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The big map o the Caminos de Santiago

Picos de Europa - Is it connected to the del Norte?

FSP

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPP - SDC 2013
CP Porto - Finisterre (Coastal & Spiritual Variant) 2016
Norte Irun-Muxia 2018
#1
Hello, I was scanning through Netflix and came across a movie titled Foot Prints. The documentary covers the journey of a group of young men from various backgrounds, some very challenging and led by a priest they embark on the del Norte. Their del Norte also included what looks to be a spectacular area of what must be the picos. Do any of the guidebooks cover how to incorporate the picos into the more usual coastal route? I can't imagine doing the norte and bypassing this area if it is an optional route. I'm just starting researching a del norte for possibly a fall 2018 journey. Thanks
Frank
 

grayland

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Yes
#2
I saw that documentary also. It was difficult to place them in actual Norte locations. There were a few scenes that were obvious...I did not notice the Picos in the movie..or for that matter while walking the Norte.
Actually, you do not have to do any detouring to have spectacular views and scenery on the Norte as it is fantastic.

I would have to look up the location to see if they are on the Norte or..if not...how to detour.
I would not detour to go up into hills or mountains as I am usually looking for a way to avoid anything that says "alto" on a map. ;)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015); Camino Norte/Primitivo (2016); Camino Frances (2017); Le Puy (June 2018)
#3
I've seen that documentary and believe part of it does take place in the Picos de Europa from my research. I didn't see many of that film's locations when I walked the Norte. Just as in "The Way", movie crews can add or subtract sections as they choose, leaving us a little confused. :oops:
 

Tincatinker

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
#4
Lovely movie, bollocks geography.

There are beautiful routes through the Picos, including the Caminos Lebaniego and Vadiniense that will take you from the Norte to Leon on the Frances.

Any good navigator could loop off the Norte through the Picos and back to the coast if they wished but it wasn't & wouldn't be a camino route. It would make no sense. Unless, of course you were thinking of adding a film crew and a producer to the two pairs of pants and socks in your back-pack. ;)

Happy route planning.

and a ps. the Picos are spectacular and fine walking but you'll need more gear than you'd normally want to carry on Camino. Accommodation, water and food are sparse in those hills.
 

Jan_D

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Aragones (2011)
Frances (2012)
Norte (2013, 2014)
Hospitalera (2014)
Portugues (2017)
#5
They start on the Norte but soon take a detour to visit Gaztelugatxe hermitage, and then head inland to visit Santa Toribio de Liebana, before walking to Covadonga, and then joining up with the Primitivo. So not really the "Camino del Norte" per se.

Santa Toribio can be reached via the Lebaniego (which starts in San Vicente de la Barquera), and then across the Picos to reach Covadonga. Apparently there's now a route between Santa Toribio and Covadonga and onwards to Oviedo to join the Primitivo: http://www.rutadecovadonga.es/ruta-de-covadonga.html

p.s. I remember a thread about this film a while back, and someone wrote in to say they knew the guys in the film. Apparently it was a very arduous walk, distances were long (however they chose to do over 30kms per day even in the mountains), facilities were scarce, and most of the pilgrims and crew required medical attention at some point. I'm sure most of us would adopt a less punishing approach, but as Tincatinker says, you'd need to be prepared!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015); Camino Norte/Primitivo (2016); Camino Frances (2017); Le Puy (June 2018)
#7
You may wish to explore the website that this webpage on the Picos de Europa is on: http://francistapon.com/Travels/Spain-Trails/Los-Picos-de-Europa-and-Asturias
Note though that the author is a many time USA long distance trail veteran and really likes the mountains and wilderness.
The very first time I googled the "Camino de Santiago" after watching the movie "The Way" in 2014, Francis Tapon's website came up first in the list with the heading "Ten reasons why the El Camino sucks". I thought oh, no and was dissappointed! But after reading his reasons I said to myself...."Perfect, I can do this!":D

His trip through the Picos looks amazing, but not for the faint of heart, of which I am!:eek:
 

FSP

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPP - SDC 2013
CP Porto - Finisterre (Coastal & Spiritual Variant) 2016
Norte Irun-Muxia 2018
#9
Thanks for the info everyone. The picos look enticing but clearly not while solo trekking or with the light gear required for a traditional camino. I'll make myself happy with the Norte and its coastal path options outlined here in the forum. Jan, thank you for the link on the http://www.rutadecovadonga.es/ruta-de-covadonga.html. Looks like a very interesting journey in its own right. As most of us look for options other than what we have walked it is good to learn of these options.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Northern Way (2017)
#10
The very first time I googled the "Camino de Santiago" after watching the movie "The Way" in 2014, Francis Tapon's website came up first in the list with the heading "Ten reasons why the El Camino sucks". I thought oh, no and was dissappointed! But after reading his reasons I said to myself...."Perfect, I can do this!":D

I had exactly the same reaction :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Northern Way (2017)
#11
Thanks for the info everyone. The picos look enticing but clearly not while solo trekking or with the light gear required for a traditional camino. I'll make myself happy with the Norte and its coastal path options outlined here in the forum. Jan, thank you for the link on the http://www.rutadecovadonga.es/ruta-de-covadonga.html. Looks like a very interesting journey in its own right. As most of us look for options other than what we have walked it is good to learn of these options.
I have to admit, walking along the base of the Picos, and after doing the stretch from Irun to Bilbao, I was awfully glad I didn't have to go up and over them... That being said, the Camino del Norte will try to lure you with "short cuts". Don't take them unless you are exhausted. The long, hard way is usually much more beautiful.
 

caminka

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
see signature
#12
Hello, I was scanning through Netflix and came across a movie titled Foot Prints. The documentary covers the journey of a group of young men from various backgrounds, some very challenging and led by a priest they embark on the del Norte. Their del Norte also included what looks to be a spectacular area of what must be the picos. Do any of the guidebooks cover how to incorporate the picos into the more usual coastal route? I can't imagine doing the norte and bypassing this area if it is an optional route. I'm just starting researching a del norte for possibly a fall 2018 journey. Thanks Frank
I only saw the trailer, but at 0:40 is probably Ruta del Cares, which is definitely in the Picos but not on any official camino - but part of it is probably on Ruta de Covadonga (day 3).

I would like to know where is the stone walkway above the sea at 2.27? it almost looks like a mini chinese wall.
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
#14
Thanks for the info everyone. The picos look enticing but clearly not while solo trekking or with the light gear required for a traditional camino. I'll make myself happy with the Norte and its coastal path options outlined here in the forum. Jan, thank you for the link on the http://www.rutadecovadonga.es/ruta-de-covadonga.html. Looks like a very interesting journey in its own right. As most of us look for options other than what we have walked it is good to learn of these options.
We found a route from LLanes (Norte) to Covadonga (GR 105.2 Camin del Oriente). It is only really walkable IMO in good/dry weather as the track goes over stepping stones at the end of one section. This year we walked a short section near Mestas de Ardisana - lovely area but not well marked and at one farm the dogs were loose guarding the cattle.
Due to the weather we actually walked part of the Norte and then went to Arriondas to walk to Covadonga from there (Camino de la Reina - GR 108). Once finding the way out of town the route was well marked and there was accommodation where we wanted it. The reverse of this route branches off to go to Oviedo (GR 105) rather than returning to Arriondas. We chose to take the bus from Arriondas back to the Norte.
We were carrying our normal Camino packs. There are more links here posted by @peregrina2000 and ourselves as well as our blog posts for the walk we actually did. (See all posts for June 2013)
 

Isca-camigo

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Various ones.
#15
I met the Father on the Primitivo in July 2014, it must have been at Tineo, I probably met him again after that but I cannot remember where. There was 4 older priests from Arizona who were walking in and around the walking schedule of the loose group I was with, and in that group was a young married couple from Arizona who were very devout. I think by the time that group in the film arrived on the Primitivo they must have have started walking regular stages again, I arrived on the 22nd July and them on the 24th, I only kicked on near and after Lugo.
 

caminka

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
see signature
#17
My desktop can't show videos but I bet you are talking about Gaztelugatxe, the place described in this thread: https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/footprints-movie-where-is-the-place.45336/
that is it, thank you! definitely not on camino del norte, but certainly in the area, if one is drawn to go there.

I think that picos are perfectly walkabale for the ordinary pilgrim also, you just need to research walkable routes/paths in advance and plan ahead for accommodation (and food). next time I am there, I am quite sure I won't be able to just go by the picos (as on ruta vadiniense, for example), I'm going to get closer too. (there is this mountain refuge right at the foot of the wall of naranjo de bulnes (pico urriellu), and the routes there and back look rightly spectacular.) come to think of it, some of the stages of the new mountain camino olvidado would probably fall in the same category as the walkable paths through the picos. hmmm.
 

donalomahony

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
"Camino Frances" 2013, "Burgos to Leon," February 2014 - "Frances" June '14
#18
Watched the documentary last night. Interesting from a #faith #malebonding #blisters #picos perspective. Worth a watch if u have Netflix
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF-Finisterra-Muxia 2017; SK Camino Kosiče-Levoča Oct 2017; El Norte March 2018; Ingles Nov 2018
#19
Hello, I was scanning through Netflix and came across a movie titled Foot Prints. The documentary covers the journey of a group of young men from various backgrounds, some very challenging and led by a priest they embark on the del Norte. Their del Norte also included what looks to be a spectacular area of what must be the picos. Do any of the guidebooks cover how to incorporate the picos into the more usual coastal route? I can't imagine doing the norte and bypassing this area if it is an optional route. I'm just starting researching a del norte for possibly a fall 2018 journey. Thanks
Frank
I just read about Picos which span I believe Basque and Cantabria or the later and Asturias. I’m planning the Norte March 2018.....I’ll let you know unless you’d up your walk date to March :)
 

SafariGirl

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés, Vía de la Plata, Primitivo, Norte, Lebaniego & Vadiniense,
Aragonés
#20
I saw that documentary also. It was difficult to place them in actual Norte locations. There were a few scenes that were obvious...I did not notice the Picos in the movie..or for that matter while walking the Norte.
Actually, you do not have to do any detouring to have spectacular views and scenery on the Norte as it is fantastic.

I would have to look up the location to see if they are on the Norte or..if not...how to detour.
I would not detour to go up into hills or mountains as I am usually looking for a way to avoid anything that says "alto" on a map. ;)
Hi, I detoured off the Camino del Norte last May to walk the Lebaniego through the Picos and onto Santo Toribio and it was one of my favourite Caminos so far. When I walked the Francés in October I headed north from Mansilla de las Mulas to walk the Vadiniense, again to Santo Toribio and through the Picos, taking in Fuente de.
Few people do these routes but they are spectacular and there is accommodation (more albergues on the Lebaniego and more pensions on the Vadiniense) but it’s possible to walk under approx 25km per day. If you’re interested in doing the Lebaniego the tourist office in San Vicente de la Barquera has maps with stages, albergue details and telephone numbers FOC.
Best of luck!
Michele :)
 
#21
I did the Lebaniego and Vadiniense routes in August 2016. The Vadienense briefly passes through the Picos de Europa National Park. There is a camping site—mainly RVs but there is a room with bunks for trekkers—in Fuente Dé near the cable car. I stayed there and recommend it; I wish I stayed a few days and used it as a base to hike the surrounding routes in the Picos. While on the Camino the next day out of Fuente Dé I saw a few signposts for the mountain refuges in the park so you can make detours to hike the area and then double back to get back on the Vadiniense to León...or head west at Cistierna (?) and walk the Camino Olvidado until La Robla to join the Camimo del Salvador north to Oviedo, where you can join the Primitivo southwest through Asturias and Galicia to Santiago. That is what I did in August 2016: started in San Vicente de la Barquera walked Lebaniego-Vandienense-Olvidado, Salvador-Primitivo-Fisterra-Muxía. I've completed six Caminos and this combination of routes is my favorite. Beautiful, challenging, unique, and solitary yet the crowds pick up on the Primitivo. I have a spreadsheet with the stages, distances, and prices that I paid for accommodation.
 

SafariGirl

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés, Vía de la Plata, Primitivo, Norte, Lebaniego & Vadiniense,
Aragonés
#22
I did the Lebaniego and Vadiniense routes in August 2016. The Vadienense briefly passes through the Picos de Europa National Park. There is a camping site—mainly RVs but there is a room with bunks for trekkers—in Fuente Dé near the cable car. I stayed there and recommend it; I wish I stayed a few days and used it as a base to hike the surrounding routes in the Picos. While on the Camino the next day out of Fuente Dé I saw a few signposts for the mountain refuges in the park so you can make detours to hike the area and then double back to get back on the Vadiniense to León...or head west at Cistierna (?) and walk the Camino Olvidado until La Robla to join the Camimo del Salvador north to Oviedo, where you can join the Primitivo southwest through Asturias and Galicia to Santiago. That is what I did in August 2016: started in San Vicente de la Barquera walked Lebaniego-Vandienense-Olvidado, Salvador-Primitivo-Fisterra-Muxía. I've completed six Caminos and this combination of routes is my favorite. Beautiful, challenging, unique, and solitary yet the crowds pick up on the Primitivo. I have a spreadsheet with the stages, distances, and prices that I paid for accommodation.
That route sounds very appealing Seth. I loved the Primitivo and would like to do the San Salvador one day because I’ve been told how beautiful it is. One for the future I think.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte Sept 2013
Camino del Norte Sept 2014
Camino del Norte 2015,16,17,18
#23
I did the Lebaniego and Vadiniense routes in August 2016. The Vadienense briefly passes through the Picos de Europa National Park. There is a camping site—mainly RVs but there is a room with bunks for trekkers—in Fuente Dé near the cable car. I stayed there and recommend it; I wish I stayed a few days and used it as a base to hike the surrounding routes in the Picos. While on the Camino the next day out of Fuente Dé I saw a few signposts for the mountain refuges in the park so you can make detours to hike the area and then double back to get back on the Vadiniense to León...or head west at Cistierna (?) and walk the Camino Olvidado until La Robla to join the Camimo del Salvador north to Oviedo, where you can join the Primitivo southwest through Asturias and Galicia to Santiago. That is what I did in August 2016: started in San Vicente de la Barquera walked Lebaniego-Vandienense-Olvidado, Salvador-Primitivo-Fisterra-Muxía. I've completed six Caminos and this combination of routes is my favorite. Beautiful, challenging, unique, and solitary yet the crowds pick up on the Primitivo. I have a spreadsheet with the stages, distances, and prices that I paid for accommodation.
This is aiming to be a reply to the whole thread. I'm just so eased when there is a topic related to el Norte as I'm walking this route and this Forum I dominated by discussion of other routes
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2011 April, 2014 March) San Salvador, Primitivo, Finisterre, Muxia (June 2015) Del Norte (Sept/Oct 2016)
#24
I did the Lebaniego and Vadiniense routes in August 2016. The Vadienense briefly passes through the Picos de Europa National Park. There is a camping site—mainly RVs but there is a room with bunks for trekkers—in Fuente Dé near the cable car. I stayed there and recommend it; I wish I stayed a few days and used it as a base to hike the surrounding routes in the Picos. While on the Camino the next day out of Fuente Dé I saw a few signposts for the mountain refuges in the park so you can make detours to hike the area and then double back to get back on the Vadiniense to León...or head west at Cistierna (?) and walk the Camino Olvidado until La Robla to join the Camimo del Salvador north to Oviedo, where you can join the Primitivo southwest through Asturias and Galicia to Santiago. That is what I did in August 2016: started in San Vicente de la Barquera walked Lebaniego-Vandienense-Olvidado, Salvador-Primitivo-Fisterra-Muxía. I've completed six Caminos and this combination of routes is my favorite. Beautiful, challenging, unique, and solitary yet the crowds pick up on the Primitivo. I have a spreadsheet with the stages, distances, and prices that I paid for accommodation.
Seth, this combination is very appealing to me. I have walked the Norte, San Salvador and Primitivo before and would like to follow in your footsteps.
Would you be able to post your spreadsheet in the resources or PM me?
On the Norte last year I met a Spanish couple just outside of San Vincente and they were on their way to the Lebaniego and I wish now that I had made the diversion.
Buen Camino
 

grayland

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Yes
#25
Seth, this combination is very appealing to me. I have walked the Norte, San Salvador and Primitivo before and would like to follow in your footsteps.
Would you be able to post your spreadsheet in the resources or PM me?
On the Norte last year I met a Spanish couple just outside of San Vincente and they were on their way to the Lebaniego and I wish now that I had made the diversion.
Buen Camino
Seth...Many people would be very interested in your notes and spreadsheet.
It would be great if you could post it here in the forum.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Oct 2014
#27
Hello, I was scanning through Netflix and came across a movie titled Foot Prints. The documentary covers the journey of a group of young men from various backgrounds, some very challenging and led by a priest they embark on the del Norte. Their del Norte also included what looks to be a spectacular area of what must be the picos. Do any of the guidebooks cover how to incorporate the picos into the more usual coastal route? I can't imagine doing the norte and bypassing this area if it is an optional route. I'm just starting researching a del norte for possibly a fall 2018 journey. Thanks
Frank
Hi Frank,

I've been re-watching footprints many times because I really like the routes they took. However, my initial research says there is no official camino route that goes through Pecos de Europa national park so it probably is a hiking route that their producers researched in advance.

But, if someone has more detailed knowledge on how Camino del norte or even Camino Lebaniego can be connected through Pecos de Europa, we would really appreciate it if you can share it here.

Buen Camino,

Dale
 
#28
Another thread a while back on this topic had the trailer in it. https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/footprints-movie-where-is-the-place.45336/

In one scene, one of the men is kissing a cross. I recognized that as the cross that is said to hold a piece of the true cross in the monastery of Santo Toribio. That is in the Picos, near the town of Potes, and also the end (and objective) of the Camino Lebañiego and beginning of the Vadiniense. If you walk from San Vicente de la Barquera to Potes on the Lebañiego and continue the next couple of days on the Vadiniense through the Senda da Remoña, you will see and walk through these mountains. Potes is in the Picos, as are Espinama and Fuente Dé, and the day out of Fuente De on the Senda da Remoña is one of the most spectacular Camino days on my list. And the day from Potes to Fuente Dé is beautiful as well, just not quite as spectacular. I was tempted to stay put in Fuente Dé for a few days to do some of the amazing day hikes in the area, but I didn't. There is a LOT of good hiking in that area.
 

nilabjo

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Ingles, Camino VADINIENSE
#29
Another thread a while back on this topic had the trailer in it. https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/footprints-movie-where-is-the-place.45336/

In one scene, one of the men is kissing a cross. I recognized that as the cross that is said to hold a piece of the true cross in the monastery of Santo Toribio. That is in the Picos, near the town of Potes, and also the end (and objective) of the Camino Lebañiego and beginning of the Vadiniense. If you walk from San Vicente de la Barquera to Potes on the Lebañiego and continue the next couple of days on the Vadiniense through the Senda da Remoña, you will see and walk through these mountains. Potes is in the Picos, as are Espinama and Fuente Dé, and the day out of Fuente De on the Senda da Remoña is one of the most spectacular Camino days on my list. And the day from Potes to Fuente Dé is beautiful as well, just not quite as spectacular. I was tempted to stay put in Fuente Dé for a few days to do some of the amazing day hikes in the area, but I didn't. There is a LOT of good hiking in that area.
 

nilabjo

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Ingles, Camino VADINIENSE
#30
have you done the VADINIENSE in march? a friend and I are considering doing it for easter this year.. and concerned about the snow in Fuente de or Espinama? Any insight would be wonderful!
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF-Finisterra-Muxia 2017; SK Camino Kosiče-Levoča Oct 2017; El Norte March 2018; Ingles Nov 2018
#31
Im currently on El Norte. Two days ago I slept in SERDIO (great Municipal) and as you walk out of Serdio towards Pesues the Camino Lebaniego (?) was clearly marked at a split. It’s very popular right now as I believe it’s an anniversary year. PS big snow on Los Picos
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF-Finisterra-Muxia 2017; SK Camino Kosiče-Levoča Oct 2017; El Norte March 2018; Ingles Nov 2018
#32
Los Picos de Europa March 16-17 2018
 

Attachments

Camino(s) past & future
Planned June 2018 with my rising senior daughter
#34
I did the Lebaniego and Vadiniense routes in August 2016. The Vadienense briefly passes through the Picos de Europa National Park. There is a camping site—mainly RVs but there is a room with bunks for trekkers—in Fuente Dé near the cable car. I stayed there and recommend it; I wish I stayed a few days and used it as a base to hike the surrounding routes in the Picos. While on the Camino the next day out of Fuente Dé I saw a few signposts for the mountain refuges in the park so you can make detours to hike the area and then double back to get back on the Vadiniense to León...or head west at Cistierna (?) and walk the Camino Olvidado until La Robla to join the Camimo del Salvador north to Oviedo, where you can join the Primitivo southwest through Asturias and Galicia to Santiago. That is what I did in August 2016: started in San Vicente de la Barquera walked Lebaniego-Vandienense-Olvidado, Salvador-Primitivo-Fisterra-Muxía. I've completed six Caminos and this combination of routes is my favorite. Beautiful, challenging, unique, and solitary yet the crowds pick up on the Primitivo. I have a spreadsheet with the stages, distances, and prices that I paid for accommodation.
I can get your spreadsheet even though it was a while back?
 

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