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On this date in December...

trecile

Camino Addict
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Here's the thread to post pictures, musings, etc. for any dates in December from any year, and for any Camino route.

When you respond, please mention the year, route you were on and where you walked (or rested) that day. Thanks!
 
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alansykes

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Except the Francés
Nearing Huéneja, Camino Mozárabe, 2019
Puig Campana from Relleu, Vilajoyosa variant of the Ruta de la Lana, 2018
Corgo Valley, Camino Portugués del Interior, 2017
Pico Sacro, near Santiago, Camino Sanabrés, 2016
Puerta de la Fuenfría, Camino de Madrid, 2013
 

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Year of past OR future Camino
To Santiago and back (roads & paths; Tours; Francés; sea; roads & paths)
(Edited)
Thank you to the @moderators for moving a few irrelevant posts to a different and appropriately titled thread. I understand that this current thread with title On this date in December ... is part of the familiar series of:

On this date in November ...
On this date in September ...
On this date in August ...
On this date in July ...
On this date in June ...
On this date in May ...

I enjoy viewing the pictures, musings, etc. from pilgrims who walked on a date in December, as promised and encouraged in the first post of this thread. I walked in late November one year, but, alas, I am too late for this December thread even though the weather and the low number of pilgrims may have been the same as in December. ☺️

Fantastic December photos by December walker @alansykes, most enjoyable to look at ... as always of course. ☺️
 
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alansykes

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Except the Francés
La Calahorra, Camino Mozárabe, 2019
Nearing Torremanzanas, Vilajoyosa variant of the Ruta de la Lana, 2018
Forest fire damage near Oseira monastery, Camino Sanabrés, 2016
Santiago, 2015
Sierra de Guadarrama from near Segovia, Camino de Madrid, 2013
 

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trecile

Camino Addict
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
@Terry Callery I have created a similar thread every month since May. I was not going to leave December out just because much fewer pilgrims walk in December. I will post a thread in January and one in February where you can post your pictures and musings about your winter Caminos.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
I originally started the threads as a way to reminisce about my Camino last year, and I thought that others would like to do the same about their Caminos, especially in such a difficult year.
I also thought that the threads could serve as a resource for those who are trying to decide when to walk, as they can read about pilgrim's experiences in different months in an organized way.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I originally started the threads as a way to reminisce about my Camino last year, and I thought that others would like to do the same about their Caminos, especially in such a difficult year.
I also thought that the threads could serve as a resource for those who are trying to decide when to walk, as they can read about pilgrim's experiences in different months in an organized way.
It's been a great idea, @trecile, and I've enjoyed looking at each month, and probably participated in the Spring months. We all love reminiscing and sharing about our caminos, especially this year as so many of us are stranded closer to home.
 

Terry Callery

Chi Walker
Year of past OR future Camino
"Portuguese Camino"
"Slow Camino"
"The First Pilgrim"
All on Amazon
@Terry Callery I have created a similar thread every month since May. I was not going to leave December out just because much fewer pilgrims walk in December. I will post a thread in January and one in February where you can post your pictures and musings about your winter Caminos.
OK--- sorry to not be focused on your December post----yes ---few pilgilms go then.

Great idea to reminisce--- about the Camino month by month!
It really does affect the experience - "To every thing there is a season."
Great posts - very magnetic---engaging.
 

mspath

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
From my blog of December 5, 2010




To Land's End

The last five days have been spent walking in winter conditions further across Galicia towards the sea at Finisterra. On Tuesday after a quick final breakfast with Adelardo I slowly made my way out of Santiago in steady rain to Negeira. It was a long, sloppy slog of 22km across many hills through eucalyptus forests and much mud. Walked on and off with Anita, a young Korean girl with very sore feet. We two plus a Quebeçoise and an Australian girl were the only pilgrims at the municipal albergue. Luckily it was well heated and there were many blankets since outside it was getting very cold.

On Wednesday Anita and I continued crossing the cold, bleak forest landscape to Vilaserio where we stayed in an old school which is now a minimal albergue. (The only alternative was to walk 20km further to the next accommodation.) The school had a toilet, shower, floor mattresses and NO heat! Outside it was sleeting; inside on tile floors the constant cold was hardly bearable! Of course I wore my woolly hat plus gloves to try to sleep, but there was no relief. Frankly I am surprised that we even made it through the night! By dawn a thin layer of treacherous ice stretched to the horizon outside.

Thus Thursday walking carefully through sleet, snow and rain Anita and I followed many wet, narrow lanes crossing 23kms of higher and higher hills to eventually arrive exhausted at the wonderful albergue complex at Oliveroa. Here were cozy blankets, working radiators, and hot water, plus the kind hospitalero who remembered me from past years. What welcome comfort in contrast to the previous frigid night ! Many other pilgrims were fully exhausted since they had done the total 33kms under severe conditions.

Conditions were to get worse, however. Next day, Friday, all awoke to a thin layer of brittle ice covering most surfaces; this was especially slick on rock and stone and the Camino would now climb up over stone for several kilometers. What to do? Luckily an Australian pilgrim, Liz, a trained trail guide came along and calmly walked and talked me up the icy trail!

After climbing an hour or so our path, now descending, became unfrozen mud. I never really appreciated walking on mud until AFTER trying to walk on ice! What a relief! At last it was easy to hike down through pine and eucalyptus forests towards the now visible sea and land's end at Finisterra.

Liz and I plus a French guy spent the night at the welcoming albergue at San Roque above Corcubion. In the dark from the dorm window we could see the last lighthouse beacon shining out to sea.

Yesterday, Saturday, I walked alone the last kilometers down into Finisterra and out to the lighthouse. The rain was cold, the wind was brutal and the surf rough, but it was wonderful to feel alive! Here the land's end was my journey's end.

By the old stone cross near the marker for kilometer 0 while looking out to sea, I offered heartfelt thanks for life, for strength, and for determination to have successfully walked these past months and many kilometers. ...Weeping I wondered about the journeys yet to be. ULTREIA!
 
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Year of past OR future Camino
Frances(2006) Portugues(2013)
San Salvador (2017) Ingles (2019)
From my blog of December 5, 2010




To Land's End

The last five days have been spent walking in winter conditions further across Galicia towards the sea at Finisterra. On Tuesday after a quick final breakfast with Adelardo I slowly made my way out of Santiago in steady rain to Negeira. It was a long, sloppy slog of 22km across many hills through eucalyptus forests and much mud. Walked on and off with Anita, a young Korean girl with very sore feet. We two plus a Quebeçoise and an Australian girl were the only pilgrims at the municipal albergue. Luckily it was well heated and there were many blankets since outside it was getting very cold.

On Wednesday Anita and I continued crossing the cold, bleak forest landscape to Vilaserio where we stayed in an old school which is now a minimal albergue. (The only alternative was to walk 20km further to the next accommodation.) The school had a toilet, shower, floor mattresses and NO heat! Outside it was sleeting; inside on tile floors the constant cold was hardly bearable! Of course I wore my woolly hat plus gloves to try to sleep, but there was no relief. Frankly I am surprised that we even made it through the night! By dawn a thin layer of treacherous ice stretched to the horizon outside.

Thus Thursday walking carefully through sleet, snow and rain Anita and I followed many wet, narrow lanes crossing 23kms of higher and higher hills to eventually arrive exhausted at the wonderful albergue complex at Oliveroa. Here were cozy blankets, working radiators, and hot water, plus the kind hospitalero who remembered me from past years. What welcome comfort in contrast to the previous frigid night ! Many other pilgrims were fully exhausted since they had done the total 33kms under severe conditions.

Conditions were to get worse, however. Next day, Friday, all awoke to a thin layer of brittle ice covering most surfaces; this was especially slick on rock and stone and the Camino would now climb up over stone for several kilometers. What to do? Luckily an Australian pilgrim, Liz, a trained trail guide came along and calmly walked and talked me up the icy trail!

After climbing an hour or so our path, now descending, became unfrozen mud. I never really appreciated walking on mud until AFTER trying to walk on ice! What a relief! At last it was easy to hike down through pine and eucalyptus forests towards the now visible sea and land's end at Finisterra.

Liz and I plus a French guy spent the night at the welcoming albergue at San Roque above Corcubion. In the dark from the dorm window we could see the last lighthouse beacon shining out to sea.

Yesterday, Saturday, I walked alone the last kilometers down into Finisterra and out to the lighthouse. The rain was cold, the wind was brutal and the surf rough, but it was wonderful to feel alive! Here the land's end was my journey's end.

By the old stone cross near the marker for kilometer 0 while looking out to sea, I offered heartfelt thanks for life, for strength, and for determination to have successfully walked these past months and many kilometers. ...Weeping I wondered about the journeys yet to be. ULTREIA!
Weeping I wondered about the journeys yet to be...
You are further on your journey, if I may say so, simply on account of age. I am glad you have such vivid accounts and memories. May they be your source of succour now that you are no longer walking caminos. If I could give you my legs, they would be yours.
 

Terry Callery

Chi Walker
Year of past OR future Camino
"Portuguese Camino"
"Slow Camino"
"The First Pilgrim"
All on Amazon
From my blog of December 5, 2010




To Land's End

The last five days have been spent walking in winter conditions further across Galicia towards the sea at Finisterra. On Tuesday after a quick final breakfast with Adelardo I slowly made my way out of Santiago in steady rain to Negeira. It was a long, sloppy slog of 22km across many hills through eucalyptus forests and much mud. Walked on and off with Anita, a young Korean girl with very sore feet. We two plus a Quebeçoise and an Australian girl were the only pilgrims at the municipal albergue. Luckily it was well heated and there were many blankets since outside it was getting very cold.

On Wednesday Anita and I continued crossing the cold, bleak forest landscape to Vilaserio where we stayed in an old school which is now a minimal albergue. (The only alternative was to walk 20km further to the next accommodation.) The school had a toilet, shower, floor mattresses and NO heat! Outside it was sleeting; inside on tile floors the constant cold was hardly bearable! Of course I wore my woolly hat plus gloves to try to sleep, but there was no relief. Frankly I am surprised that we even made it through the night! By dawn a thin layer of treacherous ice stretched to the horizon outside.

Thus Thursday walking carefully through sleet, snow and rain Anita and I followed many wet, narrow lanes crossing 23kms of higher and higher hills to eventually arrive exhausted at the wonderful albergue complex at Oliveroa. Here were cozy blankets, working radiators, and hot water, plus the kind hospitalero who remembered me from past years. What welcome comfort in contrast to the previous frigid night ! Many other pilgrims were fully exhausted since they had done the total 33kms under severe conditions.

Conditions were to get worse, however. Next day, Friday, all awoke to a thin layer of brittle ice covering most surfaces; this was especially slick on rock and stone and the Camino would now climb up over stone for several kilometers. What to do? Luckily an Australian pilgrim, Liz, a trained trail guide came along and calmly walked and talked me up the icy trail!

After climbing an hour or so our path, now descending, became unfrozen mud. I never really appreciated walking on mud until AFTER trying to walk on ice! What a relief! At last it was easy to hike down through pine and eucalyptus forests towards the now visible sea and land's end at Finisterra.

Liz and I plus a French guy spent the night at the welcoming albergue at San Roque above Corcubion. In the dark from the dorm window we could see the last lighthouse beacon shining out to sea.

Yesterday, Saturday, I walked alone the last kilometers down into Finisterra and out to the lighthouse. The rain was cold, the wind was brutal and the surf rough, but it was wonderful to feel alive! Here the land's end was my journey's end.

By the old stone cross near the marker for kilometer 0 while looking out to sea, I offered heartfelt thanks for life, for strength, and for determination to have successfully walked these past months and many kilometers. ...Weeping I wondered about the journeys yet to be. ULTREIA!
Amazing narrative - well written - you need to write a book!

What a courageous woman - very inspiring. You are one tough lady-

I was captivated by the story!!!!

The rain was cold, the wind was brutal and the surf rough, but it was wonderful to feel alive.

This is like Hemingway -perhaps better-literate-- one sentance. What a gift you have for expression.

You have a talent for writing. So engaging, So soulful - So inspiring. Terse and concise,

I would be willing to be a "critical reader" of anything you write - feedback helps authors.
I can tell you about self-publishing on Amazon/Kindle - done it three times.

midcoastmarketing99@gmail.com ---email me and I wiil give you my phone number in Maine
Terence Callery

Offer to anyone else that wants to write a Camino memior---
 
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alansykes

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Except the Francés
La Peza, Camino Mozárabe, 2019
Castillo de Biar, Vilajoyosa variant of the Ruta de la Lana, 2018
Porch of Santiago de Taboada, Camino Sanabrés, 2016
Encoro da Fervenza, nearing Dumbría on the way to Fisterra, 2014
Nearing Santa María la Real de Nieva, Camino de Madrid, 2013

DSC_1654.jpg DSC_0394-1.jpg DSC_1287.jpg DSC_0416.jpg DSC_0063.jpg
 

witsendwv

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
(2015)
We walked a slow Coastal Portugues in Galicia from the end of Nov. 2018 arriving in Santiago in the first week of Dec. This was the sunset looking west from our window in A Garda the night before we started walking. It was a pretty evening, but the next morning and for several more it was pouring buckets of rain. I remember being soaked to skin most of the time, but it was a wonderful Camino.

1607188280959.png
 

alansykes

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Except the Francés
Christmas Eve in Santiago, 2012, after arriving from the Plata and the Sanabrés.

Jupiter in conjunction with a full moon over the cathedral before going in for midnight mass.

Seven long years until you could next see the twin towers without scaffolding.

santiago jupiter moon large.jpg
 
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