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Pack Size/Model Survey

Camino(s) past & future
(2007)
#1
hi, i am starting to look for a pack for the pilgrimage.
what have others had success with, in terms of size?

as a side note, what do people think is better:

a) buying a good pack first
b) buying supplies, and finding a pack to fit that list

it seems to me that one could buy a lot and force themselves to buy too big of a pack to fit everything they bought. maybe it's better to set a limit with a pack first?

thanks everyone,
paul
 

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#2
Paul,
For a pack mine was 44 L and my wife’s 40 L (weighing in at 2 lb 12 oz.). My total carry weight was 20 Lbs. including her pillow and hers was 15 lbs. They both were from REI and were the Lookout models. Had outside pockets and three compartments, that held guide book, water, camer and stuff like that. We made every thing fit the pack. I am going to have my pack bronzed. . . :)
Ultrea!
Jerry
 
#3
Hi Paul,
My pack selection was a REI UL 45. It is 45ltr. single internal fiberglass frame. ripstop nylon pack.
1. I think that it is better to not pack so tightly that the contents of the pack distort the internal frame.
2. The pack must fit comfortably when it is filled, a big difference from empty.
3. the pack must be able to be loaded and unloaded easily. I was only comfortable with my sleeping bag in the bottom of the pack.
4. External netted holders for water bottles and wet items are great.
5. This pack has a small compartment in the top cover which I used for my credential and meds that I needed access to during the day.
6. this pack was in my price range.
I wouldn't worry about taking too much. Just walk a couple of 20k practice walks wearing the loaded pack and the unnecessary stuff will disappear fast. Enjoy the planning, it is fun part of the experience. ultreya, John
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#4
Backpacks

My backpack is a 30L Prolite bag with no frills and weighs just 650gr.
We had a pilgrim-planning get together yesterday at my home and I unpacked and weighed everything that I will carry for our camino in September. Fully packed, including a 500ml bottle of water, it weighed in at 5.3kg.
For a man, a 35L bag should provide more than enough space to carry everything you need.
The secret is to weigh everything and pack the lightest of everything.
Good luck!
 

Janeh

Active Member
#5
Sil, could you please list everything you have in your pack seeing that it only weights in at 5.3kg. Would be very interested to see what you now think is essential after all your experience. cheers, Jane :D
 

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#6
Hi, Paul

I've got an Osprey Atmos 50L that I'm very happy with. It's got a mesh ventilation shaft that runs up the pack and keeps your back cool while walking. 50L seems to be a good size because it gives you room to adjust the items you're carrying into positions that are comfortable to you. We looked at 35L packs but felt that they offered too little room. The 50L has compression straps that enable you to make it smaller, too.

I do think it's a good idea to at least have a sense of how much stuff you'll be packing when you purchase the pack. If you can go into the store with your sleeping gear, clothes, first-aid kit, etc., you'll make a wiser purchase. You're right: if everything you'll need fits into a 35 or 40L, buying a pack that size will force discipline upon you.

Buen Camino!

Steve S
 

JohnnieWalker

Nunca se camina solo
Donating Member
#7
I looked at Golite as well as the Osprey series and finally decided on the latter. I can't recommend the Osprey too highly - and they come in sizes to fit you - s,m,l - it is worth trying them out in the shop. I also use a 50 ltr which for summer walking easily holds the 6.5k I carry and leaves lots of room for extra items for winter trecking. Ospreys are a little more expensive but a good long term investment imho.
 

William Marques

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
#8
Crux AK47-X.
Volume: 52 litres
Weight: 1.19kg
A very simple design made from very good materials. Lightweight.

My wife has a much smaller pack!

William
 

spursfan

Veteran Member
Donating Member
#9
Just to get my end of the distribution - first time round I used a Golite Dawn - 45L, c425g - next time I'd ditch the spare pair of shoes, replace sleeping bag with silk bag liner and aim for 20L Salomon Raid Revo - I think 30L should be do-able with comfort - I;m going April/May
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#10
My Backpack

Here is my packing list. This is a 'summer' packing list and everything is lightweight. The 'chill cheater' jacket and trousers are made of parachute material and are wind resistant. The shorts are made of 'running shorts.' material. The trousers are made of 'quantec' - a lightweight tracksuit material. The rainsuit is made by Regatta and is a lightweight jacket and over trousers. The sleeping bag liner is silk.
On most days I will be wearing a t-shirt, pants & bra, shorts, socks, boots, chill cheater jacket and hat and will carry a staff.
In (and attached to) my waist bag will be money, air tickets, passport, credential, small dictionary, notebook, pen, 6 pages of the CSJ Guide, bottle of water, lip-ice, sunblock stick, small cutlery set and camera. This weighs in at 1.9kg. (The water and camera weigh almost 1kg alone!)

Backpack + cover & Liner 755
1 Long sleeve shirt & 1 trousers 371
2 Bridgedale Socks and liners 194
Chill Cheater trousers 77
1 T Shirts and 1 pair Shorts 215
2 Pants/ 1 Bra 166
Fleece 165
Rainsuit 471
First Aid/Plasters etc 222
Bath/towel/shampoo etc 326
Soap/pegs/sewing kit 143
Torch 83
Plate 31
Cup/coil heater/coffee/sugar 290
Charger, plug /Batteries 212
Toilet paper 36
Sleeping bag liner & Fleece sheet 307
Reading Glasses 38
Survival blanket 36
Arnica 100
Croc Sandals 208
Bottle of water 533
Whiz Freedom 41
Gift for Maria/Felisa 50
Photo albumn 153
5223

200gr of this will be left with Felisa's daughter outside Logrono. (My two companions are carrying the albums for Tomas and Jesus Jato).

Spursfan - it might be really cold in April/May. You should look around for lightweight fleece fabric and make a top sheet for your silk-liner. Works like a dream!
 
#11
I listened to the advice of the veterans (experience, not age...) like Sil and Spursfan about limiting weight, and my Camino was immeasurably the happier for it.

I would fully endorse the 'no more than 10% of your body weight' rule - which limited me to 6.5Kg. I also completely agree with Steve about getting a back ventilating pack, too - I took a Berghaus Freeflow III 20L pack, and it was heaven to turn into a breeze and cool my sweaty back!After a lot of obsessive repacking I ended up with a kit that covered heat, cold, wet (early May), any number of potential medical emergencies, and even dressing up a bit in the evening. There isn't anything I would do differently - except I have just discovered that WD40 do a small pen-like device weighing only a few grams, that I will take one next time to lubricate creaky doors in albergues!

I ditched the pack's own cover, and took a tough waterproof stuff sack as a liner (it also doubled as a groundsheet to sit on, and even could be inflated as a cushion). I couldn't imagine anything worse than wet gear to change into. I made my silk sleeping bag (from scrap silk and charity shop bits and pieces) with a double layer for warmth.

I Xeroxed maps, timetables and pages from guides in reduced size, and ditched them as I went. My flashlight was a tiny white LED keychain torch weighing about 4g.

I would definitely get the pack first (and take a bag of heavy shopping to try it out in the store), and go for as small as you dare.

Even 10% of your own weight feels like a ton at the end of a long day!

Best wishes,

Pip
 

jl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances('05, '07), Aragonese ('05), del Norte / Primitivo ('09), Via Tolosana (Toulouse '05), Via Podiensis (Le Puy '07), Via Lemovicensis (Troyes '09), VF ('12), Winter Camino ('13/'14) Cammino d'Assisi ('14) Jakobseweg (Leipzig - Paris '15) San Salvador/Norte ('15) Ignaciano ('16) Invierno ('16)
#12
Pack size / model survey

I am beginning my second Camino in le Puy on August 4th having completed (in SdC) my first in 2005 from Toulouse. Although I managed to get my pack weight down to 10kgs last time I am now working on getting it down to 8kg for my next journey. To that end I have purchased a new pack from the Aarn Range of Packs. This pack is a revolutionary New Zealand design and the one I have purchased (Natural Balance) weighs 1.3 kg. I am able to add front pockets to this which increases the volume by another 10 litres (and the weight by 600 grams). These pockets are worn at the front of the pack (a bit like saddle bags if you like) The pack is divided into three sections and comes complete with interior linings making it 100 percent waterproof and eliminating the need for a pack cover. As I am planning to only carry 8 kgs I will not take these pockets, but they will be useful when I am bushwalking at any time. There are a variety of sizes in these packs and you may find it worthwhile looking at Aarn's website.

I have opted for a larger size pack as I have an aversion to having things (anything at all) dangling on the outside of my pack while walking and I also hate having to carry extras - like food shopping - in my hands. By having a larger pack I have ample room to put everything inside it, and plenty of room, on the odd days when I have to purchase food for later in the day to put that inside my pack as well.

I had a large pack last time (and heavier - 1.9kgs) and was never temprted to "fill" it up, sticking faithfully to the minimal weight goal. I having visions of my walking my Camino with a half empty pack - air weighs nothing. I won't bore you with what I take as it is very similiar to those things already mentioned above. I must say though that I now have 2 sets of gear - one for more rugged bushwalking, and another for the Camino!

Regards, Janet
 

spursfan

Veteran Member
Donating Member
#13
Aarn packs look interesting but I'd go for the mountain magic (say 30L at 800g or even 20L at 700g) - though, if you're going in August, you might need your larger pack to carry sleeping bag and even tent
 
#14
I completed my Camino a couple of weeks ago with the Aarn featherlite freedom and can't recommend it highly enough.

It is not the lightest pack you can get. However lightness is not the only factor.

The sports balance pockets at the front not only balance the pack load but also mean that water, food, guidebook, suncream, poncho are all imediately to hand without having to take the pack on or off.

The hipbelt is wide and the angle can be adjusted so it fits perfectly on the hip.

Between the hipbelt and the sports balance pockets there is no weight on the shoulders at all. Nor is it necessary to lean forward with the weight of the pack. This really helps with balance up and down hills and means the walking is generally less tiring.


Mercury
 
#15
Hi Paul,
buy the pack first and be sure you are able to exchange it after trying it out at home filled. I think mine is 45 litre with lots of side mesh pockets and velcro ties to attach water, bread, hat, etc. Packed it is 21 lbs without water. Fit is everything - a good store will be able to show you the order in which to tighten each strap for a perfect fit. Mine has adjustable stays that the store also fitted properly.
 

spursfan

Veteran Member
Donating Member
#16
Your Aarn pack might be wonderful but it's still way too big (50L + 10) and too heavy (1.8 kg) - and for it to be described as ultralite on their website is a joke

I'd far rather mix and match by using a bum bag to carry things I needed to get access to and water round my hips and then a light bag on my back (say 20L) - that's probably saving 1 kg on pack weights alone
 
#17
Hi Spurs Fan

I appreciate this is all a matter of personal choice.

Whatever the theories - I have just walked all the way from SJPP to Santiago in 21 days with my AARN pack and it was excellent :)

So I would recommend it.

Mercury
 

KiwiNomad06

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy-Santiago(2008) Cluny-Conques+prt CF(2012)
#18
There is a lot of personal preference to this. Personally, I have tried both a smaller, lighter pack and a slightly heavier, larger one. I find the larger one much more comfortable to wear with the same amount of gear in it, as the harness distributes the weight better. I might have saved weight with a lighter pack, but it 'felt' like I was carrying a heavier load.
 

spursfan

Veteran Member
Donating Member
#19
Mercury

Have to admit that I'm very tempted to try the Mountain Magic and would have, if there had been a UK distributor

Can't resist saying that I walked it in 20 days - perhaps it was the extra weight of your pack that slowed you down

Spursfan
 
#20
Perhaps it was! :lol:

It's a bummer that there is no UK distributor for AARN. I had to order my pack from New Zealand and trust it would be ok - which it was. But much better to be able to try before you buy and get help with adjusting the pack
 

jl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances('05, '07), Aragonese ('05), del Norte / Primitivo ('09), Via Tolosana (Toulouse '05), Via Podiensis (Le Puy '07), Via Lemovicensis (Troyes '09), VF ('12), Winter Camino ('13/'14) Cammino d'Assisi ('14) Jakobseweg (Leipzig - Paris '15) San Salvador/Norte ('15) Ignaciano ('16) Invierno ('16)
#21
Hi again Paul, et al.

Although I have yet to walk the Camino with my Aarn Pack, I have loaded it up (minus the front pockets, as I do not intend to take them - which means my pack weighs 1.3kg) and gone for numerous jaunts near where I live and found it of comparable compfort to my Macpac and to the One Planet pack I used last time. I chose harness over weight last time and I cannot sing the One Planet harness praises highly enough so to say the Aarn is comparable is - for me - high praise indeed!

I too had to order my Aarn long distance, as there is no supplier in Adelaide - but with the help of very experienced friends I have been able to adjust it to fit my back perfectly and am absolutely delighted. My son, a very experienced bush walker, also road tested it and sang its praises too.

good luck with your decisions Paul,

Best wishes, Janet
 
#22
To add my vote, I am an Osprey girl. I took the womans aura model 50L, and it was perfect. Very adjustable, and lots of room for those days when you have to pack your own food, and extra room for shopping in Santiago!

I placed my water bladder in the very back mesh portion. My pack with water probably weighed in at 8K, but I didn't even know it was there. I saw others on the trail with the same pack, and they also loved it.

Lora
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#23
Prolite

The 30 Lt Prolite has thin inner rods which helps keep it rigid when fully packed.
It doesn't have any outer pockets, besides a top flap pocket where I keep my rainsuit, backpack cover, sitting plastic and toilet roll.
It does have a number of external elastic ties and straps so I usually hang a bottle of water in a mesh bag on one side.
Although I have everything ready packed it is not full and it could easilty accommodate another 1kg or 2kg.
 
#24
I don't quite agree with those who say to get a large bag and carry it half-full.

I took a small, inexpensive pack -- advertised as a day and a half pack. I think it cost about $30 U.S. I only carried about 5 kg of gear (plus water). If I'd had a larger pack, I know I would have taken more stuff with me -- and I would have regretted it.

My balance also seems to be better with a smaller pack. The weight is all close to your body, and it doesn't ever swing wildly from side to side.

I might have looked a bit odd with a loaf of french bread strapped to the side of my pack, but it worked for me.

I guess it all depends on personal preference. As long as you pack as lightly as possible, I don't think your choice of pack matters all that much. I'd say that a waist strap is critical, but everything else is optional.

Buen camino!
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#25
Sleeping bags

Hi,

This is my first post here. I've been reading for a couple of weeks, and thinking about the Camino for longer.

When you are talking about packing light, are you carrying a sleeping bag? If not, what do you use, or are you not staying in the albergues.

(It is hard for those of us who have never been on a pilgrimage to envision all these details.)

Thanks for your help as I get more and more interested in this project.

By the way, I love the image of the baguette strapped to the pack. I wouldn't be successful in resisting the urge to eat it within minutes.

- C
 

spursfan

Veteran Member
Donating Member
#26
First time, I went in April/May and brought a sleeping bag but there were blankets in the albergues so at times I felt too warm - next time, I will probably go with just a silk sleeping bag liner, use blankets when available and maybe bring some thermal longjohns for when it's cold
 
#27
I took a sleeping bag, and unless you are travelling in the heat of the summer, I would recommend it, even then the weather can get cold at nights particulary in the mountains.

Mine was a Montbell, it was ultra light and weighed in a just over a pound. I also used a silk liner, but on my next Camino I would leave this behind and take instead a fitted silk sheet, and a silk pillow case

The bedding in the alberques is not always clean and even when it looks clean, I can guarantee you that it is not washed every day. Sometimes they have blankets, sometimes they don't. Most of them had pillows.


Lora
:arrow:
 
#28
C-

I actually did not take a sleeping bag -- just a silk sleep sack. That said, if I had it to do over again, I would take a very lightweight sleeping bag and perhaps leave behind my thermarest sleeping pad -- which I used, but could probably have done without. Even in the middle of summer, nights can be cold.

When I talk about packing light, I mean bringing only two sets of clothes (one to wear, one to wash), limiting toiletries to a bare minimum, leaving behind as many electronic devices as possible, and cutting back on guidebooks and other books (this was hardest for me).

It still astonishes me that I survived for a month with only the contents of a backpack designed for a day and a half.
 

Rambler

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
June 2008 Camino Frances with Daughter, 2014 Camino Frances with Son
#29
I had to reply to this one given my avatar ;)
Though I have not yet hiked the Camino, I do have a bit of experience hiking the Appalachian Trail in the US. I also use the REI UL45 and my daughter the Gregory G Pack. These are the packs we plan to take on the Camino also.
I would recommend finding a pack that is as light as possible. Don't go for the multiple pockets, dual aluminum stays, etc. A simple bag is the lightest. Both our packs have the mesh outer pockets that really are nice for stowing wet clothes or to throw a jacket in as you warm up.

Both these packs are made with the ultra-thin nylon. I am a bit concerned that the amount of time these packs will be spending on cement sidewalks and other rough surfaces may lead to a problem. In the woods we have had no issues, but we are careful not to drag the packs on rough surfaces.

Will the same be true on the Camino?

Thanks.
Rambler
 

spursfan

Veteran Member
Donating Member
#30
Might be a good bag for the Appalachian Trail but it's too big for the Camino (30L should be the target with an ultralite sleeping bag unless you want to bring a tent) and it's way too heavy (there is a 50L pack by Golite that weighs 1lb 5oz about half the weight of the REI)

I used a Golite Dawn with similar light nylon and had some wear of the material but it was fine (though I'd probably buy a new pack for next time rather than re-use the old one)
 

Minkey

Active Member
#31
I have some concerns with Osprey packs. Very comfortable but I don't think they're the kinda packs that last more than a couple of years... Still tempted though!

There's a nice one called Talon 33 if you fancy looking at some nice, light packs.
 
#32
Pack Size/Camino

I concur that 45 liters (~2750 cubic inches) is far too large for the Camino. It is more appropriate for hiking in areas with multiple days between resupply and where one is obliged to carry excessive amounts of food/multiple days, such as stove to heat water to cook the food, pot to cook in, fuel for stove, more toilet paper and other consumables, etc. Actually, about half that 45 liter volume would suffice along the Camino as none of the above is carried.

I have finally settled upon just one pack-a Moonbow Gearskin - weighing 1.50 pounds (0.70 kg) now for the last 4 years and it has no internal volume at all. It is like a long, narrow piece of Spectra cloth with straps along the sides. Gear is placed in silnylon bags, the bags placed upon the Gearskin, the flap is folded over upon the bags and the straps along the sides pulled taunt. It does not require stays as the tautness of the package keeps it up. It has a great hip belt that keeps it riding above the hip bone (iliac crest) where it should be and shoulder straps to keep it in an upright position to my back without flopping.

It is a custom pack made to my dimensions but since I use it a fair amount it was worth it to me. Besides, it is cheaper to use only one pack. On the Appalachian Trail during three season (not winter) with 3-4 day resupply the full pack weighs ~29.50 pounds (13.35 kg).
On the Continental Divide Trail, three season, non-desert, the weight jumps to 37.50 pounds because of the greater distance between resupply, carrying 7-8 days of food, etc.
But on the Camino Frances, October-November, the full pack weighs just 16.5 pounds (7.5 kg)
The pack will weigh about three pounds or so more upon the VdlP this end-of October to mid-December trip as i will need more water and slightly warmer clothes. I am looking forward to it!
 

Rambler

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
June 2008 Camino Frances with Daughter, 2014 Camino Frances with Son
#33
Interesting that you all say a 45L pack is way too big, since 40-50L is what the majority of folks have said they carried.

We will have to see if we can find an smaller pack over the next year that is lighter and no too expensive. I don't want to spend US$100 to lose 200 grams. The REI 45 UL pack weighs 1.3 kg.
An Osprey 35L is 1.1.

:(

Rambler
 

spursfan

Veteran Member
Donating Member
#34
Of course, the better question to ask is what size pack they would choose for their second Camino

Once you get below 30L or say 5kg weight plus liquid then I think that lots of traditional virtues for a pack become much less relevant (excessive comfort, weight distribution) - I'm tempted to go with the Salomon Raid Revo 20 next time with liquid carried separately around my waist but there is I think a 30L version

Start with a larger pack and you'll certainly find things to fill it - much better to find the real essentials and then find a pack just big enough to carry them all

And don't search for items in only sports and gear stores - I found some very light travel slippers in Muji (agreed not waterproof and might suffer if worn too much outdoors but hopefully fine for padding about indoors for a few weeks)
 

Minkey

Active Member
#35
I had a look at the Revo after your suggestion, Spursfan, but there ain't much too it. It's light, I grant you that, but there's very little to stop bits inside the pack piercing you in the back!

The Osprey Talon I mentioned before is light. I think I'm gonna go for it!

Oh... and I whole heartedly agree. about 5kg without water is about right. You only need to carry some t-shirts, pants, socks, sleeping bag, travel towel and some smaller bits and bobs.
 

omar504

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016,2017,2018
#36
it seems that no matter how many times people are told before they go to pack light it falls on deaf ears
ive met people with 25kgs_what are earth are they carrying_an espresso machine?
my clothing is 2 t shirts,1 shirt,1 pair shorts,1 pair zip off pants,2 prs socks,2 prs undies,flip flops,1 fleece
you dont need anything else!
one fellow had a 60ltr plus 10 backpack_and managed to fill it
PACK LIGHT
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#38
Backpack

Rambler, it looks very much like my pack. Good waist belt, sternum strap, and adjustable shoulder straps. Mine also weighs 630g.
Looks like an excellent choice.
 

Ulysse

Active Member
#39
I will stick with my old faithfull Deuter 40+10. Good compromise between big packs and ultralite ones. I can put my camel pack inside it; it has lots of pockets and attachments to hang shoes, shirts, poles and other stuff on the outside.

It is also almost indestructible as I took it twice to France and Spain (in the cargo section of the airpalne and through some nasty weather in 2006) and I hope to bring it along once more next year to Portugal.

I am a kind of romantic fellow really... :wink:
 

KiwiNomad06

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy-Santiago(2008) Cluny-Conques+prt CF(2012)
#40
omar504 said:
my clothing is 2 t shirts,1 shirt,1 pair shorts,1 pair zip off pants,2 prs socks,2 prs undies,flip flops,1 fleece
you dont need anything else!
PACK LIGHT
omar, with all due respect for your experience, I sometimes think that edicts are made on these boards about clothing that are simply unsafe for those walking in months when the weather can be cooler and wetter. I plan to start in Le Puy in mid-April next year. I have spent time in April/May in some of the areas in France where I will walk. I know how cold and wet it can get, and will definitely be carrying/wearing more clothing than this.
Margaret
 

spursfan

Veteran Member
Donating Member
#41
I'm with omar on this - the fleece is light though somewhat bulky but will be more than warm enough for spain in april/may - adding a wool t-shirt or thermal underwear would be a light way to add some more warmth - and gore-tex paclite is an expensive but very light way to stay dry (though some might prefer to just stop and shelter during rain spells)
 

Rambler

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
June 2008 Camino Frances with Daughter, 2014 Camino Frances with Son
#42
Hard finding a pack!

Since this thread started, I have been looking for a different pack than my REI 45UL to take on the Camino. I am finding it very hard to find a pack that is light (less than 2 lbs.), small (less than 35L) and supportive enough with my body size.
I am 6 feet tall and long waisted, so I need a torso length of around 19 inches to use a hipbelt effectively. Most of the ultralight packs are just too short to get any use of the hipbelt. The best one I found was the Osprey Stratos, but it weighs more than my current pack.
The REI Jet seemed like it was perfect, but the pack size was too short for me when I tried it on.

What packs are you tall folks using? Do you just not use a hipbelt?

Rambler
 
#43
Hi Rambler, I too used the REI45UL on my camino and thought that it performed great. With the internal compression cord what difference does it make whether or not it will hold 10 more liters? The weight is only one factor, the fit is equally important and how the weight is distributed is even greater to me. I carried 16 lbs in my pack including 2 500ml water bottles.Only you can determine what is best for you. Ultreya John
 

Minkey

Active Member
#44
My Paclite jacket was on sale so managed to get it for £70. Bargain.

Spursfan, if you're still looking for a new lightweight pack, I've gotta say that the Osprey Talon 33 rocks... Really... It's tough, light, comfortable, well designed so it doesn't wobble about and there are attachments for poles and a hydration pack pocket.
 

spursfan

Veteran Member
Donating Member
#45
Too late, Minkey - just bought the inov-8 race pro 22 that wraps the hydration bladder around the hips at the bottom of the pack - I haven't used hydration before so I'll try it out using the race pro 4 bumbag - if I don't like it, I'll just stick 2 SIGG bottles in the side pockets of the pack
 

Minkey

Active Member
#46
That's my preference too... The Sigg bottles that is.

Innov-8 eh? I've got some of their trail running shoes. They're fab.

Ok.. When are you off, btw?
 

William Marques

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
#47
Since this thread started, I have been looking for a different pack than my REI 45UL to take on the Camino. I am finding it very hard to find a pack that is light (less than 2 lbs.), small (less than 35L) and supportive enough with my body size.
I am 6 feet tall and long waisted, so I need a torso length of around 19 inches to use a hipbelt effectively. Most of the ultralight packs are just too short to get any use of the hipbelt. The best one I found was the Osprey Stratos, but it weighs more than my current pack.
The REI Jet seemed like it was perfect, but the pack size was too short for me when I tried it on.

What packs are you tall folks using? Do you just not use a hipbelt?

Rambler
If you are travelling in the summer you can get away with a very small pack without a hip belt. As you say if you are carrying more than the bare essentials of summer as you would in the spring autumn or winter it is difficult to find a small volume / longer length pack with a decent hipbelt. These seem to me to only be found in the larger volume / longer length packs.
 

Minkey

Active Member
#48
Hip belts will still help distribute the weight off the shoulders though, even if you're only carrying 6-7kgs...

I've got a smaller pack that's got a hip and sternum strap.
 
#49
As a complete beginner I am trying desperatley to pack as light as possible as suggested in my new osprey talon 33 (which i love). a friend has leant me a sleeping bag which seems to take up so much space, even in it's bag, I have also been leant two cotton liners and wonder if i take them both one will do as a ground sheet to put on bed/floor and the other to sleep in... I leave tomorrow for 2.5 weeks so feel it can't be so cold and i can always put on some clothes?
It would give me so much more room,

any comments?
Venetia
 
#52
I find it a little worrying that some responses on these threads come across almost as dictats. Such things are very personal and whilst I would urge people to listen to the advice of those that have gone before them (and i certainly did to a greater extent) I have to say:

a: I used a Berghaus Freeflow IV 50 litre pack and found it ideal. Not too big at all. Partly this is because the unusual design makes it harder to pack so its a good idea to buy a size bigger.

b: I took about 11-12kg in total (including nearly 2 litres of water) and had no problem with the weight once my back had adjusted to it (few days). 10% of my bodyweight would have been about 8.6kg. I think the 10% rule is a good one but its not cast in stone - neither is the pack size.

The one rule I would say is cast in stone is....go for two LONG walks with your pack and chosen shoes/boots on - on 2 consecutive days. Then see how you feel about it! (Or to put it another way practice!)

I think the Berghaus packs are great but its a very very personal thing. In summer months the freeflow is wonderful. In winter I wouldnt bother with it.

Going ultra light can be expensive, it can alse become ridiculously obsessive (who here cuts their toothbrush in two? lol)


Whateve you choose - Buen Camino!!
 
#53
I'm leaving for my first camino in 4 days. Right now, my gear - including water and pack is about 7kgs. I'd love to get it down to 5.5 or 6kgs. I weigh about 86kgs. I'm using a Northface Solaris 40. I liked the compartments on it and the meaty pads. I've done plenty of training hikes with it so far, loaded. Infact, I did a 25.6km walk today just north of dallas. Has anyone used this pack before? Only downside I see right now is that it's about 1.42kgs empty. Thoughts?
 

JohnnieWalker

Nunca se camina solo
Donating Member
#54
For what it is worth I think 7k is very good. It is my target weight to carry all included except food and extra water when it is very warm. Depending on conditions it can be less but never more. Some others using ultralite rucksacks get down to 6k or even less - Sil is a model for this. Although it is a very individual thing - I think 7k is very viable - you'll soon know!
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#55
Phsew! Only 7kg - that's excellent, especially with a pack that weighs almost 1.5kg to start with. The general rule is to have it between 10 - 15% of your bodyweight and you are under that. If your pack weighs less than 6kg you don't really need extra thick padded hip belts.

I did a show-and-tell at a camino workshop on Saturday, packing my backpack with everything for a camino walk and weighing everything that went into it on a digital kitchen scale. I wrote the weights on a whiteboard as I packed and when I put the last thing in - a 500ml bottle of water - it weighed 4.85kg.

My 30L Prolite pack only weighs 650gr (and my silk sleeping bag liner weighs 230g). I am seriously considering buying a Mariposa backpack which can weigh between 377g and 547g depending on extras. (http://www.gossamergear.com/)

A male peregrino demonstrated his backpack as well - which weighed in at over 10kg. He didn't have much more stuff than me but almost every item weighed a lot more more. His empty backpack weighed almost 2kg and his sleeping bag was 1.8kg. He is a 6' 1" hunk but besides his items of clothing being larger, they were all too heavy.

The secret is to buy everything lightweight - forget colour coding, fashion labels etc - I buy my shirts from a sports shop, lightweight, drytech - wicks the sweat away - and if they are too long I cut a few inches off the bottom. My shorts are also made of running shorts material with underpants sewn in. (I only take 2 pairs of lightweight panties)
Weigh everything that is the secret - and perhaps look for an equally comfortable, lighter weight pack for your next camino!
 

viajero

Active Member
#57
Hi,
Rambler mentioned the REI JEt Pack. I just completed my first Camino in early April. This is the pack that I carried. For me, it was perfect. I am a female and 5'8" tall. When I bought it at REI, they suggested that I might be a bit tall for it/long torso but said that if I was carrying less than 20 pounds it shouldn't make much of a difference. (I'm not sure what they are called but the straps that are up on the top of the shoulder straps that are supposed to take weight off the shoulders--in any case, they said that due to my size that these straps were not serving their purpose) I carried between 14-15 pounds (about 6.5 kg.) including water. For me, the pack felt pretty light. It seemed much smaller and lighter than most other people were carrying. MOst people that I met carried much heavier loads than I did and they didn't seem to have any problems. For me though, I would have had a tough time with a heavy pack. As I started in early March, I might have had to bring a bit more cold weather items so the pack was generally packed to the gills but it worked for me. On extremely long days, my shoulders might feel a wee bit of pressure by day's end but that was it. ON regular days (20-34 km) it didn't bother me at all. I was very satisfied with this pack and at $55.00 US it seemed a very good price. I am eager to go back and maybe do the Camino del Norte and I would definitely take this pack again.
 

nidarosa

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Yes please!
#58
I have problems with my shoulders and back, and have been reading a lot in this forum to get clued up on the pros and cons of different packs. I started with a 40+5 liter pack with a sturdy hip belt and a so called windtunnel down the back to avoid sweaty back. But when I started packing it, it just looked far too huge and heavy, so I got a 35 litre, ultralight and comfortable, instead. I will be using a bumbag too, so I probably have another 3 liters there, and this smaller pack has a proper mesh airflow back, which is wonderful. I am not taking a sleeping bag, so I save a lot of space there. Some people say that if the pack is light enough, you don't need frames and padded hip belts, but I have decided I need it to lift the straps clean off my shoulder. It has pockets and attachment points on the outside for extras, and it feels wonderfully light, but I have a horrible feeling I'm forgetting something ...?

All the best,
LM
 
#59
I took a look at the Gossamer Mariposa after reading Sil's comments a few months back, and bought the pack. I've been doing a number of 12 mile walks with it fully packed and am not all together sold on it. My biggest concern is how durable the silnylon will be by 6 weeks of the Camino- I have already noticed strain at on corner with the slightest of tears. It has "gimicky" features like the straps that velcro so you can use your socks as padding and not their rigid foam pads. I found the straps tough enough to get opened that I gave up the idea of stuffing socks in there and am using the premolded foam. It is ultra lightweight though. Also looks like they may be phasing it out and are sold out of mediums I think.
 
#60
Has anyone used a Geigerrig 1600 (26.2 litre, weight 1.46 kgs) and do you think this would be too small for the Camino. I know that the less you carry the better, but I always tend to want to take too much and with this pack I'd have to be a real "pilgrim".
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#61
Colleen, in my opinion it is the weight of the pack that is a problem more so than the capacity. 1.46kg for such a small pack is really heavy.

Have a look at some on the attached list - I'm sure you can find a lighter pack. As I've said here, my pack is a 32Lt OMM and weighs 600g when empty.
 

Attachments

NicoZ

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013
#62
I agree that weight is high for such a small pack but don't assume a lighter pack is always better.

I have a small pack that's intended to be an airline carryon. The thing is fairly light. Reasonable size (30ish litres IIRc) BUT it's a pain to wear/carry. Fine if you're just walking to the plane but not something you'd enjoy for a long day.

Many if not all the things that make a pack easier to carry add some weight. Hip,chest belts for example.

If you go ultra light understand what you're giving up.
 

Say Simba

Live, Love, Laugh.
Camino(s) past & future
2013
#63
I took a black, Arcteryx 45 liter Kea (Kata is the old name..or is it the other way around?). Looking back, I would rather, and could have done just as well with a 35 or 40, and remember, I say that, knowing that Arcteryx packs are for people who like all there kit inside without frills on the outside. Not much to hang here and there.
 
#64
I also agree that the pack is very heavy for its size and it should be easy to find other well known and respected brands (30 - 40L) which are around the 1 - 1.2kg range. If you want to go ultralight, then they can range down to 0.5kg, but there may be compromises in comfort/features.

Rather than go for the smallest volume pack that will hold your gear, consider one that is a bit roomy as it is much easier to access gear and to pack/unpack. The compression straps will keep things tight.

Murray
 

Anne100

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte, Sept.-Nov. (2013)
#65
I have a custom made pack. It is frameless, weighs 565 grams (20 oz) empty and holds 5000+ cu in (81+ liters). I've used it for many long distance hiking trips.
 
Camino(s) past & future
April 2014
#66
I trial fitted all my gear into my Gossamer Gear G4 (Medium - 66 l.). Way too big for what I'm taking. I just ordered a ZPacks Cuben Fiber "Zero" Ultralight Frameless Backpack (Medium - 36 l.). After adding all the bells and whistles (including a Forum Patch), it will weigh approximately 11 oz. I do light weight backpacking in the Sierra Nevadas and my kit for a 3 day trip is usually 18 - 20 pounds. Ditching the tent, sleeping bag (substituting a fleece liner), sleeping pad, stove, bear canister, and other gear, will let me carry a 12.5 lb. load (including food and water) for a total of 16.5 lbs from skin out.
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#67
Wow - those are very expensive packs for such a minimal design - just a large bag on a frame. The Arc Slim Backpack costs $230 and the smaller of the Blas packs are $279.

My OMM 32L sells for between $85 and $100, has side pocket, a lid complete, large mesh on the front, mesh bottle completes, compression straps, sternum strap, zip completes on the waist belt and two large compartments inside and, if you don't mind an extra 150g to 200g, a smorgasbords of ties, straps and extras for all types of backpacking.
 
Camino(s) past & future
April 2014
#68
Thanks Sillydoll for the input on the OMM. Yes, Zpacks are relatively expensive, but I look at it as an investment for not having to carry extra weight over 1.5 million footsteps. OK, OK, I admit it. I'm a gram weenie.
 

egar

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte (2013)
Kerry Camino (2017)
#69
Has anyone used a Geigerrig 1600 (26.2 litre, weight 1.46 kgs) and do you think this would be too small for the Camino?
I checked out a Geigerrig 1600 and it seemed much smaller than what you'd expect from a 26L pack. The pack has a triangular shape, with the top being quite narrow. It does widen towards the bottom of the pack. I found it hard to load and unload, especially getting to gear at the bottom of the pack without fully unloading everything above it.

I didn't spend much time looking at the weight, which does include the weight of the included hydration pack, because of the limited usable space.
 

christer1

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
none (yet)
#70
Has anyone used a Geigerrig 1600 (26.2 litre, weight 1.46 kgs) and do you think this would be too small for the Camino. I know that the less you carry the better, but I always tend to want to take too much and with this pack I'd have to be a real "pilgrim".
I have a 33 litre pack that weighs under 900grams, i would try to get the best balance between space and weight - for me 33 litres seems ok or just slightly tight on space potentially.

Buen Camino
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
Camino Portuguese (2017)
#72
Osprey Aura 50L, has more room than I need, but fits me better than anything else I have tried.
 

Anne100

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte, Sept.-Nov. (2013)
#73
Custom ultralight, 595 g, 86L.

If I were just starting out I'd buy gear first then find an appropriate pack.
 

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