and CDT are for.
 
I swear... I must've been in some Twilight zone. I ABSOLUTELY do NOT remember any long stretch beside the highway! :oops:
... I left O Pedrouso around 8AM. Although the morning started clear and sunny the fog started rolling in shortly thereafter and I was passing the airport by 9:00AM in complete fog (I could see folks walking next to me of course but not the planes; if it wasn't for the roar of the engines on the runway I wouldn't have even known that I was walking next to the airport) But I was on a path not next to any highway at all....
Simperegrina did not take the Frances through O Pedrouso, but the alternative as described before. So no Twilight zone for you .☺️
 
Ahem. I will certainly give due consideration to your advice when I starting planning my 5th, 6th and 7th Caminos to Santiago.

And disregard it.
You do what you want, but my advice is perfectly good. If I wrote down on this forum that water was wet, I'm sure there would be someone to disagree with me.
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
It is certainly feasible. But the vast majority certainly can't do it and don't want to do it. It does not necessarily correspond to the idea of pilgrimage.
This is what the PCT, AT and CDT are for.
The PCT, AT and CDT are National Scenic Trails and are very beautiful. They are considered the most scenic trails in the U.S. I would never suggest that they be powered through, or that's what they are for. There are some sections that it would be diligent if you make good time. For instance on the Pacific Crest Trail there is a stretch where there is 9 days worth of hiking between resupply points. If you do that stretch too slowly you will run out of food
 
Last edited:
It looks like it’s a $9 bus ride from Vilalba to Ferrol and the Ingles, if you don’t want the crowd or the Road walking past the airport.
 
It looks like it’s a $9 bus ride from Vilalba to Ferrol and the Ingles, if you don’t want the crowd or the Road walking past the airport.
@Simperegrina already made a decision and arrived in Santiago last week

Thanks everyone. Took the split in Biomorte yday and stayed in Twin Pines. The 10km along the road to the B&B was fine. The first part of the way to Lavacolla this morning was really rather nice, whereas the long stretch beside the busy highway till the airport just requires a head down-get on with it approach. Or a walking companion with whom you can chat - which is what I had. We saw no other pilgrims today from leaving Twin Pines, until the airport perimeter. Amazing! No one else opted for max Frances avoidance. Seeing pics other Norte people were sending me, having started from Arzúa this morning, the contrast seemed surreal.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
You do what you want, but my advice is perfectly good. If I wrote down on this forum that water was wet, I'm sure there would be someone to disagree with me.
I respectfully disagree.
(With what you say, not that the water is wet)
😇
 
Dick Bird took the other option and wasn't impressed. He said there was little of interest, and a lot of road walk. So, yes, you can completely avoid the CF until Lavacolla, but going to Arzua and powering through is a perfectly good option.
If I am going to Arzua (and I think I already quipped about it in earlier post) I am SOOOO getting laden with QUESO that I am NOT even put-putting through.
Cheese vs fast power walk.... the cheese will win every time!

I mean, come ON, you should KNOW all about CHEESE, right? 😋:)
 
Ideal sleeping bag liner whether we want to add a thermal plus to our bag, or if we want to use it alone to sleep in shelters or hostels. Thanks to its mummy shape, it adapts perfectly to our body.

€46,-
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.

Most read last week in this forum

Hi that will be my 3 camino I would like to get some information about doing the camino del norte from early April to end the end of may 2025 My goal is to walk 800km our more during that...
Hi everyone I have got about a week free at the end of July and thinking about spending it on the Norte having previously walked the Frances and Primitivo pre-Covid. While I'd love to do the Irun...
Hi everyone!! I have a question on obtaining a pilgrim passport in person in Spain. Has anyone received their passport in person in San Sebastien? I’ve read online the Albergue de Peregrinos and a...
I am having difficulty finding the Camino del Norte guide from John Brierley. Can anyone point me in the proper direction?

❓How to ask a question

How to post a new question on the Camino Forum.

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Updates on YouTube

Camino Conversations

Most downloaded Resources

This site is run by Ivar at

in Santiago de Compostela.
This site participates in the Amazon Affiliate program, designed to provide a means for Ivar to earn fees by linking to Amazon
Official Camino Passport (Credential) | 2024 Camino Guides
Back
Top