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Orthotics

2020 Camino Guides
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances April 2020
A few weeks ago, I started to have foot pain. I'm sure it was from overtraining. Regardless, I went to the podiatrist and she recommended orthotics.

I was fitted for orthotics at the specialty store. I brought along both my trailrunners and boots. I've done two training walks in the trailrunners. They are too tight with the orthotics in place after an hour. Today I did incline training and I felt like I was getting hotspots.

Do I need new orthotics, larger shoes, or different shoes? I called the store (another store in the same chain, store was closed due to snow) and they said I needed different shoes or to shave off the orthotics. I just know shaving off the orthotics is wrong. Please help with your experiences. Thanks.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés, May - June 2020 SJPDP to SDC
Before you start going down the road of changing shoes and orthotics, have you tried different sock combinations? It may be that the bulk of the orthotics means you need thinner socks, or fewer layers of socks. Might be the easy answer - hope so for your sake. Good luck.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances April 2020
Before you start going down the road of changing shoes and orthotics, have you tried different sock combinations? It may be that the bulk of the orthotics means you need thinner socks, or fewer layers of socks. Might be the easy answer - hope so for your sake. Good luck.
I wear iniji trail socks. Not one blister with hundreds of miles walking. I've also done marathons. I truly do not want to change socks. With what I've invested in socks, it will be cheaper to buy new shoes.
 

J Willhaus

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016 CF;
Hospitalera, Zamora 2017, Hospitalera Grañón 2018, Hospitalera Estella 2019
Hi Jeanne,
My husband takes his orthotics with him when he tries on shoes for this same reason. Did you get your shoes at REI? You can take them back for a larger size if you did or you may want to use the REI approach in the future since their return policy is good. If you bought them at a specialty store you might see if they will accept a return since you were fitted there. He has also taken his orthotics back to the clinic to see if they can be made thinner. I would not "shave" them yourself.
Janet
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances April 2020
I wear iniji trail socks. Not one blister with hundreds of miles walking. I've also done marathons. I truly do not want to change socks. With what I've invested in socks, it will be cheaper to buy new shoes.
It
Hi Jeanne,
My husband takes his orthotics with him when he tries on shoes for this same reason. Did you get your shoes at REI? You can take them back for a larger size if you did or you may want to use the REI approach in the future since their return policy is good. If you bought them at a specialty store you might see if they will accept a return since you were fitted there. He has also taken his orthotics back to the clinic to see if they can be made thinner. I would not "shave" them yourself.
Janet


Yes, I did buy my shoes at REI. I can return my boots, but my trailrunners have too many miles on them.

So it's normal to have to buy larger shoes with orthotics? I'm so surprised I have to have them. No one has ever told me I have high arches and I've never had foot pain before.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2017, 2018 neither successful
I am a somewhat disabled US Veteran, I have a problem with hearing. The VA provides me with custom orthotic inserts which are great. To get them I wear whatever I will be walking in with the same Marino wool socks that I hike with. The results are great. It usually takes a few weeks to get the orthotics.
 

sugargypsy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2019
In progress: CP 2020 and/or CI
I called the store (another store in the same chain, store was closed due to snow) and they said I needed different shoes or to shave off the orthotics. I just know shaving off the orthotics is wrong. Please help with your experiences. Thanks.
Had the same problem last year that my orthotics did not really fit well in my trailers. I had them shaved off by an orthopaedic technician and it worked out perfectly. Walked the Camino with no pain or blisters.
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016), VDLP (2017), Mozarabe (2018), Vasco/Bayona (2019)
While my podiatrist says that the orthotic shouldn't change the shoe size, I think that is a bit of an optimistic generalization. Orthotics change the way your foot behaves, so some change in the fitting seems very likely. For example, if you are borderline between one size and another, the orthotic might push you into the larger size. With the arch support, your foot might need more "volume" in the shoe. A larger shoe will provide it.

As far as altering the orthotic goes... if it is just trimming around the edge of the soft part to fit in the bed of the shoes, maybe. But shaving any of the support areas could defeat the purpose, so you should consult with the podiatrist (as @sugargypsy has just suggested). There are 2 possible situations: (1) whether the orthotic sits correctly within the shoes, and (2) whether your foot then has enough room. If #2, I think you should get new shoes.

I am interested to know how your foot pain is, after you've worn the new orthotics and shoes for a couple of weeks.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances April 2020
While my podiatrist says that the orthotic shouldn't change the shoe size, I think that is a bit of an optimistic generalization. Orthotics change the way your foot behaves, so some change in the fitting seems very likely. For example, if you are borderline between one size and another, the orthotic might push you into the larger size. With the arch support, your foot might need more "volume" in the shoe. A larger shoe will provide it.

As far as altering the orthotic goes... if it is just trimming around the edge of the soft part to fit in the bed of the shoes, maybe. But shaving any of the support areas could defeat the purpose, so you should consult with the podiatrist (as @sugargypsy has just suggested). There are 2 possible situations: (1) whether the orthotic sits correctly within the shoes, and (2) whether your foot then has enough room. If #2, I think you should get new shoes.

I am interested to know how your foot pain is, after you've worn the new orthotics and shoes for a couple of weeks.
I'll post a follow up. 😊
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2017)
Frances(2018)
Ingles(2019)
Aragones(2020)
Portuguese(2020)
A few weeks ago, I started to have foot pain. I'm sure it was from overtraining. Regardless, I went to the podiatrist and she recommended orthotics.

I was fitted for orthotics at the specialty store. I brought along both my trailrunners and boots. I've done two training walks in the trailrunners. They are too tight with the orthotics in place after an hour. Today I did incline training and I felt like I was getting hotspots.

Do I need new orthotics, larger shoes, or different shoes? I called the store (another store in the same chain, store was closed due to snow) and they said I needed different shoes or to shave off the orthotics. I just know shaving off the orthotics is wrong. Please help with your experiences. Thanks.
It depends. When I was doing a preceptorship with a Podiatrist who had specialized specifically in sports and athletics (part of my clinicals during university), she scoffed at how frequently orthotics are prescribed. Her take was that general specialty Podiatrists rely on referrals and prescriptions for orthotics too much as an income source.

That said, she was quite frank about how she goes about the process of carefully assessing and diagnosing who would benefit from orthotics. . AND under what conditions and types of activities a person is involved in. In her view, orthotics are actually needed less than 10% of the time that they are prescribed.

So that can be considered or set aside because no one here can say whether or not you actually need orthotics. What I can say, is that for sporting and recreational issues, I would make sure that the foot doctor specializes in athletes and athletics. General practice podiatrists may or may not have the same equivalent knowledge and training in that area.

As far as the fit of the shoe, I am unclear. . . in what order were the purchases of the orthotics made in relationship to the shoes? Are you trying to use the same size shoe that you had PRIOR to your new orthotics? Or did you actually wear the new orthotics as you were fitted for your new shoes?
 
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J Willhaus

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016 CF;
Hospitalera, Zamora 2017, Hospitalera Grañón 2018, Hospitalera Estella 2019
Phil just finished a physical therapy regimen for a foot pain injury he got this summer on the Camino. His PT had him doing a variety of exercises and they were very helpful with the pain.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances April 2020
It depends. When I was doing a preceptorship with a Podiatrist who had specialized specifically in sports and athletics (part of my clinicals during university), she scoffed at how frequently orthotics are prescribed. Her take was that general specialty Podiatrists rely on referrals and prescriptions for orthotics too much as an income source.

That said, she was quite frank about how she goes about the process of carefully assessing and diagnosing who would benefit from orthotics. . AND under what conditions and types of activities a person is involved in. In her view, orthotics are actually needed less than 10% of the time that they are prescribed.

So that can be considered or set aside because no one here can say whether or not you actually need orthotics. What I can say, is that for sporting and recreational issues, I would make sure that the foot doctor specializes in athletes and athletics. General practice podiatrists may or may not have the same equivalent knowledge and training in that area.

As far as the fit of the shoe, I am unclear. . . in what order were the purchases of the orthotics made in relationship to the shoes? Are you trying to use the same size shoe that you had PRIOR to your new orthotics? Or did you actually wear the new orthotics as you were fitted for your new shoes?
I have been wearing my trailrunners for months with a few hundred miles on them. I developed foot pain on the middle of the outside of my foot a few weeks ago. The rest of the pain I had in my feet was kind of phantom pain. It would come and go in other parts. It wasn't anything constant or that bothersome. When I went to the podiatrist she said I had very high arches and prescribed orthotics.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances April 2020
It depends. When I was doing a preceptorship with a Podiatrist who had specialized specifically in sports and athletics (part of my clinicals during university), she scoffed at how frequently orthotics are prescribed. Her take was that general specialty Podiatrists rely on referrals and prescriptions for orthotics too much as an income source.

That said, she was quite frank about how she goes about the process of carefully assessing and diagnosing who would benefit from orthotics. . AND under what conditions and types of activities a person is involved in. In her view, orthotics are actually needed less than 10% of the time that they are prescribed.

So that can be considered or set aside because no one here can say whether or not you actually need orthotics. What I can say, is that for sporting and recreational issues, I would make sure that the foot doctor specializes in athletes and athletics. General practice podiatrists may or may not have the same equivalent knowledge and training in that area.

As far as the fit of the shoe, I am unclear. . . in what order were the purchases of the orthotics made in relationship to the shoes? Are you trying to use the same size shoe that you had PRIOR to your new orthotics? Or did you actually wear the new orthotics as you were fitted for your new shoes?
I'm wearing the new orthotics in my existing trailrunners.
 

lindam

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, VDLP, Invierno, Portuguese, Madrid, Ingles, Fisterra, Muxia, Catalan/Aragones/Loyola Norte
Is it possible for you to remove the inserts (i.e., that came in the shoes when you bought them) in your trail runners before replacing them with your orthotics? Both my husband and I do this whenever we are walking a Camino. It has meant no foot pains for either of us, which could have been an issue especially with the added weight of our packs.
 

Linda Fantillo

RiverWalker
Camino(s) past & future
September/October 14, May 17, September 18, MAY 2020
There is no way on God's green earth that I could walk the distances without my orthotics. I recently was on a bit of a holiday and somewhere along the way, lost my orthotics and needed to replace them (Damn!) They didn't have to cast me again to make a new pair as they were fairly recent and they had the prescription, so it saved a bit of money. When I went in to pick up the new ones, he took my walking shoe and said he needed to trim them slightly. So yes, you need to take out the insoles of whatever you are walking in and replace them with your orthotics. Mine are not so thick that I mostly can wear them with dressier shoes also. A definite word of caution - do not go to someone who has you walk on this machine that supposedly senses how the orthotics should be made. Go to someone that specializes in making a cast for your foot that will tell exactly how your foot is. My left foot is totally different from my right because of a bunion. Good luck!
 

Claudia Stephens

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
(June 1-July 25)
A few weeks ago, I started to have foot pain. I'm sure it was from overtraining. Regardless, I went to the podiatrist and she recommended orthotics.

I was fitted for orthotics at the specialty store. I brought along both my trailrunners and boots. I've done two training walks in the trailrunners. They are too tight with the orthotics in place after an hour. Today I did incline training and I felt like I was getting hotspots.

Do I need new orthotics, larger shoes, or different shoes? I called the store (another store in the same chain, store was closed due to snow) and they said I needed different shoes or to shave off the orthotics. I just know shaving off the orthotics is wrong. Please help with your experiences. Thanks.
I had this exact same experience. Took the orthotics in and had them shaved. Took the boots back and exchanged them for 1/2 size bigger. Do it!
 

jmcarp

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2013
Camino del Norte a Chimayó (USA), 2015
Camino Portugues, 2017
Were the orthotics designed to be worn with the original insoles in place? If so, take them back to the podiatrist for shaving and/or adjustment. If not, take the original insoles out and see if that helps the fit of the orthotics.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances April 2020
Is it possible for you to remove the inserts (i.e., that came in the shoes when you bought them) in your trail runners before replacing them with your orthotics? Both my husband and I do this whenever we are walking a Camino. It has meant no foot pains for either of us, which could have been an issue especially with the added weight of our packs.
I have removed the existing inserts. The orthotics fit when I first put the shoes on. They don't after walking a few miles in them. Especially when I walked on an incline. My foot swells and the shoe no longer fits. I think my mistake was not getting the inserts after a long walk.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances April 2020
Were the orthotics designed to be worn with the original insoles in place? If so, take them back to the podiatrist for shaving and/or adjustment. If not, take the original insoles out and see if that helps the fit of the orthotics.
I was wearing the orthotics without the original insole in place.
 

Tom Quinn

Happy walker
Camino(s) past & future
(2019)
(2020)
I have yet to walk the Camino, fill disclosure. I am an old man, but have been trained in my early life as a US Marine and subsequently served as the CO of a Recruit Company of 1500 recruits in the 3rd battalion MCRD, Parris Island. I have experienced the joy of walking and have called upon my past experience inorder to train for my Camino (Lyon to Santiago). I gather as much information as I can from you precious camino walkers. I have never worn orthotic inserts. However I can learn. At the suggestion of a Marine I have acquired 2 pair of inserts for my boots. I am wearing them now. My back no longer feels the dull pain, my feet feel comfortable in the boots. There is enough room for my toes to wiggle comfortably. I am wearing one pair of icebreaker socks and walking in Merrell Moab 2 Mid Vents. Daily I walk 4 to 6 miles, sometimes 10 or more on the weekend. The point I'm trying to make is this: get orthotics. They help! Temper Fi, Tom
 

gbob

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portugal 2020
A few weeks ago, I started to have foot pain. I'm sure it was from overtraining. Regardless, I went to the podiatrist and she recommended orthotics.

I was fitted for orthotics at the specialty store. I brought along both my trailrunners and boots. I've done two training walks in the trailrunners. They are too tight with the orthotics in place after an hour. Today I did incline training and I felt like I was getting hotspots.

Do I need new orthotics, larger shoes, or different shoes? I called the store (another store in the same chain, store was closed due to snow) and they said I needed different shoes or to shave off the orthotics. I just know shaving off the orthotics is wrong. Please help with your experiences. Thanks.
Remove the insoles from the shoes. Ive been doing this for years. Adjust how you lace your shoes.
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2017)
Frances(2018)
Ingles(2019)
Aragones(2020)
Portuguese(2020)
Remove the insoles from the shoes. Ive been doing this for years. Adjust how you lace your shoes.
In another post that she made, she stated that is what she had been doing on both counts. :)
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016), VDLP (2017), Mozarabe (2018), Vasco/Bayona (2019)
[Edited since Jeanne has explained that she didn't get custom orthotics; I had missed that point. But I'll leave some of my post, since it might be informative to someone else.]
I was fitted for orthotics at the specialty store.
When I refer to custom orthotics, I am talking about inserts that are made according to a plaster cast of my foot, when my foot is in a relaxed non-weight-bearing position. Each foot is different, as @Linda Fantillo points out. You can't go into a store, pick up a pair of custom orthotics, and walk out with them. I have to go back a week or so later, as they are made to fit the cast of my foot.

The orthotics need to fit inside your shoe without puckering or big gaps. If they are too wide or long, they need to be trimmed. They don't stop fitting when your foot swells after walking. Your shoes might become too tight and you need a larger pair but the orthotics are not the problem. The thickness of your inner sole/ insert/ orthotic may slightly affect the fit of your shoe, which could be a problem.

The orthotics support the bottom and arch of your foot, and help your foot roll properly as you walk. This does not change when your foot swells.
 
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RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
Some insoles whether custom made or off the shelf retail are more substantial than the factory one. Subsequently they take up more room in the footwear. If that is the case you have to adjust the footwear size or trash the new insoles. Could also perhaps be remedied by thinner socks. Only you know the solution as you have the shoes and insoles. Try different combinations.
I will say this much, you will not truly know if a combination works for you until you walk at least a week in them, minimum 10 kms a day. The wrong to find out is when you are on the Camino.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances April 2020
I wonder if we are talking about the same things.

When I refer to custom orthotics, I am talking about inserts that are made according to a plaster cast of my foot, when my foot is in a relaxed non-weight-bearing position. Each foot is different, as @Linda Fantillo points out. As far as I know, you can't go into a store, pick up a pair of custom orthotics, and walk out with them. I have to go back a week or so later, as they are made to fit the cast of my foot.

I wonder if you have bought one of the over-the-counter inserts that other people have recommended. These are fine for many people, but they are not really "custom orthotics" that you would get from a podiatrist.

The orthotics need to fit inside your shoe without puckering or big gaps. If they are too wide or long, they need to be trimmed. They don't stop fitting when your foot swells after walking. Your shoes might become too tight and you need a larger pair but the orthotics are not the problem. The thickness of your inner sole/ insert/ orthotic may slightly affect the fit of your shoe, which seems to be your problem.

The orthotics support the bottom and arch of your foot, and help your foot roll properly as you walk. This does not change when your foot swells.


I think the mistake was not having the inserts in the shoes when you bought the shoes.
I did not get custom orthotics. My podiatrist wrote down what I needed on a store flyer for a specialty foot store. She sent me there. I already had my trailrunners for the past months that I have been training in.
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
I am a somewhat disabled US Veteran, I have a problem with hearing. The VA provides me with custom orthotic inserts which are great. To get them I wear whatever I will be walking in with the same Marino wool socks that I hike with. The results are great. It usually takes a few weeks to get the orthotics.
This is where I learn something new every day. How do orthotic inserts in your shoes help with your hearing? I can sort of see (in another thread) how they might help with knee problems. But helping with ear problems sounds like a real miracle to me.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2017, 2018 neither successful
This is where I learn something new every day. How do orthotic inserts in your shoes help with your hearing? I can sort of see (in another thread) how they might help with knee problems. But helping with ear problems sounds like a real miracle to me.
The VA works in mysterious ways. Once any disability is diagnosed, and agreed to, they do many odd/extra things. Everything is always done their way.
 

Jeff B

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2019
Larger shoes may be worth trying. For myself, i wear a size 11.5 casual/dress shoe, 12.0 in a running shoe, and 12.5 in my hiking shoes. In fact, the web site for my hiking shoe said that if i wear an Asics/New Balance running shoe, then i should wear a 1/2 size larger in my hiking (North Face) shoe. Keep in mind that your feet will 'expand' significantly after a full day of hiking.
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2017)
Frances(2018)
Ingles(2019)
Aragones(2020)
Portuguese(2020)
Definitions are getting very blurry for the terms 'Insole' vs 'orthotic'

Insoles, arch supports and inserts are pretty much the same thing as a category. You can usually find them over the counter at retailers from big box stores to athletic shops to outdoor recreation stores like REI. They are all over online shopping sites as well.

They provide additional cushioning and may also offer some level of minor support in your shoes, replacing the insole that came with the shoe.. Because the material is soft and deforms easily, replacing them about every 4 to 6 months, at most, is a good idea. Beyond that and their functionality decreases.

Orthotics are found in shops that are specialized or medical offices. What has happened is that the term “orthotic” has been adopted as a generic term, like kleenix or windex.

An orthotic is a firm support. It is primarily made from some type of plastic material where the arch of your foot is located. They are meant to provide some distinct level of arch support in order to reduce the risk of further structural damage of injury to the feet while walking or running.

As a result, orthotics tend to be custom made and cannot be pre-made or manufactured then placed on a store shelf waiting for a buyer. Your foot must to be evaluated, and that evaluation determines what and which type of orthotic you need. A mold is made of the foot/feet and then the orthotic is fabricated (off site or on site) to precisely match your foot its needed correction. Orthotics do not usually deform; therefore, they do not have to be replaced as often as over-the-counter insoles.

Superfeet models, even though they have a plastic component, for example, are NOT orthotics. Neither are Dr. Scholls products, or gel inserts, or silicone stuff that slips into a shoe. The same applies to heat molded insole products.

Some other personal observations:

Into this mix comes a sorta hybrid approach: The specialty shops which are retail locations, where one can pop into and have a mold taken, and a device produced, that is meant to act in the same manner as an orthotic. The problem is, that such devices may not solve the problem at all, and attempt to replace the need for a physical exam and assessment with a robotic algorithm which attempts to deduce problems based on a foots shape and visualized pressure points.

That is an imprecise way to try and determine an actual deformity or structural problem that NEEDS to be corrected, vs one which does NOT need correcting. They can work to help soreness, but they can also do nothing, or worse, exacerbate an underlying issue.

Keep in mind that the business of orthotics, even those custom made in a podiatrist's office, are a BUSINESS. There is a large debate, even in professional circles, about how to evaluate the need for an orthotic, whether they are needed, and even whether they produce the benefits which are promise to patients and consumers.

Anecdotally, there are many who find them a life saver. . . but also those who have found them to create harm.

So if you have undiagnosed soreness, or motion control issues, start first with the footwear to see if changing it will affect performance. Then if more is needed, look at the various insoles that focus on the issues that you are concerned with: pronation, comfort, heel pain, metatarsal pain.

Beyond that if more is needed and a solution isn't found, I would think about a Sports Podiatrist to assess to properly assess feet and ankles.

If knees and lower back are involved, I recommend seeking consultation with an Orthopedic practitioner or surgeon who can more accurately assess you for specific musculoskeletal issues.

There are folks who will report that there symptoms were resolved using a variety of means. These are anecdotal reports. While they worked well for someone else, there are others for which they have failed.

So go conservatively and be cautious about any serious concerns regarding knees, lower legs, ankles and feet as you seek solutions. If someone suggests something that sounds interesting to try, go slowly as you try it out yourself.

For issues with knees and ankles I would not seek to try and correct such issues on my own or with a foot-based additive like an insole or orthotic. While they can relieve some discomfort in a given circumstance, they may also mask more serious underlying issues. Get those issues evaluated professionally to determine if a footwear based solution is the right solution. It may be, or not.
 
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RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
This is where I learn something new every day. How do orthotic inserts in your shoes help with your hearing? I can sort of see (in another thread) how they might help with knee problems. But helping with ear problems sounds like a real miracle to me.
LOL...yes, I was wondering what the correlation was as well. My father goes to the VA for his hearing aids and it is a separate clinic there just for that. I think their podiatry is on another floor of the building.
 

craiger1511

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
V. Fran (2019) in progress
C. Primitivo (2019)
C. Frances - (2019) in progress
C. Finnisterre (2015)
Peregrinos, allow me make a quick comment re: orthotics, shoes and socks.
Short version: consider New Balance shoes and boots since the are available widths A to EEEE. New Balance works fantastically with my orthotics.
Tedious version: I first developed some heel pain approximately one month prior to my first camino. I was seen by a Sport Podiatrist who fitted me for an orthotic (as well as gave me a number of stretches for leg and foot). When my orthotics arrived they did not fit well with my trail runners and was advised to try New Balance (there's a NB store nearbye). NB shoes and boots come in all widths. I went from an 11 C to a 12 EE. Since the switch in shoes/boots, I have been able to walk the CF (parts), Finesterre, Norte, TMB and the VF (parts). Whenever, I order a new style of NB I wear them for a week or so indoors to be certain that they fit well; if not, they returned for a different style. Currently, I wear the 1080s for their wide toe box, neutrality, and cushion. Lastly, I've settled on Smartwool PhDs. BTW, I too love REI for it's member's return policy but none of the shoes or boots fit me like NB so I buy them directly from NB. Buen Camino a todos.
 
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Eric G

Member
Camino(s) past & future
1st timer
I can relate! Being a retired Paratrooper I have many foot issues. Keep it simple!
1. I get cortisone injections prior to each Camino. I've walked 7 thus far. I will return for 3 more in May.
2. I too take orthodics. I also take the original inserts in case my feet swell and need more room. Also, if one pair gets wet. I can switch them out.
3. Always try new shoes with your orthodics and your hiking socks.
4. Buy your shoes at least 1 size larger. Your feet will swell after several days.
I know some are against cortisone injections however I swear by them. Instant relief!! I get them for plantar fasciitis and a Nuroma.
Hope this helps:)
 

Bohemiana

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
First Camino will be April 2015
I got foot problems from over training but primarily adding too much weight to my training pack too fast. Anyway, I got $300 custom orthodicts and I HATED them. Total waste of money! I purchased a few over-the-counter orthodics and they worked alright and I was able to walk the Camino but my feet hurt all the time.

Overall, I would only purchase shoes from either REI or RoadRunner Sports both of which have a guarantee even after you wear the shoes (you have to be a member). I use trail runners and I have purchased many different pairs, most of which I didn't like and RoadRunner Sports always takes them back within 90 days.
 

mikebet

Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP to Pamplona (2016); Baiona to Santiago (2018); Sarria to Santiago (2018)
I am a somewhat disabled US Veteran, I have a problem with hearing. The VA provides me with custom orthotic inserts which are great. To get them I wear whatever I will be walking in with the same Marino wool socks that I hike with. The results are great. It usually takes a few weeks to get the orthotics.
I'm in the same boat with regard to a service-related hearing deficit but I didn't know that the VA provides orthotic services as well. I've got plenty flat feet which have plagued me on log hikes. What did you tell them when you sought help?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2013), Primitivo (2015), Muxia/Fisterra (2015), Haervejen (2017)
Hi Jeanne, My husband walks with orthotics. It really took him some experimentation to come up with a good system. You might need different orthotics, but before you go to the expense you might want to try changing your socks to some that have more padding. Also my husband has a very thin foam insole that he puts on top of the orthotics. It cushions and covers up the orthotic so it didn’t create as many hotspots. He actually cannibalized the insole from a pair of really cheap shoes and cut it to fit. It’s foam and about an eighth of an inch thick. He wears Merril Moabs for walking. He wears Feetures socks which are quick dry and provide a bit of compression and cushion.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2017, 2018 neither successful
I'm in the same boat with regard to a service-related hearing deficit but I didn't know that the VA provides orthotic services as well. I've got plenty flat feet which have plagued me on log hikes. What did you tell them when you sought help?
I cheated a bit with that being my only problem. I also broke my ankle in a parachute accident. It still is painful. I tried to get compensation but they said that I was "making too much money" and they denied my request. Since then they have decided to provide to provided the boot incerts only. Somewhere I mentioned that the VA has to also agree about the disability to have if be real.
 
Thread starter OLDER threads on this topic Forum Replies Date
davebugg Equipment Questions 2
Steven Light Equipment Questions 16
DoubleD Equipment Questions 25
Karen2017 Equipment Questions 8

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