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Packing recommendations please

2020 Camino Guides

Bear

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: Camino Frances 2012.
Future: Camino Frances 2020
Hi everyone,
I have spent so long researching items to pack that I "can't see the wood for the trees".

It appears that:
Merino wool is a must for socks.
Light layers work best for tops.
Shorts or long trousers that convert to shorts with a zip are ideal.
A poncho is as effective as light weight waterproof jackets.
My backpack needs a rain cover. (I have purchased an Osprey Kestrel 48)
Light weight sandals or flip flops are essential for the end of the walking day.

Can anyone recommend particular brands that they regularly use please?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese 2018
Camino Ingles, Caminos Muxia and Finisterre 2019
I am also in the UK and have Icebreaker merino socks (light crew). They have worn well and are comfy. I also use Injinji liner toe socks (which prevents the blisters between my toes that I otherwise suffer).

I have a Rab Kinetic Plus jacket from Cotswold Outdoor. I love this jacket; it's a waterproof softshell, lightweight and very comfy indeed. I've used it on the Portuguese, Inglés and Finisterre. Heavy Galician rain and I stayed dry. Cool mornings and it was a great windproof keeping me warm.

I have just ordered a Frogg Topps poncho because it is highly rated by @davebugg and it cheap enough to try out and see how I get on. Purchased from Amazon UK.

I have an Arc'teryx shirt and a T shirt. Expensive but very light, easy to wash and very quick to dry.

If you want a lightweight sleeping bag take a look at the Alpkit Cloud Cover down blanket. Very versatile with integral stuff sack, drawcords at each end plus poppers so can become a sleeping bag. Mine weights 520g.

Some ideas to consider
Buen Camino
 

henrythedog

Loved and fed by David
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2017, 2018, 2019, Ingles 2018, (Madrid 2019 partial - retired hurt!) (more planned)
Hi everyone,
I have spent so long researching items to pack that I "can't see the wood for the trees".

It appears that:
Merino wool is a must for socks.
Light layers work best for tops.
Shorts or long trousers that convert to shorts with a zip are ideal.
A poncho is as effective as light weight waterproof jackets.
My backpack needs a rain cover. (I have purchased an Osprey Kestrel 48)
Light weight sandals or flip flops are essential for the end of the walking day.

Can anyone recommend particular brands that they regularly use please?
If you’ve bought a Kestrel you should already have a rain cover, have a look at the bottom of the sac on the side away from your back for an inbuilt pocket wherein you should find a brightly coloured rain cover.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Currently on a "Virtual" Camino and striding out across Navarra!
Hi everyone,
I have spent so long researching items to pack that I "can't see the wood for the trees".

It appears that:
Merino wool is a must for socks.
Light layers work best for tops.
Shorts or long trousers that convert to shorts with a zip are ideal.
A poncho is as effective as light weight waterproof jackets.
My backpack needs a rain cover. (I have purchased an Osprey Kestrel 48)
Light weight sandals or flip flops are essential for the end of the walking day.

Can anyone recommend particular brands that they regularly use please?
You shouldn't need a pack rain cover if you're taking a poncho otherwise you have learned wisely young Padawan!
Sadly you can't take other peoples' recommendations too much to heart - some swear by X Co. trail runners others will swear at them.

If you get it wrong well Spain is a First World Country so there will be shops along the Way and don't forget that the Camino is the wood.

Buen Camino!

(I'm in a philosophical mood today)
 

NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
My first two caminos were done with clothing I already owned. I started ‘upgrading’ as I found things on sale or at charity shops. You likely have stuff in your closet that will serve. Check out what you or family members have that gets used at the gym or for exercising/training. Ideally aim for things that wick away sweat and dry fast. I love merino wool, but if you are walking in late spring, summer or early autumn, it’s not necessary in tops.

I own a pair of those convertible shorts/trousers but they only went on my third camino and never since. I just prefer something else.
A decent rain system is needed, and good socks are part of a good pair of shoes, but the rest is just us getting finicky.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Merino wool is a must for socks.
I'm a big fan of merino wool clothing, but my socks are WrightSocks synthetic double layer socks.
A poncho is as effective as light weight waterproof jackets.
My backpack needs a rain cover.
Your poncho should cover your backpack, so a separate pack cover may not be necessary.
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
I love merino wool, but if you are walking in late spring, summer or early autumn, it’s not necessary in tops.
I would suggest a good pair of merino underwear (the boxer-briefs with 6"-8" legs), and I would recommend a merino tee. I've walked twice now in June low conditions where the merino was pretty critical in keeping core warmth. The beauty of "just the core" was that I could walk in high temps later and not overheat.
 

RoseW

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2018
Camino Portuguese 2020
As far as lightweight sandals for the end of the walking day - I propose something you can shower in that also has molded cushioning. The foam Birkenstocks are what I had and they were perfection (in my opinion) but lots of people like the Adidas shower slides, crocs and there are many other options. These are all very light but supportive for end of day and walking around town. Others have more heavy duty hiking sandals that they can also wear with their packs on but let their feet breath in the evening. My friend had a pair of teva's that were somewhere between these two options that she was happy with.
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2018)
I actually wrote up every item I brought, including photos & links to everything. Located here.

I am in North America (Western Canada now), and a lot of my gear was old so I couldn't find the exact thing available now. I tried to link the best thing I could find in each case. I had a raincoat along but on reflection, a poncho would have done the trick given the weather I encountered. I did not have a rain cover for my backpack - I instead had a few very light 'dry bags' that I put the essentials into inside my backpack. Buen Camino!
 

NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
A lot of people seem to like using assorted dry bags inside their pack to keep their contents dry. To me, they are just more (albeit not much) weight. I want my backpack to stay dry, so I’m not carrying the weight of a wet bag. The harness of the backpack can absorb a fair amount of wet and take a while to dry out. So for me, a poncho and pack cover combo is the ticket.

Have we clouded the issue further? 🙂
 

november_moon

Veteran Member
Here is my take on your list:

Merino wool is a must for socks.
* Not really. It is a personal preference. I prefer Wrightsocks myself. You've got to determine what is right for you.

Light layers work best for tops.
* This is my approach because it allows for maximum flexibility - easy to adjust to various weather conditions. You'll want layers for warmth as well as sun protection.

Shorts or long trousers that convert to shorts with a zip are ideal.
* I like this approach too - again, maximum flexibility with minimal items

A poncho is as effective as light weight waterproof jackets.
* Poncho vs rain jacket is probably the most controversial topic among long distance walkers - maybe 2nd most controversial. Whether or not to pop blisters is probably number one. It comes down to personal preference. I am more comfortable with a rain jacket and pack cover.

My backpack needs a rain cover. (I have purchased an Osprey Kestrel 48)
* I like having a rain cover for my pack. Even with a poncho, I still like the rain cover. There are days where it isn't really rainy enough for a rain jacket or poncho, but it's nice to cover the pack. People can dry out more quickly after a light rain than a pack can. A pack cover is also handy in cities and train stations or anywhere else that pickpockets could be an issue - it provides an extra barrier to thwart quick fingers.

Light weight sandals or flip flops are essential for the end of the walking day.
* You'll want something other than your boots/hiking shoes. Your feet will want a break and a lot of alberques don't let you take your boots/hiking shoes into the dorms. Having another pair of shoes is handy. Even nicer if they are shoes you can go into the shower with. Alberques are usually pretty clean, but with all the pilgrims in there, things like foot fungus can easily get passed around.
 

Dromengro

Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP - Leon 1984
Frances (2021)
Hi Bear, there's a wealth of good info on the site, but it can be a bit overwhelming and often conflicting.
Only you will know works for you.

I wore normal cheap thin cotton supermarket socks, and a pair of crepe soled desert boots
Light cotton t shirts and shirts
Cotton combat trousers and a pair cut off as shorts
A cheap lightweight cagoule
I've never used a rain cover, not even in the U.K.
Only use one pair of footwear

Probably not the best list, and probably not one I'd recommend, but almost anything you take will be O.K.
 

Tandem Graham

Every new day an adventure
Camino(s) past & future
Bike: Mont St Michel-SdC. Budapest-Vezelay. Alicante-Burgos
Walk: Le Puy-SJPdP. Dax-(CF)-SdC.
Hi everyone,
I have spent so long researching items to pack that I "can't see the wood for the trees".


It appears that:
Merino wool is a must for socks.
Light layers work best for tops.
Shorts or long trousers that convert to shorts with a zip are ideal.
A poncho is as effective as light weight waterproof jackets.
My backpack needs a rain cover. (I have purchased an Osprey Kestrel 48)
Light weight sandals or flip flops are essential for the end of the walking day.

Can anyone recommend particular brands that they regularly use please?
Hi Bear!
My camino gear is bought on a budget. It is expensive enough to get to Spain without spending a fortune on fancy technical clothing.

Many do prefer merino socks, but most important is that they are comfortable and don't give you blisters, so dual-layer socks or a pair of liners and a pair of outers. The key is to avoid cotton. Wool or even nylon is better. In the UK, Bridgedale are available at Millets and Blacks. I pair Injinji liner socks (which separate my toes, because otherwise my toenails do damage) - which I buy online - with cheap woollen hiking socks from the market! Practise some longwalks on consecutive days with your sock and footwear choice. If it isn't comfortable to begin, it won't become more so after several hundred kilometres.

First thing in the morning, I wear a polyester t shirt, a long sleeve nylon running shirt (Ron Hill) and a buttoned, long sleeve hiking shirt (Peter Storm), with a down-filled gilet if it is really cold and my rain jacket if it is windy. But once I'm moving I start removing layers and often end up wearing a t-shirt and sun cream. A buff is useful to keep the wind out of your collar and/or the sun from your neck.

I bought my down-gilet 2nd hand on ebay, for £15 delivered. They go in and out of fashion for non-hikers, so they are often available. Make sure it is down-filled though, the synthetic ones are much heavier. I manage a whole camino without having to wash it, since I've always taken it off before I start sweating.

I think your Osprey pack will have a semi-integrated rain cover hidden in a base pocket.

I wear a Sprayway rainjacket which has a removable peaked hood. I previously wore an old fashioned Fjallraven waxed-cotton jacket, with a thin Regatta cagoule on top when rain was persistent. Whatever brand you choose, the most important word is 'breathable'. Again, Regatta and Peter Storm have affordable versions. Poncho is preferred by many, but I don't like the idea of doing a Mary Poppins when it catches the wind!

I wear Craghopper shorts or Brasher shorts - alternating. They are slightly different lengths, so my knees' tan marks aren't so stark! They are polyester and dry quickly. They have zip pockets for loose change and my phone. I have a pair of Peter Storm hiking trousers too, but usually only wear them in the evening.

I take light hiking sandals for the evening. I don't wear them in the shower. My wife Carol takes very light flipflops in addition, which she does wear in the shower.

I wash my walking clothes everyday, except the gilet and rain jacket, and carry a complete spare outfit in case not everything dries. Woollen socks usually dry slowest, so I have three pairs, and often use nappy pins to dry them on the back of my pack while walking.

As others have said above, when packing it is best to take not enough and buy in Spain than to take too much and either carry needless extra weight or discard it.

I know the planning and the trial packing is part of building the excitement, but don't worry that your kit isn't the best, the lightest, the smartest or anything else. From being on this forum, you are already better prepared than more than half of pilgrims who arrive successfully in Santiago!

Buen Camino!
Graham
 

FSP

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(13)
Portuguese & Finisterre(16)
Norte & Muxia(18)
Olvidado&Salvador&Primitivo(20??)
One very useful thing I would add to your pack list is one of those suction cup clothes hooks and or a metal S hook. You will find that few shower and sink areas have any place to hang or put your clothes. You may want to buy more than one. In my experience I've forgotten more than a couple of these on shower doors.
 

nili

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
camino franch 2020
hey guys thanx for all the help im still find it hard to decide and searching all the time...
sorry to by annoying but can someone simplfy it for me, i dont want to spend all my money buying eqipment.
im also comfused about merino does it work as thermals too?
can someone talk to me in private and help? will be grateful 4 everi prefer women just because the list is a bit diffrent bless u all.
 

NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
Merino can act as thermals. You likely have all the clothing you need. Go through your stuff and pull out the possibles, then compare them for weight and functionality.

What month are you planning to walk?
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016), VDLP (2017), Mozarabe (2018), Vasco/Bayona (2019)
I will disagree with on two points:

"Merino wool is a must for socks" - Not at all. This is very individual. I find that merino socks are too soft and my foot slips, causing hot spots. I wear merino normally at home, but prefer fairly thin synthetics for the camino.

"Shorts or long trousers that convert to shorts with a zip are ideal" - Only if you like them and want to wear shorts. I always wear long pants so they are not ideal for me.

Can anyone recommend particular brands that they regularly use please?
That sounds like a request for more trees to be planted. ;) :) Maybe it is too much detail, given that you said
I have spent so long researching items to pack that I "can't see the wood for the trees".
 

Rosemary Boyd

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
future
I'm a big fan of merino wool clothing, but my socks are WrightSocks synthetic double layer socks.

Your poncho should cover your backpack, so a separate pack cover may not be necessary.
I find the toe seam on the Wright sox annoying!
 

Bear

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: Camino Frances 2012.
Future: Camino Frances 2020
Thanks everyone for taking the time to share your views and packing suggestions.
I'm overthinking things having walked SjPP to SdC in June 2012 and walking again in June this year.
Last time I was living in Spain so got everything from my local Decathlon, mainly Quechua branded - this time I have too much time on my hands and have researched to the nth degree.
 

RRat

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning 2017
As far as lightweight sandals for the end of the walking day - I propose something you can shower in that also has molded cushioning. The foam Birkenstocks are what I had and they were perfection (in my opinion) but lots of people like the Adidas shower slides, crocs and there are many other options. These are all very light but supportive for end of day and walking around town. Others have more heavy duty hiking sandals that they can also where with their packs on but let their feet breath in the evening. My friend had a pair of teva's that were somewhere between these two options that she was happy with.
Agree. I took flip flops and replaced them after a few days with an inexpensive pair of sandals with straps for support. Bunk on the 2nd floor, bathroom/showers in the basement, everything in town is up or down hill, you need the support for your tired feet.
 

Stivandrer

Perambulating & Curious. Rep stravaiging offender
Camino(s) past & future
I´ve got Camino plans until 2042,
- or till I fall flat on my face, whichever comes first !!
Hang on - back to the rain cover - still if you have a poncho, or worse , one day forgot to bring it, there is still the built in raincover with Osprey Kestrel line :
below the mesh on the front, above this little blue label, is a zipper, with the cover inside...

There has been a lot of clamour about how poorly it protects the sack, but that is because it just need some additional proofing...
It is usually detachable, so take it away and reproof it properly, twice, if you must and re-attach...
 

Attachments

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lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(2012) Le Puy/CF (2015) Portugues (2017) Norte (2018) CF (2019)
Hi everyone,
I have spent so long researching items to pack that I "can't see the wood for the trees".

It appears that:
Merino wool is a must for socks.
Light layers work best for tops.
Shorts or long trousers that convert to shorts with a zip are ideal.
A poncho is as effective as light weight waterproof jackets.
My backpack needs a rain cover. (I have purchased an Osprey Kestrel 48)
Light weight sandals or flip flops are essential for the end of the walking day.

Can anyone recommend particular brands that they regularly use please?
I would recommend that you get a poncho instead of a rain cover. Rain covers can be notorious for not completely keeping your bag dry. A good poncho takes care of having a rain jacket and cover for your pack as well as saving room and a little weight in your pack. A poncho can also help against cold and wind as an extra layer. My daughter bought me a pair of slip on Toms that I have sworn by. They are super light also and very comfortable. On my second Camino I had a blister on my heal and when the ground was payment, grass or gravel I would wear them. I could walk 10K without a problem with them. If the ground is rocky or cobblestone I probably wouldn't wear them but they sure helped with my blister issue.
This is a link to the website and although these are not the exact ones I have they are very close.
Another great thing about Toms is for ever pair they sell they give a pair away.
 

Chris Gi

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Did April through June 2018 from Pamplona to Santiago.
2020 May or end of September - NO!
2021 ?
I'm a big fan of merino wool clothing, but my socks are WrightSocks synthetic double layer socks.
I love WrightSocks (spelling?) too as an alternative to Merino wool. They dry much faster.

Your poncho should cover your backpack, so a separate pack cover may not be necessary.
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
Hi everyone,
I have spent so long researching items to pack that I "can't see the wood for the trees".

It appears that:
Merino wool is a must for socks.
Light layers work best for tops.
Shorts or long trousers that convert to shorts with a zip are ideal.
A poncho is as effective as light weight waterproof jackets.
My backpack needs a rain cover. (I have purchased an Osprey Kestrel 48)
Light weight sandals or flip flops are essential for the end of the walking day.

Can anyone recommend particular brands that they regularly use please?
I never take a raincover for my pack, as I have a rain cape that goes over the pack.
 

Sixwheeler

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Arles Route (2013/2014 onwards)
Do you really need a 48 litre rucsac? Seems huge to me and you know that you will fill it up despite your best intentions.
 

NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
I had no problem keeping only 25L of stuff in my 45L bag.

It’s called discipline. 😉
 

poogeyejr

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte, May 2011
Norte, Sept 2013
Frances, 1wk, Jan 2017
I found I took too much, I shipped my clothes to Santiago and kept . . .
1 pair walking pants/shorts (must be quick quick quick dry)
1 pair evening pants
1 walking shirt (must be quick quick quick dry)
1 evening shirt
1 outfit that doubles as pajamas and that i can wear when the rest gets washed at a laudrymat (lavendieria)

1 icebreaker merino wool sweater - that can be worn while wet and still keeps you warm.
 

easygoing

Camino Sharon
Camino(s) past & future
I have walked the Camino Francis 7 times, twice in 2017 and 2018. (2019)
I'm a big fan of merino wool clothing, but my socks are WrightSocks synthetic double layer socks.

Your poncho should cover your backpack, so a separate pack cover may not be necessary.
I also vote for wright socks. I've won them on 10 caminos and the Pacific Crest trail and not one blister. Another plus is they dry really fast. So when I wash them out there dry by morning, sometime sooner.
Also I'm a fan of a rain jacket because it's more versatile. You can wear it as a windbreaker or even a top when all your clothes are in the washing machine. My pack cover is very lightweight I think it's about 2 ounces. But like someone else said what works for one person may not work for another. So in that case I would do some training hikes with my pack loaded with the things that I plan on taking. you'll find out how the shoes work if the socks are perfect, and is it worth it carrying an extra 5 lb of what ifs. Try to walk on a rainy day too and you'll become such an expert you'll soon be telling other people what they should be bringing. Have a great Camino
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (2020)
Here's my take on this:

Merino wool is a must for socks. Don't get caught up in the advertising hype. They are neither any better nor any worse than other good trekking socks. Find ones that are comfortable. Avoid cotton in wet conditions, which generally means not taking cotton at all.
Light layers work best for tops. This is generally true, but because light layers work well overall, not just for tops.
Shorts or long trousers that convert to shorts with a zip are ideal. Very much a personal choice. Done this once and I now carry a pair of shorts.
A poncho is as effective as light weight waterproof jackets. Perhaps. How good is the poncho and how good is the lightweight rain jacket? They could both perform poorly, or very well. Lightweight rain jackets are rarely long enough to protect much of one's upper thighs, which a poncho will normally protect quite well. Horses for courses here.
My backpack needs a rain cover. (I have purchased an Osprey Kestrel 48) This is not the only way to keep the contents dry. A poncho with a hump might, or you could choose to use a pack liner of some sort. Garbage bags work well for this, but will make you incredibly unpopular if you rise early and pack them in the dormitory of an albergue.
Light weight sandals or flip flops are essential for the end of the walking day. Very little is essential! But it is nice to wear something other than one's walking footwear. I prefer a lightweight mesh shoe, which has the additional advantage of avoiding the socks and sandals look!!

Branding is a complex issue. If you are not confident about on-line shopping, find a good bricks and mortar outdoors retailer. Shop in as many as you can - even larger retailers won't carry every brand option and it is worth understanding the pros and cons of the range of styles and materials used by different manufacturers.

And good luck.
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
I prefer a lightweight mesh shoe, which has the additional advantage of avoiding the socks and sandals look!!
ROFL! #longlivesocksandsandals !!!

I plan to go into a full open casket with socks and Birkenstocks loud and proud.
 
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koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
Given some of the discussion about socks, it's worth noting that not all socks or sock systems are made equal. I've enclosed some links into an excellent website dedicated to blister prevention based on medical science and testing. They do have a commercial interest, but I have never seen a case where I found myself being steered towards their products on false merits (and I haven't found a case where I needed their products, either). Regardless, the science behind their information is solid.

Here is an article on double socking.
Here is an article comparing sock fibers.

There is a guide in the resources section that has much of the detail from the website, and which is organized more cleanly than the website. It is fairly comprehensive in its coverage.

On the topic of merino v other synthetics, an item they don't really address (and one of the reasons they are as popular as they are with trail hikers) is the issue of stench. Merino is very stench ("funk") resistant, while different synthetics have varying levels of susceptibility to it. If one is handwashing their clothes each day, which is generally far less effective than a machine, then synthetics will start to build up greater stench, whereas the merino will be mostly unaffected. If using washing machines regularly, the difference is generally less notable. Also, some synthetics have chemical treatments that resist stench better, though these lose effectiveness over time. Finally, there are a lot of merino-synthetic fibers that are engineered together directly in the fiber that provide the best of both.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (May-June 2020)
A lot of people seem to like using assorted dry bags inside their pack to keep their contents dry. To me, they are just more (albeit not much) weight. I want my backpack to stay dry, so I’m not carrying the weight of a wet bag. The harness of the backpack can absorb a fair amount of wet and take a while to dry out. So for me, a poncho and pack cover combo is the ticket.

Have we clouded the issue further? 🙂
For me, dry bags don't just help keep the contents of my pack dry - they keep things organized, which is just as (or almost?) as important. Well worth the extra couple of grams in my opinion.
 

NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
For me, dry bags don't just help keep the contents of my pack dry - they keep things organized, which is just as (or almost?) as important. Well worth the extra couple of grams in my opinion.
To each their own, but that reason always puzzled me as I didn’t think any of us was carrying enough to need organizing. 😁

Buen camino!
 

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