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Oral Rehydration Solution

BobM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (SJPDP - Santiago); Via Podensis (Le Puy en Velay - SJPDP); Via Francigena (Canterbury - Rome); Via Portugues (Tui - Santiago); Via Francigena del Sud (Rome - Bari).
To Do Via Egnatia (Durres - Thessaloniki); INT & Jerusalem Trail (Tel Aviv - Jerusalem)
#1
I saw a comment in another thread about taking sports drinks or similar energy drinks on the camino if walking in hot weather.

Sufficient water intake and electrolyte replacement is very important, but don't waste your money on expensive commercial products.

If walking at high altitudes, I can justify making up and carrying my own ORS, but not on the camino (weight limitations).

I mix 1tspn "low sodium" salt with 6 tspns of plain white sugar per litre of water. For a 2 - 3 week trip that means 2 kg sugar and about one little container of salt. My supermarket sells "low sodium" salt, which is just potassium chloride and sodium chloride. The sodium/potassium ratio is important for cell metabolism, but if not available, ordinary salt is better than nothing.

Glucose would also be better than plain sugar because it gets into the blood stream faster than sucrose (which has to be metabolised first), but glucose powder is more expensive and possibly not as readily available as sugar.

Don't fall for the hype about magnesium and all those other magical salts in commercial sports/energy drinks. Sure, they are important over time, but the main thing about ORS is getting energy and Na/K into the body.

The taste is actually quite OK, but sometimes I toss in some orange flavoured Staminade as a little luxury.

Have a look at Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oral_rehydration_solution
(or Google "oral rehydration solutons"). The Wikipedia entry is about life-saving ORS when dysentry strikes children in very poor countries, but it gives the principles which are also relevant for hikers in hot conditions.

Hope this is helpful - if not for the camino, then for other trips.

Regards
Bob M
 

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A

Anonymous

Guest
#2
In Dharma Bums - and we are all Dharma Bums I think - it was little bags of nuts and raisins ...

I tend to try to carry enough water but if I run low I dilute it - works fine.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
#4
If with no serious health probs, and even with them, drinking lots of H2O, should do the trick. Best, xm :lol:
 

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#6
I will be taking with me a product called Emergenc-C which I don't believe is available in Europe. It comes in a box of 30 packages, but the packages are very light.

The weight of each pack would be no more than a teaspoon of salt. I use this product at home all the time when I do hot yoga, and I think it will be perfect for the camino. In addition to other things, each package has 1000mg of Vitamin C, and I believe that much vitamin C will be hard to get on the typical camino diet without supplementation. So, everything is combined in one package, all my electrolytes with the vitamin C.

I am even considering mailing some to myself in case I need more.

Blessings,
Lora
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
#7
"and I believe that much vitamin C will be hard to get on the typical camino diet"

eerrmmm, Spanish Oranges?
 
#8
Well, I just don't see myself eating 4 oranges a day! And that may be a little heavy to carry!

However, we all need to do what makes sense to us, and that will be different for everyone.

The camino is a great way to know thyself, and to realize just what is most important to oneself.

Lora
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
#10
...don't see myself eating 4 oranges a day! And that may be a little heavy to carry!
I think in the end the determining factor for weight needs to be one own's needs. I take a (pocket) book always, which represents xtra weight, am good with it. Others take meds, an umbrella (yes :!: ) , etc.

Best, xm 8)
 

lynnejohn

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2005), VDLP(2007), Madrid(2009), Ingles(2009), Sur (2011), VDLP(2011)-partial, VDLP(2014)
#12
I think, aside from extreme situations (scarity/lack of water, extreme heat, diarrhea, or individual health situations), a sensible diet and water intake are sufficient. You're not running a marathon. You're going for a walk every day.
 

renegadepilgrim

Veteran Pilgrim and Traveler
Camino(s) past & future
2010: Camino Frances, 2011: Santo Domingo de la Calzada (Hospitalera), 2012: Camino Portuguese from Porto, 2015: Camino Norte
#13
lynnejohn said:
I think, aside from extreme situations (scarity/lack of water, extreme heat, diarrhea, or individual health situations), a sensible diet and water intake are sufficient. You're not running a marathon. You're going for a walk every day.
True, but if you are not staying properly hydrated you also run the risk of injuring yourself. We had a lot of pilgrims come through in mid to late October with bad tendonitis...I am almost certain it was because they were not drinking enough water because it wasn't hot out...it is important to drink before you feel thirsty. And drink even if you don't think you need it...I am a big fan of Emergen-C packets too....they also help keep you healthy with the B Vitamins, in addition to the electrolytes and vitamin C too....They weigh less than the Nuun tabs and take up less space too.... :)
 


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